Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
The Capitol Years, Part IV (1957-1959)

by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Sep 18, 2017


PRELIMINARY NOTES




The Peggy Lee Look

Images: a photographic showcase of Peggy Lee during the three years to be discussed in this page.  Both above and down below, each pictorial row starts out with a photo from 1957, moves on to a 1958 picture, and ends with a 1959 shot. (Evidence corroborating these dates exists for the 1957 photographs; the dates assigned to the other images are estimates of mine.) Please note that this page is currently under construction: I am currently halfway through the process of adding pictures to its sections.

Peggy Lee's Recording Career, 1957-1959

Having spent the bulk of her solo,  post-canary career at Capitol Records, Peggy Lee considered that company her alma mater.  She worked with Capitol for two long periods which were separated by a very rewarding five-year stay at Decca Records.  The first Capitol period began in January of 1944 and concluded in February of 1952, thereby consisting of a seven-year total.  The second period had its start in April 2, 1957 and came to its close in April 28, 1972 (15 years).  That 22-year total grants Peggy Lee the all-time longevity award among Capitol female artists, and comfortably places her (as well as latecomer Nancy Wilson) within a top ten filled almost entirely with male acts.

The present discographical page covers the first three years of Lee's second Capitol period.  A note at the end of the page offers an overview of Lee's recording activity during this sub-period (1957-1959).  The same note supplies a tabulation of this page's 101 masters and alternate takes, plus trivia such as Lee's placement in Downbeat polls from 1957 to 1959.  As for Lee's Grammy nominations within the years under discussion, specifics can be found under the relevant sessions, which range from the date at which she recorded the song "Fever" (May 19, 1958) to one of the dates dedicated to the album Latin Ala Lee! (August 14, 1959). 


Suggestions, Recommendations And Technicalities

Viewers looking for CD recommendations should pay attention to items whose titles are typed in uppercase and boldface.  (Note also that, under each song, the listing of releases has been arranged chronologically, by year of release.) In addition, you may want to consult this page (section I). 

My recommendations take into consideration both sound quality and track rarity.  Ideally, a recommended issue should rank high on both areas.  However, in some cases the rarity of the tracks have granted recommended status to a collection with middling sound quality; RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES and MISS PEGGY LEE (CDs #3 & #4) are the most notable examples.  

As for the blue arrowheads that are periodically found through the page, click on them if you want to see a full list of issues -- LPs, CDs, etc. -- containing any given Peggy Lee performance.  (I have aimed at listing every single issue in existence, with the following exceptions:  various-artists compilations, foreign editions of domestic issues, and MP3 files. The first two categories are covered separately, within the miscellaneous section of this bio-discography.  As for the MP3 category, I have chosen to make very limited mention of such a format in my work; I consider it a non-physical configuration of inherently poor sound quality and ephemeral issue production.)






Date: April 2, 1957 (8:30 p.m. - 12:00 m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session CSD #E25

Peggy Lee (ldr), Voyle Gilmore (pdr), Frank Sinatra (con), Buddy Collette, Harry Klee (as), Warren "Champ" Webb, James Williamson (ts), Tommy Pederson aka Pullman Pederson (tb), James "Jim" Decker, Sinclair Lott (frh), Juan Tizol (vtb), George Roberts (bt), Nick Bonney (g), Max K. Bennett (b), Lou Levy (p), Stella Castellucci (hrp), Lou Singer (d), Victor Arno, Victor Bay, Alex Beller, Harold Dicterow, David Frisina, Henry Hill, Alex Murray, Erno Neufeld, Eudice Shapiro, Marshall Sosson (vn), Alvin Dinkin, Maxine Johnson, Barbara Simons (vl), Ennio Bolognini, Victor Gottlieb, Edgar Lustgarten, Kurt Reher (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. E 16791-6Master Take (Capitol) He's My Guy - 4:11(Gene DePaul, Don Raye) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 2 2864 — The Man I Love, Part 2    (1957)
CAPITOL EP(France) 4 864 — Peggy Lee [aka That's All]    (1957)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/LP(United Kingdom) Caps __/1006 (also reissued by Emi as Vine 1020) — Songs For My Man   (1977)
Capitol©EMI's Axis CS/LP(Australia) Tc.Axis 6329 / Axis 6329 — Songs For My Man   (1977)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 4 97143 2 8 — C'est Magnifique   (1998)
b. E 16792-4Master Take (Capitol) Something Wonderful - 3:16(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 864 — The Man I Love, Part 1   (1957)
c. E 16793-6Master Take (Capitol) Please, Be Kind - 4:14(Saul Chaplin, Sammy Cahn) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 2 2864 — The Man I Love, Part 2    (1957)
CAPITOL EP(France) 4 864 — Peggy Lee [aka That's All]    (1957)
CAPITOL EP(Japan) 7EP 68 — The Man I Love   (1957)
Longines Symphonette Society Licensed LPSl 5501 — Peggy Lee / Ella Fitzgerald (Zenith Presents Encore; Great Artists Of Our Time, Volume VI)   (1972)
Alto Take: 2 Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Aln 1907 — Fever! The Very Best Of Peggy Lee    (2008)
Nova AP Music Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Aupcd 4012 — Fever; The Best Of Peggy Lee ("The Ultimate 101 Collection" Series)   (2014)
d. E 16794-4Master Take (Capitol) The Man I Love - 3:44(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 864 — The Man I Love, Part 1   (1957)
CAPITOL EP(Japan) 7EP 68 — The Man I Love   (1957)
CAPITOL©EMI Bovema LP(Netherlands) 4C 064 82274 — Rendez-Vous With Peggy Lee   (1975)
All titles on: CAPITOL LPT 864 — The Man I Love   (1957)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt 925 [mono] /St 925 [reprocessed stereo] — The Man I Love   (1970)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPDf 518 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — The Folks Who Live On The Hill [reissue of The Man I Love, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)




The Man I Love Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 2, 4 and 8, 1957.


Photos

Above: original Capitol US LP T-864 (1957) and Japanese EMI-Toshiba CD Tocj-9467 (2002). I should take this opportunity to point out that the American LP is listed in the sessionography above, but the Japanese CD is listed nowhere. The reason for the omission of the CD is that this sessionography focuses on original issues and rarities. "Straight" foreign reissue such as the Japanese CD have been excluded. (By "straight," I mean a reissue that has the exact same tracks and front cover as the original American album. Herein, I have listed only reissues that have either different artwork or bonus tracks.)

Straight foreign reissues are not entirely ignored in this discography, however. For coverage of them, consult the Pictorial Capitol Albums page. (Also, please click above, on the blue arrowheads, if you want to take a look at a series of album listings that are currently invisible to the eye.)

Below: two shots from these April 1957 sessions. Peggy Lee is seen in an isolation booth, consulting with both Nelson Riddle (first picture) and Frank Sinatra (second picture).


Personnel

1. Frank Sinatra
For her comeback to Capitol Records, Peggy Lee joined forces with long-time friend Frank Sinatra, who was then at the height of his popularity as a recording act. In these April 1957 sessions, Sinatra unofficially took on the role of producer. Officially, he was the conductor of all twelve performances.

Peggy Lee frequently discussed the scope of Sinatra's involvement in the production of the sessions and in the resulting album, which was aptly entitled The Man I Love. The following comments have been pieced together from various sources, including Lee's autobiography: "He was my neighbor then, and came over and said, let's do an album ... That was Frank's idea, the whole thing. It was his entire production. He came over with a list of about 40 songs, and they were all excellent songs -- gems, you know -- and said, Just choose from this ... Bill Miller came over and set all the keys with me. Then Frank hired Nelson Riddle to write those lovely arrangements .... And then he had a beautiful orchestra. I thought that album probably would never pay for itself. But I always thought at the time, it doesn't make any difference; this is just so much fun .... And Frank did conduct ... he was following the score and he knew every note in there ... Frank thought of everything to the last detail, including putting menthol in my eyes so I'd have a misty look in the cover photograph ..."

The Man I Love was Sinatra's third experience as an album conductor. His first try had been Frank Sinatra Conducts The Music Of Alec Wilder, a set of instrumentals which Columbia Records released in 1946. His second try happened ten years later (1956), when he conducted the very first sessions held at the Capitol Tower. Capitol Records released the fruits of those sessions in the LP Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems Of Color, also a set of instrumentals. One year later, Sinatra chose Peggy Lee as the very first vocalist for whom he conducted an album.

Following the Man I Love album sessions, Sinatra would eventually embark in four more conducting projects. The next of them took place in 1959, when he conducted the Sleep Warm album sessions for Dean Martin, another friend.






Record Labels

1. Essex And Capitol
In her autobiography, Peggy Lee writes that the album The Man I Love was "first released on Frank's Essex label, which was a subsidiary of Capitol Records, and later the album was released on Capitol." The various album copies that I have inspected do bear the Capitol logo on the cover and, on the vinyl itself, the legend "manufactured for Essex Productions, Inc." Other than that legend, the albums do not identify themselves as Essex releases, however.

Essex Productions had been formed by Sinatra in 1956. Beginning with one of his sessions from January 1956, Sinatra's own masters for Capitol bear the E prefix, which stands for Essex Productions. This E also occurs in all masters from Peggy Lee's sessions for The Man I Love. Moreover, each of the Lee album sessions are labeled "CSD," a Capitol code for custom-made recordings.

In his book Sinatra! The Song Is You, Will Friedwald quotes a statement from former Capitol president Alan Livingston, to the effect that Essex was "purely a paper deal for tax purposes." More pointedly, Livingston adds that "[w]e still owned every Sinatra record made at Capitol, and in perpetuity." Sinatra probably had a different perspective on the matter, as suggested by comments that he made to the trade press over the years. Mr. Chairman of the Board maintained that Essex was a "full-fledged independent record company" and that Capitol's involvement was just as a distributor, rather than as an owner. Peggy Lee's above-quoted comment was probably based on information that Sinatra had given her.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. "Something Wonderful"
2. Peter Matz
3. Eddie Karam
In addition to Nelson's Riddle's arrangement of this session's performance of "Something Wonderful," Peggy Lee kept in her library of music scores two other arrangements of this song, one by Peter Matz and the other by Eddie Karam.


Date: April 4, 1957 (8:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session CSD #E26

Peggy Lee (ldr), Voyle Gilmore (pdr), Frank Sinatra (con), Buddy Collette, Harry Klee (as), Warren "Champ" Webb (ts), Joe Koch (bar), Harry "Sweets" Edison, Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (t), Tommy Pederson aka Pullman Pederson (tb), James "Jim" Decker, Vincent DeRosa (frh), Juan Tizol (vtb), George Roberts (bt), Nick Bonney (g), Max K. Bennett (b), Lou Levy (p), Stella Castellucci (hrp), Lou Singer (d), Victor Arno, Victor Bay, Alex Beller, Henry Hill, Alex Murray, Paul Nero, Erno Neufeld, Eudice Shapiro, Felix Slatkin, Marshall Sosson (vn), Alvin Dinkin, Maxine Johnson, Barbara Simons (vl), Cy Bernard, Ennio Bolognini, Edgar Lustgarten, Eleanor Slatkin (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. E 16799-13Master Take (Capitol) There Is No Greater Love - 3:40(Marty Symes, Isham Jones) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 864 — The Man I Love, Part 1   (1957)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI CD(Japan) Tocp 7459-7460 — Peggy Lee ("Twin Best Now" Series)   (1992)
Beautiful Music Licensed CS/LP/CDBmcs/Bmclp/Bmc S21 56958 (Also Pyr 1, Pyr 2 & Pyd) — The Beautiful Music Company Presents Peggy Lee   (1993)
b. E 16800-5Master Take (Capitol) That's All - 2:55(Alan E. Brandt, Bob Haymes) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 3 864 — The Man I Love, Part 3   (1957)
CAPITOL EP(France) 4 864 — Peggy Lee [aka That's All]    (1957)
Disky Licensed CD(Netherlands) Hr 883492 — Fever   (1997)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Nova AP Music Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Aupcd 4012 — Fever; The Best Of Peggy Lee ("The Ultimate 101 Collection" Series)   (2014)
c. E 16801-4Master Take (Capitol) Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe - 4:05(Erwin 'Yip' Harburg, Harold Arlen) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 3 864 — The Man I Love, Part 3   (1957)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/LP(United Kingdom) Caps __/1006 (also reissued by Emi as Vine 1020) — Songs For My Man   (1977)
Capitol©EMI's Axis CS/LP(Australia) Tc.Axis 6329 / Axis 6329 — Songs For My Man   (1977)
d. E 16802-6Master Take (Capitol) The Folks Who Live On The Hill - 3:39(Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 3 864 — The Man I Love, Part 3   (1957)
CAPITOL 45(United Kingdom) Cl 15214 — {The Folks Who Live On The Hill [[not released as a single in the USA]] / Mañana}   (1961)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/(S)t 21141 — The Best Of Peggy Lee [=The Hits Of Peggy Lee + 5 bonus tracks]   (1968)
All titles on: CAPITOL LPT 864 — The Man I Love   (1957)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt 925 [mono] /St 925 [reprocessed stereo] — The Man I Love   (1970)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPDf 518 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — The Folks Who Live On The Hill [reissue of The Man I Love, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)




The Man I Love Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 2, 4 and 8, 1957. Scan above: a trade review, published on The Cash Box.


Issues

1. The Man I Love In Stereo? [LP, CD]
On vinyl, the album The Man I Love was originally issued in mono. Reissues in re-processed, electronically channeled stereo did appear during the LP era, but no vinyl in true stereo was ever issued. Among the labels which resorted to "fake stereo" were EMI itself (see 1970 album listed above) and the World Record Club, a British-Australian mail label with ties to EMI.

On CD, the album has also appeared in mono only. Although various Japanese (EMI Toshiba) CD editions have been advertised as being in stereo, the advertisement has proven false. (I do not know what has caused this mistake, but I can certainly speculate about possible reasons. Perhaps the makers of the EMI Toshiba CDs became confused when they looked at internal company data, in which the electronically processed LPs must have been listed. Those fake stereo albums might have been taken for real stereo albums.) Furthermore, some listeners of these CDs have convinced themselves that they are listening to stereo. Their misconception is understandable -- and not just because of EMI Toshiba's erroneous claims. So brightened and amplified is the sound quality of these Japanese CDs that, during a casual listening, one could easily fall under the impression of stereophonic sound, when the recording is in truth monophonic.)

Should we then conclude that The Man I Love was taped in mono only, or could it have been recorded in (hitherto unissued) stereo as well? At the present time, there is no definitive answer to this question. Granted that all issued versions are in either mono or fake stereo, a couple of insiders with access to the Capitol vaults have claimed seeing tapes that were labeled as stereo. Their sightings happened decades ago, however, and recent vault searches have not succeeded in locating any stereo items. The tapes could have been mislabeled, of course, and currently lost as a result. By the same token, the insiders could have been mistaken.

It is worth adding that, chronologically, there is no objection to the possible existence of stereo Man I Love tapes. Capitol's earliest-known pop stereo date took place four months before these April 1957 sessions. (It was a Nat King Cole session, dated December 19, 1956.) In the ensuing months, the company followed an experimental, inconsistent approach on this matter: some sessions were recorded in mono only, and some were in both mono and stereo, irrespective of the artist involved. (For instance, a few of of Sinatra's and a few of Cole's subsequent sessions were exclusively in mono, the others in both stereo and mono.)

2. The Folks Who Live On The Hill [LP]
Electronically processed stereo is heard in this 1970 Capitol album, which is an abridged reissue of The Man I Love. Two songs from the original LP were deleted, and the original artwork was also changed. The Folks Who Live On The Hill can be found both as a stand-alone and as part of a double LP set.

The catalogue number of the stand-alone is Df 518. The letter D in the prefix refers to the so-called Duophonic process, which was Capitol's name for its own brand of mimicked stereo.

The catalogue number of the 2LP set is Sttb 517. This so-called set consists of just the two albums and the small adhesive sticker that precariously holds them together. Approximately 3" by 1", the sticker is placed around the albums' spines. (As for the other LP in this 2LP set, Broadway Ala Lee is an abridged reissue of Latin Ala Lee!, another Peggy Lee original album. See notes under session dated August 13, 1959.)


Date: April 8, 1957 (6:30 p.m. - 9:30 m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session CSD #17882/E27

Peggy Lee (ldr), Voyle Gilmore (pdr), Frank Sinatra (con), Alex Gershunoff, Jules Jacob[s], Harry Klee, Wilbur "Willie" Schwartz (r, sax), Ed Kusby aka Edward Kuczborski, Ray Sims (tb), James "Jim" Decker, Vincent DeRosa (frh), George Roberts (bt), Nick Bonney (g), Max K. Bennett (b), Lou Levy (p), Stella Castellucci (hrp), Lou Singer (d), Victor Arno, Victor Bay, Alex Beller, Henry Hill, Paul Nero, Erno Neufeld, Eudice Shapiro, Paul Shure, Felix Slatkin, Marshall Sosson (vn), Alvin Dinkin, Maxine Johnson, Barbara Simons (vl), Cy Bernard, Ennio Bolognini, Edgar Lustgarten, Eleanor Slatkin (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. E 16815-12Master Take (Capitol) If I Should Lose You - 2:24(Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 2 2864 — The Man I Love, Part 2    (1957)
CAPITOL EP(Japan) 7EP 68 — The Man I Love   (1957)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPDf 518 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — The Folks Who Live On The Hill [reissue of The Man I Love, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)
Beautiful Music Licensed CS/LP/CDBmcs/Bmclp/Bmc S21 56958 (Also Pyr 1, Pyr 2 & Pyd) — The Beautiful Music Company Presents Peggy Lee   (1993)
CAPITOL CS/CD7243 8 28533 4 3 — Spotlight On... Peggy Lee ("Great Ladies And Gentlemen Of Song" Series)   (1995)
b. E 16816-9Master Take (Capitol) Then I'll Be Tired Of You - 2:31(Erwin 'Yip' Harburg, Arthur Schwartz) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 2 2864 — The Man I Love, Part 2    (1957)
CAPITOL EP(France) 4 864 — Peggy Lee [aka That's All]    (1957)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Big3 Public Domain CDBt 3039 — Peggy Lee ("The Absolutely Essential CD Collection" Series)   (2011)
c. E 16817-2Master Take (Capitol) Just One Way To Say I Love You - 2:53(Irving Berlin) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 864 — The Man I Love, Part 1   (1957)
CAPITOL EP(Japan) 7EP 68 — The Man I Love   (1957)
d. E 16818-4Master Take (Capitol) My Heart Stood Still - 2:47(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 3 864 — The Man I Love, Part 3   (1957)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPDf 518 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — The Folks Who Live On The Hill [reissue of The Man I Love, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)
Beautiful Music Licensed CS/LP/CDBmcs/Bmclp/Bmc S21 56958 (Also Pyr 1, Pyr 2 & Pyd) — The Beautiful Music Company Presents Peggy Lee   (1993)
All titles on: CAPITOL LPT 864 — The Man I Love   (1957)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt 925 [mono] /St 925 [reprocessed stereo] — The Man I Love   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI's Music For Pleasure LP(Australia/United Kingdom) Mfp 8094 — Peggy Lee [Reissue of The Man I Love; issued with 2 different covers]   (1970)




The Man I Love Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: April 2, 4 and 8, 1957.


Photos

Above: A Capitol 2-LP set called Spectacular! (Pro 363 - Pro 366), promoting the label's album releases for the 1957 month of August. This set includes two Peggy Lee renditions, "Then I'll Be Tired Of You" and "If I Should Lose You," both of them recorded at the present date..

Below: A Capitol trade ad promoting the same batch of album releases. For further details, read the next paragraphs.


Issues

1. The Album The Man I Love [LP] In The Trade Press And In The Music Charts
"Capitol August LP Release Intros 26 New Hi-Fi Packages," touted a news byline in the August 3, 1957 issue of Cash Box magazine. The article's first paragraph added that this new Capitol batch, "which [had] hit the nation's stores last week July 22," was "[o]ffering 26 new high fidelity albums for August, including initial packages for the label by Leopoldo Stokowski, Fred Waring, Trudy Richards, The Merry Macs, England's Ron Goodwin, and the first LP since her return to Capitol after a five year absence by Peggy Lee."

The record company's promotional campaign baptized this August 1958 batch of releases as its Capitol August Spectacular. The tag line can seen in the ad below, originally published on Billboard magazine. A different ad, published on Cash Box magazine, made clear that some of the LPs were also available in EP configuration. In the case of The Man I Love, there were three of them, each containing four of the LP's twelve tracks.

Trade reviews were favorable. In its August 1957 issue, Billboard published the following critical reaction to the album: "[t]his represents a powerful outing for the fine trushing of Peggy Lee. The romantic ballads get that wonderful, well-controlled, bluesy huskiness as its best. As if that weren't enough, the package lists Frank Sinatra as conductor of the big strings and woodwind line-up with arrangements by Nelson Riddle. Little more of merchandising value could be asked. Cover of Miss Lee being embraced by a friend is also a stopper. Bound to get good disc jockey support and the word would be to go on this."

The Man I Love entered Billboard's Best-Selling Pop LPs chart during the week of September 23, 1957. It peaked at #20. (For Peggy Lee's previous album chart entries, see sessions dated April 10, 1954 and May 6, 1955. For her next album entry, see session dated January 3, 1958.)






Date: April 13, 1957 (1:00-4:30 p.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #4960

Peggy Lee (ldr), David Klein (om), Nelson Riddle (con), John "Plas" Johnson (sax), Robert "Bob" Bain, Jack Marshall (g), George "Red" Callender (b), Ray Sherman (p), Roy Harte, Raymond Martinez (d), Peggy Lee (v), Unknown (bkv)

a. 16840-14Master Take (Capitol) Every Night - 2:32(Scott J. Johnson, Jr., Ronie Rae, Ed Townsend) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL 45F 3722 — {Baby, Baby, Wait For Me / Every Night}   (1957)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Ttp/Tp 352 — The Fabulous Miss Lee   (1963)
Marginal Bootleg CD(Belgium) Mar 068 — Extra Special!   (1997)
b. 16841-rejectedMaster Take (Capitol) Uninvited Dream(Burt Bacharach, Sammy Gallop) / arr: Nelson Riddle
unissued
c. 16842-rejectedMaster Take (Capitol) Baby, Baby, Wait For Me - 2:23(Joseph Davis Hooven, Marilyn K. Hooven) / arr: Nelson Riddle
DRG CD97484 — JUMP FOR JOY   (2009)
American Jazz Classics Public Domain CD(Spain) Ajc 99136 — The Nelson Riddle Sessions   (2017)






The Singles Sessions With Nelson Riddle (Cross-references)

Dates: April 13 and 22, 1957. August 30, 1957.


Issues

1. "Every Night" / "Baby, Baby Wait For Me" [45]
Capitol single #3722 was sent to radio stations with a legend that read "promotional debut record." Since this 45-rpm disc was by no means Peggy Lee's debut record for Capitol, the legend is somewhat deceptive. She was misleadingly treated as a debut artist because this was the singer's first Capitol single after her return to the label that she had left five years earlier.


Masters And Cross-references

1. "Every Night"
For another master of "Every Night" (not listed in Capitol's Peggy Lee session file, and discovered in 2008), see session dated April 22, 1957.

2. "Uninvited Dream"
In Capitol's files, this master of "Uninvited Dream" is labeled as rejected. Capitol and Lee proceeded to remake it one week later, on April 22. They made it yet again, for a third and final try, on August 30, 1957.

3. "Baby, Baby, Wait For Me"
Also branded as 'rejected' in Capitol's files is this session's version of "Baby, Baby, Wait For Me" is. That branding notwithstanding, no defects or errors are audible in the master. Hence it was satisfactorily mixed to stereo in 2008, and finally released in 2009.

For details about the "Baby, Baby, Wait For Me" master that was originally released on 45-rpm single in 1957, see next session (April 22, 1957). There are various obvious differences between the two "Baby, Baby, Wait For Me" masters. The April 22 remake is somewhat faster in tempo, and slightly shorter in timing. This session's master gives a more prevalent role to the background vocal chorus, especially during the intro.

4. Possible Master/Issue Errors In The Official Paperwork
For a discussion on the possibility that one of this session's masters ("Uninvited Dream") has been wrongly assigned to issues which actually feature a different master of the same song, consult this supplementary page to the 1957 sessions.


Personnel

1. Male Chorus
Though not identified or credited in any of my sources, a male chorus is heard throughout this date's masters. In most cases where an unidentified male chorus is part of a session, the likeliest and most logical suspects are the musicians themselves. But in this particular case, I believe that we are listening to a professional vocal ensemble -- even if, I should stress, no such ensemble is listed in the official AFM report.


Songwriters

1. Ron(n)ie Rae
2. "Every Night"
Capitol 45-rpm single #3722 ("Every Night" / "Baby, Baby, Wait For Me") lists only Scott Johnson and Ed Townsend as the songwriters of "Every Night." My sources for the songwriting credit to Ronnie Rae are BMI and The Library of Congress. Additionally, Rae's first name can be found with two slightly different spellings. It is spelled as 'Ronnie' at the Library of Congress, as 'Ronie' at BMI.


Date: April 22, 1957 (9:00-12:00)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #4980

Peggy Lee (ldr), John "Plas" Johnson (sax), Al Hendrickson, Jack Marshall (g), Max K. Bennett (b), Lou Levy (p), Roy Harte (d), Peggy Lee (v), Unknown (bkv)

a. 16860Master Take (Capitol) Every Night(Scott J. Johnson, Jr., Ronie Rae, Ed Townsend)
unissued
b. 16861Master Take (Capitol) Uninvited Dream - 2:30(Burt Bacharach, Sammy Gallop)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
American Jazz Classics Public Domain CD(Spain) Ajc 99136 — The Nelson Riddle Sessions   (2017)
c. 16862-10Master Take (Capitol) Baby, Baby, Wait For Me - 1:56(Joseph Davis Hooven, Marilyn K. Hooven)
CAPITOL 45F 3722 — {Baby, Baby, Wait For Me / Every Night}   (1957)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1052 — Fever   (1958)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 921 2 — ALL AGLOW AGAIN!   (2008)
Future Noise's Fantastic Voyage Public Domain CDFvtd 043 — Ridin' High; The Complete Record Releases, 1957-1959   (2010)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 5365 - P 5356 — Basic Music Library [4 Peggy Lee vocals]   





The Singles Sessions With Nelson Riddle (Cross-references)

Dates: April 13 and 22, 1957. August 30, 1957.


Recording Session (Cross-references)

Session #4980 was dedicated to re-recording numbers that had been initially tried during session #4960. Nelson Riddle had conducted the earlier session. He did not attend this remake date, however.

In addition to Riddle's absence, there were other significant differences. Most notably, members of Peggy Lee's own rhythm section -- specifically, her bassist and her pianist -- joined the few musicians who were returning from the previous session.

There is yet a third incarnation of one of the numbers from these April 13 and 22, 1957 dates. In a subsequent session, dated August 30, 1957, Nelson Riddle came back to conduct for Peggy Lee, bringing with him the large orchestra. On that date, "Uninvited Dream" was recorded one last time (along with brand new songs, also meant for the singles market).


Masters, Issues And Cross-references

1. "Baby, Baby, Wait For Me"
For an earlier master of "Baby, Baby Wait For Me," see session dated April 13, 1957.

2. "Every Night"
For the only master of "Every Night" that has ever been released, see session dated April 13, 1957.

Mysteriously, this session's "Every Night" (master #16860) is not listed in the Capitol session files at my reach. I am told that it is listed, however, in the company's inventory files. (I have also found this master listed in a belatedly consulted source, the Capitol Label Discography compiled by Michel Ruppli, Bill Daniels, and Ed Novitsky, with assistance from Michael Cuscuna.)

3. "Uninvited Dream"
For other versions of "Uninvited Dream," see sessions dated April 22 and August 30, 1957. Of those three versions, Capitol identifies the last one (master #17426, recorded on August 30, 1957) as issued on 45-rpm single #3811. This session's version (master #16861) is identified as rejected. In this particular case, however, I have doubts about the full accuracy of the Capitol database. I have voiced my doubts at some length in this supplementary page to the 1957 sessions. (I should clarify that I have not "acted upon" my doubts: the above-seen session details are presented as they are found in Capitol's files.)

4. The Singles Collection [CD Set]
5. "Uninvited Dream" In Stereo
Two of Lee's three versions of "Uninvited Dream" are described in Capitol's session files as either rejected (April 13, 1957) or unissued (April 22, 1957). In 2002, one of those two hitherto unissued versions was unintentionally released as part of The Singles Collection. The team involved in the making of that collection wrongly thought that they were including the version heard in the single.

If we leave aside the matter of the unintentional dissemination of wrong data, fans of Peggy Lee should consider this error a felicitous one: a second version of "Uninvited Dream" was released from the vaults, where it might have otherwise stayed. Moreover, this second version turned out to be very different from the one that had been issued on the original mono single. Even better: coming as it did from a multitrack tape, this second version was mixed for stereo.

Less fortunate was the fact that this production error led to the publication of inaccurate data in the discographical details that I prepared for the booklet of The Singles Collection. Under the mistaken assumption that the version to be included was the one originally on 45-rpm disc, the information that I supplied pertained to that single, not to the previously unissued doo-wop version. At least, the error is found only in the original pressing. Later pressings of the set correct the error in both its booklet and back cover.


The Mysterious "I'm Following You" Master

Listed in Capitol's inventory of Peggy Lee masters is a song entitled "I'm Following You," numbered 16596 and recorded on June 14, 1957. However, a look at the Capitol Label Discography by Michel Ruppli et al reveals that master #16596 is from a session (#6082) credited to The Four Dolls, not to Peggy Lee.

The other two songs from session #6082 ("Three On A Date" and "So Proud Of You") are listed as issued on Capitol single #3766. I have actually seen a copy of this 45-rpm disc online. The disc's label bears the legend "promotional debut record," and the act is indeed named The Four Dolls. (This act is unknown to me. While researching it, I have come across only one brief description of them as "a teenage girl group.") Credited with conducting the two numbers on the single is a man who, at this time, had just begun working with Peggy Lee on a regular basis: Jack Marshall.

It thus appears that an unissued number from a session by The Four Dolls has been erroneously listed among Peggy Lee's masters. Then again, we should not completely discount the (admittedly slim) possibility that a Peggy Lee master has been wrongly misplaced in a session by The Four Dolls, or even that Peggy Lee could have accompanied The Four Dolls as a guest performer. Of course, actual listening of this master is necessary before a definitive conclusion can be offered.


The Undated 1957 Photo Sessions




The two photos seen above come from a 1957 Peggy Lee session for Capitol Records. Further specifics remain unclear. In the absence of any other leading clues, each of Lee's 1957 record dates qualify as possibly being the occasion on which these photos were taken. Here is a list of dates:

-- April 2, 4, 8 (the Man I Love sessions)
-- April 13 & 22; August 30 (the singles sessions)
-- (December 5 & 20 (Jump For Joy sessions)

August 30, 1957 is the strongest candidate, for two reasons. One of the photos was published on a December 1957 magazine issue. If the magazine actually came out in early December, or even late November, then August 30 would be the closest session to the magazine's publication. The second reason stems from the fact that the published photo bears a caption promoting Capitol single 3811. The two masters on that single, "Listen To The Rocking Bird" and "Uninvited Dream," were both recorded during Lee's August 30, 1957 session. (Note, however, that the caption does not state if the photo is from that particular session.)

The December 5 and 20 dates are the least likely possibilities, but they should not be discarded. On the one hand, the magazine on which the session photo was published is from the same month as these sessions. For that reason, the photo could be presumed to have been taken in an earlier month. On the other hand, the magazine issue could have actually come out in late December, and the photo could have been taken earlier that month. (I just do not know when the magazine was ready for publication.)


Date: August 30, 1957 (8:00-11:30/12:00 p.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6163

Peggy Lee (ldr), David Klein (om), Nelson Riddle (con), The Nelson Riddle Orchestra (acc), Buddy Collette, Joe Cook, Skeets Herfurt aka Arthur Herfurt, Wilbur "Willie" Schwartz, William "Buck" Skalak (sax), Walter "Pete" Candoli, Harry "Sweets" Edison, Conrad Gozzo, Vito "Mickey" Mangano (t), Richard "Dick" Noel, Tommy Pederson aka Pullman Pederson, George Roberts, Juan Tizol (tb), Barney Kessel (g), Max K. Bennett (b), Lou Levy (p), Mel Lewis (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 17424-6Master Take (Capitol) Listen To The Rocking Bird - 2:13(Alice Hawthorne aka Septimus Winner, Hal Levy, Richard "Whistling Dick" Milburn) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL 45F 3811 — {Listen To The Rockin' Bird / Uninvited Dream}   (1957)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1052 — Fever   (1958)
CAPITOL©EMI's Odeon CS/LP(Argentina) 106083 — Peggy Lee ("Elegidos/Personalidades" Series)   (1979)
b. 17425-7Master Take (Capitol) It Keeps You Young - 2:30(Larry Coleman, Charles Singleton) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL's Starline reel/LPT 1366 — All Aglow Again!    (1960)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France Pm 156 554 4/1) & (UK Eg 26 0605 4/1) — All Aglow Again! ("Retrospect" & "Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1985)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 921 2 — ALL AGLOW AGAIN!   (2008)
DRG CD97483 — THE MAN I LOVE   (2009)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt/T 606 — All Aglow Again!   
c. 17426-9Master Take (Capitol) Uninvited Dream - 2:02(Burt Bacharach, Sammy Gallop) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL 45F 3811 — {Listen To The Rockin' Bird / Uninvited Dream}   (1957)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Ttp/Tp 352 — The Fabulous Miss Lee   (1963)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 921 2 — ALL AGLOW AGAIN!   (2008)
DRG CD97483 — THE MAN I LOVE   (2009)
Future Noise's Fantastic Voyage Public Domain CDFvtd 043 — Ridin' High; The Complete Record Releases, 1957-1959   (2010)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 5999 - P 6000 — Basic Music Library [LP Jump For Joy + 2 songs from 1 single]   
d. 17427-LOSTMaster Take (Capitol) You Don't Know(Walter Spriggs) / arr: Nelson Riddle
unissued






The Singles Sessions With Nelson Riddle (Cross-references)

Dates: April 13 and 22, 1957. August 30, 1957. (For other singles sessions in this page, look up the following dates: May 19 and September 14, 1958. October 10, 1959. Naturally, the album sessions also include songs that were released on singles.)


Masters

1. "You Don't Know"
This session's master of "You Don't Know" (master #1742) is currently deemed lost. For the version(s) of "You Don't Know" that has been issued, see session dated May 25, 1958.

2. "Uninvited Dream"
For other versions of "Uninvited Dream," one of which is still unissued, the other also issued, see sessions dated April 13 and 22, 1957. The issued versions are easy to distinguish because the musical backings are markedly different from one another. Also, this session's version (released in the original 45-rpm single) is in mono, whereas the version from April 22, 1957 has been mixed to stereo.

3. Possible Master/Issue Errors In The Official Paperwork
For the possibility that at least one of these masters ("Uninvited Dream") has been wrongly assigned to some issues, read my comments in this supplementary page to the 1957 sessions.





Issues

1. "Uninvited Dream": Discographical Error In The Singles Collection [CD]
See notes under April 22, 1957 session.

2. "You Don't Know": Discographical Error In Peggy Lee ("The Best Of The Capitol Years" Series) [CD]
The version of "You Don't Know" that was issued in Capitol CD #724382120421 is the one recorded on May 25, 1958. The CD's annotator wrongly identifies it as this session's version.


Date: December 5, 1957 (8:00 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6441

Peggy Lee (ldr), David Klein (om), Lee Gillette (pdr), Nelson Riddle (con), The Nelson Riddle Orchestra (acc), Morris Bercov, Gene Cipriano, Joe Cook, William Ernest Green, Harry Klee (sax), Harry "Sweets" Edison, Vito "Mickey" Mangano, Clarence "Shorty" Sherock, Joe Triscari (t), Murray McEachern, Richard "Dick" Noel, George Roberts, Juan Tizol (tb), Al Hendrickson (g), Joe Comfort (b), James "Jimmy" Rowles (p), Kathryn Julye (hrp), Frank Flynn, Mel Lewis (d), Victor Arno, Victor Bay, Alex Beller, Ben Gill, Paul Nero, Mischa Russell, Paul Shure, Marshall Sosson, Gerald Vinci (vn), Stan Harris, Dave Sterkin (vl), Ralph "Ray" Kramer, Edgar Lustgarten (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 18041-7Master Take (Capitol) Just In Time - 2:50(Jule Styne, Betty Comden, Adolph Green) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 979 — Jump For Joy   (1958)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
b. 18042-10Master Take (Capitol) Music! Music! Music! - 2:30(Bernie Baum, Stephen Weiss) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 979 — Jump For Joy   (1958)
Disky Licensed CD(Netherlands) Hr 883492 — Fever   (1997)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 5999 - P 6000 — Basic Music Library [LP Jump For Joy + 2 songs from 1 single]   
c. 18043-17Master Take (Capitol) Back In Your Own Back Yard - 2:26(Dave Dreyer, Al Jolson, Billy Rose) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 5999 - P 6000 — Basic Music Library [LP Jump For Joy + 2 songs from 1 single]   
d. 18044-15Master Take (Capitol) When My Sugar Walks Down The Street - 1:58(Gene Austin, Jimmy McHugh, Irving Mills) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 979 — Jump For Joy   (1958)
Pickwick Licensed 8-track/LPP8 139/(S)Pc 3090 — Once More With Feeling   (1968)
Pickwick Licensed LPPtp 2028 2 — Once More With Feeling / I've Got The World On A String ("2 Sensational Albums In 1 Hit Package")    (1968)
CAPITOL (10") LP(Japan) Olp 10 — Jump For Joy   
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 5999 - P 6000 — Basic Music Library [LP Jump For Joy + 2 songs from 1 single]   
All titles on: CAPITOL LP(S)t 979 — Jump For Joy   (1958)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt/T 524 — Jump For Joy   (1966)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) Lm 87 — Jump For Joy   (1966)




The Jump For Joy Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: December 5 and December 20, 1957. January 3, 1958. Photos above: original Capitol US LP T-979 (1958) and one of its several Japanese issues, Capitol LP Ecs 80167 (1975).


Arrangements

1. "Just In Time"
In addition to this session's arrangement by Nelson Riddle, Peggy Lee kept in her sheet music library another "Just In Time" arrangement by Benny Golson.


Masters

1. Alan Silverman
2. Jump For Joy
3. "Just In Time"
On July 27, 2013, mastering engineer Alan Silverman gave a talk at the Fourth Annual Capital Audiofest, a three-day symposium geared toward serious music audiophiles. Silverman's talk concentrated on his experiences working with the master tapes of Jump For Joy, which he remixed and remastered for DRG's CD edition of the album. At the time of this writing (September 2013), the full talk is available on YouTube, in the form of three video clips. The second clip contains the bulk of the engineer's commentaries about the album. Near the beginning of the third clip, Silverman plays the full master take of "Just In Time," including a fleeting bit of rehearsal and studio talk.


Date: December 20, 1957 (3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6457

Peggy Lee (ldr), David Klein (om), Lee Gillette (pdr), Nelson Riddle (con), The Nelson Riddle Orchestra (acc), Joe Cook, William Ernest Green, Skeets Herfurt aka Arthur Herfurt, Harry Klee, Warren "Champ" Webb (sax), Harry "Sweets" Edison, Vito "Mickey" Mangano, Uan Rasey, Clarence "Shorty" Sherock (t), Russell Brown, Joe Howard aka Francis Howard, Murray McEachern, Juan Tizol (tb), Bobby Gibbons (g), Joe Comfort (b), James "Jimmy" Rowles (p), Stella Castellucci (hrp), Mel Lewis (d), Frank Flynn (per), Victor Bay, Alex Beller, Harold Dicterow, David Frisina, Lou Raderman, Eudice Shapiro, Paul Shure, Felix Slatkin, Marshall Sosson (vn), Stan Harris, Paul Robyn (vl), Ralph "Ray" Kramer, Joseph Saxon (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 18084-9Master Take (Capitol) I Hear Music - 2:07(Burton Lane, Frank Loesser) / arr: Nelson Riddle
Pickwick Licensed 8-track/LPP8 139/(S)Pc 3090 — Once More With Feeling   (1968)
Pickwick Licensed LPPtp 2028 2 — Once More With Feeling / I've Got The World On A String ("2 Sensational Albums In 1 Hit Package")    (1968)
Harmony Collection Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Har c/cd 116 — Peggy Lee ("Portrait Of A Song Stylist" Series)   (1990)
b. 18085-3Master Take (Capitol) Old Devil Moon - 2:58(Erwin 'Yip' Harburg, Burton Lane) / arr: Nelson Riddle
Harmony Collection Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Har c/cd 116 — Peggy Lee ("Portrait Of A Song Stylist" Series)   (1990)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 5 32580 2 3 — Peggy Lee Sings The Standards   (2001)
c. 18086Master Take (Capitol) What A Little Moonlight Can Do - 2:41(Harry Woods) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL©EMI LP/CD(Australia) Tc Sca 082/Cdmid 166224 [CD rel. in 1984] — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats" Series)    (1982)
All titles on: CAPITOL LP(S)t 979 — Jump For Joy   (1958)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt/T 524 — Jump For Joy   (1966)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) Lm 87 — Jump For Joy   (1966)




The Jump For Joy Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: December 5 and December 20, 1957. January 3, 1958. Scan above: Trade reviews, published on The Cash Box and The Billboard.


Masters

1. Unissued Or Unused Master?
This session consists of three masters (#18084 - #18086). I am wondering if a fourth master was planned -- or even attempted and ultimately erased. The main reason why I am considering this possibility is that, according to the Capitol Label Discography by Ruppli et, "no information about master #18087" can be found in the files.

There is no reason to presume that the master would have belonged to Capitol's next date, in which Lee was not involved. (The recording artist for that session --#6458-- was Gordon MacRae. Four masters were completed.)

Going back to Peggy Lee's dates, notice that her next session (January 3, 1958) consisted of five instead of the customary four masters. Ot thus seems that the January 3 session compensated for the master missing from this one. Notice also that the last master from that January 3 session received a number much higher than the others.


Date: January 3, 1958 (8:30 p.m. -1:30 a.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6468

Peggy Lee (ldr), David Klein (om), Lee Gillette (pdr), Nelson Riddle (con), The Nelson Riddle Orchestra (acc), William Ernest Green, Harry Klee, Joe Koch, Wilbur "Willie" Schwartz, Warren "Champ" Webb (sax), Walter "Pete" Candoli, Conrad Gozzo, Vito "Mickey" Mangano, Clarence "Shorty" Sherock (t), Tommy Pederson aka Pullman Pederson, Jim Priddy, George Roberts, Juan Tizol (tb), Al Hendrickson (g), Joe Comfort (b), Paul Smith (p), Frank Flynn, Mel Lewis (d), Victor Arno, Victor Bay, Alex Beller, Ben Gill, Daniel "Dan" Lube, Paul Nero, Mischa Russell, Eudice Shapiro, Marshall Sosson (vn), Stan Harris, Paul Robyn, Dave Sterkin (vl), Armond (Armand) Kaproff, Edgar Lustgarten (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 18128-7Master Take (Capitol) Ain't We Got Fun - 2:10(Raymond Egan, Richard Whiting, Gus Kahn) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
CAPITOL (10") LP(Japan) Olp 10 — Jump For Joy   
b. 18129-9Master Take (Capitol) The Glory Of Love - 2:37(Billy Hill) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
CAPITOL (10") LP(Japan) Olp 10 — Jump For Joy   
c. 18130-19Master Take (Capitol) Jump For Joy - 2:07(Duke Ellington, Sid Kuller, Paul Francis Webster) / arr: Nelson Riddle
CAPITOL EPEap 1 979 — Jump For Joy   (1958)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecs 65039/65040 — Peggy Lee ("Golden Double 32" Series)   (1976)
CAPITOL©EMI Publishing House CDMp Aw 11/05 — The EMI Songs Collection ("Great Singers Sing Great Songs," Volume 4: Peggy Lee)   (2005)
CAPITOL (10") LP(Japan) Olp 10 — Jump For Joy   
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI LP(Japan) Cp 8215 — This Is! Peggy Lee ("Jazz Vocal Best" Series)   
d. 18131-17Master Take (Capitol) Cheek To Cheek - 2:37(Irving Berlin) / arr: Nelson Riddle
Harmony Collection Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Har c/cd 116 — Peggy Lee ("Portrait Of A Song Stylist" Series)   (1990)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI CD(Japan) Tocp 7459-7460 — Peggy Lee ("Twin Best Now" Series)   (1992)
CAPITOL©EMI's Music For Pleasure CS/CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 56805 2 6 [also Mfp 6342] — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee [tracks same as EMI Presents The Magic, diff. artwork]   (1997)
e. 18158Master Take (Capitol) Four Or Five Times - 2:33(Byron Gay, Marco H. Hellman) / arr: Nelson Riddle
All titles on: CAPITOL LP(S)t 979 — Jump For Joy   (1958)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt/T 524 — Jump For Joy   (1966)
World Record Club Licensed LP(Australia) Lm 87 — Jump For Joy   (1966)




The Jump For Joy Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: December 5 and December 20, 1957. January 3, 1958.


Issues And Dating

1. Original Releases Year Of Jump For Joy [LP]
The release date of Jump For Joy is not disclosed in the Capitol files that I consulted. Some secondary sources claim that it was originally issued in 1959. This claim is incorrect. Extant trade ads prove that the album was part of Capitol's batch of releases for April of 1958. As further evidence, there are album reviews dating from 1958 (April 19 in Cash Box, May 5 in Billboard, September 1958 in a British publication). Still further, the LP was included in a Capitol Record Club ad published by Life magazine on its September 8, 1958 issue.

2. The Album Jump For Joy In The Trade Press
As seen in the ad above, Capitol's batch of April 1958 issues was promoted under the rubric Hi-Fi(esta). The batch consisted of 31 albums which fell in the following genres or categories: pop (14), classical (11), international (6). Pride of place is given in the ad to the offerings by Danny Kaye, Peggy Lee, and Frank Sinatra. The latter, a compilation, marked Capitol's twelfth Sinatra issue. Among the other releases from the Hi Fiesta bonanza were Bob Bain's first album for the label (Rockin' Rollin' Strollin').

3. The Album Jump For Joy In The Music Charts
After entering Billboard's Best-Selling Pop LPs chart on the week of July 14, 1958, this long play spent five weeks in the countdown. It peaked at #15.

4. Original Mono And Stereo LP Releases Of Jump For Joy
I do have a plausible (albeit yet-to-be-proven) explanation for the discrepancy mentioned in point #2. All aforementioned ads and reviews make mention of the mono album only. It is thus apparent that T-979 was the April 1958 issue, while ST-979 must have issued at a later date. Obviously, the year claimed by the secondary sources (1959) is likely to be the release date for the stereo configuration. I have yet to locate, however, corroborating data.

Some sources have similarly attached a seemingly much-too-late release date to Things Are Swingin', the follow-up to Jump For Joy. In the case of that other album, I have been able to corroborate that the 1958-mono/1959-stereo pattern is correct, and explains the late-date attribution. (See notes under session dated May 19, 1958.)

It is my belief that, in 1959, Capitol Records embarked in a project of releasing stereo versions of some of its more marketable albums from the last couple of years -- albums had been issued only as mono offerings, though in many cases they have been taped on both mono and stereo. Such was definitely the case with Frank Sinatra's Where Are You? (mono release: September 1957; stereo release: February 1959), for instance.

5. Capitol's Stereo LPs (Cross-references)
To contextualize the various points that were just made above, an overview of Capitol's early stereo days is currently being constructed. See also section XVIII of the discography's essay about the song Fever.


Date: May 19, 1958
Location: Studio B, Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6844

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall's Music (acc), Justin Gordon, George Smith (r), Don Fagerquist, Conrad Gozzo, Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (t), Milt Bernhart (tb), Bob Enevoldsen (vtb), Howard Roberts (g), Joe Mondragon (b), Joe Harnell (p), Shelly Manne (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 19142-6Master Take (Capitol) Things Are Swingin' - 2:10(Peggy Lee, Jack Marshall) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1049 — Things Are Swingin', Part 1 {aka It's A Wonderful World}   (1958)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL 45(United Kingdom) Cl 15103 — {Things Are Swingin' [not released as a single in the USA]/ You Deserve}    (1959)
b. 19143-11Master Take (Capitol) Lullaby In Rhythm - 2:14(Benny Goodman, Clarence Profit, Walter Hirsch, Edgar Sampson)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France Pm 156 619 4/1) & (United Kingdom Tcems/Ems 1139) — Things Are Swingin' ("Retrospect" & "Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1985)
c. 19144-4Master Take (Capitol) You're Getting To Be A Habit With Me - 2:39(Al Dubin, Harry Warren)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI LP/CD(Australia) Tc Sca 082/Cdmid 166224 [CD rel. in 1984] — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats" Series)    (1982)
d. 19145-5Master Take (Capitol) Fever - 3:19(Otis Blackwell aka John Davenport, Eddie Cooley, Uncredited Second Lyricist) / arr: Peggy Lee
CAPITOL 45F 3998 — {Fever / You Don't Know [1958 master]}   (1958)
CAPITOL 78(Canada?) 3998 — {Fever / You Don't Know [1958 master]}   (1958)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1052 — Fever   (1958)
All titles on: CAPITOL Jazz CD7243 5 97071 2 9 — THINGS ARE SWINGIN'   (2004)
Carrefour Licensed CD(France) 50999 505469 2 3 — Things Are Swingin'   (2007)
Play 24-7 Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Play 2 073 — Things Are Swingin' & The Man I Love ("Original Masters Collection" Series)   (2010)
Future Noise's Fantastic Voyage Public Domain CDFvtd 043 — Ridin' High; The Complete Record Releases, 1957-1959   (2010)
Play 24-7 Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Play 3 015 — These Ladies Can Swing, Volume 1 {Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone}   (2010)
Blue Moon Licensed/Public Domain CD(Spain) Bmcd 880 — Swingin' Brightly & Gently; Complete Recordings, 1958-1959   (2016)




The Things Are Swingin' Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: May 19, 25, 27 and 30, 1958. Images above: original Capitol US LP T-1049 (1958) and Japanese EMI-Universal CD reissue Tocj-9753 (2013).


Issues And Dating

1. Things Are Swingin' [LP]
2. Original Mono And Stereo LP Releases Of Things Are Swingin'
The release date of the LP Things Are Swingin' is not disclosed in the official sources at my reach. Many secondary sources list it as originally issued in 1959 -- specifically, May 1959. Not so. The error stems from the fact that the mono and stereo editions of the LP were separately issued.

A November 1958 Capitol trade ad proves that the mono edition of Things Are Swingin' was originally released on that month. Further proof of a pre-May 1959 release date comes in the form of a magazine review published in February 1959.

It was the stereo edition that was released in May of 1959. Indeed, the May 16, 1959 issue of Cash Box lists Things Are Swingin' among 20 albums that Capitol was issuing in stereo on that month.

(A similar, parallel mono/stereo situation applies to Jump For Joy, the Peggy Lee album which was released right before this one. See the notes under session dated January 3, 1958. There might have been a concerted 1959 project at Capitol to re-release in stereo many albums originally recorded in both mono and stereo, but previously available only in mono.

3. Things Are Swingin' [CD, Blue Note]
In addition to the 2004 American release of this compact disc under the Capitol Jazz branch, the Blue Note branch seems to have also issued it, apparently in Europe only. The Blue Note version uses entirely different artwork: a small b&w photo of Lee from the mid-1950s, against white and blue stripes. That artwork can be seen in the Main Capitol Albums Photo Gallery of this discography.

4. Capitol #3398 [78]
Peggy Lee's Capitol session files identify Capitol #3998 ("Fever"/"You Don't Know") as a single released on 45-rpm disc. No 78-rpm counterpart is listed. However, a 78-rpm disc version of Capitol #3998 definitely exists. I do not own it, but I have seen copies up for auction on the web. Since one auctioneer identified his copy as a Canadian issue, I have tentatively assumed that Capitol #3998 was released on 78-rpm disc in Canada, but not in the United States. If any reader of this discography knows otherwise I would appreciate receiving a correction and/or corroboration of the existence of an American 78-rpm pressing. ("Fever /You Don't Know" was definitely issued on 78-rpm speed in the United Kingdom and maybe in other parts of the Old World, too. But, as far as I have been able to ascertain, such overseas 78-rpm disc editions bore (or are likely to bore) a different catalogue number: CL 14903. My just-stated query pertains not to CL 14903 but to a Capitol 78-rpm disc that bears the catalogue number 3998.)

5. Capitol #6014 [45]
6. Capitol # A 6014 [45]
Part of Capitol's Starline series, a 45-rpm single numbered 6014 has actually been issued in two versions. Both versions contain the same two songs ("Fever" / "Alright, Ok, You Win") but differ in the inclusion or omission of a prefix letter (A) as part of the catalogue number, and in the color used for their respective labels (light brown in the case of #6014, light blue in the case of # A 6014).





The Fever Singles Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: May 19 and September 14, 1958. This date is mainly an album session, to which a single session was tagged -- probably because Capitol executives were keen on having Lee rush-record what was expected to be a hit single, "Fever." The September 14 session was the follow-up, in which (once again, probably at the instigation of Capitol executives), Lee was asked to record a couple of songs obviously aimed at mainstream radio and at the popular mass market. (One of the September 14 numbers was musically modeled after "Fever," although it is vocally taken in a different direction by Lee.)


Songs

1. Peggy Lee's Initial
Exposure To "Fever"

The song "Fever" was first brought to Peggy Lee's attention by Max Bennett, who played bass for her during the mid-1950s. For extensive details about the song and its history, both before and after Peggy Lee recorded it, consult this supplementary page.

2. Peggy Lee's "Fever"
In The Music Charts,
At The Grammys, And In
The Annals Of Popularity

According to Joel Whitburn's The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Hits, Peggy Lee's recording of "Fever" debuted in Billboard's Hot 100 during the week of July 21, 1958. It peaked at #8 and stayed in the chart for 13 weeks. The song also reached the top ten of two specialized Billboard charts: #10 in the Most Played By Jockeys list and #9 in the Best Seller Pop Singles in Stores list. At Cash Box, Peggy Lee's "Fever" did even better, peaking at #6 and spending 14 weeks in the Best Selling Singles chart (from the week of July the 12th to the week of October 11th, 1958).

As shown in another Whitburn book (The Billboard Book Of Top 40 R&B And Hip Hop Hits) Peggy Lee's recording of "Fever" also entered Billboard's rhythm & blues charts. It peaked at #5 in theMost Played By R&B By Jockeys chart and #12 in the R&B Best Seller In Stores chart. (As for the previously mentioned Most Played R&B In Jukeboxes chart, by 1958 it was no longer operating -- or, if it was, Billboard magazine was not publishing the tabulations.)

In the United Kingdom, Lee's smash hit fared very well, too. "Fever" not only peaked at #5 when it was released there (1958), but it also managed to re-enter the British chart in 1992, reaching #75. (This re-entry was presumably the result of a TV commercial that featured the song, and which elicited the release of various above-listed 1990s European singles.)

Furthermore, Lee's recording of "Fever" was a multiple nominee at the very first Grammy award ceremony. For starters, "Fever" was nominated for Record Of The Year. (The award-winning song ended up being "Volare," as sung by Domenico Modugno.) "Fever" also garnered a Best Arrangement nomination, which was questionably bestowed on Jack Marshall, rather than on Peggy Lee. (Henry Mancini's arrangement of "The Music From Peter Gunn" won. See also separate commentary about Arrangements, below.) A third nomination at the ceremony was strictly for Lee, in the category of Best Vocal Performance, Female. Nominations in that category were incongruously given for both songs (interpreted by Doris Day, Peggy Lee and Keely Smith) and albums (recorded by Ella Fitzgerald and Eydie Gormé). The album Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Irving Berlin Songbook earned the award. Lee herself was one of the presenters during the ceremony, held on May 4, 1959.

Peggy Lee's version of "Fever" was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998. (For another Lee performance that also received this honor, see session dated January 24, 1969.)






Arrangements

1. "Fever"
Peggy Lee herself came up with the arrangement of "Fever." She was the who conceived the overall direction of the number, and decided on its instrumentation. Lee was also the one who, in rehearsals and concert performances, directed her musicians to play the melody in its famously spare way. Further specifics on this matter are provided in an epilogue that was added to the second edition of Lee's autobiography. The epilogue's author, music critic Will Friedwald, states that "Peggy Lee had sketched the arrangement and given it to [Jack] Marshall. He kept adding things and Miss Lee taking them out to maintain her desire to keep it as earthy as possible. Producer Dave Cavanaugh agreed with her on this point, and as a result, the final arrangement is Peggy Lee's and hers alone."

However, all the official Capitol paperwork credits Jack Marshall with the arrangement, not Peggy Lee. Marshall is (mis)credited chiefly because he was the conductor and arranger of the other songs that were recorded during this May 19, 1958 session. The upshot of such a bureaucratic situation was that, when "Fever" was nominated at the Grammys for Best Arrangement, the nomination went to Marshall instead of Lee. "Had she won the best orchestration Grammy in 1958, she would have been the first female for a generation to receive that award," remarks Friedwald. For a longer discussion, consult the aforementioned supplementary page.


Personnel

1. "Fever"
Master #19145 features only (Peggy Lee's vocal with Joe Mondragon's bass, Shelly Manne's snare drums, and finger snapping. The latter has been credited to different people in different reports, none of which have sufficient confirmation. Note also that, during the recording, Mondragon actually turned off the snares, using his fingers instead of drum sticks. The identity of the playing musicians (Manne, Mondragon) has been fully confirmed; numerous listings of erroneous personnel can be found on the web and in print.

It is not clear if all the above-listed musicians stayed (idly) around for the recording of "Fever." They might have been dismissed after the other three masters had been completed, and the presence of a full orchestra was no longer needed. It seems, however, that one musicians stayed: guitarist Howard Roberts, who is credited in various sources as the individual (or one of the individuals) who snapped finders during the performance. His staying might have stemmed from Jack Marshall's aforementioned plan to record "Fever" with more instrumentation than Lee wished. In the end, she prevailed. (Biographer James Gavin states that both Marshall and producer Dave Cavanaugh "were commended to snap," but it is not clear if the biographer's comment is relying on an actual source, or painting a self-imagined scenario.)

For more details, in particular about the finger snaps, consult the aforementioned page about the song "Fever."






Songwriters

1. Writing Credits For "Fever" (Valid And False Ones)
The original melody and lyrics of "Fever" were written by Otis Blackwell and Eddie Cooley only. Lee's recording features some of those original lyrics, but also adds plenty of new ones, none of which were written by Blackwell and Cooley. (Among them: the verses about Romeo and Juliette, Captain Smith and Pocahontas.) Many sources, including sheet music, include the additional lyrics. Regrettably, the two men are implicitly credited for them in all such sources, despite their utter lack of involvement in their creation.

The overall tenor of the additional lyrics was Peggy Lee's idea. The singer thought of them while she was preparing to debut her version of the number in concert (four months before the song ended up being recorded). The concert in question was a major one for her, signifying a return to performing after a short period of maritally imposed retirement from show business. The venue where this return would take place was the Copacabana, known for its emphasis on spectacle and variety. (Shows often featured, besides the main attraction, a diversity of performing acts.) Intent on making her comeback show a spectacular event both musically and visually, Lee spent over $20,000 in wardrobe. She also hired Sid Kuller, a talented (and probably very expensive) wordsmith who, from his roots in vaudeville, had moved on to write special material for the Broadway shows, movies and concert acts of many notable comedians and singers (Abbott & Costello, Eddie Cantor, Sammy Davis Jr., Duke Ellington, Billy Eckstine, Lena Horne, Tony Martin, Groucho Marx, Louis Prima, et cetera).

"Fever" was among the concert numbers for which Lee commissioned Kuller to write special material, possibly with the intention of having actors or dancers enact the lyrics, as she sang them. Further specifics are unclear. She might have had a sketch and/or a general leading concept in mind, dictating that the special lyrics should concentrate on "history's love lessons." Relying on Lee's suggestions, Kuller would have proceeded to put pen to paper. Alternatively, Lee might have worked out lyrics based on Kuller's suggestions, who would have further worked on them once she was finished. In any case, the results made their debut at Lee's expensively produced but also highly successful Copacabana engagement from February 1958.

In 1989, Peggy Lee wrote, by herself, additional, fresh lyrics for a new version of "Fever." She recorded them on the MusicMasters label, which in turn released them as part of the album There'll Be Another Spring: The Peggy Lee Songbook. See studio sessions dated November 1-3, 1989, in this page. For more details, consult the aforementioned supplementary page.





Masters

1. "Fever" In Stereo
Master #19145 ("Fever") was originally issued in 1958, on both 45-rpm single and EP (first of the two images right above). Those original issues were in mono. It was released in stereo one year later, on both EP (second image above) and LP (a various-artists compilation). The immense majority of ensuing reissues have continued to use the original, monaural option. Conversely, there is a relatively small number of reissues that have used the stereo alternative For the benefit of audiophile listeners wanting to hear the master in stereophonic sound, below is a chronological list of the much smaller quantity of issues which is known to contain it. (The stereo sounds fine. However, in the particular case of "Fever," mono is by far the best-sounding of the two configurations.)

a) Capitol LP: Sw 1162 (Reissued as Sw 6184?) — More Stars In Stereo (various-artists set, 1959)
b) Capitol EP: Sep 1 1232 — Fever (pictured above; 1959)
c) Capitol©Emi's Pathé Marconi 45: 2c 008 83378 — Fever ("Dance Forever" Series, No. 28) (France, 1983)
d) Time-Life Music Licensed CS/LP: 4 Lgd/Slgd 07 — Peggy Lee; "Legendary Singers" Series (1985)
e) Capitol's Cema Special Markets CS/CD: S41/S21 17888 — Greatest Hits (1994)
f) Capitol CS/CD: 7243 8 28533 4 3 — Spotlight On... Peggy Lee ("Great Ladies And Gentlemen Of Song" Series) (1995)
g) Capitol Jazz CD: 0777 7 97826 2 8 — Miss Peggy Lee (1998)
h) Capitol CD: 7243 4 97308 2 3 — The Best Of Miss Peggy Lee (1998)
i) Capitol©Emi CS/CD: 7243 5 27818 4 3 / 7243 5 27818 2 9 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee (United Kingdom, 2000)
j) Collectors' Choice CD: Ccm 921 2 — All Aglow Again! (Licensed, 2008)
k) Future Noise's Fantastic Voyage CD: Fvtd 043 — Ridin' High; The Complete Record Releases, 1957-1959 (United Kingdom, Public Domain, 2010)
l?) Capitol LP: Cw 5077 — I Left My Heart In San Francisco (Japan; release year unknown, possibly early 1970s)

The last item, identified by the letter L, is a tentative entry. Unfortunately, I have not listened to this particular item, which identifies its contents as being in stereo. (Hence I cannot categorically assert that the stereo claim applies to all 12 of its tracks.)

For all other issues containing master #19145, monaural is either known or believed to have been used.

2. "Fever" Remixed And Mashed Up
During the first decade of the twenty-first century, Peggy Lee's hit version of "Fever" began to be used in remixes and mashups that counted with the approval and involvement of EMI, the record company that owned the master at the time. Here are three such remixes, along with the issues in which they have been commercially released:

a) Fever {Gabin Remix} - 3:22
available on ...
-- Capitol CD single: 70876 17990 2 6 — Fever Single Remix (2003)
-- Capitol©Emi CD: 7243 82680 2 7 — The Best Of The Singles Collection (2003)
-- Capitol©Emi Electrola CD: 94635 9779 2 9 — Essential Peggy Lee (Germany, 2006)
-- For non-Peggy Lee items containing this remix, see the "Fever" entry in the page that this discography dedicates to Various-Artists Compilations.

b) Fever {Alex Callier Remix} - 3:25
available on ...
Capitol©Emi's Blue Note CD: 00946 342786 2 1 — Mad About Blue ("Sidetracks" Series, Volume 6; Compiled And Remixed By Alex Callier) (Various Artists, Netherlands, 2006)

c) Passenger Fever {Mark Vidler's Mashup Of Iggy Pop And Peggy Lee Numbers; Produced By Mark Vidler} - 3:07
available on ...
Capitol©Emi CD: 387629 — Mashed (Various Artists, United Kingdom, also identified as Virgin 858; 2007)

Peggy Lee had no direct involvement in the making of the above-listed mashup and remixes. (They were made, however, with EMIl's consent. Digital copies were kept by the label in its logs.) Hence they have been duly discussed in these notes but have not been entered in the discography's database of masters and alternate takes. As can be seen above, the Peggy Lee CDs that feature them have been listed under the regular "Fever" master. In the CD Index, the notes under these CDs' entries also specify whether said CDs contain a remix or a mashup.


Photo

Below: an unidentified and undated photo shows Peggy Lee in the act of performing "Fever" at a charity event (possibly March Of Dimes). Her general look suggests that this event dates from the first half of 1958. Note also that her dress seems to be the same attire which she wore for the Jump For Joy photo session.

There is a good chance that this telethon performance was the one which led to Capitol's request for a Lee recording of "Fever." (Details on that particular situation, courtesy of celebrated disc jockey Red Robinson, can be read in this discography's research page about "Fever," section IX.)

A bit of additional research has uncovered that the Third Annual March Of Dimes Telethon took place on Saturday, January 18, 1958, from noon to midnight. If that's truly the 1958 telethon on which Lee sang "Fever," then one of my previous statements will need to be corrected: her first public performance of the song would have happened at this telethon, not at her Copa engagement.





Date: May 25, 1958
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6874

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall's Music (acc), Justin Gordon, George Smith (r), Don Fagerquist, Conrad Gozzo, Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (t), Milt Bernhart (tb), Bob Enevoldsen (vtb), Howard Roberts (g), Joe Mondragon (b), Joe Harnell (p), Shelly Manne (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 19200-6-stereoAlternate Take You Don't Know - 2:22(Walter Spriggs)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 921 2 — ALL AGLOW AGAIN!   (2008)
b. 19200-7-monoMaster Take (Capitol) You Don't Know - 2:31(Walter Spriggs)
CAPITOL 45F 3998 — {Fever / You Don't Know [1958 master]}   (1958)
CAPITOL 78(Canada?) 3998 — {Fever / You Don't Know [1958 master]}   (1958)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1052 — Fever   (1958)
c. 19201-4Master Take (Capitol) Ridin' High - 2:07(Cole Porter)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
Pickwick Licensed 8-track/LPP8 139/(S)Pc 3090 — Once More With Feeling   (1968)
d. 19202-5Master Take (Capitol) Alright, Okay, You Win - 2:52(Mayme Watts, Sidney Wyche) / arr: Bill Holman
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL 45F 4115 — {Alright, Ok, You Win / My Man}   (1959)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1213 — Alright, Okay, You Win [aka Peggy Lee]   (1959)
e. 19203-10Master Take (Capitol) It's Been A Long, Long Time - 2:18(Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1049 — Things Are Swingin', Part 1 {aka It's A Wonderful World}   (1958)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)


The Things Are Swingin' Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: May 19, 25, 27 and 30, 1958.






Photos ("You Don't Know")

Recorded at this session, the number "You Don't Know" was picked to serve as the B side of Capitol single #3998, which featured "Fever" on its main side. Though never as popular as "Fever," this other number is an important one in the singer's canon. Lee actually recorded "You Don't Know" four times -- more than just about any other song in her sessionography. We can thus surmise that the singer favored this blues.

Her first recorded version (August 30, 1957) was never issued, and is currently deemed lost. Made for Capitol, it features an arrangement by Nelson Riddle.

This session's master take of "You Don"t Know" (#19200-7) is the rendition heard on the Capitol single. (The latter was released on 45 and, abroad, on 78 as well. A 78-rpm disc copy is indeed pictured above.) "You Don't Know" was also included, as a bonus track, on the Capitol Jazz CD issue of Things Are Swingin' (second photo above).

An alternate take from the present session has been commercially issued, too. Take #19200-6 appears as a bonus track on the Collectors' Choice CD All Aglow Again! (third picture above).

Lee recorded the song for Capitol again on February 1, 1966. That version also came out as the B single of another single (fourth photo above), and was included as well in the LP Big $pender (fifth picture above).

The artist's last recorded version of "You Don't Know" was undertaken in February of 1988, for the MusicMasters album Miss Peggy Lee Sings The Blues (last image above).


Masters And Alternate Takes

1. "You Don't Know"
Two takes of "You Don't Know" have been issued. Thanks to Peggy Lee's different phrasing and approach from one to the other, the two takes are easy to tell apart. Besides the vocal, there are marked differences between the musical intros, too. Moreover, one take is in mono, the other in stereo. An earlier (and unissued) master of "You Don't Know" was also recorded; see session dated April 30, 1957, including notes.


Songs

1. "Alright, Okay, You Win" At The Grammys
"Alright, Okay, You Win" earned Peggy Lee her second Best Performance, Female Grammy nomination. The nomination in itself was of course an honor, but Lee had a secondary reason to feel even prouder of this achievement: she was one of the two female singers who had been nominated on the two years of the Grammy's existence. The other repeat nominee for Best Performance, Female was Ella Fitzgerald. As in the previous year, the category mixed nominations for albums (this time by Lena Horne, Pat Suzuki and Caterina Valente) with nominations for singles (by Peggy Lee and Ella Fitzgerald). At the ceremony, held on November 29, 1959, the winner was Fitzgerald, for her version of the song "But Not For Me."

2. "Alright, Okay, You Win" In The Music Charts
The Peggy Lee singles that followed on the heels of Lee's successful Capitol single #3998 ("Fever" / "You Don't Know," the latter from this session; see also notes under preceding session) were "Sweetheart" / "Light Of Love" (#4071) and "Alright, Okay, You Win" / "My Man" (#4115). Both were double-charting singles not only in the United States but also in Canada. Capitol #4115 peaked at #28 in CHUM's Weekly Hit Parade, a top fifty airplay chart tabulated by Toronto's radio station CHUM.

In the United States, "Alright, Okay, You Win" and "My Man" charted separately. "Alright, Okay, You Win" entered Billboard's Hot 100 during the week of January 26, 1959 and stayed for six weeks, peaking at #68. It became Lee's 51st entry in Billboard's singles charts -- and her fourth hit after returning to Capitol. It had a slightly better showing in Cash Box's Best Selling Singles chart, where it spent seven weeks and peaked at #62.

For chart details about "My Man," see session dated October 17, 1965. For details about the other double-charting single (#4071), see notes under session dated September 14, 1958.


Issues

1. Discographical Error In Peggy Lee ("The Best of The Capitol Years" Series) [CD]
2. "You Don't Know"
See notes under session dated August 30, 1957.

2. Bewitching-Lee! [CDs from S&P and DCC]
Potential buyers interested in compact disc versions of the hits album Bewitching-Lee! have two options, one on S&P and the other on DCC Records. Whereas fans of the original Capitol LP may prefer the DCC disc, dedicated audiophiles will probably favor the S&P CD. Casual listeners probably won't mind either version.

The sound of the S&P CD is arguably clearer. S&P worked with a master tape of the LP which had neither artificial echo nor the other procedures that engineers applied to the final LP mix. The resulting reissue has a feel of immediacy to it. Listeners may get the impression that many of the songs are being performed in the moment, right in front of them. The lack of in-depth processing has thus resulted in greater clarity.

On the flip side of the coin, there is some unavoidable hiss and distortion in the S&P CD -- particularly, in the songs that come from the 1940s. However, such instances of distortion are minor and do not work to the tracks' detriment. Vocal and instruments are still heard in clear and fine fidelity, even on top of the occasional hiss.

As for the DCC version, it possesses a more "faraway," echo-laden quality which actually benefits the darker songs in the album, such as "Don't Smoke In Bed." This CD preserves the echo or reverb effect that is heard in the original LP. Given the lack of any significant amount of hiss or tape distortion throughout (except for one track, "While We're Young," which was sourced from the hiss-filed tape that was readily available at the time, not from the original acetate disc) the CD's final engineer (Bob Norberg) must have applied additional processing, such as a modern no-noise program.

Reports about the engineering of the DCC CD indicate that a dry transfer was originally made and released, but promptly recalled at the client's request, who asked for a new transfer with reverb. For that second, reverb-drenched transfer (the one heard in most of the commercially available DCC CD copies), engineer Bob Norberg was enlisted. Only one track ("Is That All There Is?") was kept as it was heard in the original pressing (i.e., without reverb and without no-noise). Despite Norberg's crucial, final involvement, the DCC still credits the engineer that did the dry, subsequently modified transfer (Steve Hoffman).


Date: May 27, 1958
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6876

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall's Music (acc), Justin Gordon, George Smith (r), Don Fagerquist, Conrad Gozzo, Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (t), Milt Bernhart (tb), Bob Enevoldsen (vtb), Howard Roberts (g), Joe Mondragon (b), Joe Harnell (p), Shelly Manne (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 19209-5Master Take (Capitol) It's A Good, Good Night - 1:54(Peggy Lee)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France Pm 156 619 4/1) & (United Kingdom Tcems/Ems 1139) — Things Are Swingin' ("Retrospect" & "Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1985)
b. 19210-10-monoMaster Take (Capitol) You're Mine, You - 1:46(Johnny Green, Edward Heyman)
CAPITOL LPT 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
Pickwick Licensed 8-track/LPP8 139/(S)Pc 3090 — Once More With Feeling   (1968)
Pickwick Licensed LPPtp 2028 2 — Once More With Feeling / I've Got The World On A String ("2 Sensational Albums In 1 Hit Package")    (1968)
c. 19210-_-stereoAlternate Take (Capitol) You're Mine, You - 1:47(Johnny Green, Edward Heyman)
CAPITOL LPSt 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France Pm 156 619 4/1) & (United Kingdom Tcems/Ems 1139) — Things Are Swingin' ("Retrospect" & "Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1985)
d. 19211-8-monoMaster Take (Capitol) Life Is For Livin' - 3:11(Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) / arr: Sammy Cahn
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1049 — Things Are Swingin', Part 1 {aka It's A Wonderful World}   (1958)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
e. 19211-_Alternate Take (Capitol) Life Is For Livin' - 3:08(Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) / arr: Sammy Cahn
CAPITOL Jazz CD7243 5 97071 2 9 — THINGS ARE SWINGIN'   (2004)
Carrefour Licensed CD(France) 50999 505469 2 3 — Things Are Swingin'   (2007)
Play 24-7 Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Play 2 073 — Things Are Swingin' & The Man I Love ("Original Masters Collection" Series)   (2010)
Play 24-7 Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Play 3 015 — These Ladies Can Swing, Volume 1 {Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone}   (2010)
Blue Moon Licensed/Public Domain CD(Spain) Bmcd 880 — Swingin' Brightly & Gently; Complete Recordings, 1958-1959   (2016)


The Things Are Swingin' Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: May 19, 25, 27 and 30, 1958.





Photos

British and Australian vinyl reissues of the album Things Are Swingin', issued by those countries' branches of the World Record Club. For details about reissues such as these ones, consult this discography's gallery of Capitol albums. Similar details are also provided in the British and foreign index pages.


Arrangements

1. "Life Is For Livin' "
2. Sammy Cahn
In an oral, unpublished interview, Peggy Lee referred to Sammy Cahn as the arranger of this song, which he co-wrote, and which was composed for Lee. However, none of the three arrangements of "Life's Is For Livin' " extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library give credit to Cahn. Credited instead are Bill Holman, Mundell Lowe, and Shorty Rogers. A conciliatory scenario: perhaps Cahn visited Lee to sketch the arrangement, and later Lee commissioned a more formal arrangement from one of the other three men. Alternatively, Lee's recollection could be somewhat off the mark. In any case, my crediting of Cahn as the arranger of this performance should be deemed very tentative.


Masters, Alternate Takes And Issues

1. "You're Mine, You"
The differences between the two released takes of "You're Mine, You" are most evident in Peggy Lee's phrasing of the opening line. My thanks to Steve Dodd and to Gary Trinder for their comments about this topic in the Peggy Lee Bulletin Board.

2. "Life Is For Livin' "
The differences between the two released takes of "Life Is For Livin' " are not readily evident to the ear, because most of them consist of the smallest variations in emphasis and intonation. I hear them most clearly in Peggy Lee's singing of words such as "silly" and "pigeons" ("... Before this silly old willy nilly world goes poof. It's worth repeating, my pigeons ..."). In both cases, Lee's pronunciation is more emphatic (and preferable) in the mono take. But there is actually one very clear difference. It is in one of the final lines:

Life is for livin'
And love's to give
[Yes,] Life is for livin'
So live, live, live.

Live it up!
Yes, live!

Life is for livin'
So, live, live, live.

Live it up!


In the third of the quoted lines, Lee utters the word "yes" in one take, but not in the other. The only issue that I know to contain the "yesless" take is the 2004 Things Are Swingin' CD from Capitol Jazz. The "yes" take is in all other issues that I have checked (e.g., the mono LP, the Pathé Marconi reissue, the Japanese LP Ecj 60044).

I do not have a copy of the original stereo LP, but a fellow fan has told me that it too features the "yes" take. I'd be grateful for input from owners of the original reel-to-reel of Things Are Swingin': is the "yes" take also heard in that issue (as I have tentatively assumed while entering that reel in this discography)?

My thanks to Don and to Yvan Tarbouriech, from the aforementioned Board, for their kind assistance with this matter.


Date: May 30, 1958
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #6883

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall's Music (acc), Justin Gordon, George Smith (r), Walter "Pete" Candoli, Emmanuel "Manny" Klein, Uan Rasey (t), Milt Bernhart (tb), Bob Enevoldsen (vtb), Barney Kessel (g), Joe Mondragon (b), Joe Harnell (p), Shelly Manne (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 19233-10Master Take (Capitol) Alone Together - 2:05(Harold Dietz, Arthur Schwartz)
Nova AP Music Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Aupcd 4012 — Fever; The Best Of Peggy Lee ("The Ultimate 101 Collection" Series)   (2014)
b. 19234-8Master Take (Capitol) It's A Wonderful World - 2:13(Harold Adamson, Jan Savitt, Johnny Watson)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1049 — Things Are Swingin', Part 1 {aka It's A Wonderful World}   (1958)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/CD(United Kingdom) CdFever 1 / 72437 80361 2 8 — FEVER; THE BEST OF PEGGY LEE   (1992)
Disky Licensed CD(Netherlands) Hr 883492 — Fever   (1997)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 4 97143 2 8 — C'est Magnifique   (1998)
Nova AP Music Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Aupcd 4012 — Fever; The Best Of Peggy Lee ("The Ultimate 101 Collection" Series)   (2014)
c. 19235-10Master Take (Capitol) I'm Beginning To See The Light - 1:45(Duke Ellington, Don George, Johnny Hodges, Harry James)
K-tel Licensed CS/LP(Netherlands) Tn 1722/1721 — Lovers' Rendezvous   (1988)
CAPITOL CS/CD7243 8 28533 4 3 — Spotlight On... Peggy Lee ("Great Ladies And Gentlemen Of Song" Series)   (1995)
EMI Special Markets CD95937 — The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1995)
Disky Licensed CD(Netherlands) Hr 883492 — Fever   (1997)
Reader's Digest Licensed CD(United Kingdom) Rdcd 5831 3 — Peggy Lee ("The Ultimate Collection" Series)   (2007)
All titles on: CAPITOL LP(S)T 1049 — Things Are Swingin'   (1958)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France Pm 156 619 4/1) & (United Kingdom Tcems/Ems 1139) — Things Are Swingin' ("Retrospect" & "Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1985)


The Things Are Swingin' Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: May 19, 25, 27 and 30, 1958.





Photos

Todo Se Dice Con Swing is the Argentinian LP edition of the album Things Are Swingin'. The second image is a shot from the same photographic date that generated the front cover of Things Are Swingin'.


Issues

1. Things Are Swingin' [LP] In The Music Charts
This long play entered Billboard's Best-Selling Pop LPs chart during the week of December 9, 1958 and ended up peaking at #16. (For Lee's next entry in the album charts, see session dated May 28-30, 1959.)

The album is also listed in a Most Played By Jockeys survey published in the December 8, 1958 issue of Billboard, where it ranked #6.

2. Things Are Swingin' [CD]: Mono Versus Stereo
The EMI CD Things Are Swingin' / Jump For Joy contains not stereo but mono versions of both albums. There is no definitively known reason for EMI's choice of mono despite the availability of stereo, but two unofficial explanations have circulated among fans of Peggy Lee.

According to one explanation, EMI in the United Kingdom faced a dilemma when they belatedly realized that Capitol's tape library (located in the United States) had shut down for nine months, as part of an ongoing process of tape relocation. This situation posed a dilemma for the British label. EMI had already publicized the twofer, going as far as to announce its release date. Moreover, the project had gone into production, with features such as the cover artwork in the process of being completed. The option of waiting for nine months was thus deemed out of the question. In this version of events, EMI decides to just use its own library's tapes, which are non first-generation. More to the point, this explanation portrays EMI as able to locate only mono copies in its library.

The other explanation holds that EMI misunderstood a directive given by Ray Purslow, owner of the music store Record Centre, in Birmingham, England. (Mr. Purslow used to supply EMI with advice on which albums to release in the two-fer-one series, and he would also lend cover artwork to the company when necessary.) According to this account, Purslow had made some comments to EMI about the imperative of rejecting duophonic or "fake stereo" when it was the only available stereo, instead choosing mono in such cases. EMI is said to have misinterpreted those comments as meaning that issuing mono was preferable to issuing stereo.

Both of these explanations center on the notion of miscommunication among the parties involved. Underlying them is the fact that EMI's twofer series was just starting when this Peggy Lee disc was prepared. Hence errors of coordination were much likelier to happen then than in later times. Subsequent Peggy Lee titles in the series invariably used the stereo versions of the albums (with the exception of The Man I Love, which was digitally issued in mono because there has never been a stereo release).


Date: September 14, 1958 (3:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7252

Peggy Lee (ldr), David Klein (om), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), William "Bill" Pitman, Hilmer "Tiny" Timbrell (g), Max K. Bennett (b), John Williams (p), Verlye Mills Brilhart (hrp), Larry Bunker, Shelly Manne (d), Peggy Lee (v), The Evelyn Freeman Singers (bkv)

a. 30107-14-monoMaster Take (Capitol) Light Of Love - 1:30(Charles Singleton) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL 45F 4071 — {Sweetheart / Light Of Love}   (1958)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1213 — Alright, Okay, You Win [aka Peggy Lee]   (1959)
CAPITOL EP(France) Feap 106 — Sweetheart   (1959)
b. 30107-15-stereoAlternate Take (Capitol) Light Of Love - 1:28(Charles Singleton)
CAPITOL CD72435 27564 2 1 — RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES [aka Capitol's Collectors Series, Vol. 2]   (2000)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 921 2 — ALL AGLOW AGAIN!   (2008)
c. 30108-12-stereoAlternate Take (Capitol) Sweetheart - 2:19(Winfield Scott) / arr: Jack Marshall
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 921 2 — ALL AGLOW AGAIN!   (2008)
d. 30108-21-monoMaster Take (Capitol) Sweetheart - 2:22(Winfield Scott) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL 45F 4071 — {Sweetheart / Light Of Love}   (1958)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1213 — Alright, Okay, You Win [aka Peggy Lee]   (1959)
CAPITOL EP(France) Feap 106 — Sweetheart   (1959)


The "Fever" Singles Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: (May 19, May 25) and September 14, 1958. The first two dates are parenthetically included because they were actually album session. However, in addition to the numbers for the album, a song for release on a single was tagged to the May 19 session. "Fever" was the song in question. Producer Dave Cavanaugh and other Capitol executives were probably keen on having Lee rush-record what was expected to be a hit single. The May 25 session started off with the recording of the prospective flip side for the single (the blues "You Don't Know," a favorite of Lee's), and then proceeded with its scheduled recording of album numbers. The present session was the follow-up to "Fever." Lee was asked to record a couple of songs obviously aimed at mainstream radio and the popular mass market. One of the numbers was musically modeled after "Fever," whereas the other number was patterned in the contemporaneous pop gospel/ r&b vein. (For other 1957-1959 sessions specifically dedicated to singles, look up the following dates: April 13 and 22, 1957. August 30, 1957. October 10, 1959. Naturally, some of the album sessions included songs that were released on singles, too.)






Photo

A trade advertisement placed by Capitol in music trade publications in early October of 1958. It highlights three singles, including the one that resulted from this Peggy Lee session.


Songs (And Music Charts)

1. "Light Of Love" In The Music Charts
2. "Sweetheart" In The Music Charts
The follow-up to Lee's smash single "Fever" (released on Capitol #3998) consists of "Light Of Love" and "Sweetheart", both lighthearted pop pieces which Lee might have recorded at the suggestion of Capitol's brass. Capitol #4071 proved a double-charting hit single, albeit a minor one.

The gospel-tinged "Light Of Love" did best, peaking at #63. After its debut during the week that started on November 3, 1958, it spent six weeks in Billboard's Hot 100.

As for flip side "Sweetheart," in November 1958 it stalled at #98 for two weeks, and then fell off Billboard's chart. Even though it barely cracked the Hot 100, "Sweetheart" still achieved the noteworthy feat of increasing Peggy Lee's Billboard output to 50 chart entries. Furthermore, "Sweetheart" fared a little better in Cash Box's Top 100 Singles, earning a #92 peak.

A percussion-driven piece, "Sweetheart" is clearly modeled after "Fever." Lee's interpretation is not in a "Fever" mold, however; she suitably treats the song as a jump blues. The number is musically catchy and there is plenty of appeal in the vocalist's interpretation, but the lyrics are lacking in substance, thereby limiting the song's overall catchiness and appeal.

In Canada, Capitol #4071 had a warmer reception. Tabulated as an unity, "Light Of Love" and "Sweetheart" reached #30 in CHUM's Weekly Hit Parade, a top 50 airplay chart generated by Toronto's radio station CHUM. (Incidentally, each of those Canadian weekly charts has been printed and included in Albert Hall's The CHUM Chart Book -- starting with the very first one in 1957 and concluding with charts from the year in which the book was published, 1983.)

3. Unusual Sightings In Billboard's Hot 100 Chart: Songbirds From The Pre-Rock Era
For artists whose careers had blossomed in the 1930s and 1940s, entries in Billboard's weekly singles charts were rare from the mid-1950s onwards. And even when one such entry uncharacteristically showed up, seldom did it crack the top 40. (A very notable exception to this generalization is the case of Frank Sinatra, whose singles reached top ten positions many times in the 1950s and 1960s. Aside from Sinatra, a handful others managed one major top 40 hit here and there -- most notably, Louis Armstrong with "Hello Dolly" -- or a brief string of minor hits in a by-the-numbers, overtly commercial vein. There were also one or two pop artists who found some success by catering to a country or countrypolitan audience, but not much of it when they tried to record in the pop-jazz vein which had characterized their work of previous decades.)

Peggy Lee was also among the precious few acts who cracked the Hot 100 during those lean years. She actually scored two high-charting hits ("Fever" and "Is That All There Is"), recorded ten years apart. Lee also managed to land a fair share of numbers in the second half of the chart (i.e., the slots from #50 to #100) -- a feat that unfortunately evaded many of her similarly worthy peers.

This overall lack of older, established acts in Billboard's Hot 100 chart was not necessarily a sign of disinterest from all listening demographics. Proof that there was still a market for vintage artists' singles came in 1965, when Billboard finally started tabulating airplay on radio stations that had stayed away from the rock, rock 'n' roll, or country genres and fads. Acts such as Peggy Lee readily appeared in such tabulations. (For some specifics, see notes under session dated December 9, 1964.)


Masters And Alternate Takes

1. "Sweetheart"
2. "Light Of Love"
Two takes of "Sweetheart" have been issued, one in mono and the other in stereo. The same is true for "Light Of Love." In the case of "Sweetheart," one of the most noticeable differences between takes can be heard when Lee first comes to the lines "I'll drown myself in the deep blue sea / Yes, I'll drown myself in the deep blue sea." Listen, in particular, to the way in which the word "sea" is sung from one take to the other.

The differences between the two takes of "Light Of Love" are subtler. The vocal sounds identical and, overall, the music sounds the same, too. Nevertheless, intent listening of the intro reveals that, at :06, the bass plays five notes in the mono take, four notes in the stereo take. As best assessed by my friend George Hewitt (to whom I owe the realization that more than one take of "Light Of Love" has been released), "the tempo of the mono take is slower, but only by a fraction."


Date: October 17, 1958 (8:00 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7340

Peggy Lee (ldr), Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (om, t), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall and His Orchestra (acc), Mahlon Clark (cl), Benny Carter (as), Milt Bernhart (tb), Barney Kessel (g), Meyer Rubin (b), James "Jimmy" Rowles (p), Shelly Manne (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 30428-7Master Take (Capitol) Charley, My Boy - 1:35(Ted Fiorito, Gus Kahn)
CAPITOL LPS(T) 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
b. 30429-10Master Take (Capitol) Oh Johnny, Oh Johnny Oh! - 1:47(Ed Rose, Abe Olman)
CAPITOL LPS(T) 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) T 518 — I Like Men! [contains 1 track not on original US version]   (1966)
c. 30430-8Master Take (Capitol) My Man - 2:13(Jacques Charles, Channing Pollock, Albert Willemetz, Maurice Yvain) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL 45F 4115 — {Alright, Ok, You Win / My Man}   (1959)
CAPITOL LPS(T) 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL EPSep 1 1232 — Fever   (1959)
d. 30430-9Alternate Take (Capitol) My Man - 2:10(Jacques Charles, Channing Pollock, Albert Willemetz, Maurice Yvain) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1213 — Alright, Okay, You Win [aka Peggy Lee]   (1959)
CAPITOL EP(France) Feap 106 — Sweetheart   (1959)
CAPITOL EP(Germany) Eap 1 45 010 — O.k. Peggy Lee   (1959)
Disky Licensed CD(Netherlands) Tc 862652 — Peggy Lee ("A Touch Of Class" Series)   (1997)
e. 30431-8-monoMaster Take (Capitol) I'm Just Wild About Harry - 2:09(Eubie Blake, Noble Sissle)
CAPITOL LPT 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) T 518 — I Like Men! [contains 1 track not on original US version]   (1966)
Pure Pleasure Licensed audiophile LP(United Kingdom) Ppan T1131 — I LIKE MEN!   (2009)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 6901 - P 6902 — Basic Music Library [LP I Like Men + 4 songs from 2 singles]   
f. 30431-stereoAlternate Take (Capitol) I'm Just Wild About Harry - 2:09(Eubie Blake, Noble Sissle)
CAPITOL LPSt 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/LP(United Kingdom) Caps __/1006 (also reissued by Emi as Vine 1020) — Songs For My Man   (1977)




The I Like Men! Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: October 17, 19, and 22, 1958. Images above: original Capitol US LP T-1131 (1958) and Japanese EMI-Universal CD reissue Tocj-9754 (2013).


Personnel

1. "I'm Just Wild About Harry"
2. Milt Bernhart And Other Session Members
In the previous edition of this discography, this session's personnel was deemed tentative. In this edition, the personnel that I am listing has been officially confirmed. Excluded are three of the musicians that were previously listed (Pete Candoli, Frank Rosolino, Jack Sheldon). Although all three might have participated in later I Like Men! album sessions, the AFM report shows that none of them played during this particular date.

Peggy Lee's version of "I'm Just Wild About Harry" contains two choruses that I have not heard in any other interpretations. One of those choruses opens the song, and thus functions as a verse of sorts: "Samuel is great, Irving is a joy, ?Merv is wonderful, and Robert, oh boy. Jay is terrific, Phil is supreme, Dan is the most, and Frank is a dream. But I'm just wild about Harry." The other chorus occurs around 1:15, before Lee sings the refrain: "There's Barney and Jim, Shelley and Mike, Benny and Pete and others I like, like Mannie and Milt, and David and Jack, Mahlon and Tony and Curly and Mack."

Those two choruses were apparently created specifically for Lee's recording. The late Milt Bernhart, who was one of the session's musicians, referred to them on more than one occasion. Stan Kenton researcher Ed Chaplin shared with me his knowledge about this particular matter: "I asked [Bernhart] a few years ago when he was in the UK telling lots of us about his life in music, and he told me he thought that the new words in I'm Just Wild About Harry were constructed to name all the sidemen on the date(s)." Indeed, heard in the second of the two choruses are the names Barney, Jim, Shelley, Mike, Benny, Mannie, Milt, Jack, and Mahlon, a list that cover the session's entire personnel (i.e., Kessel, Rowles, Manne, Rubin, Carter, Klein, Bernhart, Marshall, Clark). Less clear is the identity of the other men mentioned in the second chorus, since they are not listed in the AFM report: Pete, David, Tony, Curly and Mack. Perhaps some names, such as "Curly," were thrown in just for rhyming or comical effect. Other names could belong to the engineers and additional personnel; "David" was probably producer Dave Cavanaugh.

As for the names heard in the other chorus (i.e., the first chorus, from which I quoted in the previous paragraph), they could of course refer to actual individuals as well, but so far I have not found any evidence of such being the case.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Jack Marshall
2. "My Man"
The album I Like Men! credits Jack Marshall with all of its arrangements. Because collective credits of this type sometimes prove to be highly inaccurate, I have tried to exercise caution in my handling of them. Hence I have given arranging credit to Marshall only for those numbers for which there are scores under her name, in Peggy Lee's sheet music library: this date's "My Man" and, from subsequent I Like Men! dates, two more songs.





Songs

1. "My Man" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's reworking of this standard from the 1920s became the 52nd Billboard entry of her career (and the singer's fifth number to make the charts after her return to Capitol). "My Man" entered the Hot 100 during the week of January 26, 1959 and spent six weeks in the chart, peaking at #81. The recording had a slightly better showing in Cash Box's Top 100 Singles chart, where it spent a total of seven weeks and peaked at #76.

Notice that Capitol #4115 (consisting of "My Man" and "Alright, Ok, You Win") was a double-charting single. For chart details about the flip side, see session dated May 25, 1958.

Capitol #4115 also fared well when it traveled north of the border. The single peaked at #28 in CHUM's Weekly Hit Parade, a top 50 airplay chart tabulated by Toronto's radio station CHUM.


Masters, Alternate Takes And Issues

1. "I'm Just Wild About Harry": Take Differentiation
Two takes of "I'm Just Wild About Harry" have been released. They sound almost identical. Almost. To hear one of the differences, listen to the way in which Lee sings the word "cannot" in the lines "' ... just wild about / Cannot do without" (around 47 seconds into the number). In the stereo take, she holds on to the first syllable of "cannot." She does not do so in the mono take.

2. "I'm Just Wild About Harry": Mono/Stereo Distribution
Please notice that I have not listened to all the issues listed above. For that reason, I have had to make some educated guesses when it has come to choosing which version (mono or stereo) of II'm Just Wild About Harry" is found in the non-auditioned issues. The exact same caveat applies to two other performances from the I Like Men! sessions that have also been issued on different mono and stereo takes. See a more extensive commentary about this matter in the Issues notes under session dated October 22, 1958.

3. "My Man": Take Differentiation
This session's two takes of "My Man" have clearly audible differences. One of the differences is heard in Peggy Lee's phrasing of the line "the world is bright," around 1 minute and 24 seconds into the two takes. In the alternate (#9), the singer stretches the word "bright" more than in the master (#8).

At least three songs from the I Like Men sessions were issued in different takes, one for the mono and the other for the stereo version of the album. (The three songs in questions are not from the session under discussion.) The same master take of "My Man" was, on the other hand, included in both the monophonic and the stereophonic version of the album. The alternate take was originally consigned to 45-rpm issues, as can be seen in the issue listings above.

4. "My Man": Take Distribution
I have not been able to locate every issue in which "My Man" has been included. Of the list seen above, I can vouch for the correct take assignation of the following issues:

a) the EP Alright, Okay, You Win [aka Peggy Lee] (Eap 1 1213).
b) most of the LPs listed, including I Like Men!, All Aglow Again!, Bewitching-Lee!, and The Very Best Of Peggy Lee.
c) most of the CDs listed, including those on Capitol, its subsidiaries and licensees.
d) as already mentioned, the original LP in both its mono and stereo incarnations.

On the other hand, I have yet to locate copies or receive specifics about the following issues:

e) the original 45-rpm single (F 4115).
f) the EP Fever (Sep 1232).
g) the French EP Sweetheart (Feap 106).

For these last three items, my assignation of one or the other take of "My Man" is thus based on educated guessing only. Confirmation and corrections would be appreciated.


Date: October 19, 1958
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7342

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall and His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 30436-3Master Take (Capitol) I Love To Love - 2:51(Herbert Baker) / arr: Benny Golson
b. 30437-14Master Take (Capitol) It's So Nice To Have A Man Around The House - 2:22(Harold Spina, John M. "Jack" Elliot)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 6901 - P 6902 — Basic Music Library [LP I Like Men + 4 songs from 2 singles]   
c. 30438-14Master Take (Capitol) So In Love - 2:33(Cole Porter)
Pickwick Licensed 8-track/LPP8 139/(S)Pc 3090 — Once More With Feeling   (1968)
Pickwick Licensed LPPtp 2028 2 — Once More With Feeling / I've Got The World On A String ("2 Sensational Albums In 1 Hit Package")    (1968)
Pair Licensed CS/CDPcdk/Pcd 2 1194 — Seductive   (1989)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 6901 - P 6902 — Basic Music Library [LP I Like Men + 4 songs from 2 singles]   
d. 30439-5Master Take (Capitol) I Like Men! - 2:06(Peggy Lee, Jack Marshall) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL EPSep 1 1232 — Fever   (1959)
BMG MUSIC PUBLISHING CD[promo] Pub 016 — PEGGY LEE: SONGWRITER   (2001)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 6901 - P 6902 — Basic Music Library [LP I Like Men + 4 songs from 2 singles]   
All titles on: CAPITOL LPS(T) 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) T 518 — I Like Men! [contains 1 track not on original US version]   (1966)




The I Like Men! Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: October 17, 19, and 22, 1958. Images above: May 1959 advertisement announcing the release of various Capitol albums in stereo. Among them was I Like Men, whose mono edition had been originally issued two months earlier. Also, a black & white, larger edition of the photo that graces the front cover of the I Like Men! album.


Arrangements

1. Jack Marshall
2. "I Like Men"
The album I Like Men! credits Jack Marshall with all of its arrangements. Because collective credits of this type are sometimes highly overstated, I have tried to handle them with caution in this discography, putting more trust on individual authorship claims. Accordingly, three of this session's four arrangements are left uncredited. The fourth, for the song "I Like Men," is extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library, and bears Marshall's name. (For evidence that may contradict the album's overall credit to Marshall, see entries immediately below.)

3. Benny Golson
4. "I Love To Love"
Lee's library also contains a Benny Golson arrangement of the song "I Love To Love." Since I have no absolute certainty that his arrangement is the same one used for this session's performance, the Golson credit should be deemed tentative.

3. Yutaka Yokokura
4. "So In Love"
Furthermore, a Yutaka Yokokura arrangement of the song "So In Love" is also found in Lee's library. Nevertheless, that particular score bears no direct connection to this date's performance of "So In Love": Yokokura probably wrote his score 20 years after the present session took place.


Personnel

This date's musicians are unknown. They are presumed to be mostly the same ones who participated in the first of the I Like Men! sessions, dated October 17, 1958. Additional musicians that could have participated in this session are Pete Candoli, Frank Rosolino, and Jack Sheldon.


Issues

1. Fever [EP]
On April 13, 1959, Capitol proudly released its first batch of stereo EPs. The four artists whose EPs Capitol chose for this treatment were Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Ray Anthony, and the only female in the bunch, Peggy Lee. (As for stereo LPs, Capitol had already released its first batch of 13 titles, all of them instrumentals, back in October 1958.) Lee's stereophonic EP consisted of songs that she had recorded the previous year. Three of them had been hit singles: "Fever," "Alright, Ok, You Win," and "My Man". The EP's fourth song was Lee's self-penned number "I Like Men!," a cut from her 1959 LP of the same title. (Also, for the record, I should add that two of the hits had been previously released not only on single but also on original LP: "Alright, Ok, You Win" in the album Things Are Swingin' and "My Man" in the album I Like Men!.)

2. Absent From The Music Charts: I Like Men! [LP]
The LP I Like Men! did not enter the music charts. This fact is curious because each of Lee's three previous Capitol LPs made Billboard's Top 20, and the same would prove true of Beauty And The Beat!, the album that followed the one under discussion.

Released by Capitol in February 1959, I Like Men! might have received limited promotion. As the company's pop branch became more invested in other commercial concerns, this LP (and those by other artists) could have gotten lost in the shuffle. One of such concerns would have been the aforementioned series of stereo releases (compilatory EPs and instrumental LPs) that came out between October 1958 and April 1959, and which were highly touted by the company.

Another factor worthy of consideration has received discussion in previous sessions of this discographical page: during the first half of 1959, Capitol appears to have undertaken the task of re-releasing in stereo many a LP that had been originally recorded in both mono and stereo, but which had been previously available only in mono. In short, the stereo reissue project was the focus of the day and, as a result, some of the new releases might have received a lesser amount of attention and promotion than usual.

There was also a circumstantial event that probably monopolized the attention of Capitol's record-making and advertisement departments, requiring as it did a substantial amount of preparation. I am referring to the much publicized Miami disc jockey convention that would take place in May 1959 (and which would lead to Lee's next album, the chart-hitting Beauty And The Beat!).

The comments that I have just made should not be taken to mean that Capitol is known to have neglected doing promotion for the album I Like Men!. The album did receive an amount of promotion that can be measured, at the very least, as moderate. Promotional copies were certainly sent out to radio stations. An album track was probably included in Sounds Unlimited, a LP sampler of Capitol's releases for March of 1959. (Unfortunately, I have not been able to locate the track listing of that promotional Capitol LP.)

In the trade press, Capitol placed a by-the-numbers ad on Billboard magazine. Shown in the ad are the front covers of nine albums. (Such was, I assume, the full batch of new Capitol pop/jazz releases for the first quarter of 1959.) Viewable in this discography's Capitol Albums Pictorial Page (section VII), the ad proclaims that it is showing "BRAND NEW MUSIC! (Capitol brand, by Nat 'King' Cole, Judy Garland, Jonah Jones & Others)." The full list of artists, in order of album presentation, is as follows: Nat King Cole, Judy Garland, Jonah Jones, George Shearing, Peggy Lee, Les Baxter, Freddy Martin, The Frank Moore Four, and Guy Lombardo.

Amidst this Capitol batch of albums from March of 1959, lack of chart success is not exclusive to I Like Men!. On the contrary, not one of these nine albums seem to have managed to enter the charts. This arguable oddity becomes all the more curious when these LPs are compared to recent and subsequent albums from these artists' catalogues. Matching the already described pattern of Peggy Lee's album releases, Nat King Cole's LP offerings from the previous year had charted, and so would his ensuing LP. Some of George Shearing's various albums from the previous year had charted as well, and at least one more would do so in the following year. Notice, too, that the March 1959 Jonah Jones album Jonah Jumps Again was a sequel to his top 15-charting LP Jumpin With Jonah from 1958 and thus a release with potential for at least a modicum of sale and chart action. Etc., etc.

Given the above-shared observations, deficient promotion strikes me as the main, likeliest reason why I Like Men! (along with other Capitol artists' worthwhile LPs) failed to crack the music charts during the first half of 1958. Also worth pondering is whether Capitol saturated the market with its release of four Peggy LPs during 1959 (as opposed to two in 1958): in addition to I Like Men! and Beauty And The Beat!, there were the new stereo versions of two albums previously issued in mono only (Jump For Joy and Things Are Swingin'). Then again, Capitol went on to release five Peggy Lee LPs in 1960, a fact which suggests that, from the company's perspective, the market was not saturated, and the singer's sales were healthy.


Date: October 22, 1958
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7353

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall and His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 30470-9-monoMaster Take (Capitol) Jim - 2:59(Caesar James Petrillo, Nelson A. Shawn, Milton Samuels)
CAPITOL LPT 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) T 518 — I Like Men! [contains 1 track not on original US version]   (1966)
Pure Pleasure Licensed audiophile LP(United Kingdom) Ppan T1131 — I LIKE MEN!   (2009)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 6901 - P 6902 — Basic Music Library [LP I Like Men + 4 songs from 2 singles]   
b. 30470-_-stereoAlternate Take (Capitol) Jim - 2:59(Caesar James Petrillo, Nelson A. Shawn, Milton Samuels)
CAPITOL LPSt 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(United Kingdom) Tcems/Ems 1287 — I Like Men! ("Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1988)
c. 30471-25-monoMaster Take (Capitol) Bill - 2:46(Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II, P. G. Wodehouse)
CAPITOL LPT 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) T 518 — I Like Men! [contains 1 track not on original US version]   (1966)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Pure Pleasure Licensed audiophile LP(United Kingdom) Ppan T1131 — I LIKE MEN!   (2009)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 6901 - P 6902 — Basic Music Library [LP I Like Men + 4 songs from 2 singles]   
d. 30471-_-stereoAlternate Take (Capitol) Bill - 2:46(Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II, P. G. Wodehouse)
CAPITOL LPSt 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/LP(United Kingdom) Caps __/1006 (also reissued by Emi as Vine 1020) — Songs For My Man   (1977)
e. 30472-4Master Take (Capitol) When A Woman Loves A Man - 2:46(Bernie D. Hanighen, Gordon Jenkins, Johnny Mercer) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL LPS(T) 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) T 518 — I Like Men! [contains 1 track not on original US version]   (1966)
f. 30473-15Master Take (Capitol) Good-For-Nothin' Joe - 2:32(Rube Bloom, Ted Koehler)
CAPITOL LPS(T) 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL EPEap 1 1131 — I Like Men!   (1959)
CAPITOL reel-to-reel tapeY2t 2234 — I Like Men! / Things Are Swingin'   (1965)




The I Like Men! Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: October 17, 19, and 22, 1958. Images above: March 1959 advertisement displaying Capitol's batch of new album releases on that month. Among them was I Like Men, along with offerings from Nat King Cole, Jonah Jones, George Shearing, Judy Garland, and others. (This image shows 10 of them. There were more.) Also, a color shot from the same photographic session which generated the front cover of the I Like Men! album.


Masters And Alternate Takes

1. "Bill" And "Jim"
The differences between Lee's master and alternate takes of "Bill" and "Jim" may seem minor but stylistically they are significant. The two mono takes feature Lee in a slightly tremulous voice and in an overtly emotional mode. The two stereo takes evince a more subtle, less permeating display of emotion, and a tone that is a few shades huskier.

In the case of "Jim," compare how Lee sings the chorus that starts with the line "sometimes when I get feeling low." Also pay attention to the differences in the piano playing.

As for "Bill," listen to Lee's singing of the words "are not." (Those words are heard in the lines "his form and face, his manly grace are not the kind that you would find in a statue"). For the mono version, Lee holds the note in the word not, and makes a quick pause afterwards. For the stereo version, she holds the note in the word "are" and her pause precedes the word "not."

Mono or stereo, master or alternate, "Bill" and "Jim" show that as a balladeer Peggy Lee cultivated various levels of emotional intensity. Although the mono takes strike me as the better choices, I consider all four takes excellent.


Issues

1. Mono/Stereo Distribution
Please notice that I have not listened to all the issues listed above. For that reason, I have had to make some educated guesses when it has come to choosing which version (mono or stereo) of "Bill" and "Jim" is found in the non-auditioned issues. At the present time, I can only vouch for the correct adjudication of these takes in the case of:

a) the original Capitol LPs
b) the Capitol reel-to-reel tape
c) the EMI LP Songs For My Man
d) the EMI twofer CD
e) the above-average, noteworthy Public Domain 2CD set Ridin' High
f) the set Peggy Lee ("Eight Classic Albums" Series), Volume 2

In the case of (b), the adjudication is not based on actual listening. It relies instead on the heavy advertisement of such tapes as being full-stereo offerings. As for the following items:

g) World Record Club
h) Pure Pleasure audiophile LP
i) Pathé Marconi LP and cassette reissues

I have not listened to any of them, but details such as their respective catalogue numbers suggest that (g) and (h) are monophonic.

The company Pathé Marconi favored the use of stereo over mono, though it certainly reissued monophonic items when no stereo counterparts were available. Unfortunately, I have not seen even photos of these two Pathé Marconi items; my awareness of their alleged existence comes only from music guide listings.


Personnel

This session's musicians are unknown, but presumed to be mostly the same ones who participated in the first of the I Like Men! sessions, dated October 17, 1958. Additional musicians that could have been played at this date are Pete Candoli, Frank Rosolino, and Jack Sheldon.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Jack Marshall
2. "When A Woman Loves A Man"
The album I Like Men! credits Jack Marshall with all of its arrangements. Since collective credits of this type are sometimes found out to be overstatements, I have tried to be cautious when entering them. For this particular date, I have given Marshall credit for the "When A Woman Loves A Man" arrangement, of which there is a copy under his name in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. (Lee also kept two other arrangements of this song in her library, one by Albert Harris and the other by Mickey Ingalls.)


Date: March 28, 1959 (5:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.)
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7680

Peggy Lee (ldr), Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (om, t), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall and His Orchestra (acc), Don Fagerquist, Uan Rasey (t), Ed Kusby aka Edward Kuczborski, Stuart "Stu" Williamson (tb), John Cave, Herman Lebow, Richard Perrisi (hrn), Al Hendrickson, William "Bill" Pitman, Allan Reuss, Howard Roberts (g), Max K. Bennett (b), James "Jimmy" Rowles (p), Larry Bunker, Shelly Manne, Lou Singer (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 31444-11Master Take (Capitol) Hallelujah, I Love Him So - 2:26(Ray Charles) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL 45F 4189 [purple label] — {Hallelujah, I Love Him So / I'm Looking Out The Window} [mono]   (1959)
CAPITOL 45S 4189 [red label] — {Hallelujah, I Love Him So / I'm Looking Out The Window} [stereo]   (1959)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom/France) Eap 4 1366 — All Aglow Again!   (1960)
b. 31445-10Master Take (Capitol) You Deserve - 2:26(Kenny Jacobson, Rhoda Roberts) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL 454298 — {You Deserve / Where Do I Go From Here?}   (1959)
CAPITOL 45(United Kingdom) Cl 15103 — {Things Are Swingin' [not released as a single in the USA]/ You Deserve}    (1959)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom/France) Eap 4 1366 — All Aglow Again!   (1960)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/CD(United Kingdom) CdFever 1 / 72437 80361 2 8 — FEVER; THE BEST OF PEGGY LEE   (1992)
Marginal Bootleg CD(Belgium) Mar 068 — Extra Special!   (1997)
CAPITOL©EMI Electrola CD(Germany) 94635 9779 2 9 — Essential Peggy Lee   (2006)
c. 31446-16Master Take (Capitol) I'm Looking Out The Window - 2:49(Traditional) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL 45F 4189 [purple label] — {Hallelujah, I Love Him So / I'm Looking Out The Window} [mono]   (1959)
CAPITOL 45S 4189 [red label] — {Hallelujah, I Love Him So / I'm Looking Out The Window} [stereo]   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 82680 2 7 — The Best Of The Singles Collection    (2003)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(Korea) 8806344820326 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee; The Capitol Years   (2006)
Starbucks Coffee Licensed CD509996 — Come Rain Or Come Shine ("Opus Collection" Series)   (2010)
All titles on: CAPITOL's Starline reel/LPT 1366 — All Aglow Again!    (1960)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France Pm 156 554 4/1) & (UK Eg 26 0605 4/1) — All Aglow Again! ("Retrospect" & "Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1985)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)





A Singles Session. The All Aglow Again! Pick-up Sessions (Cross-references)

This session's main purpose was the recording of numbers for release on singles. All three session masters also served a secondary purpose when they were picked up for inclusion in the twelve-track album All Aglow Again!, which consisted entirely of numbers from singles sessions, a few of them even hitherto unissued.

All Aglow Again! dates: primarily February 18, 1952 (3 masters, all of them previously unissued) and March 28, 1959 (3 masters). Also, November 25, 1947 (1 master), August 30, 1957 (1 master), May 19, 1958 (1 master), May 25, 1958 (1 master), October 17, 1958 (1 master) and October 10, 1959 (1 master).

Images above: Original Capitol LP T-1366, All Aglow Again! A trade review of one of the singles generated by the present session. Sheet music for Ray Charles' self-written 1956 hit "Hallelujah, I Love Her So," which later on became a hit for one of his admirers, Peggy Lee (1959). The number has been recorded by several other singers as well, including Harry Belafonte (1958) and Ella Fitzgerald (1962). Pictured in the sheet music, along with Peggy Lee, is Charles' fellow Atlantic labelmate Chris Connor, who recorded the song earlier than Lee (1958).


Issues

1. All Aglow Again [LP]: Mono Or Stereo?
Notwithstanding erroneous information found in some record guides, Capitol LP #366 was released in mono only. There is no stereo version of this LP.

2. "Hallelujah, I Love Him So" / "I'm Looking Out The Window" [45]: Mono And Stereo
Capitol 45-rpm single #4189 was released in both mono and stereo. Visually, the two discs can be differentiated by the color of the label (red or violet) and by the prefix letter in the catalogue number (F or S).

3. The Advent Of Stereo 45-rpm Singles At Capitol Records
Capitol 45-rpm disc #4189 ("Hallelujah, I Love Him So" / "I'm Looking Out The Window") was part of the very first batch of stereo singles to ever be issued by Capitol Records. Released in April of 1959, the batch consisted of six singles whose catalogue numbers ran from 4168 to 4193. According to the Both Sides Now discographical website, they were:

S4168 - Castin' My Spell / Telephone Baby (Johnny Otis Show)
S4176 - The Bunny Hop / Walkin' To Mother's (Ray Anthony)
S4189 - Hallelujah, I Love Him So/ I'm Lookin' Out the Window (Peggy Lee)
S4192 - Here I Am / Big Fat Sally (Ronnie And Roy)
S4193 - Little Child / Rhythm (Bobby Hammack)
S4194 - Wanna Kiss You To-Night / I'm In The Mood For Love (Earl Holliman)

Essentially an advertisement for this batch of releases, the following article can be found in the April 13, 1959 issue of Billboard magazine: Capitol will invade the stereo singles field on April 27 with an initial release of six sides. Four of those sides will be simultaneous stereo and one-track singles while two will be dual-track versions of earlier monaural releases. Four simultaneous stereo-monaural singles will feature Peggy Lee, Bobby Hammack, Ronnie & Roy and Earl Holliman. Stereo repeats of earlier monaurals will be Ray Anthony's "Walkin' To Mothers" and Johnny Otis' "Castin' My Spell". Disks will be $1.15 per single. Capitol won't stick to a regular stereo singles schedule but will issue dual-track singles when it feels market demands or the material itself particularly warrants.

Two more Capitol singles followed in May of 1959:
S4167 - Tijuana Jail / Oh Cindy (The Kingston Trio; released on 5/18/59)
S4184 - You Made Me Love You / I Must Be Dreaming (Nat King Cole; released on 5/25/59)

The next batch of Capitol stereo singles came out in October (or, according to a different source, November) of 1959, and once again a Peggy Lee item was among them. The following list, containing four singles, could be incomplete:
S4298 - You Deserve / Where Do I Go From Here? (Peggy Lee)
S4301 - The Happiest Christmas Tree / Buon Natale (Nat King Cole)
S4302 - Love Is The Only Thing / Sunny Side Of Heaven (Tennessee Ernie Ford)
S4303 - Coo Coo-U / Green Grasses (The Kingston Trio)

From the same early stereo Capitol period (1959-1961), I know of two additional Peggy Lee singles: “The Tree / The Christmas List” (#4311, released in 1959), and “Heart / C’est Magnifique” (#4349, released in 1960).

By 1961, the industry had just about given up on the idea of selling stereo singles. The stereophonic 45-rpm disc would thus have to wait until 1968 for its return to record stores. (In the interim, new stereo singles were made only for jukebox machines. One such stereo jukebox single is Capitol Kb 2820-2821, containing Peggy Lee and Nat King Cole versions of the song “Toys For Tots,” and playing at a speed of 33 rpm. It was produced as a promotional service for a Marine Reserve charity campaign. Its release date is unclear; it might actually date back to late 1960.)

4. All Aglow Again [CD]: Stereo
Collectors' Choice CD Ccm 921 2 contains stereo versions of "Where Do I Go From Here," "Sweetheart," "You Don't Know" and "You Deserve." Before the appearance of this noteworthy compact disc, all four songs had been available only in mono.

5. The 1962 Album Bewitching-Lee! In The Music Charts
From "I Don't Know Enough About You" (recorded on December 26, 1945) to this date's "Hallelujah, I Love Him So", the twelve songs in the hits compilation Bewitching-Lee! spanned more than two decades. Released in July 1962, the album entered Billboard's album chart during the week of August 5, 1962, spent six weeks in that chart, and peaked at #85. Chronologically, it became the singer's 10th album entry (following the 1961 LP Basin Street East Proudly Presents Miss Peggy Lee).


Songs

1. "Hallelujah, I Love Him So" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's treatment of this Ray Charles original peaked at #77. Her 53rd Billboard entry, it debuted during the week of August 18, 1959, and stayed in the chart for two weeks. At Cash Box, the recording made its debut much earlier (May 16, 1959) and managed to stay for one more week, yet it had a far lower peak (#93).


Songwriters

1. Don Raye
2. "I'm Looking Out The Window"
Don Raye is credited with this date's adaptation of "I'm Looking Out The Window," a folk song from the Appalachian region.

3. Kenny Jacobson (Jackson)
4. "You Deserve"
In Capitol single #4298, "You Deserve"is credited to Rhoda Roberts and Kenny Jackson. Elsewhere, including the Capitol album All Aglow Again!, the name of the male songwriter is given as Kenny Jacobson -- not Jackson.


Masters

1. Session patter: "Thank you very much"
2. "I'm Looking Out The Window"
3. The Singles Collection [CD set]
One of the bonus tracks in the Capitol/EMI set The Singles Collection consists of patter in which Peggy Lee is heard saying "thank you very much" (track #29 of the collection's fourth disc). The set's producers isolated this spoken phrase from the master tape that contains Lee's rendition of "I'm Looking Out The Window." She utters the words right before she begins the song. This humorously intoned phrase seems to have been trademark Lee; she is also heard saying it, with the same special intonation, before the start of some rehearsal recordings.



The present page is currently under reconstruction. Essentially, each of its sessions is being supplied with one or more images. The sessions directly below are still in the process of receiving such treatment.


Date: May 29, 1959
Location: DJ Convention, The Americana Hotel, Miami
Label: CAPITOL
Session Number, If Any, Unknown / Taped In Concert

Peggy Lee, George Shearing (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), The George Shearing Quintet (acc), Toots Thielemans (g), Carl Pruitt (b), George Shearing (p), Ray Alexander (vib), Ray Mosca (d), Armando Peraza (bo, cng), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Mastered By Capitol Always True To You In My Fashion - 2:53(Cole Porter) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL©EMI CD(United Kingdom) 7243 596515 2 1 — The Best Of The Singles Collection [British Edition; 3 Bonus Tracks]   (2003)


The Beauty And The Beat Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Late May and possibly early June, 1959.


The Live (Concert) Session

In the late 1950s, Peggy Lee and George Shearing were both Capitol artists whose records were produced by Dave Cavanaugh. The three of them joined forces to perform and record a concert during the Second National Disc Jockey Convention at the Americana Hotel, in Miami. Unfortunately, technical problems at the venue resulted in a very poorly-sounding audio feedback, thereby causing the thwarting of the original plan. Hence, in order to fulfill retailers' expectations of an album release from the convention, Capitol and Cavanaugh asked Lee and Shearing to recreate the concert at another venue. The recreation was issued as an album entitled Beauty And The Beat, which is discussed in the next session (May 28-30, 1959). The present session (May 29, 1959) concentrates on the actual concert at the Americana in Miami.

In his autobiography, George Shearing writes an extensive commentary about this concert. The pianist states that "the whole industry was there, all the main record companies. So this gave us a built-in audience response, in fact it was an incredible audience and the whole atmosphere [...] was charged because of that." In the liner notes of the 1992 Capitol Jazz CD Beauty And The Beat!, Peggy Lee adds: "I was so exhausted [after flying in, working out keys, and doing continuous rehearsal with little sleep], I don't remember the performance too well, I just remember standing there." Lee's vague reminiscence notwithstanding, this session's performance shows that she and Shearing were in excellent form, and that the audience was indeed very appreciative.


Performance

This delightful rescue from the vaults starts with a playful exchange between Peggy Lee and her audience. She catches herself as she sings "there's an oil...," realizing that those words are not from the chorus that she had just started ("I've been asked to have a meal ..."), but from one that comes later in the song ("there's an oil man known as Tex ..."). She charmingly tells the audience that she "goofed." Words in jest are briefly exchanged with audience members, before she and The Shearing Quintet start over. After they end and as applause ensues, Lee is heard asking, in a humorous voice, "you think that one might have a chance maybes? ... I hope so!" (She was probably wondering if, in the case of this rendition of "Always True To You In My Fashion," the audio pickup had been good enough.)


Masters And Issues

1. "Always True To You In My Fashion"
2. The Best Of The Singles Collection [CD]
Please notice that this rendition of "Always True To You In My Fashion" is not the same one that is heard in the album Beauty And The Beat!. Notice also that the only issue which contains this particular rendition is the British CD edition of The Best Of The Singles Collection. The American edition of the CD does not include it, and neither does the MP3 edition, which is domestically and internationally available only in its American form.


Personnel

The identities of this session's bassist, drummer and vibraphonist have been the subject of contention. Herein I have listed the names given in Capitol's session file, which is my primary source for this discographical page. The names are: Carl Pruitt (b), Ray Alexander (vib), and Ray Mosca (d). All three musicians were members of Shearing' quintet during the late 1950s. In the album itself, George Shearing is heard saying "at this time, we introduce our bass player, Carl Pruitt," thereby giving partial validation to the personnel listing in the session file. The 1992 Capitol Jazz CD Beauty And The Beat! lists a different set of musicians, which is now known to be erroneous. For a longer explanation, consult this session's supplementary page.


Date: May 28-30, 1959
Location: possibly Miami
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7774

Peggy Lee, George Shearing (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), The George Shearing Quintet (acc), Toots Thielemans (g), Carl Pruitt (b), George Shearing (p), Ray Alexander (vib), Ray Mosca (d), Armando Peraza (bo, cng), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 31800Master Take (Capitol) Don't Ever Leave Me - 2:58(Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(Korea) 8806344820326 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee; The Capitol Years   (2006)
b. 31803-1 / 31893-editMaster Take (Capitol) You Came A Long Way From St. Louis - 3:16(John Benson Brooks, Bob Russell) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL 45F 4243 — {You Came A Long Way From St. Louis / I Lost My Sugar In Salt Lake City}   (1959)
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
c. 31804Master Take (Capitol) There'll Be Another Spring - 2:27(Peggy Lee, Hubie Wheeler) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI EP(United Kingdom) Eap 8 1219 — Beauty And The Beat!, Part 2 {I Lost My Sugar In Salt Lake City} {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
d. 31805Master Take (Capitol) Nobody's Heart - 2:29(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
e. 31806-5Master Take (Capitol) Blue Prelude - 2:24(Joe Bishop, Gordon Jenkins) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI EP(United Kingdom) Eap 8 1219 — Beauty And The Beat!, Part 2 {I Lost My Sugar In Salt Lake City} {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
f. 31807Master Take (Capitol) Do I Love You? - 3:51(Cole Porter) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI EP(United Kingdom) Eap 7 1219 — Beauty And The Beat!, Part 1 {Do I Love You} {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
g. 31808Master Take (Capitol) All Too Soon - 3:16(Duke Ellington, Carl Sigman) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI EP(United Kingdom) Eap 9 1219 — Beauty And The Beat!, Part 3 {Mambo In Miami} {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
h. 31809Master Take (Capitol) If Dreams Come True - 2:49(Benny Goodman, Irving Mills, Edgar Sampson) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI EP(United Kingdom) Eap 9 1219 — Beauty And The Beat!, Part 3 {Mambo In Miami} {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
i. 31810 / 31894-editMaster Take (Capitol) I Lost My Sugar In Salt Lake City - 2:47(Johhny Lange, Leon Rene) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL 45F 4243 — {You Came A Long Way From St. Louis / I Lost My Sugar In Salt Lake City}   (1959)
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
j. 31811Master Take (Capitol) Get Out Of Town - 2:30(Cole Porter) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI EP(United Kingdom) Eap 7 1219 — Beauty And The Beat!, Part 1 {Do I Love You} {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
k. 31812Master Take (Capitol) Always True To You In My Fashion - 2:17(Cole Porter) / arr: {Head Arrangement}
CAPITOL LPT 1219 — Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention {Peggy Lee, George Shearing} [aka Beauty And The Beat!]   (1959)
CAPITOL reel/LPTat/(S)T 1219 — Beauty And The Beat! {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
CAPITOL©EMI EP(United Kingdom) Eap 7 1219 — Beauty And The Beat!, Part 1 {Do I Love You} {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1959)
All titles on: CAPITOL Jazz CDCdp 7 98454 2 — Beauty And The Beat! ["original album" version] {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (1992)
CAPITOL Jazz CD7243 5 42308 2 0 — BEAUTY AND THE BEAT! ["original session tapes" version] {Peggy Lee, George Shearing}   (2003)
Real Gone Jazz Public Domain CD(Holland) Rgjcd 314 (also 5036408133823) — Peggy Lee ("Eight Classic Albums" Series)   (2012)


The Beauty And The Beat Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: Late May and possibly early June, 1959.


The Studio (Album) Session

This session contains a studio recreation of a special concert that Peggy Lee and the George Shearing Quintet had given on a joint bill. For details about the actual concert and the P.A. system that made impossible to release the live proceedings, read this supplementary page. The songs in this studio recreation are presumed to have been the same ones performed (or scheduled to be performed) at the concert.


Dating

May 28-30 is the date given to these masters in Capitol's master file. However, a different date (April 28, 1959) appears in Capitol's Peggy Lee session file. Though most likely a mistake, that April 28 date can also be found in various Capitol CDs, such as the boxed set Miss Peggy Lee and the 1992 CD edition of Beauty And The Beat!. The May 28-30 is also likely to be slightly off the mark: it is probably an "umbrella date," covering the whole scheduled stay of Lee and Shearing in Miami, including rehearsals and concert. Hence I am inclined to think that these masters were recorded on May 30 -- or even later, in June. For an extensive discussion about both dating and venue, consult this session's supplementary page.


Personnel

See personnel comments under previous session. I am operating under the assumption that the same members of The George Shearing Quintet played during both live and studio dates.


Arrangements

All titles are believed to have head arrangements. As previously mentioned, Peggy Lee writes in her autobiography (published in 1989) that she and George Shearing "rendezvoused in Florida to set the keys and figure out the arrangements." In the liner notes of the Capitol Jazz CD Beauty And The Beat! (1992), more recent comments by both Lee and Shearing are included. Lee remembers that "[w]e started from scratch with all new arrangements ... We used head arrangements, because George is blind and doesn't use written music. We kept working these songs out and rehearsing as we went, until George had all the harmonies and everything going." Shearing says that "[w]e just discussed the tunes between us, the same as I do with every singer that I've worked with. We had various ideas, some of which we dismissed, some of which we adopted." In her interview with Fred Hall, Lee similarly tells that "because George is unsighted, everything had to be head arrangements. So the whole thing was planned. We came down a little early, and worked out the whole album. He is so brilliant, that George. So, it was like doing the arrangements and everything all in one time there."


Masters

1. "Lonely Town" [Master #31805]
In his Sixty Years Of Recorded Jazz discography, Walter Bruyninckx identifies Capitol master #31805 as "Lonely Town" and claims that it was released on the Capitol LP Beauty And The Beat!. This information is partially -- if not completely -- erroneous. No song with such a title is to be found in the LP.

In Peggy Lee's Capitol session files, master #31805 is identified instead as "Nobody's Heart." Lee's performance of "Nobody's Heart" was first released, as a bonus track, in the 1992 CD version of Beauty And The Beat!.

I am left to wonder if this bit of misinformation in Bruyninckx's text originated in some Capitol documents that I have not consulted, or even in an older, superseded version of the documentation that I did consult. Could it be that Lee and Shearing actually recorded some song titled "Lonely Town" (perhaps the well-known number authored by Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden and Adolph Green), yet ultimately the master was rejected? As far as possibilities go, it could well be.

But there's a different explanation that makes more sense. After "Lonely Town" (master #31805), the next master (#31806) listed in the Capitol files is "Blue Prelude," whose first chorus reads as follows: "Let me sigh / Let me cry when I'm blue / Let me go 'way from this lonely town." Bruyninckx's source must have misidentified the first chorus of "Blue Prelude," treating as if it were a separate song, assigning it 31805 as its master number and assuming its title to be "Lonely Town."

2. Edits
According to the Capitol Label Discography by Michel Ruppli et al, masters #31803 and #31810 also exist as edited versions with different master numbers (#31893 and #31894). Those edits are the ones listed in Capitol's files as issued on Capitol single F 4243.

3. Non-Lee Masters
Released as part of the Beauty And The Beat! sessions are three instrumentals interpreted by The George Shearing Quintet, with no involvement from Lee other than her announcement of one of them:

31801 Isn't It Romantic?
31802 Satin Doll
31813 Mambo in Miami (Armando Peraza feature)


Issues And Collectors' Corner

1. The Album Beauty And The Beat! In The Music Charts
This long play entered Billboard's Best-Selling Pop LPs chart on the week of September 12, 1959, and peaked at #19. Lee's seventh album entry, Beauty And The Beat! spent 18 weeks in the chart.

2. Two Different Versions Of Beauty And The Beat! [CD]
Capitol has issued two versions of Beauty And The Beat!. The version heard in the original LP is the same one that was domestically transferred to a Capitol CD which was released in 1992. (It had been previously released in Japan, on CD.) That version comes from second-generation tapes. It contains dubbed-in applause and spoken introductions, spliced into those tapes.

The more recent CD version comes from the first-generation master tapes. It has no applause and no spoken introductions. In the United States, it came out on Capitol Jazz in 2003, but it had already been released in Japan, too, as Toshiba EMI CD 32-5309. Because the first-generation master tapes have been preserved in excellent condition, this 2003 version reveals a wealth of vocal nuances that are not as readily apparent in the 1992 version. (Many fans of vocals are thus particularly awestruck by the 2003 release. However, the earlier version also has many fans, for whom there is pleasure to be had in listening to the charm of a live-in-concert atmosphere, however recreated it might be.)

3. Souvenir Of The 1959 DJ Convention, Miami, Florida [LP]
Limited to a 2,500 pressing, this item was sent to disc jockeys who pre-signed for a copy while at the Miami convention. It is actually a gatefold LP box, all-black (front, back). The front cover is completely blank, except for the album's title, in white letters. When opened, the inner sides of the box reveal themselves to be the front and back covers of the regular, commercially released Capitol LP. Also found inside, along with the vinyl, are two photos and two typewritten letters. One photo is of Peggy Lee, who has signed it with the comment "let's cut another one soon," followed by the words "Love, Peggy." The other is a photo of George Shearing, with another inscription by Peggy Lee herself ("couldn't have done it without you, George"). One of the handwritten letters is from Capitol Records, individual unknown; the other is signed by Lee on behalf of both her and Shearing. The two letters apologize to the convention's attendants for the sonic problems that preventing many of them from hearing the concert.


Date: August 12, 1959
Location: Studio B, Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7889

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), John Kraus (eng), Jack Marshall's Music (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 32216-6Master Take (Capitol) Hey There - 2:10(Richard Adler, Jerry Ross) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL jukebox EPXe 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 6 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 2 {aka On The Street Where You Live}   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(France) Eap 4 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
b. 32217-9Master Take (Capitol) C'est Magnifique - 2:06(Cole Porter) / arr: Marty Paich
CAPITOL 454349 — {Heart / C'est Magnifique}   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 5 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 1 {aka Heart}   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(France) Eap 4 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
c. 32218-5Master Take (Capitol) Till There Was You - 2:31(Meredith Willson) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL jukebox EPXe 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 7 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 3 {aka Till There Was You}   (1960)
CAPITOL 45(United Kingdom) Cl 15184 — {Till There Was You [not released as a single in the USA] / (A) Bucket Of Tears}   (1961)
d. 32219-5Master Take (Capitol) Dance Only With Me - 2:29(Jule Styne, Adolph Green, Betty Comden)
CAPITOL jukebox EPXe 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 7 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 3 {aka Till There Was You}   (1960)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPSf 519 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — Broadway Ala Lee [Reissue of Latin Ala Lee, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)
Marginal Bootleg CD(Belgium) Mar 068 — Extra Special!   (1997)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/LPZt/(S)T 1290 (Reissued as Sm 1290, Srs 5080) — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
Pigeon Public Domain CD(Japan) Gx 106 — Latin! Peggy Lee ("Latin Music" Series)   (1987)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(United Kingdom) Tcems/Ems 1304 — Latin Ala Lee! ("Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1988)


The Latin Ala Lee! Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: August 12, 13, and 14, 1959.


Issues

1. Latin Ala Lee! [British LP Edition]
2. "Till There Was You" Denied British 'Visa'
In both the United States and the United Kingdom, the LP Latin Ala Lee! was released in 1960, with the same catalogue number in both countries. There was, however, a significant difference between the two pressings: the British edition excluded the number "Till There Was You," thereby featuring a total of 11 instead of 12 tracks. That song had originated in the show The Music Man, which had been recently running on Broadway. The reason for its exclusion from Lee's LP was contractual. British EMI was not allowed to release any versions of the song -- at least, not until after the release of the cast album and/or the show's run therein.

"Till There Was You" was also left unissued from Srs 5080, a reissue of Latin Ala Lee that British EMI released around 1971 as part of its Starline LP series. The track was finally included in the 1988 cassette/LP reissue of the album (Tcems 1304 & Ems 1304), from a series which the French and British branches of EMI had jointly coordinated.


Songs

1. "Till There Was You" In The British Music Charts
Faced with the prohibition to include "Till There Was You" in the British edition of the LP Latin Ala Lee!, EMI decided to instead issue it on a single about a year later, when restrictions no longer applied.

The debut of "Till There Was You" in the British music charts took place during the week of March 25, 1961. Lee's rendition stayed for just a week, placing at #40. But shortly afterwards (during the week of April 8), it re-entered the chart, staying for three more weeks. That second time around, it peaked at #30.

This belated release of "Till There Was You" had a felicitous side effect. Paul McCartney heard the single and loved Lee's rendition. The song was recorded by The Beatles soon thereafter. An admiring McCartney eventually wrote and produced a track for a Lee album, too. (See early June,1974 session.)


Personnel

This date's musicians are unknown, but presumed to be mostly the same ones who participated in the second Latin Ala Lee! session, dated August 13, 1959.


Arrangers And Arrangements

1. Jack Marshall
2. Marty Paich
3. Dick Hazard
Capitol issues of the album Latin Ala Lee! credit Jack Marshall with all of the album's arrangements. This credit is a generalization, and thus potentially misguiding. Peggy Lee's sheet music library indeed contains Marshall arrangements of this session's "Hey There" and "Till There Was You," but the library's one arrangement of "C'est Magnifique" is credited to Marty Paich instead. As for the remaining song from this session, Lee's library has no arrangement of "Dance Only With Me." (Also in Lee's library is a second arrangement of "Hey There," credited to Richard Hazard.) Capitol's own collection of scores does not contain any of these arrangements.


Date: August 13, 1959 (1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.)
Location: Studio B, Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7893

Peggy Lee (ldr), Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (om), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), John Kraus (eng), Jack Marshall's Music (acc), Justin Gordon (r), Rubén León (f), Rudolph Loera, Henry Miranda, Alfonso "Al" Rojo, Ray Vázquez (t), Tony Reyes (b), Eduardo "Eddie" Cano (p), Eduardo Aparicio, Manuel E. López, Carlos Mejía, Ray Rivera (d), Luis "Puntilla" Kant (cng), Peggy Lee (v), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. 32228-5Master Take (Capitol) Heart - 1:59(Richard Adler, Jerry Ross, John M. "Jack" Elliot) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL 454349 — {Heart / C'est Magnifique}   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 5 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 1 {aka Heart}   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(France) Eap 4 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
b. 32229-6Master Take (Capitol) The Surrey With The Fringe On The Top - 1:59(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL jukebox EPXe 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 6 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 2 {aka On The Street Where You Live}   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(Denmark) Eap 4 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI CD(Japan) Cp 32 5297 (reissued as Tocp 9068 in 1990) — Peggy Lee ("Best Now"/"Best 20" Series)   (1988)
CAPITOL©Toshiba-EMI CD(Japan) Tocp 7459-7460 — Peggy Lee ("Twin Best Now" Series)   (1992)
Curb Licensed CS/CD0071518 77629 23 — Classics   (1993)
c. 32230-6Master Take (Capitol) Wish You Were Here - 2:47(Harold Rome) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL jukebox EPXe 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 6 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 2 {aka On The Street Where You Live}   (1960)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
d. 32231-4Master Take (Capitol) I Am In Love - 2:10(Cole Porter) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL jukebox EPXe 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 7 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 3 {aka Till There Was You}   (1960)
CAPITOL©EMI's Music For Pleasure CS/CD(United Kingdom) 7243 8 56805 2 6 [also Mfp 6342] — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee [tracks same as EMI Presents The Magic, diff. artwork]   (1997)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/LPZt/(S)T 1290 (Reissued as Sm 1290, Srs 5080) — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPSf 519 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — Broadway Ala Lee [Reissue of Latin Ala Lee, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)
Pigeon Public Domain CD(Japan) Gx 106 — Latin! Peggy Lee ("Latin Music" Series)   (1987)


The Latin Ala Lee! Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: August 12, 13, and 14, 1959.


Songs

1. "Heart" At The Grammys And In The Music Charts
At the 3rd Grammy Award ceremony ever held, the category of Best Performance By A Pop Single Artist had an eye-popping list of nominees: Ray Charles, Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee, Elvis Presley and Frank Sinatra. Both Charles and Lee had been nominated for cleverly re-imagined numbers. "Heart" had been thoroughly transformed from a Broadway tune into a hot Latin number. "Georgia On My Mind" had been gently removed from its original big band setting into a bluesier realm. During the event, held on April 12, 1961, "Georgia On My Mind" earned a Grammy for Charles.

Peggy Lee had received three Grammy nominations, including the above-described one. For details about the other two nominations (and for a fourth nomination that did not go to Lee, but involved a release of hers), see notes under session dated August 14, 1959.

"Heart" does not seem to have entered Billboard's Hot 100, but it did manage to sneak into Cash Box's Top 100 Singles for a week, placing at #97.


Issues And Masters

1. Latin Ala Lee! [Jukebox EP]
The catalogue number Xe-1290 belongs to the jukebox EP version of Latin Ala Lee!. The EP set consists of the following 33-rpm discs, all of them released in stereo only:

Xe1 1290 - "The Surrey With The Fringe On The Top" & "The Party's Over"
Xe2 1290 - "Hey There" & "I Am In Love"
Xe3 1290 - "I Could Have Danced All Night" & "Till There Was You"
Xe4 1290 - "I Enjoy Being A Girl" & "Dance Only With Me"
Xe5 1290 - "On The Street Where You Live" & "Wish You Were Here"

This jukebox set culls 10 of the 12 songs from its LP counterpart, leaving out "Heart" and "C'est Magnifique." These omitted songs are the ones that were instead issued on a commercial 45-rpm single. It is also likely that this pair of songs was issued on a single playable on jukebox machines, but so far I have found no confirmation for such a possibility.

A more basic note on the matter at hand. Oftentimes, discs such as the ones from the EP under discussion wound up being sold as separate pieces. Online auction sites sometimes misrepresent their true nature, failing to acknowledge that they were originally part of a larger unit.

2. Broadway Ala Lee [LP]
This 1970 Capitol LP is a reissue of the 1960 album Latin Ala Lee!. Two songs from the original album were deleted. The original artwork was changed, too. Broadway Ala Lee was sold both as a stand-alone (catalogue number Sf 519) and as a twofer (catalogue number Sttb 517). The other album in the twofer is also a reissue, titled The Folks Who Live On The Hill and presented in "duophonic" or electronically processed stereo (catalogue number Df 518). See session dated April 4, 1957. Incidentally, the prefix of Broadway Ala Lee truly is Sf, not Df as some sources erroneously claim. As for Stbb, Capitol used that prefix to identify all the twofers in the reissues series to which The Folks Who Live On The Hill / Broadway Ala Lee belongs.

3. S&P Latin Ala Lee! [CD]
4. S&P Latin Ala Lee! [LP] {180 Gram Virgin Audiophile Vinyl}
5. DCC Latin Ala Lee! [CD]
6. EMI Latin Ala Lee! [CD]
Remixed in the same studio where the original sessions were recorded, the S&P issue of Latin Ala Lee! boasts vibrant sound quality. The LP version is on 180 gram Virgin audiophile vinyl.

For both the S&P CD and audiophile LP, the original master tapes were used. As for the other CD versions of the album Latin Ala Lee!:

a) the DCC version was also remastered from the original three-track tapes, though not mixed anew.

b) the EMI twofer version is likely to have used the two-track mix heard in the original LP, not the three-track tapes.

c) unlike the above-mentioned two, the Hallmark version is not a licensed but a Public Domain release. Hallmark is a budget company with a tendency to release poor-sounding product, sometimes obviously (and outrageously) mastered from beaten LPs.

7. "I Am In Love"
8. S&P Latin Ala Lee! [CD, LP]
The S&P remix of this session's "I Am In Love" boasts a minor but curious detail. Toward the end of the track in the S&P CD, Lee is heard singing the phrase "so in need of a stampede of love" five times. In all other issues, that closing phrase is heard only four times.


Personnel And Instruments

The names in this session's personnel are confirmed, but the assignation of instruments is, on the other hand, tentative. In the paperwork that I consulted, there is no identification of the instrument that each musician plays. Some amount of research, along with a few educated guesses, have proved necessary. Readers must therefore bear in mind that there could be errors in my attempts at instrument assignation, particularly in cases where a player is known for his dexterity in more than one instrument.


Arrangers

1. Jack Marshall
Credit to Jack Marshall for all the arrangements from this session relies on the existence of his sketches for them in Capitol's library of scores.


Date: August 14, 1959
Location: Studio B, Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7895

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), John Kraus (eng), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall's Music (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 32234-7Master Take (Capitol) I Could Have Danced All Night - 2:09(Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 5 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 1 {aka Heart}   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(France) Eap 4 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL EP(Denmark) Eap 4 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
b. 32235-11Master Take (Capitol) On The Street Where You Live - 2:13(Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 6 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 2 {aka On The Street Where You Live}   (1960)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPSf 519 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — Broadway Ala Lee [Reissue of Latin Ala Lee, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)
CAPITOL©EMI 8-track/CS/LP(United Kingdom) 8x/Tc/St 23168 (also 062.81537) — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee ("Very Best" Series)   (1973)
c. 32236-5Master Take (Capitol) I Enjoy Being A Girl - 2:14(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 5 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 1 {aka Heart}   (1960)
CAPITOL 8-track/CS/LPSf 519 (Twofer: 8xf/4xf/Stbb 517) — Broadway Ala Lee [Reissue of Latin Ala Lee, minus 2 tracks; false stereo]   (1970)
Pair Licensed CS/CDPcdk/Pcd 2 1194 — Seductive   (1989)
d. 32237-8Master Take (Capitol) The Party's Over - 3:18(Jule Styne, Betty Comden, Adolph Green) / arr: Jack Marshall
CAPITOL EP(United Kingdom) Eap/Sep 7 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!, Part 3 {aka Till There Was You}   (1960)
Harmony Collection Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Har c/cd 116 — Peggy Lee ("Portrait Of A Song Stylist" Series)   (1990)
CAPITOL©EMI CS/CD(United Kingdom) CdFever 1 / 72437 80361 2 8 — FEVER; THE BEST OF PEGGY LEE   (1992)
All titles on: CAPITOL reel/LPZt/(S)T 1290 (Reissued as Sm 1290, Srs 5080) — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
CAPITOL jukebox EPXe 1290 — Latin Ala Lee!   (1960)
Pigeon Public Domain CD(Japan) Gx 106 — Latin! Peggy Lee ("Latin Music" Series)   (1987)


The Latin Ala Lee! Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: August 12, 13, and 14, 1959.


Issues

1. The Album Latin Ala Lee! In The Music Charts And At The Grammys
This long play peaked at #11 in Billboard's Best-Selling Pop LPs chart. After making its debut during the week of April 11, 1960, it went on to become Lee's longest-lasting album in that chart: 59 weeks.

In Music Vendor's stereo album chart, Latin Ala Lee! fared even better, peaking at #9 during the week of July 25, 1960. This magazine also published a separate mono album chart. I do not know exactly how high the LP peaked therein, but it was definitely no lower than within the top 15, with the top 10 certainly possible.

A year later, on April 12, 1961, the third Grammy award ceremony was held. This time, separate categories were established for albums and singles by female singers. Peggy Lee received nominations in both categories.

In the category of Best Vocal Performance, Album, Female, Ella Fitzgerald and Peggy Lee were repeat nominees for the third straight year. Also nominated were Rosemary Clooney, Miriam Makeba and Della Reese. Fitzgerald won thanks to her live album Mack The Knife. (For details about the singles category, in which Lee was also nominated, see session dated July 26, 1960.)

Peggy Lee's work actually received 4 Grammy nominations. The third nomination was for Best Performance By A Pop Single Artist. (See session dated August 13, 1959.)

The fourth category in which Latin Ala Lee! received a nomination was Best Album Cover. Lee had suggested the basic concept for the cover to Capitol's art department, where it was developed in full by art director Marvin Schwartz. In his bid for a Grammy, Schwartz faced stiff competition from Bob Jones, who monopolized the category with three nominated covers (from the albums Carlos Montoya, Stravinsky: Petruchka, and Prokofiev: Alexander Nevsky). Also in competition for the award was Marvin Israel, with his cover of Milt Jackson's album Bean Bags. Against such odds, Latin Ala Lee! still prevailed: Schwartz was the year's winner.


Personnel

This date's musicians are unknown, but presumed to be mostly the same ones who participated in the second Latin Ala Lee! session, dated August 13, 1959.


Arrangers

1. Jack Marshall
Credit to Jack Marshall for all the arrangements from this session relies on the existence of his sketches of them in Capitol's library of scores. Peggy Lee's sheet music library also holds copies of all but one of them (the exception: "I Could Have Danced All Night").


Date: October 10, 1959
Location: Capitol Tower, 1750 North Vine St., Hollywood
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #7978

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Cavanaugh (pdr), Jack Marshall (con), Jack Marshall and His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jimmy Joyce Children's Choir (bkv), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 32505-6Master Take (Capitol) The Tree - 1:41(Peggy Lee) / arr: Billy May
CAPITOL 454311 — {The Tree / The Christmas List}    (1959)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1423 — Christmas Carousel   (1960)
CAPITOL 45(United Kingdom) Cl 15227 — {Jingle Bells (I Like A Sleigh Ride) / The Tree} [different pairing than in USA singles]   (1961)
b. 32506-5Master Take (Capitol) The Christmas List - 2:38(Peggy Lee) / arr: Billy May
CAPITOL 454311 — {The Tree / The Christmas List}    (1959)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 1423 — Christmas Carousel   (1960)
CAPITOL LP(S)T 2390 — Happy Holiday   (1965)
c. 32507-10-monoMaster Take (Capitol) Where Do I Go From Here? - 2:18(Sheldon Harnick, Jerry Bock)
CAPITOL 454298 — {You Deserve / Where Do I Go From Here?}   (1959)
CAPITOL's Starline reel/LPT 1366 — All Aglow Again!    (1960)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France Pm 156 554 4/1) & (UK Eg 26 0605 4/1) — All Aglow Again! ("Retrospect" & "Nostalgia" Reissue Series)   (1985)
Blue Moon Licensed/Public Domain CD(Spain) Bmcd 880 — Swingin' Brightly & Gently; Complete Recordings, 1958-1959   (2016)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Tt/T 606 — All Aglow Again!   
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 6901 - P 6902 — Basic Music Library [LP I Like Men + 4 songs from 2 singles]   
d. 32507-_-stereoAlternate Take (Capitol) Where Do I Go From Here? - 2:18(Sheldon Harnick, Jerry Bock)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 921 2 — ALL AGLOW AGAIN!   (2008)
Future Noise's Fantastic Voyage Public Domain CDFvtd 043 — Ridin' High; The Complete Record Releases, 1957-1959   (2010)


The 1959 Singles Session And The Christmas Carousel Album Sessions (Cross-references)

Dates: June 15 and 19, 1960. Also this session. (For other singles sessions in this page, look up the following dates: April 13 and 22, 1957. August 30, 1957. May 19 and September 14, 1958. Naturally, the album sessions also include songs that were released on singles.)


Songs And Songwriters

1. "The Christmas List"
2. The Tree"
3. Haydn and Schumann
"The Christmas List" is based on a theme by Franz Josef Haydn, from his Symphony No. 94, aka "The Surprise Symphony." "The Tree" is based on Robert Schumann's popular theme "Freiliche Landmann" ("The Happy Farmer"). According to Peggy Lee, both themes were brought to her by Victor Young, years before this session, at a time when she was bedridden and convalescing from an illness.

Personnel

1. Billy May
2. Jack Marshall
The various sources at my reach are in discrepancy over the identity of this session's conductor. In Capitol's Peggy Lee session file, Billy May is named. But Jack Mirtle's discography of Billy May does not show May as involved in the session's conducting. Various Capitol issues (45 single #4311, LP #4298, LP #1423) list instead Jack Marshall as conductor for this date.

Most tellingly, the notes in the back cover of the LP Christmas Carousel state that "Billy May provides a variety of beguiling backgrounds for ten of the selections ... The other two have Jack Marshall's fine accompaniments - a rollicking song called The Tree and a bustling tale of happy preparation, The Christmas List. " Thus Marshall is likelier to have conducted this particular date.


Arrangements

1. Billy May
2. Jack Marshall?
3. "The Tree"
In Peggy Lee's sheet music library, extant arrangements of "The Tree" and "The Christmas List" are credited to Billy May. His authorship is also backed by a comment that Lee made in her autobiography; see notes under session dated June 15, 1960. Nevertheless, in Capitol's library of music scores the arrangement of "The Tree" is credited to Jack Marshall. This discrepancy is obviously problematic. I have put more trust in the claim that May is the arranger.

Lee's library contains no arrangement of "Where Do I Go From Here?" The number was originally issued on 45-rpm disc and next included in the LP All Aglow Again!. A short note in the back cover of that album claims that its arrangements are by Dave Barbour, Jack Mashall, and Nelson Riddle. No mention is made of Billy May. Given the prominence of guitar in the performance of "Where Do I Go From Here?," it could well be a Jack Marshall arrangement -- or a head arrangement in which Marshall might have been heavily involved.


Issues [Stereo Releases]

1. All Aglow Again! [CD]
Collectors' Choice CD Ccm 921 2 contains stereo versions of "Where Do I Go From Here?," "Sweetheart," "You Don't Know" and "You Deserve." All four songs had been previously available in mono only.


Masters And Alternate Takes

1. "Where Do I Go From Here?"
If wanting to pinpoint differences between the two takes of "Where Do I Go From Here?" that have been issued, listen in particular to the last verse of each take.




GENERAL NOTES

Peggy Lee At Capitol Records, 1957-1959

At the end of 1956 or the beginning of 1957, Peggy Lee's contract with Decca Records was up for renewal. From both artistic and commercial standpoints, she had had a satisfactory, successful five-year run with the company. Yet she decided to come back to the company with which she had exclusively recorded for the seven years that had preceded her Decca period. When interviewers asked about the reason(s) for this second switch, Lee told them that she had loved the time spent with Decca but still couldn't help feeling that Capitol was her main home as an artist. Doubtlessly Lee took into consideration other factors as well, but I know of no further comments from her on this matter. Below, I will speculate on other few possible factors.

By 1957, Peggy Lee had more than proven the point that she had set out to make when she left Capitol. The point pertained to her artistic and commercial instincts. In 1952, Capitol had not supported the artist's plan to record the standard "Lover" in the brand new arrangement that she had conceived, and which she had confidently expected to be a hit. Capitol's executives had rejected her concept on the grounds that their catalogue already counted with another act's hit version of "Lover," apparently dismissing any chart-busting potential in Lee's version.

On the other hand, Decca's executives were overly enthusiastic over Peggy Lee' concept for "Lover" and over the prospect of having her join their roster. Their enthusiasm proved well-founded. Immediately after its release, Lee's "Lover" proved a buzz-worthy single, a favorite among industry insiders, and a solid best seller.

Many other significant successes ensued while Lee was at Decca, including not only critically acclaimed albums but also the artist's professional branching out from singing into film. The success of those previous years could not have been lost on Capitol. By 1957, the company must have been open to the idea of having their "daughter" return "home."

Peggy Lee might have also been lured back through an invitation that she couldn't refuse. Her friend Frank Sinatra had joined Capitol in 1953, the year after Lee had left, and he had generated huge critical and commercial success for the label. Sinatra came up with the notion of collaborating on an album, and to have Capitol distribute it.

The Capitol to which Peggy Lee returned was by no means the same one from which she had departed. Most notably, the label's stockholders had sold most of their shares to the British corporation Electric & Musical Industries (EMI) in 1955.

To hold its ever growing operations, Capitol had moreover begun constructing, around 1954, a new studio office complex. The result of this labor was a circular-shaped building with 13 floors that purposefully resemble a stack of records -- a building which is now considered a landmark. The Capitol Tower's full facilities officially opened on April 6, 1956, although the inaugural sessions had been in advance on February 22, 1956. Those initial sessions were dedicated to recording masters for the album Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems Of Color.

A year later, with Sinatra conducting again, Peggy Lee began recording at the Tower. Thereafter (from 1957 to 1959, and beyond), most of Peggy Lee's studio recording activity for Capitol took place in the Tower's ground floor, particularly in studios B and A. (The Tower has three recording studios, simply called A, B, and C, all of them located in the ground floor).

Lee's comeback to Capitol was a solid success. Of the six albums that she made during the three years covered by this discographical page, five made the Billboard chart, all of them peaking within the top 20. One of the albums, Latin Ala Lee!, managed to stay an impressive 59 weeks in the chart. Also making the Billboard charts were six songs from Lee's singles. Among them was "Fever," which became a bona fide hit and is now an enduring pop classic. There was, moreover, a number that is nowadays celebrated as a classic (and as proof of exemplary artistry from all parties involved): "The Folks Who Live On The Hill," a collaboration with Nelson Riddle. Lee's collaboration with George Shearing (Beauty And The Beat!) comes from this period, too, and is still widely praised as a model of musical good taste. (Photos above: Peggy Lee during the years under discussion, beginning with 1957 and ending with 1959. The second photo is from 1958, the third from either 1958 or 1957.)


Creative Input, Artistic Control, And Teamwork: Peggy Lee In Charge

Anecdotal evidence indicates that, starting in 1958, Peggy Lee exercised strong control over the nature and direction of her recording sessions at Capitol.

Such does not seem to have been entirely the case, however, during the first year of her comeback to the company (1957). Her two albums from that year strike this discographer as more representative of the musical approach favored by the men who conducted or arranged them -- namely, Nelson Riddle and Frank Sinatra. Similarly, most of that year's singles are in the then-popular genres that Capitol was imposing on its vintage acts: rock 'n' roll and doo-wop. (In addition to Peggy Lee's repertoire, see, for instance, contemporaneous Nat King Cole singles such as "When Rock And Roll Come To Trinidad," "If I May" and "Send For Me.") Granted that Lee sings all of this material with gusto, dedication, personality and good taste, her own stylistic inclinations were probably elsewhere.

After 1957, Lee apparently took the reins. In 1958, she enlisted two men, both musicians, to lead her sessions and albums: Dave Cavanaugh and Jack Marshall. Cavanaugh remained in his position as Lee's producer until 1967. Erstwhile a musician who had played sax in some of Lee's 1940s Capitol sessions, Lee considered him a beloved friend and a collaborator with whom she co-wrote various numbers.

A musician by trade, Marshall played guitars in the sessions of various Capitol artists during the late 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s. After doing so in a couple of 1957 Peggy Lee sessions, he graduated to the role of conductor in 1958, and continued to work with her until 1959. I have found no evidence that Marshall conducted for any singer before he did for Lee, although he appears to have arranged a few instrumental sessions under his name. Lee could have thus been instrumental in his graduation from session musician to session leader. She might have thought of Marshall as an arranger-conductor amenable and malleable enough to follow her directive, without substantially challenging it. Marshall can also be thought of as a Dave Barbour successor (albeit a short-lived one); both men were guitar players who nominally led Lee's sessions. The Marshall-conducted albums from this period (Things Are Swingin', I Like Men!, Latin Ala Lee!) naturally show his musical acumen and supportive skills, but ultimately they are more reflective of Peggy Lee's own creative input and stylistic leanings at this stage of her career. Once Lee stopped working with Marshall, he went on to amass extensive credits for both film and television scoring.


Popularity: Peggy In The Polls

For the year 1957, Peggy Lee placed at #8 in Downbeat's female poll. Ranked right below her were Carmen McRae and Julie London, and found right above Lee were Billie Holiday and Eydie Gormé. The top five was held by Ella Fitzgerald, Anita O'Day, Sarah Vaughan, June Christy and Chris Connor.

As was typically the case over the years, Peggy Lee's 1957 Cash Box rankings were lower. A mid-year survey called The Cash Box Disc Jockey Poll places her at #16 in a top 23 topped by Doris Day and Patti Page, bottomed by Margaret Whiting and Jill Corey. The only other Capitol artist on the list is June Christy, at #11.

In the March 6, 1958 issue of Downbeat magazine, Leonard Feather published the results of a survey that he had conducted on his own. His twenty-question survey centered around the hotly debated issue of who and what is a jazz singer. 71% of his respondents "cited the manner of phrasing as a jazz singer's chief component." In descending percentage, the other mentioned components were vocal timbre, type of material, type of accompaniment, and handling of vibrato. Another part of the survey asked to rate and rank twelve artists as jazz singers. (Presumably, the chosen names were vocalists with particularly debatable jazz qualifications.) After tallying the results, Feather found out that the top five consisted of Dinah Washington and Frank Sinatra (60% and 57 %, respectively), followed by Woody Herman, Mahalia Jackson, and Peggy Lee (38%, 34%, 32%). The other names that he had included were Jeri Southern (who placed at no. 6, with 29%), Julie London, Barbara Lea, Roberta Sherwood, Bing Crosby, Al Jolson, and Perry Como (the lowest-ranked, with only 2%).

In Downbeat's 1958 annual poll, Peggy Lee and Carmen McRae tied at #10. Mahalia Jackson debuted at #9, Dakota Staton at #4.

For its part, The Billboard published its Eleventh Annual Disc Jockey Poll on its December 15, 1958 issue. In the category of Favorite Female Vocalist, Capitol's Peggy Lee ranked at #3, up three notches from the previous year, when the #3 position had been occupied by Ella Fitzgerald (now one notch below). Exchanging their respective positions from the preceding year, Mercury's Patti Page placed at #2 and Columbia's Doris Day at #1. Capitol also grabbed the fifth and seventh notches, thanks to Keely Smith and June Christy. (The former was making her debut, the latter had fallen two notches). Meanwhile, in the same poll's Favorite Single top ten list, Peggy Lee's rendition of "Fever" could be found at #6. "Volare" occupied both the first and the last spots, courtesy of Domenico Modugno's and Dean Martin's versions.

In 1959, Peggy Lee climbed back to #8. Carmen McRae, Billie Holiday, and Mahalia Jackson had all fallen from the top 10. Nina Simone debuted at #9, Annie Ross at #3. Lee would continue to climb the poll in the next years.

Also in 1959, Lee placed at #6 in the magazine's Popular poll, which tallied acts of either gender.


Statistics: Total Number Of Peggy Lee Masters

This discographical page lists 92 masters and 10 alternate takes, all of them recorded for Capitol Records between 1957 and 1959.

Besides those 101 performances, there are various special entries that are excluded from the total count:

1. As a concession to audiophiles who often request information on this matter, I have made separate entries for the stereo and monophonic versions of "Fever." (Both versions feature the exact same vocal and instrumental performance, which was recorded on May 19, 1958. The chief difference is in the manner that microphones were set up for either mono or stereophonic reproduction.)

2. I have also made separate listing for selected remixes of "Fever." Those remixes are listed herein because EMI holds them in its vaults, and because official Peggy Lee CDs from the record company have included at least one of the two. (Lee was not directly involved in the making of either remix.)

Only issued alternate takes are included in this page. Additional takes of many of Peggy Lee's masters are known to exist in the vaults, but no systematic listening of them has ever been made.

As for the 92 masters listed, all but 3 of them have been released. Unissued are "Uninvited Dream" (April 13, 1957), "Every Night" (April 22, 1957), and "You Don't Know" (August 30, 1957). Common to those three unissued titles is the fact that Peggy Lee re-made them in subsequent sessions. (The remakes have been released.) In the case of the August 30, 1957 master of "You Don't Know," there is no evidence of its preservation; a search through the vaults did not retrieve it.

In a previous edition of this discography, I listed a fourth unreleased master: "I'm Following You," dated June 14, 1957. I characterized it as "a number about which so little is known that I cannot fully guarantee that Peggy Lee is its singer." In this edition of the discography, I am in a better position to characterize it. Though listed among Peggy Lee's masters in some of the official documentation, this unissued number is actually credited to a teenage girl group called The Four Dolls.

All 101 masters and takes were originally recorded in the studios, except for a live master of "Always True To You In My Fashion" that was taped in concert at The Americana Hotel in Miami, on May 29, 1959. (Photos below: colorful publicity shots of Peggy Lee, during or around the years under discussion. The first and last shots are believed to be from 1957; the middle one from 1959.)





Sessions Reported: 24

Performances Reported: 102

Unique Songs Reported: 86

Unique Issues Reported: 283