Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
The Capitol Years, Part VII (1968-1972)

by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Aug 8, 2017


PRELIMINARY NOTES

The Peggy Lee Look

{This section is currently under construction, and thus unavailable for viewing. It is scheduled to feature a set of photos or profiles from the five years under scrutiny.}

Peggy Lee's Recording Career, 1968-1972

This discographical page covers the last five years of Peggy Lee's contract with Capitol Records.  For an overview of the period, consult the extensive notes at the bottom of the page.  Also discussed in those bottom notes are topics such as the 102 masters (plus additional takes) recorded by Lee between 1968 and 1972, and the singer's placement in Downbeat polls from the late 1960s.  For specifics about the Grammy award that Lee received in the category of Best Contemporary Vocal Performance, Female, see notes under session dated January 24, 1969. 

Suggestions, Recommendations And Technicalities

Viewers looking for CD recommendations should pay attention to items whose titles are typed in uppercase and boldface.  (Note also that, under each song, the listing of releases has been arranged chronologically, by year of release.)  In addition, you may want to consult this page (section I). My recommendations take into consideration both sound quality and track comprehensiveness.  Ideally, a recommended issue should rank high on both areas; TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) is one such instance.  However, in some cases the rarity of the tracks or comprehensives of the track listing have granted recommended status to a collection with middling (antiseptic, over-cleaned, over-brightened) sound quality; CDs #3 and #4 of the MISS PEGGY LEE set are notable examples.  In yet other cases, the number of available choices was slim and I felt that none of the options merited a "recommended" status. 

As for the blue arrowheads that are periodically found through the page, click on them if you want to see a full list of issues -- LPs, CDs, etc. -- containing any given Peggy Lee performance.  (I have aimed at listing every single issue in existence, with the following exceptions:  various-artists compilations, foreign editions of domestic issues, and MP3 files. The first two categories are covered separately, within the miscellaneous section of this bio-discography.  As for the MP3 category, I have chosen to make very limited mention of such a format in my work; I consider it a non-physical configuration of inherently poor sound quality and ephemeral issue production.)


Date: March 18, 1968 (3:00-6:00 p.m.)
Location: Sound Recorders, 6226 Yucca, Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #14947 (Not 13947)

Peggy Lee (ldr), Don Randi (om, key), Charles Koppelman, Don Rubin (pdr), Shorty Rogers (con), William H. "Bill" Hood (bar), Jack Sheldon, Stuart "Stu" Williamson (t), Dick Hyde, Richard Leith (tb), Unknown (bfb), Arnold Belnick, Emil F. Briano, William "Bill" Kurasch, Ralph Schaeffer, Daryl Terwilliger, Tibor Zelig (vn), Joseph Di Tullio, Nathan "Nate" Gershman, Raymond J. Kelley, Jerome A. Kessler (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 59408Master Take (Capitol) Money - 2:26(John Benson Sebastian) / arr: Shorty Rogers
b. 59409Master Take (Capitol) Reason To Believe - 2:25(Tim Hardin) / arr: Shorty Rogers
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 10745 - P 10746 — Basic Music Library [4 vocals from LP The Hits Of Peggy Lee + 2 from a single]    (1968)
CAPITOL 452171 — {Reason To Believe / Didn't Want To Have To Do It}   (1968)
c. 59410Master Take (Capitol) Didn't Want To Have To Do It - 2:43(John Benson Sebastian) / arr: Shorty Rogers
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 10745 - P 10746 — Basic Music Library [4 vocals from LP The Hits Of Peggy Lee + 2 from a single]    (1968)
CAPITOL 452171 — {Reason To Believe / Didn't Want To Have To Do It}   (1968)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(Korea) 8806344820326 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee; The Capitol Years   (2006)
All titles on: Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)


Masters And Personnel (I)

1. A New Recording Process For Peggy Lee: Independent Production And Overdubbed Vocals
2. A New Production Team For Peggy Lee: Charles Koppelman And Don Rubin
3. Shorty Rogers

Significant changes happened at Capitol Records during the period covered by this discographical page. Most notably, the label went through three presidents in a five-year span (1968-1972). Other changes are mentioned in this page's final note.

Around 1968, Capitol also became more aggressive in its recruiting of outside producers. Contemporaneous press articles connect this pursuit with the appointment, effective around September or October 1968, of a new A&R vice-president. (The man in question was Karl Engemann, who had actually been with Capitol since 1960, in various A&R job titles.) In one of the articles, the duties of the new vice-president are listed as "head[ing] Capitol's internal production and ... be[ing] responsible for all relationships with outside producers and master acquisition." Another article stated that, under Engemann's direction, Capitol had "initiated an independent producers program to broaden even further the number of people the label depend on." By the end of 1968, the company's combined number of in- and out-house producers had reached 17.

After nearly ten consecutive years as Peggy Lee's cherished in-house producer (1958-1967), Dave Cavanaugh was removed from this duty. At the beginning of 1968, the production of her Capitol sessions was delegated to the independent team of Charles Koppelman and Don Rubin. (n.b.: Many years later, one half of the team would end up joining EMI's staff. In the 1990s, Koppelman chaired the North American wing of the music conglomerate. His long career as an executive has continued into the twenty-first century, more recently as the chairman of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc.)

For this first session with Koppelman and Rubin, Peggy Lee's vocals were (according to Capitol's session file) "overdubbed on band tracks by orchestra arranged by Shorty Rogers." In an article that Melody Maker published in its July 1, 1968 issue, Lee explained how her recording routine had changed as a result of Capitol's re-assignment of producers: "I was used to hearing demonstration records, talking over material, rehearsing the rhythm section, selecting my arranger, deciding on a style of interpretation. Under the new system, they just sent me lead sheets and I waited for them to call me up. I had nothing to do with the instrumental aspects of the records. When I found out Shorty Rogers was going to arrange and conduct the first session, I felt a lot more secure ... It wasn't a mechanical process at all. They'd put a lot of creative effort into it, preparing backgrounds so that I could just step in and bring my own interpretation of the lyric to whatever they had set up for me."

Lee's comment makes evident her satisfaction with the work that Rogers, Koppelman and Rubin had done for these sessions, despite her misgivings about the changes in the recording process. Obviously, the new process forced her to give up on the degree of control that she had been able to exercise over her recording sessions. For the previous 15 years or so (maybe longer), the singer had consistently determined the direction of not only the vocals but also the music of her masters -- with a few exceptions, such as the special project The Man I Love.

Besides the artist's degree of control, the other main basic difference between the old and the new recording process was the recourse to overdubbing. On this specific matter, Lee's opinion seems to have been mixed at best. Like other singers of her time, she preferred to record when both she and the musicians were present in the studio, though she must have approved of overdubbing when circumstances left producers with no better option.

In the mid-1960s, Dave Cavanaugh had occasionally dubbed in an instrument or two -- primarily, strings -- but it had not been the norm for him, or for Capitol. It became more of the norm from the late 1960s through the 1970s. Quite a few Capitol sessions by the likes of Nancy Wilson, Helen Reddy, and Glen Campbell (to cite some of Capitol's best-known acts from that period) are labeled as overdubbed. Some of Lee's sessions from those years are listed as overdubbed, too. (I suspect, however, that Capitol used the word "overdub" as an "umbrella term" which covered processes that nowadays do not fall under that terminology -- processes such as a second remix of a given master. For more on this subject matter, see notes under session dated August 5, 1970.)

Decades after the sessions listed in this page had taken place, Lee would actually express basic disapproval of recording sessions in which either vocalist or orchestra are absent.


The 1968-1972 Singles Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates of the 1968-1972 singles sessions; March 18 and March 21, 1968. January 24, 1969. June 1, 1970. Possibly April 26, 1972. (Besides the songs recorded during the dates just listed, songs from various 1969-1972 album sessions were also picked for release on singles.)


Personnel (II) And Musical Instruments

1. Source
2. Correct Instruments
The session report at the American Federation of Musicians is my source for the personnel that I've entered under this date.

AFM reports from the late 1960s often omit identification of the instruments played at the session. Case in point: this session's report. The musicians' names are given, of course. Also found in the report, next to each musician's name, is an indication of how many instruments he played at the session (i.e., one, two, or three instruments). But the instruments themselves are not named.

In order to pair musicians with instruments, I have relied on common knowledge about the players and their musical skills. Corrections will be appreciated. For those musicians who played more than one instrument at this date, I have generally listed only the one for which (s)he is most known.

3. Dick Hyde
4. Jack Sheldon
5. Stuart Williamson
Each of the above-listed musicians played two instruments during this session.

6. Ralph Schaeffer
7. William Hood
At this date, Ralph Schaeffer played three instruments. So did William Hood.

8. Don Randi
In this session and in the next one, Don Randi served the role of contractor or orchestra manager. He might have also played a musical instrument at both dates. See next point.

9. Keyboard
A keyboard is heard in these masters. To my (limited) knowledge, the other above-listed musician who played the keyboard is Don Randi. Hence I have tentatively identified him as the session's keyboardist.


Date: March 21 (9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) & 22 (1:00-4:00 p.m.), 1968
Location: Sound Recorders, 6226 Yucca, Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Sessions #17063 & #17349 (+ NY: #16094)

Peggy Lee (ldr), Don Randi (om), Charles Koppelman, Don Rubin (pdr), Shorty Rogers (con), James R. "Jim" Horn, John "Plas" Johnson (sax), Stan Fishelson, Jack Sheldon, Stuart "Stu" Williamson (t), Richard Leith, Lewis "Lew" McCreary (tb), Max K. Bennett, Brian Williams (b), Lou Levy (p), Michael Lang (key), Hal Blaine, Norman Jeffries (d), David Cohen (per), George F. Poole, Daryl Terwilliger (vn), Norman Botnick (vl), Jesse Ehrlich (vc), John E. Lowe (wds), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 59659-lostMaster Take (Capitol) Daydream(John Benson Sebastian)
unissued
b. 59661[LA]/70393[NY]Master Take (Capitol) Misty Roses - 2:20(Tim Hardin)
CAPITOL 452308 — {It'll Never Happen Again / Misty Roses}   (1968)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
c. 59660[LA]/70394[NY]Master Take (Capitol) It'll Never Happen Again - 2:15(Tim Hardin)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11041 - P 11042 — Basic Music Library [1 Peggy Lee vocal; also Lyn Roman, Evie Sands, Johnny Mathis ... numbers ]    (1968)
CAPITOL 452308 — {It'll Never Happen Again / Misty Roses}   (1968)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(Korea) 8806344820326 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee; The Capitol Years   (2006)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)


Sources

Extant information about this session comes from three sources which unfortunately disagree on various details. So that readers may have a better sense of the disagreements, I have copied below the data provided by each source.

1. Information Gleaned From Peggy Lee's Session File At Capitol

LA, March 21, 1968
Session #14063
59659 Daydream (band track)
59960 It'll Never Happen Again
59961 Misty Roses (band track)

[n.b.: There is one incorrect digit in the above-listed session number. It should be #17063 instead of #14063. Other Capitol documents show the correct number; the mistake is found only in Capitol's Peggy Lee session file. It should also be noted that quite a few Peggy Lee sessions are similarly misnumbered in this file: they show 1300 and 1400 numbers when their real digits are actually in the 1700 range. Capitol just did not give 1300, 1500 or 1600 numbers to its LA pop sessions; those numbers were on reserve for non-pop series.]

LA, March 22, 1968
[No session number given]
Peggy Lee (vo) overdubbed on previous tracks.
59659 Daydream
59961 Misty Roses

[n.b.: Curiously, this overdub session does not list master #59960. Was it or was it not overdubbed?]

2. Information Gleaned From The AFM Files (Chapter 47, Los Angeles)

March 21, 1968
Session #17063
59659 Daydream
59660 It'll Never Happen Again
59961 Misty Roses

[Personnel listed: 6-person combo (basically, a rhythm section with reinforced percussion) under Shorty Rogers' leadership.]

March 22, 1969
[No session number given]
59960 It'll Never Happen Again
59659 Day Dream [sic]
59961 Misty Roses

[Personnel listed: 12-person orchestra, featuring both brass and strings, under Shorty Rogers' leadership.]

3. Information Gleaned From The Capitol Label Discography, Compiled By Michel Ruppli, Bill Daniels, And Ed Novitsky, With Assistance From Michael Cuscuna

From Volume 3: Los Angeles Sessions
LA,March 21,1968
Session #17063
59659 Daydream - unissued
59660 It'll never happen again - unissued
59661 Misty roses - unissued
[Ruppli's note.] Overdubs on all titles: LA,March 22, 1968.

From Volume 4: New York Sessions
NYC, August 15, 1968
Session #16094
26992 Misty Roses
26993 It'll Never Happen Again
[Ruppli's note.] Above titles transferred to session #17349 (listed in volume 3) and master number & session numbers were reassigned to session below.

[n.b.: The "session below" to which Ruppli refers is indeed numbered 16094, too, and its first two masters are certainly identified as #26992 ("Only Love) and #26993 ("Knowing When To Leave"). It is a Gordon MacRae date, recorded in NY on September 18, 1968.]

Also From Volume 3: Los Angeles Sessions
NYC, August 15, 1968
Session #17349
70393 Misty Roses
70394 It'll Never Happen Again
[Ruppli's note.] Remastered from masters 26992/93 (see session #16094 in Volume 4 - New York sessions).

[n.b.: According to the data given by Ruppli and company, this session is listed in Capitol's LA files. And yet, NY is identified as its recording location.]

4. Discussion Of The Data Gleaned From The Three Sources Itemized Above

The data transcribed above elicits two basic questions. First, which of the extant sources should be considered the most reliable? And second, how can we explain the listing of multiple sessions that seemingly feature the exact same masters?

The answer to the first question is straightforward. When it comes to studio sessions, the American Federation of Musicians is widely considered the most reliable of all sources.

To answer the second question, the producers' recourse to overdubbing must be taken into account. As explained under the previous date (March 18, 1968), this technique was introduced in Lee's sessions by the producing team that Capitol had newly assigned to her.

Let's concentrate, then, in the data supplied by the most reliable source, the AFM report. Let's also take for granted that (all or most of) the session's masters were overdubbed, since all three sources reflect (each in its own way) that such was the case. If we follow those two directives, then the hard facts are that masters #59559, #59560 and #59561 were recorded in LA over two days (March 21 and 22, 1968). On the 21st, a rhythm section (bass, drums, guitar, piano, and percussion) taped its part. On the 22nd, an orchestra was recorded. That orchestra was overdubbed to the rhythm section track from March 21. As for Lee's vocal, I assume that Lee taped it on the 21st, with the rhythm section.

Notice that, compared to the previous date (March 18) there is a reversal in the recording sequence of this second session (March 21-22) with Koppelman and Rubin. For the earlier date, the orchestral tracks had been pre-recorded at an unknown date; for this date, the rhythm section was taped first. (Notice also that Capitol's session file disagrees with the AFM report over this matter: the file contends that the orchestra was recorded first -- at least in the cases of two of the masters, if not all three. I have put more trust in the AFM report.)

As for the NY session (August 18) which is also listed in one of my sources, I suspect that it was an engineering date, dedicated to the revision (remix?) of the two masters that had been picked for issue on 45-rpm single. The probable reason for doing this date in New York was that, at this time, producers Koppelman & Rubin were located chiefly in The Big Apple. Could there have been vocal work done at the date? I doubt it. Peggy Lee lived primarily in Los Angeles; I have found no evidence that she was in New York at this time. (Had the date been closer to her two 1968 Copacabana engagements -- one held in April, the other in October -- I would have been more willing to entertain the possibility of vocal work, or of Lee's presence during the engineering process.)


The 1968-1972 Singles Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates of the 1968-1972 singles sessions; March 18 and March 21, 1968. January 24, 1969. June 1, 1970. Possibly April 26, 1972. (Besides the songs recorded during the dates just listed, songs from various 1969-1972 album sessions were also picked for release on singles.)


Masters

1. "Daydream" [Master #59659]
Searches conducted in Capitol's database have resulted in no finding of master #59659. Because this session was independently produced, the session tapes were probably kept by the session's producers, and eventually discarded. At the time of this writing, "Daydream" is thus deemed irretrievably lost.


Personnel And Instruments

1. Norman Jeffries
2. Michael W. Deasy
3. Hal Blaine
These three musicians played more that one instrument during this session. Jeffries played two, Deasy and Blaine three. Since the paperwork that I consulted does not identify any of the instruments played at the date, herein I have listed only the main instrument with which each musician is associated. Therefore, instrument assignation for this session is tentative.


Arrangements

1. Shorty Rogers
In the track annotation of the Collector's Choice CD Two Shows Nightly (Deluxe Edition), "Misty Roses" and "It'll Never Happen Again" are listed as both conducted and arranged by Shorty Rogers. His credit as conductor is certainly a valid one, confirmed by the above-mentioned AFM report. I am not aware, however, of any official confirmation for the credits as arranger of the songs from the present date, and hence I have refrained from adding them to this discography.

Having acknowledged the lack of confirmation, I should add that Rogers' involvement as arranger of this date's numbers is very possible. We know that he both conducted and arranged the just-discussed, thematically similar March 18, 1968 date. We also know that he conducted this subsequent date. Those two points could be deemed strong enough to postulate the possibility that Rogers indeed arranged "Misty Roses," "It'll Never Happen Again," and maybe even "Daydream." Solid evidence remains elusive, unfortunately.


Date: April 22, 1968
Location: Copacabana Club, 10 E 60th Street, New York
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #16042 / Taped In Concert

Peggy Lee (ldr), Charles Koppelman, Don Rubin (pdr), Brooks Arthur, Joe Sidore (eng), Lou Levy (con, p), Lou Levy and His Orchestra (acc), Hubert Laws (sax, f), Al Derisi, Victor Paz, Tony Robilotte, Lew Soloff (t, fh), Ray De Sio, Mort Trautman, Bill Watrous (tb), Alan Robinson (frh), Mundell Lowe (g), Ben Tucker (b), Toots Thielemans (h), Grady Tate (d), Francisco Aguabella (per), Peggy Lee (v), Steve Blum (unk)

a. 25133Mastered By Capitol Do I Hear A Waltz? - 2:27(Richard Rodgers, Stephen Sondheim) / arr: Bill Holman OR Shorty Rogers
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
b. lostMastered By Capitol Don't Speak(Margaret Bonds, Janice Lovoos)
unissued
c. 25135Mastered By Capitol Reason To Believe - 2:31(Tim Hardin) / arr: Shorty Rogers
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
d. lostMastered By Capitol Paradise(Nacio Herb Brown, Gordon Clifford) / arr: Mundell Lowe
unissued
e. 25136Mastered By Capitol Didn't Want To Have To Do It - 3:05(John Benson Sebastian) / arr: Shorty Rogers
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
f. 25144Mastered By Capitol Come Back To Me - 2:24(Burton Lane, Alan Jay Lerner) / arr: Bill Holman
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)


The Two Shows Nightly Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 22, 23 and 24, 1968.


Masters

1. The Lost Two Shows Nightly Masters
The Two Shows Nightly album master has been preserved in Capitol's vaults. It is a two-track master mix, and remains in fine condition.

Sadly, the same cannot be said of the Two Shows Nightly session tapes. They are nowhere to be found in the vaults. Since Two Shows Nightly was a project carried out by an independent producing team, the producers probably kept the session tapes and delivered to Capitol only the album master. The session tapes are believed to have been eventually discarded.

2. "Don't Speak"
3. "Paradise"
Because this session's performances of "Don't Speak" and "Paradise" were not among those picked for inclusion in the album Two Shows Nightly, they are presumed to be irretrievably lost.

4. Live Or Studio: The Two Shows Nightly Sessions
5. Brooks Arthur And Record Engineering
6. Robert Strom And Miss Peggy Lee: A Career Chronicle
In his book Miss Peggy Lee: A Career Chronicle, Robert Strom writes the following: "Based on the past success of Peggy's annual Copa engagements, Capitol Records decided to record her April 1968 stint. The album was given the title Two Shows Nightly. Unfortunately, something went awry during the live recording. As a result, the sound quality was not up to Peggy's standards. Lee attempted to salvage Two Shows Nightly, going into the Capitol studios to re-record her vocals. An applause track was added (for reasons unknown) ..... Peggy was still dissatisfied with the uneven and muddy sound. She pulled the album from release. Today a copy of Two Shows Nightly is a treasured collector's item."

I do not know how much of Strom's explanation is based on fact, and how much is based on educated deduction (or in his experience as an album listener). Strom was personally acquainted with Lee, and might have asked her about this subject. Over the years, Peggy Lee indeed told various parties that she had requested the album's withdrawal because, to her ears, the backing musicians were not fully audible (the brass, especially) in some tracks. (I have also heard rumors of a disagreement between Lee and the producers at some point of the process, but I have found no corroboration whatsoever for this bit of hearsay, nor have I heard that this alleged disagreement led to the album's withdrawal.)

In the official paperwork, there is no indication that the vocals were re-recorded. The documentation only makes clear that an applause track was indeed added to nearly all masters. My own listening suggests that at least half of the vocals are live, while the other half is open to debate.

In the recollection of Brooks Arthur, Lee's vocals were indeed recorded live at the Copacabana. Arthur was the session's main engineer; during a long career in the music industry, he has also racked up credits as producer, studio owner, singer and songwriter. According to him, no studio re-recording was made, aside from some very minor "punching in" in spots where the sound quality was momentarily poor -- a par-for-the-course practice for live albums. "We were using analog," he added during an interview conducted in 2010. "Though it’s a dinosaur today, it still had a wonderful ambient sound. We had some ribbon microphones that were just sensational. We have mics that can match them today, but at that particular time, we were going with our best guns ... I would say [that the album's warmth, palpable in the CD issue, is] attributable to the analog on our original recording. I’m sure they remixed it digitally. Those are remixes, but that’s my work. The rough mixes were pretty representative of a great album." He did the mastering process at A&R Studios, which was then located at 112 W48th St, NY.

Brooks Arthur also has given his own take on the reason(s) why the album was not released in 1968. After making a sensible caveat ("I wasn’t privy to the conversations that were going on behind closed doors, between Koppelman-Rubin and Peggy Lee and her label"), Arthur told the interviewer that "what did surface was, she said that she wasn’t happy with some of the sweetening. The producers wanted us to sweeten some of the crowd sounds with applause. Not fake applause, but applause from another spot that could seem like it was part of this spot. She had great ears and detected that and didn’t like that. Also, we tried to fix one or two phrases, vocally. And, as I recall, she protested doing that. She was a purist. They were ready to master this thing and ship it, get it out, probably in September of ‘68. And it was never launched, because she pulled it back."


Arrangements

1. Sources
The LP Two Shows Nightly gives a list of the arrangers who were responsible for the album's arrangements (Billy Byers, Dave Grusin, Bill Holman, Mundell Lowe, and Shorty Rogers), but it does not identify which songs were arranged by each man. Hence I have also relied on the existence of arrangements of these songs in Peggy Lee's sheet music library; those arrangements identify their respective authors.

1. "Do I Hear A Waltz?"
2. Bill Holman
3. Shorty Rogers
There are two arrangements of "Do I Hear A Waltz?" in Peggy Lee's sheet music library, one by Bill Holman and the other by Shorty Rogers. Since I have not inspected them, I can only speculate if either one is the same used during this date. Because Rogers had been working with Lee in sessions that preceded Two Shows Nightly, there's a likelier chance that he, not Holman, is responsible for this lively arrangement. Still, Holman is also a valid, strong possibility.

4. "Paradise"
5. Mundell Lowe
6. Mickey Ingalls
This session's arrangement of "Paradise" is probably by Mundell Lowe, who also played at the date. In addition to Lowe's, Peggy Lee kept two other arrangements of "Paradise" in her sheet music library, both of them by Mickey Ingalls. One Ingalls arrangement is in 3/4 time, the other in 4/4/ time.


Personnel And Musical Instruments

1. Steve Blum
Musician Steve Blum is not listed in Capitol's session file. However, he was clearly one of the live date's players. During this session's rendition of "Alright, Ok, You Win," we hear Peggy Lee pause to acknowledge the names of the musicians who are playing behind her; Blum is among those mentioned. (Furthermore, a trade review of Lee's opening night at the Copa also lists him. My spelling of his last name is taken from that review.) Since Blum's specialty is electric guitar, I have tentatively listed him under that instrument.

2. Harpsichord
An electric harpsichord is audible during these Copa sessions. It is not listed in Capitol's session file.

3. Joe S(i)dore
In the LP Two Shows Nightly, the last name of record engineer Joe Sidore is misspelled as Sadore.


Sources

For the Two Shows Nightly sessions, my main sources are Peggy Lee's Capitol session file and the Capitol Label Discography, by Michel Ruppli and company. The session file lists the performances in the same order in which they appear in the original LP, and tags the unissued numbers at the end of each session. But in this sessionography, I have followed instead the non-sequential master order given in the Capitol Label Discography. Ruppli's text is also my only source for the session numbers of these Copa dates. (As for the personnel, it is listed in the back cover of the original LP.)


Date: April 23, 1968
Location: Copacabana Club, 10 E 60th Street, New York
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #16043 / Taped In Concert

Peggy Lee (ldr), Charles Koppelman, Don Rubin (pdr), Brooks Arthur, Joe Sidore (eng), Lou Levy (con, p), Lou Levy and His Orchestra (acc), Hubert Laws (sax, f), Al Derisi, Victor Paz, Tony Robilotte, Lew Soloff (t, fh), Ray De Sio, Mort Trautman, Bill Watrous (tb), Alan Robinson (frh), Mundell Lowe (g), Ben Tucker (b), Toots Thielemans (h), Grady Tate (d), Francisco Aguabella (per), Peggy Lee (v), Steve Blum (unk)

a. 25137Mastered By Capitol My Personal Property - 2:06(Cy Coleman, Dorothy Fields) / arr: Ralph Burns
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
b. 25134Mastered By Capitol By The Time I Get To Phoenix - 4:13(Jimmy Webb) / arr: Mundell Lowe
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Time-Life Music Licensed CS/LP4 Lgd/Slgd 07 — Peggy Lee ("Legendary Singers" Series)   (1985)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
c. 25140Mastered By Capitol Something Stupid - 2:02(Carson Parks)
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
d. 25139Mastered By Capitol Until It's Time For You To Go - 4:18(Buffy St. Marie) / arr: Shorty Rogers
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
e. 25138Mastered By Capitol (Keep Your) Hand On The Plow - 2:41(Traditional, Peggy Lee, Mundell Lowe) / arr: Mundell Lowe
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
f. lostMastered By Capitol Big Spender(Cy Coleman, Dorothy Fields) / arr: Dave Grusin
unissued


The Two Shows Nightly Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 22, 23 and 24, 1968.


Masters

1. Lost Masters
2. "Big Spender"
This session's unissued performance of "Big Spender" is believed to be irretrievably lost. For further details, see notes about masters under session dated April 22, 1968.


Arrangements And Arrangers

1. "My Personal Property"
2. Ralph Burns
The credit to Ralph Burns for this version's arrangement is tentative. The rationale behind the credit is the fact that Peggy Lee kept a Burns arrangement of "My Personal Property" in her sheet music library. I cannot guarantee, however, that the arrangement heard in this version is the same one found at the library, because I have not listened to it.

2. "Until It's Time For You To Go"
3. "(Keep Your) Hand On The Plow"
4. Mundell Lowe
5. Shorty Rogers
Lee's sheet music library is also the source of the credits to Shorty Rogers and Mundell Lowe for the arrangement of these songs. Again, the credits should be deemed tentative. Lowe's involvement with "(Keep Your) Hand On The Plow" is further backed by the fact that ASCAP credits him as one of the 'authors' of this rendition -- which is actually a Traditional number.

6. "By The Time I Get To Phoenix"
7. Mundell Lowe
The source for this credit to Mundell Lowe is Peggy Lee herself. During a special performance that she gave after the end of her Copacabana run (and which was broadcast by New York's WNEW radio station), she identified Lowe as the arranger of "By The Time I Get To Phoenix."


Issues

1. Two Shows Nightly [LP]
2. Wayne Rankin's Discography In Miss Peggy Lee: An Autobiography
The first edition of Peggy Lee's autobiography includes a list of her singles and albums, compiled by Wayne Rankin. On the subject matter of Two Shows Nightly, Rankin indicates that it was recorded "live at the Copacabana, 1967." He further adds the following note: "LP release was withdrawn by Miss Lee immediately after initial pressings, as the artist felt that sound reproduction was inconsistent with her usual high standards. Fewer than ten copies have been traced as in existence in private collections in the USA." Rankin gives valuable information in that quote and elsewhere, but it must be clarified that the recording date he assigned to Two Shows Nightly is erroneous. It should be 1968 instead of 1967.

Back in 1989, when Lee's autobiography was first published, Rankin knew of less than ten extant copies of this album. Nowadays, when we are well into the era of computerized access to information, there is awareness of many more extant copies. In the last ten years, I have come across over 15 copies, some of them sighted in US record stores and others in the internet, up for auction. I have also heard from 7 or 8 collectors, three of whom owned multiple album copies. In any case, chances are that the number of initially pressed copies was a pre-determined, standard amount -- certainly a number much higher than 10 or 15. (Incidentally, Rankin uses the plural when he makes his reference to "initial pressings" but I am more inclined to believe that there was no more than one pressing in the US.)

In any case, Capitol clearly had every intention to release Two Shows Nightly. A sure indication of the company's intent was the advance promotion that it did for the LP. Two of the album's tracks were included in The Capitol Disc Jockey Album: November 1968, which was a promotional LP sampler. Those samplers were sent to radio stations shortly before the 'street date' release of a new batch of albums. The record label had also assigned a precise release date to the album: November 4, 1968.

After that bit of advance promotion, Capitol's course of action is less clear. Was Two Shows Nightly actually sent to commercial stores, and then promptly recalled, or were no copies ever released commercially? I have found no evidence to back up the suggestion that the album arrived at stores in 1968. On the contrary, all U.S. copies known to me tellingly have the word "FREE" punched into the front cover's upper right corner. Such copies were usually promotional items sent out to music critics, disc jockeys and radio stations. I have also heard that additional copies (remainders) were eventually given, free of charge, to charity organizations such as Goodwill and the Salvation Army, but I do not know if such hearsay is based on fact or on speculation.

Years after its aborted release, the album was definitely being sold at one specific commercial store. I know of two record collectors who bought various copies therein. According to one of them: "in the mid-70s, the Olssen's record chain in DC was selling off (for 99 cents) a consignment of Capitol records, with free punched into the upper right corners. There were 5 or 6 copies of Two Shows Nightly, which mystified me since I'd never heard of the album and I was a big Peggy fan."

Over the years, many of those "free" copies have ended up in the hands of vendors, who have sold them at high, collectors-only prices. (One copy was once auctioned, through Goldmine magazine, for $1,500. Relatively more reasonable prices, ranging from $100 to $300, tend to be the norm.)

Lee's request to have the LP withdrawn was carried out in the United States, but not everywhere abroad. Copies manufactured in Australia (or New Zealand) are identical to those pressed in the United States, but do not carry the "free" sign. Copies from Japan are pressed in red vinyl, which was typical of Japanese LPs from the 1960s. Given the scarcity of such foreign copies, they too might have been limited to just one small pressing.


Date: April 24, 1968
Location: Copacabana Club, 10 E 60th Street, New York
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #16044 / Taped In Concert

Peggy Lee (ldr), Charles Koppelman, Don Rubin (pdr), Brooks Arthur, Joe Sidore (eng), Lou Levy (con, p), Lou Levy and His Orchestra (acc), Hubert Laws (sax, f), Al Derisi, Victor Paz, Tony Robilotte, Lew Soloff (t, fh), Ray De Sio, Mort Trautman, Bill Watrous (tb), Alan Robinson (frh), Mundell Lowe (g), Ben Tucker (b), Toots Thielemans (h), Grady Tate (d), Francisco Aguabella (per), Peggy Lee (v), Steve Blum (unk)

a. lostMastered By Capitol Why Don't You Do Right?(Joe McCoy)
unissued
b. lostMastered By Capitol Fever(Otis Blackwell aka John Davenport, Eddie Cooley, Uncredited Second Lyricist) / arr: Peggy Lee
unissued
c. 25142Mastered By Capitol Alright, Okay, You Win - 2:16(Mayme Watts, Sidney Wyche) / arr: Billy Byers
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
CAPITOL Jazz CD7243 8 21204 2 1 — THE BEST OF PEGGY LEE; THE CAPITOL YEARS ("BLUES & JAZZ SESSIONS" SERIES)   (1997)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
d. lostMastered By Capitol Trav'lin' Light(Johnny Mercer, Jimmy Mundy, Trummy Young)
unissued
e. 25141Mastered By Capitol What Is A Woman? - 4:49(Tom Jones, Harvey Schmidt) / arr: Billy Byers
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)
f. lostMastered By Capitol Lonesome Road(Gene Austin, Nathaniel Shilkrat) / arr: Billy May
unissued
g. 25143Mastered By Capitol Here's To You - 3:23(Richard Hazard, Peggy Lee) / arr: Richard "Dick" Hazard
CAPITOL LPSt 105 — Two Shows Nightly {Unreleased In the U.S., Except For Promo Copies}   (1968)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD(Switzerland) 346 — Peggy Lee In Concert ("The Entertainers" Series)   (1996)
BMG MUSIC PUBLISHING CD[promo] Pub 016 — PEGGY LEE: SONGWRITER   (2001)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CD2070 2 — TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY (DELUXE EDITION) ("Hepcat" Series)   (2009)


The Two Shows Nightly Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 22, 23 and 24, 1968.


Masters

1. Lost Masters
2. "Why Don't You Do Right?"
3. "Trav'lin' Light"
4. "Lonesome Road
This session's unissued performances are believed to be irretrievably lost. For further details, see notes about masters under session dated April 22, 1968.

Oddly, one of the date's three unissued performances is not listed in Peggy Lee's Capitol session file. My source for "Lonesome Road," is instead the Capitol Label Discography, by Michel Ruppli et al.


Arrangements And Arrangers

1. "What Is A Woman?"
2. "Here's To You"
3. Billy Byers
4. Dick Hazard
Preserved in Peggy Lee's sheet music library is an arrangement of "What Is A Woman?" by Billy Byers and an arrangement of "Here's To You" by Dick Hazard. Since I have not inspected them, my identification of those arrangements as the same ones used at this session is tentative.

5. "Alright, Ok, You Win"
6. Billy Byers
This live date's arrangement of "Alright, Ok, You Win" is the same one which was used at an earlier studio session, dated October 29, 1965. Billy Byers is its author.


Issues

1. Factual Error in The Best Of The Capitol Years ("Blues & Jazz Sessions" Series") [CD]
Found in the track annotation of this CD is the statement that "Alright, Okay, You Win" features an "orchestra recorded live at The Copacabana sometime in 1967, vocals overdubbed in Los Angeles, April 23, 1968." This statement seems to be speculation rather than fact, and is either partially or completely incorrect. The year 1967, perhaps obtained from a look at Wayne Rankin's album list in Peggy Lee's autobiography, is an error. From his embracement of this error, the annotator seems to have moved on to the wrong conclusion that the 1968 date had to refer to an overdub.

There are other errors in this CD's track annotation. The last names of Francisco Aguabella and Alan Robinson are misspelled as "Aquibella" and "Robertson." Mundell Lowe's first name is given as "Mundelle." Toots Thielemans is credited with playing harmonica and "guirat." Some of these particular errors are obviously typographical, while others probably derive from a listener's phonetic transcription of the personnel credits given by Peggy Lee before she sings her concert version of "Alright, Okay, You Win" (master #25142). For yet one more error in this otherwise fine CD, see notes under session dated August 30, 1957.

2. Peggy Lee In Concert [CD]
Included in the bootleg CD Peggy Lee In Concert are the nearly full contents of two Capitol LPs: Basin Street East Proudly Presents Miss Peggy Lee and Two Shows Nightly. Edited out from the bootleg's transfer of the Two Shows Nightly album are a few of the spoken, introductory bits that Lee utters before some songs.


Lost Peggy Lee 1968 Sessions?


After the above-listed March and April dates, Peggy Lee's session file shows no evidence of recording activity for the remainder of 1968. This eight-month-long gap without recording activity is unusual in Lee's career at Capitol Records. For the duration of Lee's stay with that record company, the only gap of such length happened in 1948, when a musicians' ban compelled her to abstain from coming into the studio. (Bouts with pneumonia and other illnesses account for a couple of shorter gaps.)

But in 1968, no motive is readily apparent. One thing is clear: the singer was not taking a vacation from the music business. Far from it, she is known to have played in Las Vegas during both May and December, and to have been back at the Copacabana in September.

It might be that the situation with Two Shows Nightly led to an indefinite postponement of further recording plans. Notice that the album's material was taped in April, yet the album was not scheduled for release until November.

Or it could be that the changes undergone by Capitol in 1968 included the stipulation that some artists, such as Lee, were to record just one album per year, and just one or two singles. From 1959 to 1970, two or three original Lee albums were annually released by Capitol, the only exceptions being 1967 and 1968. In those two years, there was one original album (Somethin' Groovy!, the aborted Two Shows Nightly) and one compilation (Extra Special, The Hits Of Peggy Lee). If such a stipulation was in place (and I have found no evidence), it must have changed in 1969.

I can think of yet a third possibility. Peggy Lee could have recorded during this period and, somehow, the resulting performances could have been left unlisted in her session file. Were this to be the case, such performances would be not only unlisted but perhaps also mislabeled. The performances would thus be either lost in the vaults or they could have been scrapped by mistake. (Lest I raise high hopes among fans, I must add that Capitol seems to have kept very careful inventory of all the masters in its vaults. Hence the chances of locating mislabeled or "hidden" masters are not high.)

Had Peggy Lee done further recording in 1968, which numbers would she have sung? It's of course difficult to adequately reply such a hypothetical query. But, since the following songs were performed by her that year in concert, all of them qualify as candidates: "Yesterday I Heard The Rain," "Everybody's Gone to The Moon," "Alfie," "I Got It Bad," "Almost Like Being In Love," "I've Gotta Be Me," and "This Girl's In Love With You."

Many years ago, I was told of the existence of a Capitol session tape with an unissued Peggy Lee performance entitled "Please, Don't Go." In 1968, a song carrying that same title was making the rounds in record labels; Sammy Davis, Jr. recorded a version for Reprise. (n.b.: This "Please, Don't Go" was a number written by David Cohen, not the later disco hit popularized by KC & The Sunshine Band.) However, at the present time I no longer believe that Lee recorded any number titled "Please, Don't Go." The performance found in the aforementioned Capitol tape was "Please, Don't Rush Me," wrongly referred in the tape's label as "Please Don't Go." ("Please, Don't Rush Me" indeed remained unissued until its appearance in the 1998 CD version of the album Mink Jazz.)


Date: January 24 & 29, 1969 (29: 8:00-11:00)
Location: United Studios (Engineering at Western Recorders and at Wally Heider Studios), Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #17649

Peggy Lee (ldr), S. W. Spampinato (om), Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller (pdr), Bill Halverson, Sandy Lehmann-Haupt (eng), Carlo A. Spiga (ccm), Randy Newman (con), William Ernest Green, Jack Nimitz (r), William H. "Bill" Hood (bar), John Audino (t, fh), Anthony Terran (t), Michael "Mike" Barone, Ernie Tack (tb), Vincent DeRosa (frh), David Allan Duke (tu), Louis "Lou" Morell (g), Donald "Don" Bagley, James "Jimmy" Bond (b), Myron Sandler (str), Maury Dell (p), Bobby Bruce, Leonard Malarsky, Wilbert Nuttycombe, George F. Poole, Jerome Joseph Reisler, Leonard Selic, Daryl Terwilliger, Abraham Weiss, Walter S. Wiemeyer (vn), Alfred Barr, Samuel Boghossian (vl), Justin DiTullio, Jesse Ehrlich, Jerome A. Kessler, Gloria Strassner (vc), Peggy Lee (v, spk), John T. Johnson, William Murasch, M. Ray Pohlman, John Rotella, Jerry D. Williams (unk)

a. 71710-20Master Take (Capitol) Is That All There Is? - 4:20(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Randy Newman
CAPITOL 452602 — {Is That All There Is? / I'm A Woman} [alternate version of Capitol single #2602]   (1969)
US Government's Treasury Department Service LP73 13-14 — The Grammy Treasure Chest [Various Artists; 1 Peggy Lee Vocal + Interview]   (1973)
CAPITOL's Starline 456161 — {Is That All There Is? / Spinning Wheel} ("Star Line" Reissue Series)   (1973)
b. 71711-10Master Take (Capitol) Me And My Shadow - 3:04(Dave Dreyer, Al Jolson, Billy Rose) / arr: Mundell Lowe
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11697 - P 11698 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Is That All There Is?]   (1969)
Longines Symphonette Society Licensed LPSl 5501 — Peggy Lee / Ella Fitzgerald (Zenith Presents Encore; Great Artists Of Our Time, Volume VI)   (1972)
CAPITOL©EMI Bovema LP(Netherlands) 4C 064 82274 — Rendez-Vous With Peggy Lee   (1975)
Both titles on: CAPITOL 452602 — {Is That All There Is? / Me And My Shadow} [primary version of #2602]    (1969)
CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 386 (Reissued in 1975 as CS&LP M/Sm 386) — Is That All There Is?    (1969)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)


The 1968-1972 Singles Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates of the 1968-1972 singles sessions; March 18 and March 21, 1968. January 24, 1969. June 1, 1970. Possibly April 26, 1972. (Besides the songs recorded during the dates just listed, songs from various 1969-1972 album sessions were also picked for release on singles.)


The Is That All There Is? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Primarily October 14 and 15, 1969. Also January 24 & 29, February 4 & 28, October 1 & 21, 1969.


Songs (I)

1. The Genesis Of "Is That All There Is?"
"Is That All There Is?" was brought to Peggy Lee's attention by the songwriters themselves, who had been shopping it around for a while. Extensive details about the song's history and about Peggy Lee's connection to the lyrics can be read in this supplementary page.


The Recording Session

The recording session was held at United Recording Studio on January 24, 1969. As Leiber dramatically tells the story in Hound Dog: The Leiber And Stoller Autobiography, "[w]e had a reputation as demanding producers, so Peggy set the rules from the start. I'll do three takes, she said, and no more ... The initial takes weren't great. She had to ease her way into the mood and find that sweet spot. At take 10, she still didn't have it. But being a trouper, Peggy kept going. At take 15, I suspect that she took a belt because her takes were improving. Take 30 was good, but take 36 was pure magic. I looked at Mike and Mike looked at me and we could do nothing but jump up and down with joy. This was one of the greatest performances ever. Peggy had done it. We had done it. The enormous potential of this little song had been realized." (In various interviews, Leiber has similarly rated this performance as one of the two greatest takes that he ever produced in his career, the other one being Big Mama Thornton's performance of "Hound Dog.")

Continues Leiber: "Let's hear it back, I told the engineer. We waited. Silence. We waited a little longer. More silence. What's wrong?, asked Peggy. I'm dying to hear the last take. Then came the words that cut through me like a knife. I forgot to hit the record button, said the engineer. What do you mean you forgot to hit the record button?, I screamed at the top of my lungs. This has to be a f*ckin' prank! No one forgets to hit the record button. This was the greatest take in the history of takes! Stop joking! Let's hear it! Play the goddamn thing!"

"But there was nothing to play. Nothing to do. Nothing had been recorded. Killing this kid would have been too kind. Yet Peggy, bless her heart, was stoic. Guess I'll have to sing it again, she said bravely. And she did. Take 37 was nothing short of marvelous. That's the take the world knows today. She is melancholy, she's sultry, she's fatalistic, she is in tune, and she delivers the song with a wondrous sense of mystery. It is good -- it is, in fact, very, very good -- but it is not, nor will ever be, take 36."

The 37th take was thus used as the master, with various splices from the other takes -- particularly, splices of the spoken parts. (Or so the songwriters have claimed. For the reason why this discography lists the take as #20 instead of #37, see below, under Dating, Masters And Take Numbers.) The mastering and mixing process was performed by Leiber & Stoller with the involvement of a second engineer (Bill Halverson). Lee is not known to have been present during that process, which was completed over subsequent dates at a different studio (Wally Heider).


Songs (II) And Cross-references

2. "Is That All There Is?": Peggy Lee Versus Capitol Records
Peggy Lee tells in her autobiography that "[w]hen I came to record Is That All There Is? there was resistance everywhere. They said it was too far out, they said it was too long, they said and they said ..." Hence Lee lobbied hard and used her wiles to talk the company into releasing the number. Further details can be read in this supplementary page.

3. "Is That All There Is?" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's recording of "Is That All There Is?" enjoyed extensive chart success.

In Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart, it reached #1 during the week of October 18, 1969 and stayed in that position for two weeks. The previous holder of the top spot had been Oliver, with his rendition of Rod McKuen's "Jean." The successor to "Is That All There Is?" was The Fifth Dimension's version of Laura Nyro's "Wedding Bell Blues."

Earlier, on October 11, 1969, "Is That All There Is?" had also entered Billboard's Hot 100, where it eventually peaked at #11. During the song's eight-weeks-stay in the Hot 100 chart, the top hits were The Archies' "Sugar, Sugar," The Temptations' "I Can't Get Next To You," Elvis Presley's "Suspicious Minds," The Fifth Dimension's "Wedding Bell Blues," and The Beatles' "Come Together / Something." The mainstream success of "Is That All There Is?" seems all the more remarkable when the song is compared to those top numbers of the psychedelic era, all of them so markedly different from "Is That All There Is?" in both mood and message. Thematically, the only contemporaneous hit with more than a passing resemblance to "Is That All There Is?" was Laura Nyro's "And When I Die," which the jazz-flavored rock group Blood, Sweat And Tears took to #2. (Peggy Lee did not tackle "And When I Die" but she did put her imprint on another #2 Blood, Sweat And Tears hit: "Spinning Wheel." She clearly relished singing that conspicuously psychedelic number.)

In Cash Box's Top 100 Singles chart, "Is That All There Is?" reached #10 during the week of November 8, 1969. It made its debut on September 27 and went on to stay in that chart until the week of December 6, for a total of 11 weeks. In Record World's chart, Lee's recording did even better. It peaked at #8.

In Canada, "Is That All There Is?" reached #6 in the RPM 100 chart and #1 in the Young Adult chart of RPM Weekly. The number reached those peak positions during November 1969.

4. "Is That All There Is?" At The Grammys
At the Grammy ceremony that was held on March 11, 1970, "Is That All There Is?" was nominated for Record Of The Year . The winning song was The Fifth Dimension's hit "Aquarius / Let The Sunshine In."

Peggy Lee herself was Grammy-nominated in the category of Best Contemporary Vocal Performance, Female. So were Vikki Carr ("With Pen In Hand"), Brenda Lee ("Johnny One Time"), Jackie DeShannon ("Put A Little Love In Your Heart"), Dusty Springfield ("Son Of A Preacher Man"), and Dionne Warwick ("This Girl's In Love With You"). After six previous nominations in this particular category (and a handful of nominations in other categories), Peggy Lee was the year's winner.

Additional Grammy honors for Peggy Lee, including a Lifetime Achievement Award, would not happen until the late 1980s and the 1990s. (See session dated January 29, 1988.)

Furthermore, Peggy Lee's version of "Is That All There Is?" would go on to being inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. (For another Lee performance that also received this honor, see session dated May 19, 1958.)

5. "Me And My Shadow" [Cross-references]
In addition to this session's master of "Me And My Shadow," another one can be found in this page, under the session dated February 4, 1969. Therein, I discuss the possibility that Capitol's files could contain a mistake: a misidentification of the released take as the one from this session, instead of the one from February 4.


Dating, Masters And Take Numbers

1. Master #71710 ("Is That All There Is?"): Take #20 Or Take #37?
2. Master #71711 ("Me And My Shadow"): Take #10 Or #Take 20?

"Is That All There Is?" and "Me And My Shadow" were originally recorded on January 24, 1969. An orchestral backing was featured at that date's taping. However, after a few attempts, the orchestral background was deemed inappropriate for "Me And My Shadow." Hence plans for an orchestral version of this song were abandoned.

Five days later, on January 29, 1969, "Me And My Shadow" was recorded again. This time, only a small combo backed Lee.

Also on that date (the 29th), the editing and mastering process of "Is That All There Is?" was begun.

Whereas Leiber claimed that the 37th take of "Is That All There Is?" was the one released, Capitol's own paperwork identifies the released take as the 20th. Therefore, my two sources are at odds on this matter. One of various possible explanations for this discrepancy would be that Leiber might have exaggerated the total number of performed takes. (Claims about his supposed penchant for overstatement have been made.) Another possibility is that, given the fact that Leiber & Stoller were not in-house producers at Capitol, the take count on their own documentation could have differed from the count made by the record company. In the absence of any concrete evidence in one direction or another, I am choosing to follow the data from Capitol's paperwork.

Further complicating matters is the fact that some Capitol's documents carry an error in the assignation of this session's take numbers: "Me And My Shadow" has been wrongly assigned the take number of "Is That All There Is?," and vice versa. (In other words, the master take for "Is That All There Is?" is misidentified as #10, the take master of "Me And My Shadow" as #20.)


Songwriters

1. Jerry L(ei/ie)ber
This songwriter's name is unfortunately misspelled all too often. Even in the physical label of the original single that contains "Is That All There Is?" (Capitol #2602) his name is given as 'Lieber' [sic]. The same situation holds true for the Capitol LP Is That All There Is?.

2. Jerry Leiber Versus Peggy Lee
The professional relationship between Peggy Lee, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller (Lee and Leiber in particular) was sometimes very amicable, sometimes extremely tense. See various examples in this supplementary page.


Personnel And Instrumentation

1. "Me And My Shadow"
This session's master of "Me And My Shadow" features piano, bass, drums, and guitar only.

2. Tentative Instrumentation
The personnel that I have listed in this session has been confirmed as official. However, the paperwork at my reach does not identify the instruments played by each musician. My instrument assignation for this session should thus be deemed tentative.

As part of my attempt to correctly assign instruments, I have conducted research on the musicians' careers. Unfortunately, many of those careers are poorly documented. Corrections would be appreciated.

3. Leonard Malarsky
4. Anthony Terran
5. John Audino
At this date, the above-listed musicians played more than one instrument, but the information at hand does not help in determining all the instruments in question. Leonard Malarsky played three instruments; Anthony Terran played two and so did John Audino.

In Audino's case, trumpet, bass trombone, and flugelhorn are all instruments which he is known to have played in other recording sessions. In this date, I have tentatively listed him under trumpet and flugelhorn.

I have listed each musician only under the one instrument for which he was best known.

6. Mundell Lowe
The back cover of the Capitol LP Is That All There Is? lists Mundell Lowe as both arranger and conductor of this session. The conducting credit is false: Lowe is not listed in the official paperwork. Still further, one of the session's participants has no recollection of Lowe's presence in the session. Perhaps Capitol gave conducting credit to Lowe because he wrote one of the arrangements for "Me And My Shadow."


Arrangements, Arrangers And Cross-references

1. Randy Newman
In Hound Dog: The Leiber And Stoller Autobiography, Mike Stoller writes: "We went to LA to have our initial meeting with Peggy at her home on Tower Grove. She wanted us to hear a debut album by a musician she liked: Randy Newman. Jerry and I loved Newman's work and thought it would be a great idea if he did the chart for Is That All There Is? We heard in Randy's work an irony and theatricality that we thought appropriate for our song. We were right. Randy's contributions went beyond the scope of what arrangers and orchestrators normally do. I'll be forever grateful to him." For her part, Lee tells in her own autobiography how she first heard of Newman: "Johnny Mandel had brought me one of Randy Newman's very first albums, telling me, you'll love this fellow, which I did, and I asked him to write the arrangement. It turned out to be perfect for his style."

2. "Is That All There Is?"
3. Mundell Lowe
In addition to Randy Newman's arrangement of this song, Peggy Lee kept in her sheet music library another one, by Mundell Lowe. (Perhaps that second arrangement is connected with her other recording of this song; see session dated October 15, 1969.)

3. "Me And My Shadow"
4. Peter Matz
5. Randy Newman
6. Mundell Lowe
The Capitol LP Is That All There Is? credits Mundell Lowe with the arrangement of this session's recording of "Me And My Shadow." Peggy Lee's sheet music library actually holds three arrangements of the song, including one by Lowe. The other arrangements are by Peter Matz and Randy Newman.

I assume that Newman's arrangement was the one attempted with full orchestra, and ultimately abandoned (as already explained above, in the note titled Dating, Masters And Take Numbers.) Since the issued master of "Me And My Shadow" also sounds like a possible Newman arrangement, I am wondering if Lowe's main task was to strip down Newman's orchestral arrangement, making it suitable for a small combo approach.

At any rate, credit to Mundell Lowe for the arrangement of "Me And My Shadow" should be deemed tentative. See also my comment about Lowe above, under Personnel.


Date: January 31, 1969 (First session, 7:00-10:00 p.m.)
Location: Studio B, Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #17677

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b), Phil Wright (pdr), James R. "Jim" Horn (sax, f), Pete Christlieb (ts), Marion "Buddy" Childers, Paul Hubinon (t), Dick Hyde, Lewis "Lew" McCreary (tb, bt), David Allan Duke, William Hinshaw (frh), John Audino (bt), James Burton, Fred Robinson (g, 12g, Gut), Michael Lang (g, p), Mike Melvoin (p, elp, elo), Paul Humphrey (d), Kenneth Watson (trd, Lat), Peggy Lee (v), Sister Love's Ghen Berry, Sister Love's Lillie Fort, Sister Love's Vermettya Royster (bkv)

a. 71771 "A"Master Take (Capitol) Everyday People - 2:38(Sylvester Stewart) / arr: Robert "Bobby" Bryant
b. 71772Master Take (Capitol) Please, Send Me Someone To Love - 4:05(Percy Mayfield) / arr: Robert "Bobby" Bryant
CAPITOL Jazz CD7243 8 21204 2 1 — THE BEST OF PEGGY LEE; THE CAPITOL YEARS ("BLUES & JAZZ SESSIONS" SERIES)   (1997)
Both titles on: CAPITOL 8-track/LP8st/St 183 — A Natural Woman   (1969)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11333 - P11334 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP A Natural Woman]   (1969)
CAPITOL LPStcl 576 — Peggy Lee [Reissue of LPs Big $pender/A Natural Woman/I'm A Woman, all 3 abbreviated]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 92657 2 8 — A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?   (2003)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) R 02199 — A Natural Woman   


The A Natural Woman Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: January 31, 1969. February 12, 15 and 28, 1969.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Mike Melvoin
2. Robert Bryant
The Capitol album A Natural Woman features the credit "arranged & conducted by Mike Melvoin and Bobby Bryant*." There is one asterisk next to Bryant's name and also next to some of the songs in the album's track listing. Evidently, the asterisk identifies the songs that were arranged by Bryant. Conversely, Melvoin is presumed to have arranged the songs without asterisk. Corroboration comes from Peggy Lee's sheet music library, which contains arrangements for all twelve numbers in the album: each arrangement is attributed to the same arranger that the album credits through its asterisk/no asterisk system.


Personnel

1. Background Vocals
2. Sisters Love
My main source for the personnel on this date is its AFM session report. The report does not list background singers. (They could have been absent from the actual date with Lee and the musicians. Were that the case, their vocals would have been overdubbed at a later time.)

The source for the claim that Sisters Love were the background vocalists is Rudy Calvo, co-producer of the group's With Love -- an album whose tracks were originally recorded in the early 1970s but which had to wait until 2010 to be issued in full. Sisters Love actually consisted of four members; not listed above is Jeanie Long. Calvo can attest to the participation of only the three other members.


Sources And Masters

1. Discrepancies In The Sources
See next session's comments about sources.


Date: January 31, 1969 (Second session, 10:30-1:30 a.m.)
Location: Studio B, Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #17678

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b), Phil Wright (pdr), Mike Melvoin (con, org), Paul Horn (sax, f), Pete Christlieb (ts), John Audino, Robert "Bobby" Bryant, Marion "Buddy" Childers (t, fh), Paul Hubinon, Dick Hyde, Lewis "Lew" McCreary (tb), William Hinshaw (frh), James Burton (g, Gut), Fred Robinson (g, 12g, Gut), Michael Lang (p, elp), Paul Humphrey (d), Kenneth Watson (trd, tym, Lat), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 71774-_Master Take (Capitol) Spinning Wheel - 2:35(David Clayton Thomas) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL 452477 — {Spinning Wheel / Lean On Me}   (1969)
CAPITOL 8-track/LP8st/St 183 — A Natural Woman   (1969)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11309 - P 11310 — Basic Music Library [1 Peggy Lee vocal; also Vic Damone, Tony Bennett ... numbers]   (1969)
b. 71774-_Alternate Take (Capitol) Spinning Wheel(David Clayton Thomas) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL 8-track cartridge? — title unknown   
c. 71775Master Take (Capitol) Living Is Dying Without You - 3:27(Joel Hirschhorn, Al Kasha) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL 8-track/LP8st/St 183 — A Natural Woman   (1969)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 92657 2 8 — A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?   (2003)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) R 02199 — A Natural Woman   
d. 71776-1-rejectedMaster Take (Capitol) (All Of A Sudden) My Heart Sings - 2:55(Jean Marie Blanvillain, Laurent Henri Herpin, Harold Rome)
unissued


The Natural Woman Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: January 31, 1969. February 12, 15 and 28, 1969.


Songs

1. "Spinning Wheel" In The Music Charts
The rock-jazz band Blood, Sweat And Tears took to #2 their version of "Spinning Wheel," which was written by the act's own vocalist, Canadian-raised David Clayton-Thomas. During July 1969, the group's version reached its peak in Billboard's Hot 100 . It also entered the Easy Listening chart, where it reached #1 during the first week of August.

Curiously, Peggy Lee's version of "Spinning Wheel" had made the Easy Listening chart months earlier than the Blood, Sweat And Tears original. After making its debut during the week of May 3, 1969, her recording peaked at #24 and spent six weeks in the chart. Lee's take on this rock number also charted in Canada's RPM Weekly, where it reached the top 20 of the so-called Young Adult chart.


Sources, Masters And Alternate Takes

1. Discrepancies In The Sources
My main sources of information about this session show some disagreements. Below, I have copied the relevant details from each source, so that readers can compare the data more closely. Notice that the first source puts all January 31 masters together in a single session, whereas the second source breaks them into two sessions. Furthermore, the second source includes two additional songs. I have put greater trust in the information from the second source, which is considered the most reliable of the two.

1. Information Gleaned From Peggy Lee's Capitol Session Files
Session #17677
LA, January 31, 1969
71771 Everyday People
71772 Please Send Me Someone To Love
71773 (not by Peggy Lee)
77774 Spinning Wheel
77775 Living Is Dying Without You

[n.b.: Master #71773 contains a Matt Monro performance of a number titled "Love Song." Since this master falls right in the middle of other numbers assigned to Peggy Lee, an obvious question that needs to be asked is why was it not used for a performance of hers. Had #71773 been pre-assigned long before Lee recorded her masters? Or was it inadvertently skipped during the assignation of master numbers to Lee's session, thereby remaining available for later assignation to another artist? Either of those scenarios strikes me as possible. The known details about Monro's date suggest that there were special circumstances involved. Although it was held later than Lee (on February 12, 1969), his session (#17718) bears a number much lower than hers (#17767). Moreover, this Monro session consists of just one master, recorded not in LA or in NY but in London. The theme of a then-brand new movie titled Celebration, "Love Song" must have been a special master that Capitol was rushing to release.]

2. Information Gleaned From The AFM Files

January 31, 1969
7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Everyday People
Send Me Someone To Love

January 31, 1969
10:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Lean On Me
Spinning Wheel
Living Is Dying Without You
All Of A Sudden My Heart Sings

[n.b.: This AFM sheet does not give master numbers.]

3. Information Gleaned From The Capitol Label Discography, by Michel Ruppli et al
The data is the same as in the first of the two sources above, except for a few important details that are the same as the second source. First detail: the masters are separated into two sessions, both conducted on the same day. Second detail: an additional performance ("My Heart Sings"), not in the first source, is included. Furthermore, Ruppli's discography identifies this session as #17678 (not #17677).

4. "Lean On Me"
5. "(All Of A Sudden) My Heart Sings"
For the issued masters of these songs, see session dated February 15, 1969.

Notice that this session's version of "Lean On Me" is listed only in the AFM files. It does not appear in Peggy Lee's session file, nor is there a known master number for it. In short, there's no indication of its preservation anywhere. Chances are that it was performed during the date but subsequently scrapped. However, the session's tapes should be re-checked. Until such re-checking takes place, there's a slim possibility that this version of "Lean On Me" is still extant, and that it was left unlisted because it has not been mastered.

For other titles that, like the ones just discussed, appear only in the AFM sheets, see sessions below, from February through October 1969. A detail common to all such titles is that they are invariably crossed out in the respective AFM sheets. But this particular session is an exception: no titles are crossed out.

6. "Spinning Wheel"
My thanks to Kevin Koerper for alerting me to the existence of a commercially issued alternate take of "Spinning Wheel." Kevin no longer owns a copy of the 8-track issue Get Together, in which he heard it, and I have not been able to track down a copy. But he distinctly recalls that "the instrumentation as well as the interpretation [of Spinning Wheel] were so different." I have also been told that a Capitol database identifies this version of "Spinning Wheel" as an 8-track sub-master. Get Together was released in various configurations, including LP, but so far I have found no evidence that the alternate was used anywhere but in the 8-track cartridge. There is a good possibility that this alternate was also included in the 8-track version of the Peggy Lee compilation Raindrops, too.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Mike Melvoin
2. Mundell Lowe
Peggy Lee's sheet music library has two arrangements of "Spinning Wheel," one by Mike Melvoin and the other by Mundell Lowe. The exact same statement applies to "Living Is Dying Without You." The Mundell Lowe arrangements of those two songs are presumed to have been meant for live performances. See also notes about arrangements in the preceding session.


Date: February 4, 1969
Location: Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #17712

Peggy Lee (v)

a. 71866Master Take (Capitol) Me And My Shadow(Dave Dreyer, Al Jolson, Billy Rose)
unissued


The Is That All There Is? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Primarily October 14 and 15, 1969. Also January 24 & 29, February 4 & 28, October 1 & 21, 1969.


At The Recording Session (Personnel)

1. Bill Halverson
In Peggy Lee's Facebook page, a visitor who identified himself as engineer Bill Halverson wrote the following: "Me And My Shadow was recorded by me at Wally Heider's Studio 3. Just to set the record straight I sat Miss Lee down next to the piano player with a set of headphones. A couple of takes and we had it. One of the best moments of my career." It is not clear if the recording activity to which Halverson refers took place on January 24, February 4, or during some other day.


Sources, Masters And Cross-references

1. Source
Peggy Lee's session file does not list this session. The only source in which I have found it listed is The Capitol Label Discography by Michel Ruppli, Bill Daniels, and Ed Novitsky.

2. "Me And My Shadow" [Cross-references]
Ruppli's text identifies this session's one master as a remake. For details about Lee's earlier version of "Me And My Shadow," see session dated January 24 & 29, 1969.

3. Erroneous Data In Capitol's Paperwork?
The existence of two "Me And My Shadow" master takes is odd, and so is the omission of one of them (the one from this session) in some of the paperwork.

And if this take is indeed a remake, why would Capitol still choose release the earlier take from January 29?

I suspect that Capitol's official files contain an inadvertent switch: the released take is the one from this session. The earlier take might even be the orchestral one that was abandoned. (As explained in the notes to the January 29, 1969 session, there were attempts to record "Me And My Shadow" with full orchestra at that time. According to a session participant, attempts to produce an acceptable master were ultimately abandoned, because it was felt that the orchestral approach was not working for the song.)

Even if the points made above rise the suspicion that the master take from this session wass the one issued, only factual corroboration would compel me to change to the data found in Capitol's paperwork. Of course, the best way to find out if there is an error in the official documentation would be to give a listen to the session tapes that contain "Me And My Shadow." Since I do not have access to the tapes, this matter will have to remain in the realm of speculation for the time being.

4. Tapes Of "Me And My Shadow" (Masters #77711 And #71866)
Capitol's database lists approximately 10 tapes which contain Peggy Lee's vocal of "Me And My Shadow." Many of those tapes are presumed to be safety copies.

One particular tape lists its "Me And My Shadow" as a 'new remake'. Unfortunately, the master number of this so-called new remake remains unknown to me.

There is a second tape of special interest. On this tape's label, the contents are identified as master #71711 and a timing of 4:19 is given to the performance. My interest stems from that 4:19 timing, which is a far longer than the 3:04 of the commercial issued number. Could it be that this tape contains the unreleased orchestral version?


Date: February 12, 1969 (7:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.)
Location: Studio 1, T.T.G. Sunset-Highland Studio, 1441 N. McCadden St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #17708

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b), Phil Wright (pdr), Pete Christlieb (f, bar), Donald J. "Don" Menza (f, ts), Ernest Watts (f, ts, t, o), Robert "Bobby" Bryant (t), Marion "Buddy" Childers (t, c, fh), Reunald Jones, Paul Rubinon (t, fh), George Bohannon (tb, eu), David Allan Duke (tb, tu), William Hinshaw (frh, tu), Donald Waldrop (tu, bt), Louis Blackburn (bt, tnt), Mundell Lowe (g, elg), Michael Anthony (elg, 12g), Michael Lang (p, elp), M. Ray Pohlman (pac, ela), Earl Palmer (d, tym, bel), Sandra Crouch (tam), Peggy Lee (v), Sister Love's Ghen Berry, Sister Love's Lillie Fort, Sister Love's Vermettya Royster (bkv)

a. 71840-1Master Take (Capitol) (Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay - 2:37(Steve Cropper, Otis Redding) / arr: Robert "Bobby" Bryant
CAPITOL 8-track/LP8st/St 183 — A Natural Woman   (1969)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11333 - P11334 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP A Natural Woman]   (1969)
CAPITOL LPStcl 576 — Peggy Lee [Reissue of LPs Big $pender/A Natural Woman/I'm A Woman, all 3 abbreviated]   (1970)
b. 71844-1Master Take (Capitol) No More - 3:26(Bob Russell, Toots Camarata)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)
c. 71843-1Master Take (Capitol) I Think It's Gonna Rain Today - 3:15(Randy Newman) / arr: Robert "Bobby" Bryant
CAPITOL 8-track/LP8st/St 183 — A Natural Woman   (1969)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11333 - P11334 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP A Natural Woman]   (1969)
CAPITOL LPStcl 576 — Peggy Lee [Reissue of LPs Big $pender/A Natural Woman/I'm A Woman, all 3 abbreviated]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 92657 2 8 — A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?   (2003)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) R 02199 — A Natural Woman   


The Natural Woman Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: January 31, 1969. February 12, 15 and 28, 1969.


At The Recording Sessions

Impressions from those who witnessed the Natural Woman dates can be found in James Gavin's biography of Peggy Lee. Gavin's account of the sessions relies on the oral interviews that he conducted with at least two participants (producer Phil Wright, background singer Vermettya Royster) and on an April 12, 1970 Los Angeles Times piece ("Peggy Lee Is Very Different From You And Me,") written by John Hallowell. (Within the same year on which he attended one of the Natural Woman sessions, Hallowell also happened to publish his collection of celebrity interviews The Truth Game.) Excerpted below are the most relevant segments of Gavin's account (pages 288-290):

Dave Cavanaugh ... placed Lee in the hands of Phil Wright, one of the young producers whom Capitol had hired to shake up his A&R department ... [T]o Wright, soul was soul, and he heard it in Lee. "She had a feeling for the blues," he said. "Things like 'Fever' were not that far away from soul music." At her dining room table, Wright sat with Lee for hours, "deciding what we were gonna do, how we were gonna do it, the musicians she wanted" ... They jotted some rock and soul hits of the day ... Lee added Randy Newman's desolate "I Think It's Going to Rain Today" and ... "Don't Explain" ... [At the studio,] Vermettya Royster [a gospel singer, and member of the r&b trio Sisters Love] made Lee feel right at home. "I fell in love with her and that voice of hers," said Royster. "And when I opened my mouth to sing [Peggy Lee] just stood there." Lee thrilled Royster by exclaiming, "Oh, you've got such a wonderful voice!" Capitol employees drifted into the control room. John Hallowell of the Los Angeles Times came, too. "It is cold, stark, butts on the floor, big shiny black mikes, a clock on the wall, paper cups with coffee and more, but no one notices. For as the lady sings she turns that recording stage into the Mississippi Delta; a strobe-light show; two lovers in bed after love." Lee was in a playful mood. When a sung phrase emerged as a croak, she announced, "Theres a frog for ya!" and started croaking, "Ribbit! Ribbit!" Everyone laughed. But the singer ruled with force. "She knew what she wanted and that was it," said Wright. "If you tried to force her into something it would't work" ... "There's no overdubbing on the album, no sweetening," Lee enthused to a reporter. "The emotions are full and strong."


Masters And Sources

1. Information Gleaned From The AFM Files

71840 Dock Of The Bay
xxxxx xxxxxxx
xxxxx xxxxxxx
xxxxx xxxxxxx
71844 No More
71843 I Think It's Gonna Rain Today

Above, I have transcribed the masters data just as it appears in the AFM file. As can be seen, there are three lines filled with the letter x. Those x letters block out information written under them. The information is thus illegible. The most logical assumption is that the blocked out information pertains to performances bearing the master numbers 71841, 71842, and 71839, tried and abandoned during this session. Though ultimately abandoned, could they have been preserved on tape, or were they scrapped? Only a listening of the session's tape can categorically confirm or deny. (Chances are that they were not preserved, however.)

2. Order Of The Performances And Sequencing Of Masters
The other sources at my disposal show no discrepancies with the AFM record, with one exception: elsewhere these performance are listed by master number, in ascendant order. In this discography, I have decided to use the order found in the AFM file, primarily because AFM is considered the most reliable of all pertinent sources. It is thus very possible that the songs were recorded in the order shown above -- rather than in the sequential master order found in Capitol's documents.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Bobby Bryant
2. "No More"
My credit to Bobby Bryant for the arrangement of "No More" is tentative. Its basis is the existence, in Peggy Lee's sheet music library, of an arrangement of "No More" under Bryant's name. The tentativeness of the credit stems from the fact that, since I have not inspected the library arrangement, I cannot be completely certain that it is the same one used for this session's performance.


Personnel

1. Background Vocals
The group Sisters Love is heard on "(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay" and "I Think It's Gonna Rain Today." They are not heard on "No More." See also personnel comments in the first of the sessions dated January 31, 1969.


Date: February 15, 1969 (8:00-12:00 p.m.)
Location: T.T.G. Sunset-Highland Studio, 1441 N. McCadden St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #17715

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b), Phil Wright (pdr), Mike Melvoin (con, org), James R. "Jim" Horn (sax, o), Donald J. "Don" Menza (sax), John "Plas" Johnson (ts), John Audino, Marion "Buddy" Childers, James C. "Jimmy" Zito (t, fh), Richard Leith, Donald Waldrop (tb, bt), Charles C. "Charlie" Loper (tb), David Allan Duke, William Hinshaw (frh, tu), Michael Anthony (g), James Burton (g, Gut, slg), Lawrence "Larry" Knechtel (p, hps, org), Michael Lang (p, elp, org), Michael Deasy (gch, hal, bel), Joe Porcaro (mal, per), James "Jim" Gordon (d, Lat, per), Grady Tate (d), Peggy Lee (v), Sister Love's Ghen Berry, Sister Love's Lillie Fort, Sister Love's Vermettya Royster (bkv)

a. 71874Master Take (Capitol) (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman - 3:01(Gerry Goffin, Carole King, Jerry Wexler) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11333 - P11334 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP A Natural Woman]   (1969)
CAPITOL's Creative Products LPSl 6753 — Peggy Lee / The Lettermen (Zenith Presents Encore '72; Great Artists Of Our Time, Volume 2)   (1972)
CAPITOL©EMI Publishing House CDMp Aw 11/05 — The EMI Songs Collection ("Great Singers Sing Great Songs," Volume 4: Peggy Lee)   (2005)
b. 71873-1Master Take (Capitol) Don't Explain - 3:57(Arthur Herzog, Jr., Billie Holiday) / arr: Mike Melvoin
c. 71871Master Take (Capitol) Lean On Me - 2:42(Peggy Lee, Mundell Lowe, Mike Melvoin) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL 452477 — {Spinning Wheel / Lean On Me}   (1969)
CAPITOL's Starline 456131 — {Lean On Me / Mohair Sam} ("Star Line" Reissue Series)   (1973)
d. 71872-1Master Take (Capitol) (All Of A Sudden) My Heart Sings - 2:15(Jean Marie Blanvillain, Laurent Henri Herpin, Harold Rome) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11333 - P11334 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP A Natural Woman]   (1969)
CAPITOL's Creative Products 8-track/CS/LP8xl/ /Sl 6694 — The Sounds Of The Seventies [prepared for Sylvania]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(Korea) 8806344820326 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee; The Capitol Years   (2006)
All titles on: CAPITOL 8-track/LP8st/St 183 — A Natural Woman   (1969)
CAPITOL LPStcl 576 — Peggy Lee [Reissue of LPs Big $pender/A Natural Woman/I'm A Woman, all 3 abbreviated]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 92657 2 8 — A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?   (2003)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) R 02199 — A Natural Woman   


The Natural Woman Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: January 31, 1969. February 12, 15 and 28, 1969.


Issues

1. Peggy Lee [LP]
The album set Stcl 576 is an abbreviated reissue of the LPs Big Spender, A Natural Woman, and I'm A Woman. Peggy Lee was one of various acts whose earlier Capitol albums received a boxed, abridged 3-LP treatment in 1970. Others were The Lettermen, Guy Lombardo (Stcl 578), Al Martino (Stcl 572), Wayne Newton, and Buck Owens. There is also one item in the series (Stcl 575) that combines numbers from three different, though professionally related acts (Stan Kenton, June Christy, and The Four Freshmen).


Sources

1. Order Of The Performances And Sequencing Of Masters
There is no disagreement among the three sources consulted, except for the order in which the masters are listed: the AFM file does not list this session's master numbers in sequential order. In this discography, I have decided to use the order found in the AFM file, primarily because AFM is considered the most reliable of all pertinent sources. It is thus very possible that the songs were recorded in the order shown above -- rather than in the sequential master order found in Capitol's documents.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. "A Natural Woman"
2. Mike Melvoin
3. Mundell Lowe
Found in Peggy Lee's sheet music library are two arrangements of "A Natural Woman." One is by Mike Melvoin, the other by Mundell Lowe. Since the LP A Natural Woman gives credit to Melvoin for all the arrangements from this session, the Lowe arrangements are presumed to have been for concert appearances. (n.b.: Elsewhere in this discography, I have shied away from trusting collective credits for arrangers. But in the case of these sessions, the credit given in the back of the LP is not really collective. See further comments about arrangements in the first of the sessions dated January 31, 1969.)


Personnel

1. Background Vocals
The group Sisters Love is heard on "Lean On Me" only. See also personnel comments in the first of the sessions dated January 31, 1969.

Songs (Cross-references)

1. "(All Of A Sudden) My Heart Sings"
For an earlier, unissued version of this song, see second of the sessions dated January 31, 1969, including notes about sources and masters.


Date: February 28, 1969 (10:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #17750

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b), Phil Wright (pdr), Robert "Bobby" Bryant (con, t), James R. "Jim" Horn (sax, o), John "Plas" Johnson (sax, f), Donald J. "Don" Menza (f, ts), John Audino, Marion "Buddy" Childers, Paul Hubinon (t, fh), Richard Leith (tb, bt), Richard "Dick" Noel (tb), William Hinshaw, Henry Sigismonti (frh, tu), Donald Waldrop (tu, bt), Michael Anthony (g), James Burton (12g, slg, nec), Michael Lang (elp), Hal Blaine, Gary Coleman (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 71934Master Take (Capitol) Can I Change My Mind? - 2:15(Barry Despenza, Carl Wolfolk) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL 8-track/LP8st/St 183 — A Natural Woman   (1969)
CAPITOL LPStcl 576 — Peggy Lee [Reissue of LPs Big $pender/A Natural Woman/I'm A Woman, all 3 abbreviated]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 92657 2 8 — A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?   (2003)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) R 02199 — A Natural Woman   
b. 71935-lostMaster Take (Capitol) We're Gonna Make It - 2:15(Billy Davis, Gene Barge, Raynard Miner, Carl William Smith) / arr: Robert "Bobby" Bryant
unissued
c. 71936-3Master Take (Capitol) My Old Flame - 4:24(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston) / arr: Robert "Bobby" Bryant
CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 386 (Reissued in 1975 as CS&LP M/Sm 386) — Is That All There Is?    (1969)
CAPITOL 452721 — {Love Story / My Old Flame}   (1970)
CAPITOL 452721 {dj copy} — {Love Story (Short Version) / My Old Flame}   (1970)


The Natural Woman Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: January 31, 1969. February 12, 15 and 28, 1969.

The Is That All There Is? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Primarily October 14 and 15, 1969. Also January 24 & 29, February 4 & 28, October 1 & 21, 1969.


Sources

All three main sources consulted are in agreement about this session's details.


Masters

1. "We're Gonna Make It"
For reasons unknown, the session tape #17708 contains the music tracks but not the vocal track of "We're Gonna Make It" (master #71935 ). Based on the extant music, Lee was planning to record an upbeat treatment of this song.

I find it hard to believe that Lee did not record her voice, when she had even commissioned an arrangement that is still extant at her library. Hence I hold out hope that a vocal is somewhere, somehow lost among Capitol's vault tapes.

But perhaps a technical deficiency (or plain human error) prevented the session's engineer from recording the vocal onto the corresponding tape track. (At this point in time, Capitol was recording on eight-track tapes, which means that piano, bass, drums, percussion, guitar, brass, woodwinds, and lead vocal had each its own separate track.)

Or it could be that only the music tracks were taped because producer and vocalist were planning to do an overdub at a later time. See also comments immediately below, about the overdubbing of "My Old Flame." Perhaps Lee and producer Phil Wright eventually decided to abandon completion of the master, feeling that they already had enough tracks for inclusion in A Natural Woman -- the album which was the raison d'être of these February 1969 sessions.

At the very least, Lee must have rehearsed the number with the orchestra.

2. "My Old Flame" [Master #71936]
Notice that, like "We're Gonna Make It," this session's third master was also left out of the album A Natural Woman. Fortunately, "My Old Flame" was later picked for inclusion in Lee's next original album, Is That All There Is?.)

Ruppli's Capitol Label Discography indicates that some overdubbing of "My Old Flame" was done on October 17 and 20, 1969. Those dates are close to the main sessions for the album Is That All There Is?. I assume that this overdubbing activity was triggered by a desire, from the singer and her producer, to re-adjust the sound of the number, in order to make it more congenial with the overall ambience of the later album.

(It occurs to me that similar plans might have been made for "We're Not Gonna Make It" on October 17 and 20, too. "We're Gonna Make It" was left unissued, though.)


Personnel

1. Bobby Bryant (conductor)
2. Mike Melvoin (conductor)
My sources are in disagreement on the matter of who conducted the songs from this session.

The AFM report shows Mike Melvoin as the session's leader and Bobby Bryant as playing trumpet.

In Capitol's session file, Bryant is the credited conductor.

Also, in the album Is That All There Is?, one of the songs from this session ("My Old Flame") bears the credit "arr. & Cond. by Bobby Bryant."

Yet in the album A Natural Woman, the arranging and/or conducting of another song from this session ("Can I Change My Mind?") is credited to Mike Melvoin.

Peggy Lee's sheet music library has a Melvoin arrangement of "Can I Change My Mind?" and a Bryant arrangement of "My Old Flame."

Since information gleaned from AFM sources is considered to be the most trustworthy of all sources available to me, I have entered Melvoin as the conductor.

Therefore I am deeming the credit to Bryant wrong. (Of course, information proving otherwise could eventually come forth. Any number of special scenarios could have taken place. For instance, the session's main participants could have made an agreement, not reflected in the AFM sheet: Bryant and Melvin could have alternated, each conducting the songs that were set to each man's respective arrangements.)


Issues

1. Remixes For A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is? [CD]
The process of mastering and remixing this CD seems to have focused on placing Peggy Lee's vocal atop the instrumentation. Any fan of the singer would consider such purpose a noble one ... provided that the musical backing does not suffer from the process.

At the Peggy Lee Bulletin Board, engineer Steve Hoffman kindly shared his perspective on this matter: "I was one of the engineers who worked on this Two-Fer. The idea was to get Peggy to sound less squashed (compressed) than on the original mixes. Of course, all of the engineers working on this remix project had their own idea of how to fix some of these songs and we didn't all agree. We did however all try to make Miss Lee sound more dynamic, with less processing on her voice than the original mixes. Not everything was remixed; many of the songs are the original versions. We spent many long nights pondering how to help Peggy sound more natural and more like she did on the earlier vacuum tubed three-track recordings. Capitol's old eight-track recording setup left a lot to be desired, having a very dry solid state sound with NO headroom for vocal peaks. On those songs, the original engineer decided to limit Miss Lee's vocal range during the mixing even more, and focus on the background instruments as the stars of the songs. We tried to reverse that and have it be about Peggy Lee."

Repeated listening of this CD's edition of A Natural Woman has led me to conclude that, indeed, the remix removed the music from its original foreground position, relegating in to the background. No, I do no mean that the music is hard to hear. On the contrary, it comes out clearly and cleanly. But it does ride under the vocal. As a result, some of the excitement generated by the original LP's mix is missing. Except during the instrumental interludes, the music sounds diluted and, in comparison with the LP, distant.

Lee herself is known to have been very interested in maintaining a close synergy between vocal and instruments. For uptempo material, she liked to think of the vocal as "threaded through the music." Such an approach could have been in her mind when she recorded A Natural Woman, an album which is overtly styled in an upbeat r&b mode. It's an LP in which rhythm reigns. Brass blares incessantly. The voice is meant to be, I think, one more musical instrument in the mix. In such a context, the album's music actually merits amplification -- without missing the vocal in the mix, of course.

On the positive side, Hoffman and the other engineers who worked on A Natural Woman have certainly done a fine job of highlighting Peggy Lee's vocals. It must also be said that some of the problems that I am mentioning might be inherent to the original taping and mastering, as Hoffman intimates. His comments rightly point to the fact that Capitol's LA recording facilities underwent significant changes in the 1960s -- changes that, contrary to the expectations of Capitol's brass at that point in time, did not necessarily result in technical improvements.

The Is That All There Is? side of the EMI twofer strikes me as even more problematic. Some of the twofer's masters underwent a significant amount of remixing, most of which failed to work in the masters' favor. For starters, bear in mind that the twofer's engineers were asked to remove all hiss from these performances. The desirability of hiss is a controversial subject, with plenty of opinions in pro and con. Here's, for instance, a 'con argument fan' from a Peggy Lee fan: Only two tracks [from the album Is That All There Is?] sound fair enough -- "Me And My Shadow" and "Don't Smoke in Bed." Notice that these tracks have retained some of the analog hiss associated with the period (pre-Dolby); tape hiss carries quite a bit of aural information, especially in the high register including those crucial overtones. Independently of the worth that hiss might or might not have, I too am unhappy with the sonic quality of the twofer's Is That All There Is? section. Most of those tracks have a rather clinical sound which regrettably obliterates the warm ambiance of the original LP's performances.

But the very worst sound quality is circumscribed to the twofer's bonus tracks: "You Must Have Been A Beautiful Baby," "Somethin' Stupid," "I Can Hear The Music," and "Sing A Rainbow." Paradoxically, the problem with those tracks is not over-processing or 'excessive meddling' but insufficient work. Given the subpar remastering (?) applied to those numbers, a better option would have been for EMI to release this CD without such extra numbers. (For British readers wondering why do I refer to that quartet of track as extras or bonus tracks: they were not part of the LP Is That All There Is? as it was originally released in the United States. All four tracks actually originate in Somethin' Groovy!, an LP that Capitol had released in America two years prior to Is That All There Is?, but which was never released on vinyl in the United Kingdom. Oddly, EMI made the decision in 1969 to incorporate one third of Somethin' Groovy! into its British edition of the Is That All There Is? LP.)

A rather large number of individuals worked on the mastering of this EMI twofer. The booklet lists four men: Steve Genewick, Cy Godfrey, Steve Hoffman and Dave McEowen, working at Capitol Studios and/or in California. And, when the remastered album traveled from the United States to the United Kingdom, other engineers under EMI's hire probably did additional work. The project might thus be an example of that old adage about "too many cooks in the kitchen."

In a nutshell: I for one would like to have on CD newly mastered versions of both albums (A Natural Woman, Is That All There Is?). Since they are widely different, I also would not like to ever hear them again together in one twofer.


Date: October 1 & 21, 1969
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood, Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18202

Peggy Lee (ldr), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 73229-(edit?)Alternate Take (Capitol) Is That All There Is? [Short Version] - 3:30(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
b. Demo Performance Is That All There Is? [Demo Version](Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
Both titles unissued.


The Is That All There Is? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Primarily October 14 and 15, 1969. Also January 24 & 29, February 4 & 28, October 1 & 21, 1969.


Masters And Dating

1. "Is That All There Is? (Short Version)"
In Capitol's files, master #73329 is dated October 1, 1969 and identified as "Is That All There Is? (Short Version)." Since this master remains unreleased and unchecked, the exact meaning of the title's parenthetical qualification can only be speculated.

The most logical possibility is that this is an edit of master #71710 (i.e., the commercially issued version of "Is That All There Is?," recorded on January 29, 1969). Any number of reasons could have led to the creation of such an edit. The length of the original performance had been one of the objections raised by Capitol's executives when Lee asked them to release "Is That All There Is?" as a single. (Radio stations would have not been too receptive to playing a performance with a timing of 4:20.) Therefore, she might have wanted to appease Capitol with the offer of a shorter version as a viable alternative.

Of course, there is also the possibility that master #73329 was a newly recorded version, not an edit of the commercially issued performance, . Unfortunately, this matter cannot be clarified until master #73329 is played and compared with the January 29 version.

2. "Is That All There Is? (Demo Version)"
Another tape extant in Capitol's vaults contains a special demo of "Is That All There Is?". It is dated October 21, 1969.

Both in interviews and in her autobiography, Peggy Lee made mention of a demo of "Is That All There Is? which I presume to be this one. Lee explained that, during the process of recording and releasing "Is That All There Is?," she found resistance from Capitol's A&R department, for whom the song seemed not only unmarketable and unsuitably weird but also too long. Facing such objections, Lee took a demo of the song to Glenn Wallichs (one of the three founders of Capitol Records, and the company's leading man before EMI took over it in the 1950s). By then retired but still holding power over Capitol, Wallichs essentially told Lee that she could of course record anything that she wanted.

Once again, actual listening of this demo will be necessary in order to determine whether the performance is different from or identical to the commercially issued version of "Is That All There Is?"

The date given to this item (October 21, 1969) may be an indication of the day in which the tape was incorporated to the vaults of Capitol Records -- not the day in which it came into existence.


Sources And Dating

1. "Is That All There Is? (Short Version)"
My main sources of information for "Is That All There Is? (Short Version)" are Capitol's session file and the Capitol Label Discography, by Ruppli et al. As further shown below, I have also been informed of other Capitol documentation that lists this performance.

Whereas my sources do show the same master number for this performance, each supplies -- or points to -- a different date:

a) in the session file, this so-called short version is actually listed along with the four other masters that comprise session #18829, dated October 15, 1969.

b) in Ruppli's text, "Is That All There Is? (Short Version)" stands alone, under an entry for which there is no session number. There is no date either, but the placement of the session suggests that the period of late September or early October.

c) The date that I am offering herein (October 1, 1969) was retrieved from other Capitol documentation to which I have no access -- and shared with me by those who do have access, of course.

2. "Is That All There Is? (Demo Version)"
None of my main sources lists this performance. The demo's existence in Capitol's vaults has become known thanks to information that was orally communicated to me, and which was in turn retrieved from another Capitol file (not from an actual inspection of, or listening to the demo).

I am also told that, in yet another Capitol document, this demo is actually dated October 1 (not October 15), 1969.


Arrangements

1. "Is That All There Is?"
2. Mundell Lowe
Besides Randy Newman's arrangement of the hit version of this song (see session dated January 29, 1969), Peggy Lee kept in her sheet music library another arrangement that is credited to Mundell Lowe. Could the Lowe arrangement be for this session's mysterious "short version"?


Date: October 14, 1969 (8:00 p.m.-12:00 midnight)
Location: Amigo Studio, Cumpston Street, North Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18228

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b), Phil Wright (pdr), Mundell Lowe (con), Charles T. Harrington (sax, unk), John Audino, Paul Hubinon, Anthony Terran, James C. "Jimmy" Zito (t, unk), R. D. McMickle (t), James "Jimmy" Cleveland, Richard Leith, Charles C. "Charlie" Loper (tb), William Hinshaw (tu), Dennis Budimir, John J. Kelson Jr., Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g, unk), Howard Roberts, Louis "Louie" Shelton, Peter Woodford (g), Lou Levy (p, unk), Lawrence "Larry" Knechtel (org), Gary Coleman, Earl Palmer (d, per), Peggy Lee (v), B. K. Lewis, Thomas W. "Tom" Scott, Donald Waldrop (unk)

a. 73311-4Master Take (Capitol) Love Story - 3:28(Randy Newman) / arr: Mundell Lowe
CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 386 (Reissued in 1975 as CS&LP M/Sm 386) — Is That All There Is?    (1969)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11697 - P 11698 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Is That All There Is?]   (1969)
CAPITOL 452721 — {Love Story / My Old Flame}   (1970)
b. 73311-1AAlternate Take (Capitol) Love Story - 3:28(Randy Newman) / arr: Mundell Lowe
unissued
c. 70557-EditAlternate Take (Capitol) Love Story [Short Version] - 2:32(Randy Newman) / arr: Mundell Lowe
CAPITOL 452721 {dj copy} — {Love Story (Short Version) / My Old Flame}   (1970)
d. 73310-4Master Take (Capitol) Didn't We - 2:48(Jimmy Webb) / arr: Mundell Lowe
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)
e. 73313-2Master Take (Capitol) Johnny (Linda) - 2:47(Randy Newman) / arr: Mundell Lowe
CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 386 (Reissued in 1975 as CS&LP M/Sm 386) — Is That All There Is?    (1969)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11697 - P 11698 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Is That All There Is?]   (1969)
CAPITOL CS/LPM/Sm 386 — Is That All There Is? [reissue]   (1975)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 92657 2 8 — A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?   (2003)
Pure Pleasure Licensed audiophile LP(United Kingdom) Ppan St386 — IS THAT ALL THERE IS?   (2006)


The Is That All There Is? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Primarily October 14 and 15, 1969. Also January 24 & 29, February 4 & 28, October 1 & 21, 1969.


Songs

1. "Love Story" In The Music Charts
Chronologically the third of three Billboard chart entries from the LP Is That All There Is?, Peggy Lee's version of "Love Story" appeared in the Easy Listening chart during the week of February 7, 1970. It spent five weeks therein, peaking at #26. Lee's treatment of "Love Story" also made Billboard's Bubbling Under The Hot 100 chart at #105. In March 1970, it reached #25 in the Adult chart of Canada's RPM Weekly, too.


Sources And Masters

My sources are in disagreement about a few details pertaining to this session. To facilitate perusal and comparison, below I have provided transcriptions of the data as it appears in two of the sources.

1. Information Gleaned From Peggy Lee's Capitol's Session Files
Session #___
April 5, 1969
Orchestra dir. by Mike Melvoin
77310 Didn't We?
77311 Love Story
73312 (not by Peggy Lee)
73313 Johnny (Linda)
73314 Something

[n.b.: No session number supplied.]
[n.b.: Master #73312 does not appear to have been used by any other artist.]
[n.b.: The date given in this file seems to be a mistake, as discussed below.]

2. Information Gleaned From The AFM Files
October 14, 1969
Leader's name: Mundell Lowe
xxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxx
Love Story
Didn't We
Johnny Linda

[n.b.: No master numbers and no session number given.]
[n.b.: For an explanation of the meaning of the "xxxxx" lines, see below, under Masters, points #2 and #3.]

3. Information Gleaned From The Capitol Label Discography, by Michel Ruppli Et Al

a) Session number: Ruppli's text is my source for that piece of information.
b) Performances: Ruppli et al. list the same ones as on source #1 above.
c) Personnel: Ruppli et al. used this discography's listed personnel, which I drew from the AFM file. For some of the musicians, Ruppli and company have opted to list an instrument different from the one I assigned. Theirs is an entirely valid deviation from my data; see explanation below, under Musical Instruments.
d) Location: As in most other sessions, Ruppli et al. list the Capitol Tower. The location that I entered comes from the AFM sheet, and is more reliable.


Dating

1. April 5, 1969 Or October 14, 1969?
Problematically, my sources do not agree on the correct dating for this session.

As previously stressed in this discography, the AFM database is generally considered the most reliable of all the sources at hand. I have thus chosen the recording date shown in the AFM report over the one given in Capitol's files.

For this specific session, there are also other factors which suggest that the Capitol file's April 4 date is an error. Peggy Lee is known to have opened an engagement at New York's Waldorf-Astoria on April 7. This session was recorded in LA. Granted that on April 5 she could have still been in LA, chances are greater that by then Lee was in New York. (She would have wanted to rehearse on location, and well in advance.)

Notice also that Lee's next recording session took place on October 15. Since both that session and this one consisted of songs for the album Is That There Is?, there is more logic in the presumption that they were held one day (not six months) apart.

(I do wonder, though, if there could have been an April 5 session during which these songs would have been first attempted, with Mike Melvoin on the baton, only to be re-recorded on October 14 under the direction of Mundell Lowe.)


Masters, Alternate Takes And Cross-references

1. "Something"
The above-listed sources agree that "Love Story" "Didn't We," "Johnny (Linda)" were all recorded during this date. But they disagree as to whether "Something" was recorded on this date (according to the AFM report) or on the next one (according to Capitol's session file). Once again, I have put more trust in the information from AFM.

2. "Long Gone" [Attempted, Not Mastered]
3. "Whistle For Happiness" [Attempted, Not Mastered]
In the AFM report, the titles of two masters have been rendered illegible: a string of x letters have been typed over the text. Nonetheless, I think that I can still discern both titles: Long Gone on the first line, Whistle For Happiness on the second. The act of crossing out those two performances presumably meant that, after one or more attempts, the singer and/or the session's producer felt dissatisfied and abandoned any plans to further try them.

Were these "Long Gone" and "Whistle For Happiness" attempts taped? Until a listening of the original session tapes is conducted, there can be no definite answer to this question. See also notes about Masters under next session.

For the master of "Whistle For Happiness" that was issued in the album Is That All There Is?, see session dated October 15, 1969. Peggy Lee recorded no additional master of "Long Gone."

4. "Love Story"
In this discography, I have generally abstained from entering any alternate takes that are unavailable. I have made a few exceptions, however. The above-entered alternate of "Love Story" is one of them. Although never issued and never available to collectors, this take is worth listing because it was in contention for inclusion in the album Is That All There Is?. Its status as a "contender" can be gathered from the fact that it is one of two takes of "Love Story" found in the album's production reel. The other take was the one ultimately chosen for inclusion.

5. "Love Story (Short Version)"
The Capitol Label Discography is my source of information for master #70557. (It is not listed in any of my other sources.) According to Ruppli et al., this is an edit of master #73310, apparently shortened for radio airplay. The editing was done on January 27, 1970 -- two weeks before Lee's "Love Story" debuted in the charts.

6. Sequential Master Order
Notice that, curiously, this short version's of "Love Story" bears a master number (70557) that is much lower than all others from the same session. An explanation is provided in Ruppli's text. Back in late 1968, Capitol had made a jump in its master count: from 70460, the master count moved to 71000, skipping all the numbers in between. All those skipped numbers were gradually assigned in subsequent years; such was apparently the case with #70557.

7. Overdubs
According to the Capitol Label Discography, all titles from this session were overdubbed. This assertion is not corroborated by my two other sources.


Personnel

1. Mike Melvoin
2. Mundell Lowe
In Capitol's session file, Mike Melvoin is listed as the conductor of this session's masters, but in the AFM report he is not even listed among the participants. Always putting more trust in the AFM database, I have credited not Melvoin but Mundell Lowe as the session's conductor.


Musical Instruments

1. Correct Instrument Assignation
The AFM report lists this session's musicians but not the instruments that they played. Therefore, my pairing of instruments and musicians for this date is tentative. Corrections to my educated guesses would be appreciated. Notice also that, in the case of musicians credited with playing two or more instruments, I have entered only one instrument -- the one for which the musician is best known.

2. Charles Harrington
3. John J. Nelson, Jr.
4. Paul J. Hubinon
5. Anthony Terran
6. John Audino
7. James C. Zito
All the above-listed musicians played at least two instruments during this session. Nelson actually played not two but three instruments.

8. Castanets
I believe that I hear this instrument in this session's version of "Love Story"; hence I have tentatively added it to the personnel/instrument listing.


Arrangements

1. Source
Except for "Didn't We," the source for this session's arranging credits is the back cover of the album Is That All There Is?.

2. "Didn't We"
3. Mundell Lowe
Credit to Mundell Lowe for the arrangement of "Didn't We" (a number that is not part of the album Is That All There Is?) is based on the existence of an arrangement, under his name, in Peggy Lee's sheet music library.


Date: October 15, 1969 (8:00 p.m. - 12:00 midnight)
Location: Amigo Studio, Cumpston Street, North Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18229

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b), Phil Wright (pdr), George Tipton (ccm), Mike Melvoin (con), Charles T. Harrington (r), James R. "Jim" Horn, Donald J. "Don" Menza (r, unk), Marion "Buddy" Childers, Oliver "Ollie" Mitchell, James C. "Jimmy" Zito (t, unk), James "Jimmy" Cleveland (tb), Dick Hyde (tb, unk), William Hinshaw, Henry Sigismonti (tu), Dennis Budimir, Peter Woodford (g, unk), Howard Roberts (g), Lou Levy (p, unk), Victor Feldman (vib, unk), Gayle (aka Gail) Levant (hrp), Gary Coleman (d, per, unk), Earl Palmer (d, unk), Israel Baker, Assa Drori, William Hector, Bernard Kundell, Henry Peber, Stanley Plummer, Ralph Schaefer, Tibor Zelig (vn), Raymond J. Kelley, Ralph "Ray" Kramer (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 73316-2Master Take (Capitol) Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show - 3:00(Neil Diamond) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11697 - P 11698 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Is That All There Is?]   (1969)
b. 73317-6Master Take (Capitol) Don't Smoke In Bed - 3:31(Willard Robison, Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11697 - P 11698 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Is That All There Is?]   (1969)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)
CAPITOL©EMI's Bovema CS/LP(Netherlands) 5c 054 85001/ 056 80836 — Peggy Lee; 16 Greatest Hits ("Greatest Hits" Series)   (1976)
c. 73314-3Master Take (Capitol) Something - 3:14(George Harrison) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11697 - P 11698 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Is That All There Is?]   (1969)
CAPITOL 452696 — {Whistle For Happiness / Something}   (1969)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecp 80797 — Peggy Lee On Silver Screen   (1973)
d. 73318-6Master Take (Capitol) Whistle For Happiness - 2:25(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: George Tipton
CAPITOL 452696 — {Whistle For Happiness / Something}   (1969)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 386 (Reissued in 1975 as CS&LP M/Sm 386) — Is That All There Is?    (1969)
CAPITOL CS/LPM/Sm 386 — Is That All There Is? [reissue]   (1975)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 92657 2 8 — A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?   (2003)
Pure Pleasure Licensed audiophile LP(United Kingdom) Ppan St386 — IS THAT ALL THERE IS?   (2006)


The Is That All There Is? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Primarily October 14 and 15, 1969. Also January 24 & 29, February 4 & 28, October 1 & 21, 1969.


Songs

1. "Whistle For Happiness" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's 65th chart entry was also the third Leiber & Stoller number that she placed in the Billboard charts. Following her previous successes with Leiber & Stoller's "I'm A Woman" and "Is That All There Is," Lee's version of "Whistle For Happiness" peaked at #13. Its six weeks in the Easy Listening chart began on December 20, 1969, when B. J. Thomas was holding the top spot with "Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head."

"Whistle For Happiness" also charted in Canada's RPM Weekly, reaching the top 20 of the Adult chart (#19, January 1970) and the top 80 of the RPM100 chart.

2. "Long Gone"
The song "Long Gone" was a Neil Diamond composition from his 1969 album Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show. About Peggy Lee's singing of this number, see further details below, under Masters.


Issues

1. The Album Is That All There Is? In The Music Charts [LP]
Peggy Lee's 18th entry in Billboard's albums chart peaked at #55. After making its debut during the week of December 13, 1969, the LP spent 18 weeks in the chart. It also charted in Canada's RPM Weekly, reaching #62 on the February 7, 1970 issue of that periodical.

2. Remixes For A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is? [CD]
For comments about the mixed reception with which Peggy Lee fans met this EMI twofer, see Issues note under session dated February 28, 1969.

3. Fever [CD, Disky]
4. "Something" / "Something Stupid"
The track listing of this CD erroneously claims that the disc includes a performance of "Something." Instead, this issue contains Lee's performance of "Something Stupid" (recorded June 9, 1967).


Collectors' Corner

1. Is That All There Is? [LP]
The promotional version of the Capitol LP Is That All There Is? (St 386) consisted of not only the vinyl and the album's jacket but also a paperfold wrapper which showed a full-size head shot of Peggy Lee.


Sources And Masters

My main sources for this session's data show various disagreements. As in previous sessions where the situation has been similar, I am trusting the AFM report over all the Capitol file. Below, I have transcribed the data from both sources, so that readers can better assess the details under special scrutiny.

1. Information Gleaned From Capitol's Session Files
Session #___
October 15, 1969
73229 Is That All There Is (Short Version)
73316 Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show
73317 Don't Smoke In Bed
73318 Whistle For Happiness

[n.b.: No session number given.]

2. Information Gleaned From The AFM Report
October 15, 1969
Long Gone
Whistle For Happiness
Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show
Don't Smoke In Bed
Something
Whistle for Happiness

[n.b.: No session number and no master numbers given. The first two titles were typed, the last four handwritten. The first two titles were also crossed out -- by one straight line running across each given title. I presume that those two titles were tried at the session but ultimately deemed unsatisfactory. One main question about them is whether they can still be heard in the tapes. Chances are that, as stated in previous sessions where other titles have been crossed out, these performances were not preserved on tape. But only actual listening of the tapes can confirm or deny. Notice also that, once again, I have ordered the masters not sequentially but in the order in which the AFM report lists them. The AFM order might be the actual, true sequence in which the masters were recorded.]

3. Information Gleaned From The Capitol Label Discography, by Michel Ruppli Et Al
October 15, 1969
Plus Overdub Of Strings on October 15 and 20, 1969
Session #18229
73314 Something
73315 Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show
73316 Don't Smoke In Bed
73317 Whistle For Happiness

n.b.: Notice that Ruppli is the only source that gives the session's number. Ruppli is also my only source for the dating of the overdub sessions and for the names of the strings musicians. As for the rest of the personnel, Ruppli et al have taken it from the present Peggy Lee discography; I in turn copied it from the AFM report. For some of the musicians, Ruppli has listed instruments different from those assigned in this discography. Neither my instrument assignation or Ruppli's can be considered definitive; see explanation below, under Personnel And Instruments. Finally, Ruppli lists the Capitol Tower as the recording location of this and most other LA sessions. I have entered instead the location stated in the AFM sheet.]

4. Overdubbed Strings
See below, under Dating.


Dating

1. Strings
According to the Capitol Label Discography, strings were overdubbed on all titles from this session. The strings section recorded their part on October 17, between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. (that is, two days after the recording of the vocal and the rest of the instrumentation). On October 20, additional overdubs of strings were made for "Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show" and "Don't Smoke in Bed."


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. "Don't Smoke In Bed"
2. Marty Paich
In addition to this session's arrangement of "Don't Smoke In Bed" by Mike Melvoin, Peggy Lee's sheet music library holds a second one, by Marty Paich. Since Lee is known to have worked with Paich mostly during her Decca period, his arrangement is presumed to have been made for 1950s concert performances. (Also extant in Lee's library is the even earlier arrangement that was written for Lee's original recording of "Don't Smoke In Bed." Details about it can be found in the notes under the Capitol session dated December 3, 1947.)

2. "Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show"
3. Billy Byers
Lee's library holds two arrangements of "Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show." The one used at this date was authored by Mike Melvoin. Billy Byers is the author of the library's second arrangement, which was presumably meant to be used in concerts.

4. Terry Harrington
5. "Long Gone"
The AFM report indicates that a Terry Harrington did arranging duties for this session. He is probably the same Charles T. Harrington that played reeds at the date. AFM does not specify which song(s) he arranged, but Peggy Lee's sheet music library credits him with an extant arrangement of "Long Gone."


Personnel And Instruments

1. Correct Assignation Of Instruments
The AFM report lists this session's musicians but does not identify the instruments that they played. Therefore, my pairing of instruments and musicians for this session is tentative. Corrections to my educated guesses would be appreciated.

2. James R. Horn
3. Donald J. Menza
4. Oliver Mitchell
5. Marion Childers
6. James C. Zito
7. Dick Hyde
8. Lou Levy
9. Peter Woodford
10. Dennis Budimir
11. Victor S. Feldman
12. Gary Coleman
All the above-listed musicians played two or more instruments during this session. Hyde and Levy played three. Horn, Menza, Feldman, and Coleman played four instruments.

13. Cuica Or 'Muffled Flute'
14. Bassoon
15. Linebell
16. Oboe
17. "Don't Smoke in Bed"
My thanks to Oddbjörn Hedin for giving a close listening to this session's eerie performance of "Don't Smoke In Bed" and for proposing the above-listed musical instruments as among those heard.

18. George Tipton
19. Mike Melvoin
The AFM report jointly credits Melvoin and Tipton for the conducting of this session. The LP Is That All There Is? clarifies: Tipton arranged and conducted "Whistle For Happiness" only. The conductor of "Long Gone" remains unknown -- possibly Tipton, too.


Date: February 17, 1970 (7:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.)
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18418

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b, unk), Phil Wright (pdr), Hank Cicalo (eng), Mike Melvoin (con), Thomas W. "Tom" Scott (r), Charles T. Harrington (sax), James R. "Jim" Horn, Donald J. "Don" Menza (sax, unk), Marion "Buddy" Childers, Charles "Chuck" Findley, Oliver "Ollie" Mitchell (t, unk), George Bohannon, Dick Hyde (tb), David Allan Duke, William Hinshaw (frh), Dennis Budimir, Louis "Louie" Shelton, Peter Woodford (g, unk), Lou Levy (p, unk), Lawrence "Larry" Knechtel (org, unk), Joseph L. "Joe" Sample (key, unk), Gary Coleman, James "Jim" Gordon, Milton Holland (per, unk), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 74035Master Take (Capitol) Have You Seen My Baby? - 2:42(Randy Newman) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL 452817 — {You'll Remember Me / Have You Seen My Baby?}    (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 4 97143 2 8 — C'est Magnifique   (1998)
b. 74036Master Take (Capitol) Bridge Over Troubled Water - 5:05(Paul Simon) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11987 - P 11988 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Bridge Over Troubled Water]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecs 65039/65040 — Peggy Lee ("Golden Double 32" Series)   (1976)
c. 74037-14Master Take (Capitol) The Thrill Is Gone - 3:33(Arthur H. Benson, Dale E. Petite) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL Jazz CD7243 8 21204 2 1 — THE BEST OF PEGGY LEE; THE CAPITOL YEARS ("BLUES & JAZZ SESSIONS" SERIES)   (1997)
d. 74038Master Take (Capitol) (There's) Always Something There To Remind Me - 2:42(Burt Bacharach, Hal David) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11987 - P 11988 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Bridge Over Troubled Water]   (1970)
CAPITOL's Creative Products 8-track/CS/LP8xl/Smi/Sl 6723 — Raindrops [originally prepared for Abbott Laboratories]   (1971)
Disky Licensed CD(Netherlands) Hr 883492 — Fever   (1997)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 4 97143 2 8 — C'est Magnifique   (1998)
HMV Licensed CD(United Kingdom) Hmv 7243 5 22253 2 3 — The Peggy Lee Collection ("HMV Easy" Series)   (1999)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 463 — Bridge Over Troubled Water   (1970)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 920 2 — THEN WAS THEN, NOW IS NOW / BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER   (2008)


The Bridge Over Troubled Water Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: February 17 and 20, 1970.


Masters

1. Overdubs
According to the Capitol Label Discography, all titles from this session were overdubbed on February 27, 1970. This statement is not corroborated by my other sources.


Personnel And Instruments

1. Correct Assignation Of Musical Instruments
This session's AFM report lists the date's musicians but not the instruments that they played. Therefore, my pairing of instruments and musicians herein is tentative. Corrections to my educated guesses would be appreciated.

2. Max K. Bennett
3. Dennis Budimir
4. Marion Childers
5. Gary Coleman
6. Charles Findley
7. James Gordon
8. Milton Holland
9. James Horn
10. Lawrence Knechtel
11. Lou Levy
12. Donald Menza
13. Oliver Mitchell
14. Joseph L. Sample
15. Louis Shelton
16. Peter Woodford
All the above-listed musicians played two or more instruments at this session. The following men played three: Max Bennett, Dennis Budimir, James Gordon, Lawrence Knechtel, Lou Levy, and Joseph Sample. Gary Coleman played four instruments.


Arrangements

1. Mike Melvoin
Arrangements for all four songs recorded at this session are extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. Mike Melvoin is the credited author in all four of them. Although I have not inspected the library's arrangements, I believe that they are the same ones used at this date.


Date: February 20, 1970 (6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.)
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18420

Peggy Lee (ldr), Max K. Bennett (om, b, unk), Phil Wright (pdr), Hank Cicalo (eng), Mike Melvoin (con), Charles T. Harrington, Donald J. "Don" Menza (sax), Marion "Buddy" Childers, Charles "Chuck" Findley, Dick Hyde, Oliver "Ollie" Mitchell (t), Richard T. "Dick" Nash (tb), Vincent DeRosa, William Hinshaw (frh), Dennis Budimir, Louis "Louie" Shelton (g), Peter Woodford (g, unk), Lou Levy (p, unk), Pete Jolly (key, unk), Gary Coleman (d, unk), Victor Feldman (per, unk), Earl Palmer (per), Robert "Bob" Hardaway (wds, unk), Peggy Lee (v), Anthony Ortega (unk)

a. 74039Master Take (Capitol) Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head - 3:50(Hal David, Burt Bacharach) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11987 - P 11988 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Bridge Over Troubled Water]   (1970)
CAPITOL's Creative Products 8-track/CS/LP8xl/Smi/Sl 6723 — Raindrops [originally prepared for Abbott Laboratories]   (1971)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecp 80797 — Peggy Lee On Silver Screen   (1973)
b. 74043Master Take (Capitol) What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life? - 3:06(Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith aka Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11987 - P 11988 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Bridge Over Troubled Water]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)
CAPITOL LP(Netherlands) 5c 056 80 836 & (Australia) Senc 10063 — Portrait Of Peggy Lee (aka The Peggy Lee Collection)   (1973)
c. 74044Master Take (Capitol) Something Strange - 3:23(James Fagas) / arr: Mike Melvoin
d. 74045Master Take (Capitol) He Used Me - 3:48(Jim Weatherly) / arr: Mike Melvoin
e. 74046Master Take (Capitol) I See Your Face Before Me - 4:01(Harold Dietz, Arthur Schwartz) / arr: Mike Melvoin
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 11987 - P 11988 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Bridge Over Troubled Water]   (1970)
f. 74047-16Master Take (Capitol) You'll Remember Me - 3:15(Stan Worth, Arthur Hamilton) / arr: Mike Melvoin
CAPITOL 452817 — {You'll Remember Me / Have You Seen My Baby?}    (1970)
CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 622 — Make It With You   (1970)
CAPITOL's Creative Products 8-track/CS/LP8xl/Smi/Sl 6723 — Raindrops [originally prepared for Abbott Laboratories]   (1971)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 463 — Bridge Over Troubled Water   (1970)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 920 2 — THEN WAS THEN, NOW IS NOW / BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER   (2008)


The Bridge Over Troubled Water Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: February 17 and 20, 1970.


Songs

1. "You'll Remember Me" In The Music Charts
One of various Arthur Hamilton numbers associated with Peggy Lee (others being "Sing a Rainbow" and "Rain Sometimes"), "You'll Remember Me" peaked at #16 in Billboard's Easy Listening chart. It made its debut during the week of May 9, 1970 and stayed for six weeks.


Issues

1. The Album Bridge Over Troubled Water In The Music Charts [LP]
Peggy Lee's 19th entry in Billboard's Top LPs chart peaked at #142. After its debut during the week of June 6, 1970, it went on to spend a total of nine weeks in that chart.


Personnel And Instruments

1. Correct Instruments
This date's AFM report lists the session musicians but not the instruments that they played. Therefore, my pairing of instruments and musicians in this session is tentative. Corrections to my educated guesses would be appreciated.

2. Max K. Bennett
3. Gary Coleman
4. Victor Feldman
5. Robert Hardaway
6. Pete Jolly
7. Lou Levy
8. Peter Woodford
All the above-listed musicians played at least three instruments during this date. Victor Feldman actually played not three but four instruments. Gary Coleman played five.


Arrangements

1. Mike Melvoin
Arrangements for all songs recorded at this session are extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. Mike Melvoin is the credited author in all four of them. Although I have not inspected the library's arrangements, I believe that they are the same ones used at this date.


Masters

1. Number Of Performances Per Session
Notice that this session contains more songs than usual. My main sources (the AFM report, the Capitol session file, the Capitol Label discography) list all six songs under just one session.

2. Break In The Numerical Sequence
Notice also that there is a break in the numerical sequence: from #70439 to #74043. The numbers in-between were assigned to masters by Stefan Anderson that Capitol had purchased from another label.

3. Overdubs
According to the Capitol Label Discography, all titles from this session were overdubbed on February 27, 1970. This statement is not corroborated by my other sources.


Date: June 1, 1970
Location: New York?
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18714

Peggy Lee (ldr), Michel Legrand (con), Unknown (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 75313Master Take (Capitol) Pieces Of Dreams (Little Boy Lost) - 2:40(Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith aka Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand)
CAPITOL 452910 — {One More Ride On The Merry-Go-Round / Pieces Of Dreams}   (1970)
CAPITOL's Creative Products 8-track/CS/LP8xl/Smi/Sl 6723 — Raindrops [originally prepared for Abbott Laboratories]   (1971)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)


The 1968-1972 Singles Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates of the 1968-1972 singles sessions; March 18 and March 21, 1968. January 24, 1969. June 1, 1970. Possibly April 26, 1972. (Besides the songs recorded during the dates just listed, songs from various 1969-1972 album sessions were also picked for release on singles.)


Songs And Cross-references (Film)

1. "Pieces Of Dreams"
The Oscar-nominated song "Pieces Of Dreams" was written for the 1970 movie of the same title. See also page for Movie Soundtracks, once it opens for viewing. According to those who have watched the film (I have not), this session's performance of "Pieces Of Dreams" is indeed the same one heard in the soundtrack.


Personnel

1. Michel Legrand
My inclusion of Michel Legrand in this session's personnel is tentative. I am relying partially on the fact that Legrand is responsible for the film's score and partially on my impression that his characteristic arranging style is evident in the sound of this performance's strings and trumpets.

2. Mike Melvoin
All Capitol issues of "Pieces Of Dreams" list Mike Melvoin as its conductor and arranger. So does the Capitol Label Discography. (As for Peggy Lee's session file, it does not list anyone.)

But I suspect that the credit to Melvoin is an error which originated in the original 45-rpm issue (Capitol #2910). Since that single's flip side contains a number from an album conducted by Melvoin, the conducting and arranging of "Pieces Of Dreams" may have been automatically ascribed to him, too.


Location

1. New York, Los Angeles. London?
Of my various sources, the Capitol Label Discography is the only one which reveals this session's location (New York). Oddly, however, the session is listed in the Los Angeles volume of the Capitol Label Discography, not in the New York volume. It is also worth noting that Lee is known to have been in the United Kingdom from mid-June (or perhaps earlier) to June 30, 1970. See also next paragraph.


Masters

1. Overdubbed Vocal?
Combined with the aforementioned questions about the correct location, my sources' scarcity of data about this session leads me to wonder if "Pieces Of Dreams" is an overdub. If Legrand was involved, Peggy Lee might have overdubbed her vocal to an instrumental track sent by him, who was in Paris at the time. (Legrand is known to have followed this procedure for the Dusty Springfield version of the theme from the film A Time For Loving, also filmed in 1970.)


Date: July 21, 1970 (8:00 p.m. - 12:00 midnight)
Location: T.T.G. Sunset-Highland Studio, 1441 N. McCadden St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18677

Peggy Lee (ldr), Marion L. Klein (om), Phil Wright (pdr), Benny Golson (con), Gene L. "Gino" Bozzacco, Harry "Sweets" Edison, Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (t), Robert "Bob" Ascher, George Bohannon (tb), David Allan Duke, Alan Robinson (frh), Donald Waldrop (tu), Dennis Budimir, Peter Woodford (g), Max K. Bennett (b), Lou Levy, James "Jimmy" Rowles (p), Carl Fortina (pac), John Guerin (d), Jules Greenberg, Emil Radocchia, aka Richards (per), Israel Baker, Erno Neufeld, Stanley Plummer, Nathan Ross (vn), Gene Cipriano, Mel Tax (wds), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 74959Master Take (Capitol) One More Ride On The Merry-Go-Round - 2:18(Howard Greenfield, Neil Sedaka) / arr: Benny Golson
CAPITOL 452910 — {One More Ride On The Merry-Go-Round / Pieces Of Dreams}   (1970)
CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 622 — Make It With You   (1970)
CAPITOL's Cema Special Markets 8-track/LP8xl/Sl 8298 — I'm A Woman [prepared for Columbia House]   (1982)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)
b. 74955Master Take (Capitol) Passenger Of The Rain (Le Passager De La Pluie) - 4:36(Sebastien Japrisot, Francis Albert Lai, Peggy Lee) / arr: Benny Golson
unissued
c. 74956Master Take (Capitol) The Long And Winding Road - 3:20(John Lennon, Paul McCartney) / arr: Benny Golson
CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 622 — Make It With You   (1970)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12365 - P 12366 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Make It With You]   (1971)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecp 80797 — Peggy Lee On Silver Screen   (1973)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/LP(Australia) TcSenc/Senc 10150 (also Drum __) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series) [Abbreviated version of British original]   
d. 74954Master Take (Capitol) The No-Color Time Of The Day - 3:12(Barbara Fried, Milton Schafer) / arr: Benny Golson
unissued


The Make It With You Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: July 21, 1970. August 5 and 27, 1970.


Songs And Cross-references

1. "One More Ride On The Merry-Go-Round" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee had a #21 Easy Listening hit with her Capitol single of "One More Ride On The Merry-Go-Round." The single entered that Billboard chart during the week of October 3, 1970 and stayed for five weeks. Perched at the top during that week were The Carpenters, with "We've Only Just Begun."

2. "Passenger Of The Rain"
3. "The No-Color Time Of The Day"
For the released versions of these songs, see next session, dated August 5, 1970.


Masters And Sources

My two main sources list this session's masters in different order. As elsewhere, I have given priority to the order shown in the AFM sheets, which might be the actual sequence in which these performances were recorded. Below I have copied the data as shown in each source, so that readers can better assess it.

1. Master Sequence As Found In Capitol's Session Files
74954 The No-Color Time Of The Day
74955 Le Passager De La Pluie (Passenger Of The Rain)
74956 The Long And Winding Road
74957
74958
74958 One More Ride On The Merry-Go-Round

[n.b.: Next to numbers 74957 and 74958 there is only blank space, as replicated above. These blank master numbers do not seem to have been used by any other artist.]

2. Master Sequence As Found In The AFM Report
74959 One More Ride On The Merry-Go-Round
74955 Passenger Of The Rain
74956 The Long And Winding Road
74957 The No Color Time Of The Day

3. Preservation Of Masters #74954 And #74955,
Unfortunately, this session's unissued masters of "The No-Color Time Of The Day" and "Passenger Of The Rain" do not appear to have been preserved. Capitol has no record of their existence. Since both numbers were remade at the next date, they were probably scrapped. ('Probability' does not equate 'certainty', however. Only an inspection of the session tapes can definitely prove that they were scrapped.)

4. Overdub
According to the Capitol Label Discography, some overdubbing was done on master #74956 ("The Long And Winding Road") on August 28, 1970. This detail is not corroborated by my other sources.


Arrangements

1. Benny Golson
Arrangements for the songs recorded at this session are extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. Benny Golson is the credited author in them. Although I have not inspected the library's arrangements, I believe that they are the same ones used at this date.


Date: August 5, 1970 (8:00 p.m. - 12:00 midnight)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18708

Peggy Lee (ldr), Marion L. Klein (om), Phil Wright (pdr), Benny Golson (con), Gene L. "Gino" Bozzacco, Harry "Sweets" Edison, Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (t), George Bohannon, Lewis "Lew" McCreary (tb), James "Jim" Decker, David Allan Duke (frh), Dennis Budimir, Peter Woodford (g), Max K. Bennett (eb), Clare Fischer, Lou Levy (p), Earl Palmer (d), Jules Greenberg, Emil Radocchia, aka Richards (per), Israel Baker, George Berres, Elliott Fisher, Erno Neufeld, Stanley Plummer, Nathan Ross, Carroll Stephens, Daryl Terwilliger (vn), Dorothy Colton, Allan Harshman (vl), Ronald Cooper, Edgar Lustgarten (vc), Gene Cipriano, Mel Tax (wds), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 75280Master Take (Capitol) The No-Color Time Of The Day - 2:52(Barbara Fried, Milton Schafer) / arr: Benny Golson
b. 75279Master Take (Capitol) Passenger Of The Rain (Le Passager De La Pluie) - 4:00(Sebastien Japrisot, Francis Albert Lai, Peggy Lee) / arr: Benny Golson
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecp 80797 — Peggy Lee On Silver Screen   (1973)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecs 65039/65040 — Peggy Lee ("Golden Double 32" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI LP(Japan) Ecs 90049 — Peggy Lee ("Best 20" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Cw 5077 — I Left My Heart In San Francisco   
c. 75281Master Take (Capitol) That's What Living's About - 2:29(Paul Anka) / arr: Benny Golson
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12365 - P 12366 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Make It With You]   (1971)
CAPITOL LP(Netherlands) 5c 056 80 836 & (Australia) Senc 10063 — Portrait Of Peggy Lee (aka The Peggy Lee Collection)   (1973)
d. 75282-8Master Take (Capitol) I've Never Been So Happy In My Life - 2:29(Lew Spence)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12365 - P 12366 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Make It With You]   (1971)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 622 — Make It With You   (1970)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)


The Make It With You Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: July 21, 1970. August 5 and 27, 1970.


On The Make It With You Recording Session: Benny Golson's Recollections

The following Benny Golson comments are from an interview published by Crescendo International in its May 1983 issue: Yes, I’ve written for a wide variety of singers – each of them, and what they are trying to achieve, is a separate entity ... [W]hat a delight to work with Peggy Lee. I mean, she’s a real professional. I had an experience with her that I’ve never had with any other artist as the arranger/conductor of the music for a complete recording session (Make It With You on Capitol). Incidentally, at a time when people were all overdubbing the strings, the horns and everything, she insisted on doing the whole date live. The strings, the whole orchestra was there, and she was singing in the room. We did half of it in L.A. and half in New York. She wasn’t there for the mix, and when she heard it, it had been mixed so that the singing was very loud and you could hardly hear the arrangements – the vocal was just wiping the brass and everything. She said: "The voice is too loud." They went back in and remixed it, and she went with ‘em this time – that’s the way it should be. Of course, that was more money she’d have to pay off, for the remixing of the session, before she’d go into profit. I never got over that. I talked to her about it later; I said: "That was really something, Peggy, that you would do that." Yes, Peggy is very musicianly; she writes good lyrics too.

In a more casual but similarly appreciative manner, Golson recounted this album-related experience while visiting the William Patterson University Jazz Room on November 6, 2016. The occasion was a big band concert given by college members, and featuring fresh Golson arrangements, never recorded before. An hour-long chat and meeting with Golson preceded the concert. According to attendee Steve Albin, a query as to whether any vocalists had influenced Golson prompted him to mention Peggy Lee's demand that the album be remixed. In Golson's recollection, Lee told Capitol executives that the remixing was necessary because "we can't hear Benny's music." After remembering this experience, Golson moved on to mentioning other singers of note, but concluded his answer by returning to Lee, thereby conveying his fondness for the singer and the work that they did together.


Masters And Sources

My two main sources list this session's masters in different order. Moreover, a couple of master numbers are not the same in each source. As elsewhere, I have given priority to the data shown in the AFM report. Below I have copied the raw data, so that readers can come to a better understanding of the divergences.

1. Master Sequencing In The Capitol Session Files
75279 Passenger Of The Rain (Le Passager De La Pluie)
75280 The No-Color Time Of The Day
75281 That's What Living's About
75282 I've Never Been So Happy in My Life

2. Master Sequencing In The AFM Report
74954 No-Color Time
74955 Passenger Of The Rain
75281 That's What Living's All About
75282 I've Never Been So Happy In My Life

[n.b.: The first two performances are remakes of numbers first attempted on July 21, 1970. AFM gives the same master number to the earlier attempts and to their remakes.]

3. Master Sequencing In The Capitol Label Discography By Michel Ruppli Et Al.
Ruppli and company show the same order and the same numbering as in source #1 above. Ruppli et al. also notice that the masters which preceded and followed this session (i.e., master #75278 and master #75283) were left unused.

4. 'Overdubs'
According to the Capitol Label Discography, all titles from this session were overdubbed on August 28, 1970, possibly in New York City. This assertion is not corroborated by my other sources. It is very possible that such so-called overdubs were actually remixes; see above-given Benny Golson comments about The Recording Session.


Arrangements

1. Benny Golson
All but one of the arrangements for this session's songs are extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. Benny Golson is credited as the author of the three extant arrangements. Although I have not inspected the library's arrangements, I believe that they are the same ones used at this date.


Date: August 27, 1970
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #18725

Peggy Lee (ldr), Phil Wright (pdr), Benny Golson (con), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 75349Master Take (Capitol) Let's Get Lost In Now - 3:08(Charles Cane Courtney, Peter Link) / arr: Benny Golson
CAPITOL's Creative Products 8-track/CS/LP8xl/Smi/Sl 6723 — Raindrops [originally prepared for Abbott Laboratories]   (1971)
b. 75350Master Take (Capitol) Goodbye - 3:53(Gordon Jenkins) / arr: Benny Golson
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI LP(Japan) Cw 5138 — The Shadow Of Your Smile   
c. 75351Master Take (Capitol) Make It With You - 3:18(David Gates) / arr: Benny Golson
CAPITOL's Creative Products 8-track/CS/LP8xl/Smi/Sl 6723 — Raindrops [originally prepared for Abbott Laboratories]   (1971)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/8T/CS/LPM/8xt/4xt/St 622 — Make It With You   (1970)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12365 - P 12366 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Make It With You]   (1971)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)


The Make It With You Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: July 21, 1970. August 5 and 27, 1970.


Songs And Masters

1. "Let's Get Lost In [S]now"
Some Capitol documents wrongly give the title "Let's Get Lost In Snow" to master #53349 ("Let's Get Lost In Now").

2. 'Overdubs'
According to the Capitol Label Discography, all titles from this session were overdubbed on August 28, 1970, possibly in New York City. This assertion is not corroborated by my other sources. It is very possible that such so-called overdubs were actually remixes; see Benny Golson comments about The Recording Session, under session dated August 5, 1970.

3. Master #75352
Master #75352 is listed in the Capitol Label Discography as not used. Since this session generated three masters out of a possible maximum of four, #75352 may have been intended for Peggy Lee to use.


Issues And Collectors' Corner

1. The Album Make It With You In The Music Charts [LP]
Make It With You was Peggy Lee's 20th album to enter Billboard's album chart. Its debut took place during the week of December 19, 1970. Spending just 2 weeks in the chart's top 200, it peaked at #194.

While she was alive, Make It With You was Peggy Lee's last album to make Billboard's album chart. During the weeks that followed Lee's passing, some of her albums reached high positions in Amazon's sale listings, but there were no signs of them in the Billboard charts that I consulted. Then, almost a decade after having passed away, Lee had a comeback album of sorts: during the week of May 8, 2010, a Peggy Lee compilation released by Starbucks, made its debut on Billboard's Top 200 Albums chart, where it peaked at #51. In the Jazz Albums chart, it went to #2. Come Rain Or Come Shine thus qualifies as Lee's 21th album chart entry, and to date, her last one.

Notice also that, while the albums that Lee recorded after Make It With You did not chart, some of them earned other distinctions, such as Grammy nominations and in one case (Mirrors), cult status.

Notice also that, while the albums that Lee recorded after Make It With You did not chart, some of them earned other distinctions, such as Grammy nominations and in one case (Mirrors), cult status.

2. Raindrops [LP]
The 1971 compilation Raindrops was put together by Capitol Creative Products on behalf of Abbott Laboratories. Similarly, a Louis Armstrong album named Sleepytime - A Remembrance was prepared by Columbia Special Products on behalf of Abbott Laboratories in 1972. Both albums served as promotional advertisement for Placidyl, a sleeping drug produced by Abbott. The recipients of these compilations were probably physicians willing (or considering) to recommend Placydyl to their patients.

In the case of Raindrops, the original album's packaging included not only the regular components of any LP (vinyl, sleeve, cardboard jacket, sealing plastic) but also two separate pieces of advertisement. One was a glossy sheet with full promotional information about the drug. The other was a preprinted card with the following note: "Dear Doctor, for an entertainer, applause is a very personal and immediate sign of appreciation, and so this album is my way of applauding you in the medical profession. It's a special album that we've worked out with Abbott Laboratories, and my great hope is that it will give you pleasure - perhaps at a time when you have a real need for a moment's relaxation. With thanks for all you've done, Peggy Lee." Whether this note was truly written by Lee or instead devised by the company's marketing department is anybody's guess.

Capitol and its record divisions actually released the album Raindrops twice. The original version -- the one discussed above -- was created by Capitol Creative Products; the reissue was released on Capitol Special Markets. Some of the album's features, such as its title, track sequence, and catalogue number were left unchanged in the reissue. Differing features include the artwork and the color used on the vinyl's label. Further specifics about each version can be found in the next two paragraphs.

The front cover of the Creative Products version features a close shot of various tree branches, wet with rain, against a dark yellow background. (Peggy Lee is nowhere to be seen.) This photo was taken at Mount of Olives, Jerusalem. A face shot of Lee can be found in the album's back cover. (That shot is actually a reduced version of the photo that adorns the front cover of her 1970 original album Make It With You.) Also found in the back of the Raindrops jacket: brief but appreciative notes about the singer, and the album's track listing. As for the vinyl itself, it has a black label surrounded by a pink ring.

The front cover of the Special Markets version recycles the Lee photo that was used for the 1969 LP A Natural Woman. The sparse back cover offers the album's track listing along with a very simple drawing of a flower, in black and white. There are no liner notes. The label on the vinyl is yellow. I should further clarify that this version of Raindrops bears no connection to Placidyl, and does not come with the aforementioned pre-printed card. Its release date is unknown to me.

(Both albums' covers can now be seen in this discography's Capitol Compilations pictorial page, which had not yet been created when I wrote the comparative notes found above. To see the covers, you will need to scroll down to the year 1971 in that chronological pictorial.)


Arrangements

1. Benny Golson
The arrangements for this session's songs are extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. Benny Golson is credited as the author of the three extant arrangements. Although I have not inspected the library's arrangements, I believe that they are the same ones used at this date.


Date: Possibly Early April 1971 (Evening Hours)
Location: Possibly Capitol Studios, 151 West 46th Street, NY
Label: CAPITOL

Don Sebesky (con), Jerry Dodgion (as), Bill Watrous (tb), Ray Alonge, Stuart Butterfield (frh), Don Butterfield (tu), Lou Levy (p), Grady Tate (d), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. Master unknown title(unknown) / arr: Don Sebesky
b. Master unknown title(unknown) / arr: Don Sebesky
Both titles unissued.


Sources

My only source for every detail about this mysterious session is French Horn player Stuart Butterfield, who was one of the musicians at the date. The many details that Butterfield remembers with certainty are included, along with a few of which Butterfield's recollection is more tentative.

The Capitol files do not make mention of the session. (Combined with the location outside of Los Angeles, the fact that the masters were left unissued might have contributed to the presumably inadvertent omission from the files.)


Songs

Butterfield recalls that the two numbers recorded at this date were "very slow ballads."


Personnel

1. Jerry Dodgion
The presence of alto sax player Jerry Dodgion should be deemed possible or tentative, rather than certain.


Date And Location

The location is recalled by Butterfield as "someplace in the Times Square area" and the date as happening sometime after a three-week stint at the Waldorf, in 1971. Herein, I have given the date as early April because Lee is known to have been doing concerts a the Waldorf from March 16 through at least March 31. Sessions with Sebesky on April the 5th and the 6th are listed in Capitol files as having taken place in Los Angeles. Of the various possible locations, Capitol's studios is the most logical guess.


Date: April 5, 1971
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #19459

Peggy Lee (ldr), Thomas L. "Snuff" Garrett (pdr), Thorne Norgar, Phil Ramone (eng), Don Sebesky (con), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 76617-5Master Take (Capitol) Sing - 2:25(Joe Raposo) / arr: Don Sebesky
b. 76618-8Master Take (Capitol) My Sweet Lord - 2:55(George Harrison) / arr: Don Sebesky
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12797 - P 12798 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Where Did They Go?]   (1971)
CAPITOL©EMI Bovema LP(Netherlands) 4C 064 82274 — Rendez-Vous With Peggy Lee   (1975)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecs 65039/65040 — Peggy Lee ("Golden Double 32" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI LP(Japan) Ecs 90049 — Peggy Lee ("Best 20" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©EMI's Odeon CS/LP(Argentina) 106083 — Peggy Lee ("Elegidos/Personalidades" Series)   (1979)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI LP(Japan) Cw 5138 — The Shadow Of Your Smile   
c. 76619-3Master Take (Capitol) I Was Born In Love With You - 4:01(Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith aka Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12797 - P 12798 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Where Did They Go?]   (1971)
All titles on: CAPITOL 8-track/LP8xt/St 810 — Where Did They Go?   (1971)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)
World Record Club Licensed LP(New Zealand) 1566 C — Where Did They Go?   


The Where Did They Go? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 5 and 6, 1971. May 11, 1971.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Dave Grusin
2. Benny Golson
3. Don Sebesky
4. Al Capps
Found in the back cover of the album Where Did They Go? is the following credit: "arranged by Don Sebesky & Al Capps*." The obvious implication is that Sebesky arranged all songs that do not have an asterisk nearby. Elsewhere in this discography, I have been wary of fully trusting collective credits (except where I have additional corroboration), but due to the mention of two arrangers in this case, I have decided to trust the accuracy of this LP's claims.

Peggy Lee's sheet music library contains arrangements of all three songs from this session, but none of them credits Sebesky or Capps. Dave Grusin authored the library's arrangement of "Sing," Benny Golson the arrangement of "My Sweet Lord." The arrangement of "I Was Born In Love With You" does not identify its author. Were these arrangements commissioned by Lee for her concert appearances? Are they different from the ones heard in this session's masters? I do not know the answer to either of those questions. An inspection of the arrangements in Lee's library (I have not seen them) should help determine if this session's arrangements are by Sebesky, rather than by Golson and Grusin. For the time being, and in accordance to my comments in the previous paragraph, I have credited Sebesky.


Date: April 6, 1971
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #19460

Peggy Lee (ldr), Thomas L. "Snuff" Garrett (pdr), Thorne Norgar, Phil Ramone (eng), Don Sebesky (con), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 76620-4Master Take (Capitol) Where Did They Go? - 3:53(Harry Lloyd, Gloria Sklerov) / arr: Don Sebesky
CAPITOL 453113 — {Where Did They Go? / All I Want}   (1971)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12797 - P 12798 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Where Did They Go?]   (1971)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(Korea) 8806344820326 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee; The Capitol Years   (2006)
b. 76621-5Master Take (Capitol) Goodbye Again - 2:33(Donald J. Addrissi, Richard P. Addrissi) / arr: Don Sebesky
c. 76622-7Master Take (Capitol) All I Want - 2:40(Steve Clayton aka P. Tedesco, Gladys Shelley) / arr: Don Sebesky
CAPITOL 453113 — {Where Did They Go? / All I Want}   (1971)
All titles on: CAPITOL 8-track/LP8xt/St 810 — Where Did They Go?   (1971)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)
World Record Club Licensed LP(New Zealand) 1566 C — Where Did They Go?   


The Where Did They Go? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 5 and 6, 1971. May 11, 1971.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Don Sebesky
Sebesky's authorship of this session's arrangements is indicated in the back cover of the LP Where Did They Go? and arguably corroborated by copies of the arrangements, kept in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. (Since I have not inspected any of the library's arrangements. I am only assuming that they are the same ones used for this session.)


Date: May 11, 1971 (1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.)
Location: Annex Studios, 1032 Sycamire Street, Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #19499

Peggy Lee (ldr), Thomas L. "Snuff" Garrett (pdr), Thorne Norgar, Phil Ramone (eng), Don Sebesky (con), Jules Jacob[s] (r), Dennis Budimir, Louis "Lou" Morell (g), Jerry O. Scheff (b), Lou Levy (p), Mike Melvoin (org), Ronald Ellis "Ron" Tutt (d), Leonard Malarsky, Marshall Sosson (vn), Kurt Reher (vc), Peggy Lee (v), David Burk, Alan C. Estes, Virgil P. Evans (unk)

a. 76759Master Take (Capitol) My Rock And Foundation - 2:37(Burt Bacharach, Hal David) / arr: Allan A. "Al" Capps
b. 76760Master Take (Capitol) Help Me Make It Through The Night - 2:45(Kris Kristofferson) / arr: Allan A. "Al" Capps
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12797 - P 12798 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Where Did They Go?]   (1971)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)
CAPITOL©EMI's Bovema CS/LP(Netherlands) 5c 054 85001/ 056 80836 — Peggy Lee; 16 Greatest Hits ("Greatest Hits" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/LP(Australia) TcSenc/Senc 10150 (also Drum __) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series) [Abbreviated version of British original]   
c. 76761Master Take (Capitol) I Don't Know How To Love Him - 3:24(Tim Rice, Andrew Lloyd Webber) / arr: Allan A. "Al" Capps
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 12797 - P 12798 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Where Did They Go?]   (1971)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecs 65039/65040 — Peggy Lee ("Golden Double 32" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI LP(Japan) Ecs 90049 — Peggy Lee ("Best 20" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI CD(Japan) Cp 32 5297 (reissued as Tocp 9068 in 1990) — Peggy Lee ("Best Now"/"Best 20" Series)   (1988)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI CD(Japan) Tocp 7459-7460 — Peggy Lee ("Twin Best Now" Series)   (1992)
d. 76762Master Take (Capitol) Losing My Mind - 2:43(Stephen Sondheim) / arr: Allan A. "Al" Capps
All titles on: CAPITOL 8-track/LP8xt/St 810 — Where Did They Go?   (1971)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 919 2 — MAKE IT WITH YOU / WHERE DID THEY GO   (2008)
World Record Club Licensed LP(New Zealand) 1566 C — Where Did They Go?   


The Where Did They Go? Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 5 and 6, 1971. May 11, 1971.


Personnel And Musical Instruments

1. Correct Instruments
This session's AFM report lists the participating musicians but not the instruments that they played. Therefore, my pairing of instruments and musicians in this session is tentative. Corrections to my educated guesses will be appreciated.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Al Capps
In the back cover of the LP Where Did They Go?, co-conductor Al Capps is credited with this session's arrangements. Capps' authorship is arguably corroborated by the existence of his arrangements of these songs in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. (Since I have not inspected any of the library's arrangements. I am only assuming that they are the same ones used for this session.)


Masters And Sources

1. Master Sequencing
I have entered this session's masters in the same order as they appear in the AFM report. In Capitol's session files, they are listed in ascending numerical order.


Date: April 24, 1972
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #19965

Peggy Lee (ldr), Tom Catalano (pdr), Armin Steiner (eng), Artie Butler (con, p), Larry Carlton, Louis "Louie" Shelton (g), Reinhold Press (b), Unknown (str), Michael Omartian (p), Earl Palmer (d), Gary Coleman, Victor Feldman (per), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 78550Master Take (Capitol) Love Song - 3:22(Lesley Duncan) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL 453439 — {Love Song / Someone Who Cares}   (1972)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 13453 - 13454 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Norma Deloris Egstrom ...]   (1972)
b. 78551-_Master Take (Capitol) When I Found You - 3:23(Mike Randall) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
c. 78551-_Alternate Take (Capitol) When I Found You - 3:18(Mike Randall) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 74179 2 2 — I'M A WOMAN / Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (2004)
d. 78554-_Master Take (Capitol) Someone Who Cares - 3:04(Alex Harvey) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL 453439 — {Love Song / Someone Who Cares}   (1972)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecp 80797 — Peggy Lee On Silver Screen   (1973)
e. 78554-_Alternate Take (Capitol) Someone Who Cares - 3:00(Alex Harvey) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 74179 2 2 — I'M A WOMAN / Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (2004)
f. 78558-_Master Take (Capitol) A Song For You - 4:44(Leon Russell) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 13453 - 13454 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Norma Deloris Egstrom ...]   (1972)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecs 65039/65040 — Peggy Lee ("Golden Double 32" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©EMI's Odeon CS/LP(Spain) 10C 254 086.648 & St 27545 (also 054 086.648) — Peggy Lee ("Con Plumas" Series, Volume XIV)   (1983)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI CD(Japan) Tocp 7459-7460 — Peggy Lee ("Twin Best Now" Series)   (1992)
g. 78558-_Alternate Take (Capitol) A Song For You - 4:38(Leon Russell) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 74179 2 2 — I'M A WOMAN / Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (2004)


The Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 24, 26, 27 and 28, 1972.


Songs

1. "Love Song" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's 69th number to enter Billboard's singles charts made its debut in the Easy Listening chart on the week of October 7, 1972, and stayed for four weeks. Lee's version of "Love Story" peaked at #34; Three Dog Night's single "Black And White" was the chart's top number that week. Her "Love Story" also charted in the Contemporary Adult chart of Canada's RPM Weekly, reaching a #21 peak in the magazine's November 18, 1972 issue. For Lee's next chart entry, see session dated June 1974.


Masters, Issues And Alternate Takes

1. I'm A Woman / Norma Delores Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota [CD]
2. Alternate Takes
The makers of the twofer I'm A Woman / Norma Delores Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota substituted four alternate takes for the master takes that came out in the Capitol LP Norma Delores Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota. The consensus among fans of Lee is that the original takes are vastly superior to the alternates in at least three, maybe all four instances. Furthermore, some tracks ("A Song For You," "Love Song," maybe others) were newly remixed for inclusion in this CD.

The substitution is not acknowledged anywhere in the issue. There was no official explanation for the exclusion of the original takes, neither. One explanatory rumor which has circulated among fans is that the original session tapes could not be found in Capitol's vaults. Hence, the rumor goes, the only alternative was to use an unmixed tape which contained some alternate takes. But this circulating story has proven to be off-base: the album's original masters are definitely extant and well preserved in Capitol's vaults. The other part of the story (i. e., the use of an unmixed tape that contained alternate takes) remains unconfirmed.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Artie Butler
The LP Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota states that Artie Butler arranged and conducted all of its tracks. Arrangements for all of this session's songs are also extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library, and all of them are indeed credited to Butler. Although I have not inspected the library's arrangements, I believe that they are the same ones used at this date.

2. "A Song For You"
In addition to Artie Buttler's arrangement of "A Song For You," Peggy Lee kept in her sheet music library an arrangement of the same song by Bill Holman. Perhaps Holman's version was used for her concert appearances.


Date: April 26, 1972
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #19969

Peggy Lee (ldr), Tom Catalano (pdr), Armin Steiner (eng), Artie Butler (con, p), Larry Carlton, Louis "Louie" Shelton (g), Reinhold Press (b), Unknown (str), Michael Omartian (p), Earl Palmer (d), Gary Coleman, Victor Feldman (per), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 78555Master Take (Capitol) It Changes (The Scenery Changes) (Charlie Brown's Calliope) - 4:10(Richard Sherman, Robert Sherman) / arr: Artie Butler
b. 78557Master Take (Capitol) Superstar - 3:57(Bonnie Bramlett, Leon Russell) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecs 65039/65040 — Peggy Lee ("Golden Double 32" Series)   (1976)
Both titles on: CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 74179 2 2 — I'M A WOMAN / Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (2004)


The Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 24, 26, 27 and 28, 1972.


The 1968-1972 Singles Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates of the 1968-1972 singles sessions: March 18 and March 21, 1968. January 24, 1969. June 1, 1970. And, possibly, this April 26, 1972 date. I suspect that, had Lee continued to be under Capitol contract, the master "It Changes" would have been released on a single, perhaps paired with "Superstar." (Besides the songs recorded during the dates just listed, songs from various 1969-1972 album sessions were also picked for release on singles.)


Arrangements And Arrangers

1. "It Changes"
2. Bill Holman
Peggy Lee kept in her sheet music library two arrangements of "It Changes," one by Artie Buttler and the other by Bill Holman. Perhaps Holman's version was used for her concert appearances.


Date: April 27, 1972
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #19970

Peggy Lee (ldr), Tom Catalano (pdr), Armin Steiner (eng), Artie Butler (con, p), Larry Carlton, Louis "Louie" Shelton (g), Reinhold Press (b), Unknown (str), Michael Omartian (p), Earl Palmer (d), Gary Coleman, Victor Feldman (per), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 78552Master Take (Capitol) Just For A Thrill - 3:23(Lillian Hardin Armstrong, Don Raye) / arr: Artie Butler
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 13453 - 13454 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Norma Deloris Egstrom ...]   (1972)
CAPITOL©EMI's Odeon CS/LP(Argentina) 106083 — Peggy Lee ("Elegidos/Personalidades" Series)   (1979)
CAPITOL Jazz CD7243 8 21204 2 1 — THE BEST OF PEGGY LEE; THE CAPITOL YEARS ("BLUES & JAZZ SESSIONS" SERIES)   (1997)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 32580 2 3 — Peggy Lee Sings The Standards   (2001)
b. 78553Master Take (Capitol) It Takes Too Long To Learn To Live Alone - 3:25(Robert I. Allen, Leon Carr) / arr: Artie Butler
c. 78556Master Take (Capitol) Razor (Love Me As I Am) - 2:49(Jack Schectman) / arr: Artie Butler
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 13453 - 13454 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Norma Deloris Egstrom ...]   (1972)
All titles on: CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 74179 2 2 — I'M A WOMAN / Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (2004)


The Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 24, 26, 27 and 28, 1972.


Personnel And Sources

1. Sources And Discrepancies
For the Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota, I do not count with documentation from AFM. The back of the original LP lists a collective personnel that is also found in the other sources at my reach. Some of the details found in Capitol's session file differ from the details given in Michel Ruppli's Capitol Label Discography. Specifically:

a) The session file lists all but one performance under the same date (April 24, 1972, which is the first of the sessions). Only "I'll Be Seeing You" is listed separately (on April 28, 1972, the last of the sessions). In this discography, I have entered instead the multiple dating supplied by the Capitol Label Discography.

b) The session file lists all performances in sequential master order, whereas the Capitol Label Discography presents them in the order shown herein.

c) Only the Capitol Label Discography provides session numbers for the Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota dates. As previously mentioned, the session file lumps all masters under one date, for which it provides no session number.


Issues And Personnel

1. The Best Of Peggy Lee: The Capitol Years [CD]
2. Victor Feldman
3. Michael Omartian
In the Capitol CD The Best Of Peggy Lee: The Capitol Years, musician Michael Omartian's last name is misspelled as "Omattian."

Moreover, there is a difference between the credit given to Victor Feldman in that CD and the credit that he received in the LP Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota: whereas the CD lists him as playing one specific instrument (vibes), the LP's credit is more wide-ranging (percussion). The LP's credit could be the more appropriate of the two alternatives. A multi-talented musician, Feldman played not only the vibraphone but also conga and piano; therefore, he could very well have played more than just vibes during these dates.


Date: April 28, 1972
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #19971

Peggy Lee (ldr), Tom Catalano (pdr), Armin Steiner (eng), Artie Butler (con, p), Larry Carlton, Louis "Louie" Shelton (g), Reinhold Press (b), Unknown (str), Michael Omartian (p), Earl Palmer (d), Gary Coleman, Victor Feldman (per), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 78559Master Take (Capitol) The More I See You - 1:55(Mack Gordon, Harry Warren) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 13453 - 13454 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Norma Deloris Egstrom ...]   (1972)
CAPITOL©EMI's Bovema CS/LP(Netherlands) 5c 054 85001/ 056 80836 — Peggy Lee; 16 Greatest Hits ("Greatest Hits" Series)   (1976)
b. 78574-_Master Take (Capitol) I'll Be Seeing You - 2:15(Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LP8xt & Tc St 11077 & St 11077 — Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (1972)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" Transcription DiscP 13453 - 13454 — Basic Music Library [6 songs from LP Norma Deloris Egstrom ...]   (1972)
CAPITOL©EMI's Bovema LP(Netherlands) 1A 064 86654 — Grootste Hits (Wereld Sterren) ("Nostalgie Kollektie" Series)   (1983)
c. 78574-_Alternate Take (Capitol) I'll Be Seeing You - 2:22(Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) / arr: Artie Butler
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 74179 2 2 — I'M A WOMAN / Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota   (2004)


The Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 24, 26, 27 and 28, 1972.


Masters And Issues

1. "The More I See You" [Master #78559]
2. "I'll Be Seeing You" [Master #78574]
In the LP Norma Delores Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota, "The More I See You" and "I'll Be Seeing You" are heard together, as a single track with no pause in-between. This powerful two-song track closes the album. Unfortunately, modern-day EMI has taken to the practice of splitting this medley: in various-artists compilations, EMI has released "I'll Be Seeing You" all by itself, thereby diluting the impact of the LP's original concept. (n.b.: I have not listed various compilations in these Capitol session pages. Instead, I have given to such compilations their own separate page.)


Issues

1. Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota [LP]
In various interviews conducted decades after the release of the 1972 album Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota, Peggy Lee lamented the lack of proper promotion and distribution for the record -- a consequence, she asserted, of a new management shuffle at Capitol. If various unconfirmed reports (not from Lee but from other sources) are to be believed, the album was prematurely withdrawn from Capitol's catalogue. (The fact that the singer's association with the label was about to expire could have factored into the alleged withdrawal.) Still further, a Peggy Lee fan who has talked with former EMI employees in the United Kingdom asserts that "the bulk of the print of the original LP was dumped in Europe, the Netherlands to be precise, and was bought in its entirety by a department store chain and retailed for a ridiculous price, the equivalent of what was then US 50¢."

Those reports and Lee's own feelings notwithstanding, the album did receive promotion. An ad placed in Billboard magazine was presumably paid by Capitol itself. The ad showed a photo of the LP's front jacket and, under the photo, the legend "Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota Has Recorded Her Greatest Album, ST-11007."

Additionally, Capitol issued one single from the album. On both sides of its label, the single identifies itself as being from the LP Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota ST 11077. Such an identification qualifies as (indirect) promotion of the album.

The fact that copies of this 1972 piece are still occasionally found at used record stores further suggests that it did receive some amount of distribution, too, however minimal it might have been.

Perhaps the record company did not keep Lee well-informed of the promotional steps which were undertaken. Or maybe she simply wasn't happy with the amount of promotion that the album received. Perhaps her real objection pertained not so much to promotion and distribution as to the alleged withdrawal of the LP.

Sales could have also been hurt by the omission of Lee's professional name from both the ad and the album's jacket. (In the LP release, the name Peggy Lee appears in the vinyl itself, but not in the front cover. Similarly, the 8-track cartridge does not feature the singer's professional name in the front, though it can found on the spine of the cartridge's label. The cassette does have the name Peggy Lee out front, in the cover, but I only have evidence for the release of this particular format in Australia -- no evidence, so far, of an United States counterpart. For pictures of all three formats, scroll down to the bottom of this page.) Some potential buyers might have not readily identified the singer as Peggy Lee. (Her professional name only appears inside, on the vinyl's label. In the United Kingdom, EMI took care of the omission of Lee's name. According to William Naylor, who was working at record shop in the UK at the time: "after the initial shipment, subsequent copies were stickered with a small label saying simply 'Peggy Lee'." )

At any rate, the points made above prove that Capitol certainly made some promotional efforts on behalf of Lee's last album for the company. They also suggest that, up until the aforementioned corporate shuffle, the record company had still thought of Lee as an artist whose product was worth advertising.


GENERAL NOTES

Capitol Records And Peggy Lee's Career, 1968-1972

Despite the succession of corporate and artistic upheavals that Capitol Records underwent during the years under discussion, Peggy Lee's career remained stable for the duration of her contract with the company. Far from sinking into obscurity, the veteran (50 years old in 1970, and a professional singer since she was 14) actually reached one of its various peaks midway through this period, thanks to the hit "Is That All There Is?" and to her Grammy award as best female vocalist of 1969. Sadly, three years later Lee and Capitol would terminate an association which had begun 28 years earlier.

The Capitol world of late 1960s and early 1970s was permeated by change, instability and, judging from various first-person accounts, dissension. Worth quoting at length are the recollections of Steve Miller (the rock musician whose band reached the top charts with their Capitol hits "The Joker," "Rock'n Me," and "Abracadabra"). He shared these memories with journalist and former Capitol Editorial Director Stephen K. Peeples, who included them in a noteworthy obituary and tribute to Capitol record engineer John Palladino. The recollections belongs to a period that followed the successful negotiation of a record contract between The Steve Miller Band's manager Harvey Kornspan and the Capitol company's then-president, Alan Livingston.

{beginning of quote} ... [O]n the first day I showed up to discuss recording my first album after I had signed my contract ... the year was 1967 ... I was very excited to get started and thought I would be getting a lot of help from my new mentors. It turned out I was walking into a political can of ambition. The engineering staff hated each other and anyone from San Francisco. Everyone was trying to move up in the department and get rich quick. Every one of the newly signed bands was fighting for resources and the junior A&R staff at Capitol was trying to steal the best bands and manage them. They wanted your publishing and to cut your tracks with their own pals. It was a quick education. 

{Steve Miller quote continued} I tried to record at Capitol but the engineering staff wouldn’t book my sessions until midnight.  They didn’t want me to be seen at the Tower.  The first night we set up starting at midnight and finally began recording at 4 a.m. I had to stop an hour later. I was sound asleep.  The next night they made us move all our set-up gear to a different studio, re-set it and re-tune in the drums, and as soon as we were ready to go the entire engineering staff walked out. They just disappeared.  It was a horrible thing to do to a young artist on his first sessions. I was broke, inexperienced and this was my first set of sessions for Capitol. They completely humiliated me and wasted my resources and time. I had brought all my gear and the band from San Francisco and was staying in a hotel with 10 people on the tab.

John [Palladino] was the first guy I called at 4 a.m. I offered to return the newly signed contract I had just spent nine months negotiating with three major labels for. I couldn’t get out of my newly signed contract. The guy who signed me, Allen [sic; Alan] Livingston was then fired.  John was amazing. He was the guy assigned to bring me back into the fold. He was a total gentleman. He calmed me down and offered to help me find a better studio. I ended up going to London to record ... John and I eventually became good friends and worked on many projects together.  John had a complicated position. He needed his job and he had to take care of a lot of egos who were fighting each other to run the company, people who were careless and dangerous for [an artist’s] career.  At the same time, he had to keep the artists in line. So he was the man in the middle who kept the whole company all together — without threatening anyone’s position. He really needed to keep his job and he didn’t take sides and seemed like the only sane person in the company. It was quite a lesson in corporate politics. {end of quote}

"I remember when I was a kid and signed with Capitol Records," Miller added more recently, for an interview published in the April 15, 2016 issued of Billboard magazine. "I went in there," he continued, "and the engineering staff walked out because they didn't like me because I was a hippie [laughs]. That was my first experience. I was thrown into a pool of sharks, where all the bands were fighting for the same resources, managers were wheeling and dealing, and it was a lot more than I thought." Such was then, the internal politics at the label's LA offices around 1967, as perceived by the then-young (22 years old) but forever outspoken Miller.

The years 1967 and 1968 brought two momentous events to Capitol Records. The first held more of a psychological than a tangible impact. In early 1967, still-active founding founder Glenn Wallichs was diagnosed with terminal bone cancer. The painful, debilitating disease kept him hospitalized for many months of that year, but he would still keep enduring it for the next four years. The other event in question had a more concrete, bureaucratic and financial impact. In 1968, a merger with Audio Devices, a tape and recording manufacturer, resulted in the formation of Capitol Industries, Inc. The latter was a management holding company. This new organizational state of affairs meant a dramatic reduction in EMI's Capitol holdings: from 98% to 68%.

Capitol's merger and Wallichs' illness were catalysts for the state of flux that would soon prevail at the company's executive offices. Before 1968, Capitol had had just two executive presidents over a 25-year span: Glenn Wallichs (1942-1960, though initially he exerted his executive power under other professional titles) and Alan Livingston (1961-1967). Post-merger, Capitol wounded up with a succession of short-lasting presidents and, in a nutshell, a game of musical chairs. First Livingston moved to Capitol Industries while Stanley Gortikov filled his vacated position at Capitol Records. Livingston lasted just a year in his new position, which was then taken over by Gortikov. After a couple more years, Gortikov resigned. Salvatore Iannucci went through a similar trajectory, moving from president of Capitol Records, to president of Capitol Industries, to a firing or resignation. The executive door stopped revolving in 1971, when Bhaskar Menon, an EMI executive with previous offices in London and India, was appointed as president of Capitol Industries, allegedly on Wallichs' recommendation. For the July-September quarter that followed Menon's appointment to the presidency in April, Capitol reported a $76,000 profit, which was deemed cause for celebration, and would be repeated for the next quarters. Menon went on to make drastic changes across the board and, by enlisting two British bands in particular (Pink Floyd, Paul McCartney And Wings), he brought back to the company a new period of enduring commercial success. He stayed with the EMI family until 1990 (though he too underwent difficult times for some years, and is said to have been fired in May of 1988 from the position that he was then holding, as Head of EMI Music).

As executives had come and gone or changed chairs, a variety of marketing strategies and business upgrades had been put into action. Around 1968, Capitol vice-president Karl Engemann headed an ongoing initiative to actively recruit independent producers into the record company. According to Engemann, the goal was to "broaden the number of people we have to depend on for hits." By the end of the year, the combined number of in-house and independent producers had reached a high of 17. New faces were naturally brought into other business areas as well. For instance, record engineer Bob Norberg joined in 1967. (He began his Capitol tenure doing analog masters for acts such as The Beach Boys; he was still with the company in the 1990s, though by then he had shifted to digital remastering, and to Capitol's back catalogue.)

Another program, implemented around 1970, aimed at putting together solid, cohesive albums through closer coordination and cooperation between the company's departments. The plan called for a coordinated trajectory that started at the label's art department -- where the relevance of album cover artwork was being emphasized more than ever before -- and continued through seven other departments, including sales and marketing.

At a sales convention in 1970, president Salvatore Iannucci further stated that "Capitol's basic A&R approach now puts emphasis on obtaining product from the best producing talent available whether inside or outside the company." He also asserted that "the principal thrust of this company ... must be the idea of new artist development." Iannucci went on to clarify that by 'new' he meant "performers who are already on the label but who have not yet achieved star or superstar status." Among the acts he named were Grand Funk Railroad, Freda Payne, Candi Staton, Badfinger, Pink Floyd, and Steve Miller.

The (re-)orientation toward newly developing acts was only one out of many innovations and renovations taking place inside the company. Some of the implemented changes were definitely needed and worked out for the better; others did not turn out too well. Capitol's recording studios were re-equipped with solid-state gear which seemed to enhance the sound of the musical instrumentation, yet failed to capture the full range of the human voice to the commendable degree that the old gear had. The old tube gear, which had proved so effective in maintaining a balance between vocals and instruments, was discarded. Eight-track tape machines had also been installed into the engineering rooms, making the former 4-track machines a thing of the past. Overdubbing became a fairly common activity soon thereafter. Modernization was the name of the game.

Even the company's memorable logo was substituted for a simple, less appealing one. The former logo had consisted of an oval which bore a two or three-tier design: the words "Capitol Records" and, above them, a dome surrounded by stars. Introduced in 1969, the quadrangular new logo contained instead a childishly drawn 45-rpm single, and the word "Capitol" below it. As already intimated, the quality of the album artwork changed, too -- not always for the better.

Also altered was the sequencing of catalogue numbers. In 1968, when Capitol's line of popular releases reached the number 2999, it did not continue into the 3000s. Instead, the company reverted to numbers in the 100s. (This "reversion" procedure might have been borne out of a need to avoid duplication, since numbers in the 3000s were probably used for some of the other album series that Capitol concurrently carried.) Tellingly, The Beatles' White Album inaugurated this "numerical rebirth," as Capitol #101. (One of Peggy Lee's own LPs became Capitol #105.) Still further, the new numerical sequencing went hand in hand with the decision to release LPs in stereophonic sound only; monophonic sound was no longer issued by American Capitol.

Obviously, the changes extended to Capitol's established roster. The label's vintage vocalists were ordered to cover the successful ditties of the day, and dissuaded from recording tried-and-true standards of olden days. Witness, for instance, the case of Mel Tormé, whose manager struck a two-album deal with Capitol in 1969. Mister Velvet Fog was assigned to cover the likes of "Take A Letter, Maria" and "Sunshine Superman." He recorded them to little success and, worse yet, to no continuation of his contract.

Peggy Lee was an altogether different case. Peers of hers who had also been under contract with Capitol since the 1940s had fallen by the wayside in the mid-1960s. Their contracts had not been renewed or, in one or two cases, they had simply decided to abandon the record business. But EMI held onto Lee, probably because she was still generating radio airplay and a relative measure of success in sales.

For the year 1967, Peggy Lee had actually recorded relatively little: just one album and one single. Yet that one single had still made the top 10 of the Adult Contemporary chart. Even more notably, Lee's top 10 tune was not a ballad or a standard but a brand new song ("I Feel It") which she had interpreted in a contemporaneous rock pop vein.

The vocalist was probably expected to do fine when, in 1968, the company's executives dictated a change of record producer for her. Lee was paired with Koppelman & Rubin, a then-young team of independent producers with a successful track record that included hit smashes by the Turtles, The Lovin' Spoonful, and Tim Hardin, among others. Initially, Peggy Lee was probably upset by the removal of her decade-long producer Dave Cavanaugh, whom she also considered a beloved friend. However, once the artist actually listened to the musical settings that Koppelman & Rubin had devised for her, her reaction was enthusiastic.

This partnership was short-lived, though. The one album that Koppelman & Rubin and Lee did together was not officially released, reportedly due to Lee's dissatisfaction with the quality of its audio. (It had been recorded live in concert, a practice which always poses serious sonic challenges.) As for the two singles that Lee did under the direction of Koppelman & Rubin, they were folk-rock covers of hits by artists whose catalogue the producers represented. Both singles strike me as excellent folk-rock pieces with hit potential, and yet neither made the charts. Nowadays copies of those 45-rpm discs are, in comparison to Lee's other singles, extremely hard to come by. Their scarcity leads me to suspect that, as with the album, promotion and distribution for them was very limited. If we might further speculate, it might also be that the singer chose to not do much promotional support for these collaborations, which took place in March and April 1968. Disagreements between the vocalist, the record company and/or the producers could have happened, creating something of an impasse. Some difficulty (or a certain degree of resistance on the singer's part?) is suggested by the fact that the album, recorded in April, had to wait until November for its (aborted) release.

Curiously, Lee does not seem to have recorded any additional masters for the rest of 1968. The reasons for this absence from the studio are unknown. Plausible explanations, such as illness or a personal choice to take a vacation from the world of music do not seem to apply: through the year, she still made concert and television appearances. Was Lee perhaps dissatisfied with the new direction in which Capitol was leading her, and thus reticent to record more than what her contract required? Could be. After all, the alterations that Capitol had imposed on her recording routine went beyond the imposition of a new producing team and the request of a high ratio of contemporaneous hit covers. It has also meant the artist's full loss of control over certain aspects of the recording process, such as the orchestration of the music. In a word or two, she might have not been happy. On this matter, the public record remains mum, however. (But perhaps the explanation to the mystery posed at the start of this paragraph is simpler: Lee might have not recorded anything else because of the aforementioned live album, whose prospective release was delayed for months. She and all the involved parties might have been waiting for its release before doing any additional studio work.)

Whichever the case might have been in 1968, Lee was fully back in business right at the start of 1969. She was then paired with Phil Wright, another independent producer who, in late 1968, had come from Chicago to join the Capitol family. Lee did two albums in 1969, both of them produced by this r&b specialist. There were also four successful singles from those two albums. The earliest of the singles contained Lee's cover of the Blood, Sweat and Tears hit "Spinning Wheel," which she took to the top 25 of Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart. She was thus still proving her good aim as an interpreter of contemporaneous pop.

Peggy Lee's musical instincts paid off handsomely once again when she not only saw a potential hit in Leiber & Stoller's "Is That All There Is?" but also requested Randy Newman, then an emerging artist, as the best choice to arrange and conduct the song. In order to record the number, she had to argue long and hard with Capitol's brass, which argued that the song was too out-there and too long to have any commercial appeal.

Receiving permission to record the song had already been enough of a struggle, but talking Capitol into releasing it as a single seemed far more of an uphill battle. Yet the ever wily Lee got her way thanks to a negotiation which ultimately benefitted everybody. It so happened that Capitol was eager to book some of its new rock-pop acts in an evening variety show whose host was, on the other hand, more interested in having Peggy Lee as a guest. When Capitol asked Lee to guest on the show so that the newer acts could also be taken in, the singer retorted that she would do it only if they released a single of the song that she would perform in the show: "Is That All There Is?" Capitol agreed.

After Lee's TV performance, public request for the 45-rpm disc grew fast. The single ended up topping Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart, nearly cracking the top 10 of that magazine's Hot 100 chart (it did crack competitor Cash Box's top 10) and, in 1970, earning Lee a Grammy for Best Female Singer of 1969. Capitol proceeded to have Lee record an album that naturally contained the song and bore it as its title. This album peaked at #55 in the Top 200 album chart, and generated two other singles that also made the Adult Contemporary chart. For an artist who was about 50 years old, and whose earliest bestsellers dated from the 1940s, this surely was no bad outcome at all.

Peggy Lee's reputation among insiders and cognoscenti remained solid during the 1968-1972 period. She continued to earn raves for her concert work, in particular. On TV, she was treated like a grand dame of song. In 1969, the N.E.T network filmed a documentary that the network entitled The World Of Peggy Lee. There were also 1969 and 1970 one-hour specials, both of them conceived in a "high art" mode. For those specials, she shared starring bill with men who were also critically acclaimed -- Anthony Quinn in one special, Johnny Cash in the other. In 1971, she had the honor of being handpicked to sing "The Lord's Prayer" at the funeral of one of the greatest icons of twentieth-century jazz and pop music, Louis Armstrong. (More generally, perception of Lee as a consummate professional -- or, alternatively, as a perfectionist -- had begun in the mid-1960s, and during the late 1960s it colored most of the critical commentary about her.)

But among casual listeners and even some fans from this time period, opinions about Lee oscillated from positive to dismissive. Some of her frequent TV guest appearances were met with a mixed reaction, and ditto for her recorded output. A generational gap was behind much of the negative criticism. Older audiences bemoaned Lee's alleged "selling out" and "pandering" to the musical trends of the times. On the other side of the coin, younger audiences were derisive of the 50-year-old's supposed "attempts to get with it." Yet Lee was proceeding just as she had in the previous decades of her long career as a vocalist: combining the old with the new, trying to show that there was worth in both, and perceiving all of it as part of a musical continuum. Although Capitol certainly dictated the very high ratio of new songs in her albums from this period, there is no denying that Lee herself embraced the material and welcomed the opportunity to reshape it. She also expressed in no uncertain terms her approval of some of the times' up-and-coming singer-songwriters -- of whom she was a major, significant predecessor, though never acknowledged as such.

Although the last three years of Lee's contract with Capitol did not maintain the high level of success that had befallen on her in 1969, they were by no means barren ones. Her 1970 and 1971 Capitol projects were not movers and shakers, but neither were they failures. The two albums that she recorded during those two years (one with Phil Wright again, the other with yet another independent producer, Snuff Garrett) did make Billboard's album chart. From each album, one single was released, and those singles made the Adult Contemporary chart, too. (As for sales numbers, I do not have access to such information. I do not imagine that they sold well, however.)

She also remained a presence in the rarefied world of top award entertainment. In 1970, her name was among not only the winners at the Grammy ceremony but also the interpreters of Oscar-nominated songs. "Pieces Of Dreams" was the title of both the film and the song, which she had recorded for the Michel Legrand movie soundtrack. The film did not fare particularly well but its music did. As interpreted by Lee, "Pieces Of Dreams" went on to garner an Oscar nomination for Best Song of the year.

Still, for those last three years, there had been no success of the magnitude of the 1969 smash "Is That All There Is?." What's more, her final Capitol LP (1972) did not chart at all. Whichever the causes for its underperformance (allegations of poor distribution on Capitol's part have been made, though not convincingly), the album at least spawned a single that did make the top 40 of the Adult Contemporary chart. (Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota is actually cited by many of Lee's fans as one of her best crafted, most satisfactory works on record. The album's producer, Artie Butler, earned Lee's admiration for his superior craftsmanship. The notion of a sequel was enthusiastically entertained. Unfortunately, there were to be no subsequent Capitol recordings for the singer, nor did Butler's and Lee's plans ever materialize.)

I have not been able to determine the reason(s) for the parting between Capitol Records and Peggy Lee in a definitive, precise manner. It is very possible that Capitol's new management (i.e., the aforementioned Bhaskar Menon, and company) decided against a renewal of her contract. Lee's only public comment about the situation was a mere allusion to a "management shuffle" that was taking place at Capitol during this time. She did not make any other public comments about the alleged shuffle, but I presume it to have started with Menon's appointment in 1971 and to be reflected in the 1972 change of the holding company's name, from Capitol Industries, Inc. to Capitol Industries-EMI, Inc. This change was probably triggered by an increase of EMI's Capitol holdings (from 68% in 1968 to 70.84% in 1972). Old-guard executives from which Lee could have drawn some measure of support had died or left the company long before she did. Retired label founder Glenn Wallichs, on whom Lee had successfully relied just two years earlier (when she asked him to rule over Capitol's refusal to let her record the song "Is That All There is?") had died on December 23, 1971.

According to Will Friedwald in his essay for the set The Singles Collection, "[b]y then Lee was practically the only non-rock act on the label." [n.b.: It is worth noting that Nancy Wilson was another non-rock act still with Capitol at that time. She did stay with the label until 1980. That having bee said, Friedwald's point can still be said to stand. Miss Wilson sang jazz and standards only during the first decade of her contract with Capitol, which had begun in 1959. During the 1970s, Wilson went on to record chiefly rhythm & blues, top 40 pop and dance music. Tennessee Ernie Ford was another non-rock act who remained with the company into the 1970s; his output consisted chiefly of country material.] Continues Friedwald: "[by the early 1970s], the famous Capitol studios sometimes looked like an all-night commune. The label was also having serious financial problems such that it tried to get out of its contract to do the original Broadway cast album of Stephen Sondheim's Follies, and when it couldn't, exercised its right to release an incomplete version." (For her part, health problems had forced Lee to lie low during this period. In November 1971, she had had her second serious bout with pneumonia. It had required hospitalization and, subsequently, medically ordered changes in both her lifestyle and her work schedule.)

Financial worries are indeed the likeliest cause for the termination of Lee's contract with Capitol Records. After going up from $153.1 million to $178.1 during the last two years of the 1960s, the company's sales had taken a dive, down to $95.4 million in the fiscal year 1970 and $85 million in 1971. Shares had plunged accordingly. The side effects of a weak economy were among the cited reasons for the company's financial woes: a marked increase in returns, a reduction of inventory at the retail level, an increase in operating costs, customers' delay in bill payment, etc. Additional reasons included overproduction (particularly of tape cartridges and other formats, most of them under the aegis of sister company Audio Devices), the departure of the commercially successful Beach Boys and also the breakup of The Beatles, which had accounted for about 35% of the company's record sales from 1965 to 1970. (Each of The Beatles had continued to sell well as solo acts, but not in the same range as the group -- not at least during the early 1970s.) Labels such as Motown, Columbia and A&M had proven successful competitors that were taking a big bite of the record consumer's market, too. Moreover, Capitol's decision to hire independent producers had not proven financially sound, either. In the words of company president Gortikov, "our costs are rising, and we obtain lower unit margins on records because so many of the recordings are supplied by independent artists and production companies which earn higher royalty rates and guarantees than [back] when the lion's share of recordings came from in-house producers and from home-grown artists." According to Joe Smith, who would later become Capitol-EMI Music's president and CEO, "the scene on Vine Street was constantly changing. There were runs of great chart success and longer dry spells. Somewhere, somehow, the company had lost its way creatively. Periodic upheavals in London [had taken] their toll on the company's ability to compete in a fast-moving talent field," too.

Conversely, Capitol's financial decline ended up having a direct effect not just in the United States but also in the United Kingdom, where EMI saw its shares drop several points. Among the drastic changes made as a result was the trimming of Capitol's staff by 208% (1970-1971). Also, as already mentioned, a London-based EMI executive was brought in to preside over Capitol in 1971. It was within this financially conscious environment that Peggy Lee's contract with Capitol happened to expire (1972), and was not renewed. Around this time, there was a drastic reduction in the numbers of both the A&R staff and the artist roster (the latter consisting of 247 acts at the time).

The company and the artist went their separate ways, and both lived on. From 1972 to 1976, EMI purchased all of Capitol's shares. EMI Music Worldwide was created in 1978; next, in 1979, EMI merged with Thorn Electrical Industries to create Thorn EMI, Inc. (That same year, there was a special Peggy Lee anthology released by Capitol. Titled Miss Peggy Lee Sings The Songs Of Cy Coleman, it had been put together by Lee's former producer Dave Cavanaugh, who was apparently in charge of special projects at that point in time.) As for the artist, at first she spent some time pursuing various projects, both musical and non-musical: painting for the purpose of an art exhibition, acquiring the film rights to a novel, setting up her own production company, and managing her music publishing company. She also toyed with the ideas of writing children's books and setting up her own line of clothes. But by 1974 Lee was again in the recording studio, and for the next decades she would continue to be in demand as a nightclub performer.


Popularity: Peggy In The Polls

Peggy Lee had ranked #7 in Downbeat's 1967 female singers poll.

Lee should have not been expected to make that poll in 1968. During that year's first half, she had released only a couple of singles, both in the folk-rock vein, and then nothing else for the rest of 1968. Neither single had made a dent in the charts. (I actually wonder if those singles were truly commercially released, because I have seen only promotional copies of them.) For the rest of the year, there were no further singles and no original albums. (One album was planned for release, but cancelled at the last minute.)

And yet, on the strength of loyal fans and also thanks to periodic visibility through both television and concerts, Lee still ranked #11 in Downbeat's 1968 poll. She received 80 votes. Just one notch above her, cracking the top 10 with 97 votes, was Barbra Streisand. Below them at #12 with 72 votes was Grace Slick.

The following year (1969), Peggy Lee claimed the #10 slot with 111 votes. Slick also went up, with 152 votes (#9), but Streisand fell down to #14.

In 1970, Lee fell down to #12. Right below her were Betty Carter, Anita O'Day, Barbra Streisand, Joni Mitchell, and Tina Turner. Above them were Dionne Warwick at #11 and Laura Nyro at #10.

In 1971, Lee fell further down, to #16, in a tie with Joni Mitchell (59 votes). Right above them with just one more vote (60), was Jeanne Lee. Ella Fitzgerald had finally been dethroned from the top position. Roberta Flack achieved that feat.

Peggy Lee did not make Downbeat's poll for the year in which her contract with Capitol ended (1972), nor in ensuing years.


Statistics: Total Number Of Peggy Lee Masters

This discographical page shows a total of 93 masters and 9 alternate takes, all of them recorded for Capitol Records between 1968 and 1972. Excluded from the 93-master count are two additional masters about which too little is known. (The titles of that session's songs are unknown. The tentative date is early April of 1971.)

The 93 masters include 19 titles listed as live performances, all from 1968 concerts at the Copacabana Club in New York. A dozen of those tracks were originally issued on LP. Despite the file's statement, the live quality of those performances remains a matter of contention. It is clear that, as in many other LPs from this period in time, the applause of Two Shows Nightly was artificially created in the studio, probably because the mikes had trouble picking it up at the live venue. It is less clear if, due to unsuccessful microphone pickup, some of the performances had to be recreated in the studio (or maybe at the live venue itself, without the regular audience).

13 of the 93 masters listed in this page remain unissued. Unfortunately, the majority of them (9, to be exact) are believed to be permanently lost: "Daydream," "Paradise," "Don't Speak," "We're Gonna Make It," and 1968 versions of "Trav'lin' Light," "Why Don't You Do Right?," "Big Spender," "Fever," and "Lonesome Road." Believed to be lost as well, though never given a master number and thus excluded from this discography's database, is a version of "Long Gone." (For more details about "Long Gone," see notes under session dated October 15, 1969.) As for the other 4 unissued masters, four of them are titles that Lee remade in subsequent (or in related) sessions, and which might thus qualify as rejected masters: "(All Of A Sudden) My Heart Sings," "Me And My Shadow," "Passenger Of The Rain," and "The No-Color Time Of The Day."

Of the nine alternate tracks listed in this page, two are versions of "Love Story," one unissued and the other apparently meant for radio airplay only; both might be edits of the released version. Similarly, there are two masters of "Is That All There Is?", which might or might not be mere edits of the commercially issued version. The fifth alternate take ("Spinning Wheel") has been available on an 8-track various-artists compilation.

The remaining four takes were issued in the EMI twofer I'm A Woman / Norma Deloris Egstrom From Jamestown, North Dakota. They are part of the twofer's second half, Norma Deloris and have generated controversy because the CD uses them as substitutes of the master takes which were originally released on LP. In the assessment of most fans who have heard both the original LP and the reissue CD, the master takes are the superior versions. (Additional takes of many of Peggy Lee's masters are known to exist in the vaults, but no systematic listening of them has ever been made.)


Sessions Reported: 29

Performances Reported: 104

Unique Songs Reported: 91

Unique Issues Reported: 110