Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
The Capitol Years, Part II (1946-1947)
by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Sep 12, 2016


PRELIMINARY NOTES




The Peggy Lee Look

Images above: a photographic showcase of Peggy Lee during the two years that are covered in this page.  All four pictures are publicity shots, the first two taken in 1946, the last two in 1947.  Peggy Lee would have been between 25 and 27 years old at the time. (I should point out that some of these shots appeared in entertainment magazines that were published two or three years afterwards, a situation that can naturally lead to confusion as to their actual dating.) In the third photograph, Lee's attire seems to be the same one that she wore at her "Mañana" session (November 25, 1947).  

Peggy Lee's Recording Career, 1946-1947

After signing with Capitol Records in the mid-1940s, Peggy Lee's career as a solo vocalist kicked into high gear. Between 1946 and 1948, Lee put a continuous string of hits in the charts, including a million seller. She earned widespread recognition as one of the nation's top popular singers, too. For more commentary about Peggy Lee's career during this period, including her placement in music polls, and for some details about Capitol Records at this point in time, see note at the bottom of this page. Also found in that final note is a tabulation of this page's 70 masters.

Suggestions, Recommendations And Technicalities

Viewers looking for CD recommendations should pay attention to items whose titles are typed in uppercase and boldface. For instance, my choice of font and case for the following title is meant to indicate its desirability over other comparable options: THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS. (In addition, you may want to consult this page, section I). My recommendations are based on sound quality and/or rarity of the tracks included.  Note also that, under each song, the listing of releases has been arranged chronologically, by year of release. As for the blue arrowheads that are periodically found through the page, click on them if you want to see a full list of issues -- LPs, CDs, etc. -- containing any given Peggy Lee performance. (I have aimed at listing every single issue in existence, with the following exceptions:  various-artists compilations, foreign editions of domestic issues, and MP3 files. The first two categories are covered separately, within the miscellaneous section of this bio-discography. As for the MP3 category, I have chosen to make very limited mention of such a format in my work; I consider it a non-physical configuration of inherently poor sound quality and ephemeral issue production.)


Date: April 11, 1946
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #288

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (cl, tb, b, p, d), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1077-4Master Take (Capitol) Linger In My Arms A Little Longer - 3:07(Herb Magidson) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
Asv/Living Era Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Aja 5237 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 25 Early Hits   (1997)
Reader's Digest Licensed CS/CDRf 140 / Krf 140 [also Emi 72434 99216] — The Legendary Peggy Lee; Her Greatest Hits & Finest Performances   (1999)
b. 1078-5Master Take (Capitol) Baby, You Can Count On Me - 3:08(Freddie Stewart) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
Global Journey Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gj 2303 — Peggy Lee ("Unique" Series)   (2005)
Global Journey Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) GJ7710 — Peggy Lee ("Legends" Series)   (2012)
Both titles on: CAPITOL 78263 — {Linger In My Arms A Little Longer, Baby / Baby, You Can Count On Me }   (1946)
ABM (Audio Book & Music) Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Abmmcd 1092 — It's Lovin' Time   (1999)
Columbia River/Allegro Public Domain CDCrg 218010 — Peggy Lee ("Cocktail Hour" Series)   (2000)
Hallmark Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Halmcd 1320 — It's Lovin' Time [Reissue of ABM 1092]   (2001)
Naxos Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 8.120642 — It's A Good Day; Original Recordings, 1941-1950   (2002)


Songs

"Linger In My Arms A Little Longer" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's fourth solo hit (following three that are listed in this discography's 1943-1945 page) entered the charts during the week of September 28, 1946. According to Joel Whitburn's estimates in Pop Memories, 1890-1954, it peaked at #16. No competing versions appear in Whitburn's book, but two are mentioned in Edward Foote Gardner's Popular Songs Of The Twentieth Century: A Charted History, a text which does not give chart positions. One version came from Columbia (Woody Herman, with a vocal by Lynn Stevens), the other from Decca (Helen Forrest, with background vocals by The Chickadees).


Issues And Personnel

1. "Linger In My Arms A Little Longer" / "Baby, You Can Count On Me" [78]
2. Dave Barbour
Besides crediting the accompaniment as "Dave Barbour And His Orchestra," Capitol 78-rpm single #263 specifies that Barbour is responsible for the guitar solo that is heard during "Linger In My Arms A Little Longer."


Arrangements

This session's arrangements are preserved in Capitol's library of music scores. The library credits both of them to Heinie Beau.


Session Photos

Most of the pictures below bear an April 10, 1946 date. The closest session to that date is the present one. (There is, however, an unknown Capitol transcription date that is presumed to have taken place in the first half of 1946.) Not included below, another Peggy Lee shot from the same recording session has been used as the front cover of various releases, including The Complete Peggy Lee & June Christy Capitol Transcription Sessions and Trav'lin' Light, both Capitol CD issues.





Date: July 12, 1946
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #326

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Henry J. "Heinie" Beau (cl), Herbert "Herbie" Haymer (ts), Robert "Bob" Lawson (bar), Ray Linn (t), Ed Kusby aka Edward Kuczborski, Carl Loeffler, Elmer Smithers, Si Zentner (tb), Dave Barbour (g), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (b, p), Phil Stephens (b), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v), Reynold Johnson (unk)

a. 1198-4Master Take (Capitol) Don't Be So Mean To Baby - 2:53(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)
b. 1199-4Master Take (Capitol) It's A Good Day - 2:53(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78322 — {He's Just My Kind / It's A Good Day}   (1946)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1464 — G.I. Jive [Woody Herman, Lionel Hampton, Charlie Spivak]   (1947)
CAPITOL 7815277 — {You Was Right, Baby / It's A Good Day}    (1948)
c. 1200-rejectedMaster Take (Capitol) I've Had My Moments(Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
unissued


Songs, Masters And Cross-references

1. "It's A Good Day" In The Music Charts
According to data found in the book Pop Memories, 1890-1954, Peggy Lee's sixth solo hit entered the Billboard charts on January 18, 1947 and peaked at #16. (n.b.: For Lee's fifth solo hit, see session dated July 23, 1946.)

Doubtlessly to Lee's pleasure, other record labels released competing versions of her self-penned lyric. Among the competitors were RCA Victor's Phil Harris and Columbia's Gene Krupa, who assigned the vocal to his girl singer, Carolyn Grey. Apparently those two versions -- neither listed in Whitburn's aforementioned text but both mentioned in Foote Gardner's text Popular Songs Of The Twentieth Century: A Charted History -- earned smaller airplay than Lee's.

Whitburn's estimates notwithstanding, the proven popularity of this recording strongly suggests that it must have cracked the top 10, at the very least. At any rate, "It's A Good Day" was played and covered often in radio shows of the time, and thereafter it remained current for decades -- not only on radio but also on records and TV variety shows.

2. "Don't Be So Mean To Baby"
For the version of "Don't Be So Mean To Baby" that Capitol issued during the 78-rpm music era, see session dated October 16, 1946.

3. "I've Had My Moments"
In Peggy Lee's session files, this version is listed as rejected. For two other studio versions of "I've Had My Moments," one of them not issued until 2008, see sessions dated July 23, 1946 (including notes) and November 26, 1947. See also pages for MacGregor and Capitol Transcriptions.


Arrangements And Arrangers

1. Heinie Beau
2. Mundell Lowe
This session's arrangement of "It's A Good Day" can be found in Capitol's library of music scores. The library credits it to Heinie Beau. He is also credited with the library's only arrangements of "Don't Be So Mean To Baby" and "I've Had My Moments."

A Mundell Lowe arrangement of "It's A Good Day" has been preserved, too. It is in of Peggy Lee's own sheet music library. Presumed to have been written some time during the 1960s, Lowe's arrangement might have been meant for Lee's concert performances.


Personnel

1. Sources
My source for this session's personnel is the booklet of the set Capitol Records' Sixtieth Anniversary, 1942-2002 (catalogue number 7243 5 41220 2 6; not included above because I have listed all various-artists compilations in a separate page of this discography). As for Peggy Lee's Capitol session file (i.e., my main source of information), it does not name this session's musicians.


Date: July 15, 1946
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #327

Peggy Lee (ldr), John Palladino (eng), Frank DeVol (con), Frank Devol and His Orchestra (acc), Skeets Herfurt aka Arthur Herfurt, Jerome Kasper, Jules Kinsler, Ron Perry, Ted Romersa (r), Abe Benike, Uan Rasey, Irv Shulkin (t), George Faye, Si Zentner (tb), Dave Barbour (g), Phil Stephens (b), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), June Weiland (hrp), Tommy Romersa (d), Victor Arno, Joseph Livoti, Joseph Quadri, Henry Sugar (vn), Jacob Kaz, Paul Lowenkron (vl), Fred Goerner, Joseph Saxon, Julius Tannenbaum (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1203-1-AMaster Take (Capitol) A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues - 3:12(Dick Charles, Lawrence W. Markes, Jr.) / arr: Frank DeVol
CAPITOL 7815001 — {There'll Be Some Changes Made / A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues}   (1947)
CAPITOL (10") LPH 204 — My Best To You   (1950)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Ttp/Tp 352 — The Fabulous Miss Lee   (1963)


Sessions And Masters

1. A Date With Frank DeVol
2. Non-Lee Masters
Session #327 is essentially a Frank DeVol date in which two vocalists shared him and his orchestra. Hal Derwin sang on the first two masters, Peggy Lee on the third:

1201-4 I Guess I'll Get The Papers And Go Home
1202-3 The Old Lamplighter
1203-1 A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues

For another DeVol-Lee corroboration, see session dated August 14, 1947.

3. The Capitol Studio Recording Versus The Capitol Radio Transcription
This version of "A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues" sounds very similar to another one that Lee had recorded a month earlier. That June 10, 1946 version had been made for use on Capitol's radio transcription service -- not for retail. To my ears, the two versions are identical. I suspect that Capitol deemed the June 10 transcription worthy of commercial issue, and hence the company's engineers (re)mastered it for commercial release on 78-rpm disc. The producer in charge of the decision would have then assigned it a master number. Needing to include it in the artist file, he would have also tagged the remaster to this July 15 date. (In other words, Derwin and Lee might have not shared this session, after all; the Lee master might have just been conveniently inserted into a DeVol-Derwin date.)

Adding to my suspicions is the fact that the designated master of "A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues" is a take #1. For this time period (i.e., the mid-1940s), most of Lee's other masters tend to be identified in the files as second or third takes, or higher.

I must clarify, however, that there is no factual corroboration for this suspicion of mine. It could still be that the performances are different, despite sounding identical to my ears. Note also the recording session photos below, two of which do bear a July 15, 1946 date.

In any case, Capitol assigned two master numbers and two recording dates to Peggy Lee's recording(s) of "A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues." I have followed suit herein.


Personnel

1. Dave Barbour
2. Frank DeVol
The following note is found in The Capitol Label Discography, compiled by Michel Ruppli, Bill Daniels and Ed Novitsky with assistance from Michael Cuscuna: "This title was listed in artist file as with Dave Barbour and his Orchestra. Credit to Frank DeVol appears in Capitol CD release."

3. Other Musicians (Source)
The other musicians who played at this July 15, 1946 date are not identified in Lee's artist file. Relying on the above-mentioned likelihood that this performance is the same one recorded for Capitol's transcription service, I have transferred the full personnel from that session to this one. Hence this session's above-listed personnel should be deemed tentative in its entirety -- except for the vocalist and the conductor, of course.


Arrangements

An arrangement of "A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues" is extant in Capitol's library of music scores. Frank DeVol is credited as its author.


Session Photos

Two of the Peggy Lee shots seen below bear a July 15, 1946 date. The middle shot, showing not only Lee but also Dave Barbour, Buddy Cole, and a bassist in the background (Phil Stephens?), bear a generic January 1, 1946 date.





Date: July 23, 1946
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #332

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Henry J. "Heinie" Beau (cl), Unknown (cl, t, tb, b, p, d), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1211-4Master Take (Capitol) It's All Over Now - 3:00(Don Marcotte, Sunny Skylar) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78292 — {Aren't You Kind Of Glad We Did? / It's All Over Now}   (1946)
USA Government's War Department, Army-Navy V-Disc Series V-Disc720 — {It's All Over Now / Honeyfoglin' Time, by Martha Tilton / Yesterdays by Kay Penton}   (1947)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
b. 1212-2Master Take (Capitol) Aren't You Kind Of Glad We Did? - 2:58(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78292 — {Aren't You Kind Of Glad We Did? / It's All Over Now}   (1946)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1433 — G.I. Jive [Roy Eldridge, Woody Herman, Tony Martin]   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1446 — G.I. Jive [Woody Herman, Lionel Hampton, Glenn Miller]   (1947)
c. 1213-2Master Take (Capitol) I've Had My Moments - 3:16(Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)


Songs

"It's All Over Now" In The Music Charts
After entering Billboard's charts during the week of November 23, 1946, Peggy Lee's version of this song reached #10. It was her fifth solo hit. Scoring higher than Lee, with a #6, was Columbia's Frankie Carle, whose version had a vocal by Marjorie Hughes. (n. b.: For Lee's sixth solo hit, see above, session dated July 12, 1946.)


Masters And Songs

1. "I've Had My Moments"
This is the song that Peggy Lee recorded most often during the 1940's: five times. The two earliest versions were originally recorded exclusively for radio broadcasting, even though they ended up being commercially issued at a much later time. (See pages for both MacGregor and Capitol radio transcriptions.) The other three versions are Capitol studio recordings, two of them unreleased so far. (See sessions dated July 12, 1946 and November 26, 1947.)


Arrangements

This session's arrangements are kept in Capitol's library of music scores. The library credits them to Heinie Beau.


Session Photos

All three photos below bear a July 23, 1946 date.





Date: September 23, 1946
Location: WMCA Studios, at 1657 Broadway (or, otherwise, WOR Studios, at 1440 Broadway), New York City
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #361

Peggy Lee (ldr), Paul Weston (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (sax, t, tb, g, b, p, d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1226-6Master Take (Capitol) He's Just My Kind - 3:05(Floyd Huddleston, Mark McIntyre)
CAPITOL 78322 — {He's Just My Kind / It's A Good Day}   (1946)
ABM (Audio Book & Music) Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Abmmcd 1092 — It's Lovin' Time   (1999)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #1]   (2000)
BMG MUSIC PUBLISHING CD[promo] Pub 016 — PEGGY LEE: SONGWRITER   (2001)
Hallmark Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Halmcd 1320 — It's Lovin' Time [Reissue of ABM 1092]   (2001)
b. 1227-4Master Take (Capitol) She Didn't Say Yes - 2:47(Jerome Kern, Otto Harbach)
CAPITOL 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPCd 41(10072-10075)/Ccf 210(F 155501)[reissued as Ebf 210]/H 210 [rel. in 1950] — [Various Artists] Jerome Kern's Music (Criterion Series)   (1947)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) Cl 13305 — {She Didn't Say Yes [not released as a single in the USA] / Them There Eyes}   (1950)
Dutton Vocalion Licensed CD(United Kingdom) Cdus 3008 — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (2000)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Box 108 — Miss Wonderful    (2006)
Both titles on: CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)


Issues (Collectors' Corner And Cross-references)





1. "Cast" And Songwriter Albums From Capitol
2. Jerome Kern's Music [Album Configurations]
In its original configuration, Jerome Kern's Music (aka Music Of Jerome Kern) was a 78-rpm album -- specifically, a set of four discs. Later, Capitol reissued it as both an EP (containing three 45-rpm discs) and as a 10" LP. As sequenced in that LP, the songs and artists featured in Music Of Jerome Kern are:

Side 1
The Way You Look Tonight - Paul Weston And His Orchestra
A Fine Romance - Johnny Mercer and Martha Tilton
Look For The Silver Lining - Margaret Whiting
Smoke Gets In Your Eyes - Nat King Cole Trio

Side 2
She Didn't Say Yes - Peggy Lee
The Touch Of Your Hand - Hal Derwin
Who? - The Pied Pipers
All The Things You Are - Clark Dennis

Jerome Kern's Music has never been released on CD, nor did it ever come out on 12" LP. Granted that it is too brief to be issued just by itself in one digital disc, such an objection could be bypassed if the album were to be combined with another one. An ideal companion to Jerome Kern's Music would be Capitol's Somebody Loves Me: The Beloved Songs Of Buddy De Sylva, which is still waiting for its CD release, too, and which was also came out in 1947, about three months after the Kern songbook. (For details about Somebody Loves Me, see notes under session dated January 29, 1947.) For prospective labels such as DRG, The pairing of those two albums in one digital release would be particularly appropriate: in 2008, DRG Records issued a CD that combined two other early Capitol albums, Kiss Me, Kate and South Pacific, each consisting of numbers interpreted by members of the label's roster. DRG would thus be an ideal candidate to issue the Kern and DeSylva albums -- in what could be marketed as a sequel to the 2008 item. (Peggy Lee is also heard in the aforementioned South Pacific Capitol album; see sessions dated March 11 and April 18, 1949).

3. "She Didn't Say Yes" [Single Configurations]
In the original 78-rpm album version of Jerome Kern's Music (catalogue number Cd 41), "She Didn't Say Yes" is on one side of disc #10075. The flip side contains an instrumental version of "The Way You Look Tonight," performed by Paul Weston and His Orchestra.

In the 45-rpm album (=EP) version of Jerome Kern's Music (catalogue number Ccf 210), "She Didn't Say Yes" is on disc #15501, whose other side features "A Fine Romance" as sung by Johnny Mercer and Martha Tilton, in a duet version.

Notice that, although sometimes found in record sellers' listings as single units, Capitol never issued 45-rpm disc #15501 nor 78-rpm disc #10075 as singles. Both are instead pieces from the Kern album.

4. Photos
Three rows of pictures have been supplied above. The first row highlights the Capitol release Jerome Kern's Music in its 78-rpm disc configuration. The album's front cover is on display, along with one inner side of the cover and the shellac disc that features "She Didn't Say Yes." The second row spotlights the 10" LP. Its front cover and the vinyl itself are displayed. Also visible in the second row is a Capitol advertisement on behalf of the original release (i.e., the 78-rpm album). The last row features the EP set -- front and back covers, plus the 45-rpm disc that features "She Didn't Say Yes."

5. Peggy Lee: Songwriter [CD]
6. "He's Just My Kind"
BMG's promotional song disc wrongly credits the song "He's Just My Kind" to Dave Barbour and Peggy Lee. As shown in the entry above, this song was actually written by Floyd Huddleston and Mark McIntyre.


Arrangements

Capitol's library of music scores includes an arrangement of "He's Just My Kind," but it has no author credit.


Personnel

1. Paul Weston (Producer)
The sources at hand do not reveal the identity of the producer who was in charge of this New York date. Fortunately, the September 1946 issue of the periodical Variety reports the following: Every Capitol Record name currently in the east will take a shot at Capitol disking mikes this week. Paul Weston, Cap's recording director, flew into N.Y. over the weekend for a full week of cutting after which he must quickly jump back to Hollywood ..." See also next paragraph.


Location

1. WMCA Studios
2. WOR Studios
The aforementioned Variety article also states the following: "Weston will record Jo Stafford, Margaret Whiting, Peggy Lee, King Cole Trio, [Andy] Russell and Alvino Rey's orchestra all this week, at WMCA and WOR studios in N.Y. He'll work afternoons and nights some days to get them all on wax. The artists, comprising most of the cream of Capitol's crop, are all working in the east at the moment." Being the studio known to be most commonly used by Capitol for New York sessions between 1942 and 1946, I have picked WMCA as the likeliest location for the present date. However, WOR Studios remains
a valid possibility as well.


Session Photo

This shot bears a September 23, 1946 date. If that date is correct, then Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour are likely to be looking at the sheet music of either "He's Just My Kind" or "She Didn't Say Yes."





Date: October 17, 1946
Location: possibly WMCA Studios, at 1657 Broadway, New York City
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #365

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 1238Master Take (Capitol) When Irish Eyes Are Smiling - 2:22(Traditional, Ernest R. Ball, George Graff, Chauncey Olcott)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Gallerie/Music Collection Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gale 442 — A Portrait Of Peggy Lee   (1999)
Tim International Public Domain CD(Germany) 220838 [220839-220843] — A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues ("Document" Series)   (2004)
Weton-Wesgram Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Mom 641 — Peggy Lee ("Masters Of Music" Series)   (2005)
Tim International Public Domain CD(Germany) 222455 — While We're Young ("Quadromania" Series)   (2005)
Weton-Wesgram Public Domain CD(Netherlands?) Qu 408 — 101 Hits   (2009)
b. 1239-1Master Take (Capitol) Birmingham Jail - 2:23(Traditional)
CAPITOL 78 & 451776 & F 1776 — {While We're Young / Birmingham Jail}   (1951)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 2103 - P 2104 — Basic Music Library [6 Peggy Lee vocals]   (1951)
CAPITOL (10") LP(United Kingdom) Lc 6584 — Capitol Presents ... Peggy Lee   (1953)
c. 1240-4Master Take (Capitol) Don't Be So Mean To Baby - 3:00(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
CAPITOL 7815159 — {Don't Be So Mean To Baby / Just A Shade On The Blue Side}   (1948)
ABM (Audio Book & Music) Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Abmmcd 1092 — It's Lovin' Time   (1999)
Hallmark Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Halmcd 1320 — It's Lovin' Time [Reissue of ABM 1092]   (2001)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
Global Journey Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gj 2303 — Peggy Lee ("Unique" Series)   (2005)
Global Journey Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) GJ7710 — Peggy Lee ("Legends" Series)   (2012)
d. 1241-2Master Take (Capitol) Swing Low, Sweet Chariot - 3:01(Traditional)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)


The New York Recording Sessions: Peggy Lee And Dave Barbour's Debut Album?

During a successful engagement in New York at The Paramount Theatre, Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour took the opportunity to record a couple of sessions in the Big Apple. At this New York recording date, the husband-and-wife team seem to have been given freer rein than in California. Their two Manhattan sessions probably comprise tunes that they had been performing at the Paramount concerts, and which might have been favorites of them.

When heard in toto, the eight recorded numbers make for a cohesive set. A jazzy, lightly swinging approach is sustained through four of the songs. The other four titles are ballads sung in a heartfelt and bluesy manner. There were no commercial ditties or "plug tunes" in the mix. The repertoire includes two standards from the pop-jazz world, one famous jazz melody ("Nuages") with then-brand-new lyrics in English, various blues-oriented Traditional tunes, two tasteful creations co-written by the Barbour-and-Lee team, and one standard-to-be by a favorite songwriter of Lee's, Alec Wilder.

I suspect that the plan was to release the entire repertoire as a Lee-Barbour album. If such a record was truly under consideration, obviously the project did not proceed as planned. It would have been Peggy Lee's first original album, predating her next one (Rendezvous With Peggy Lee) by two years. Unfortunately, I have not come across any further details that can confirm or deny the possibility that such a hypothetical album was truly planned.

It is worth adding that all of these New York masters were initially left unissued. (Two of them had to wait three to five years to leave the vaults; the other six were not released until the CD era.) My aforementioned hypothesis (i.e., a cancelled 78-rpm album set) could gain further credibility from the fact that Capitol passed over the entire batch, not picking any of these eight songs for release on 1946 or 1947 singles.

Also likely part of the equation: AFM's looming threat of a musician's strike by the end of the year, as a result of a then-ongoing battle over wages and contracts with record companies. As was the custom when such disputes arose, the record labels rushed their artists to the studios, in the hope of producing and storing enough masters to prevent a dearth of new releases during a potentially long recording ban. "At Capitol, for instance," a reporter stated in a Billboard article with an October 19, 1946 byline, "all-night sessions have been going since last Monday, and were skidded for rest of the week." This increase in recording activity was taking place at the label's Hollywood studios, but it is conceivable that the effort was coordinated with the New York offices as well. In any case, the disputing parties arrived at a settlement in mid-october, and a new contract was drawn for the period starting on October 21, 1946 and ending on December 31, 1947. Once fears of a strike were assuaged, Capitol cancelled the remainder of the sessions that had been scheduled for the week. Company executives probably felt relaxed enough to deem the immediate release of Lee's New York masters unnecessary. Afterwards, Lee's waxing of many new masters might have had, as a side effect, the neglect of these older ones.


Masters, Songs And Cross-references

1. "Don't Be So Mean To Baby", Master #1240
For another version of "Don't Be So Mean To Baby," see session dated July 12, 1946. (That earlier version is the one that was released for the first time in 2008.) The reason why Lee re-recorded this tune three months after her first try is unknown. Since both versions sound good to my ears, I can only speculate that Lee and Barbour were eager to try the song with musicians from the New York area. Bear also in mind my previously mentioned speculation that this session's songs were intended for an album release. (Of the two, the version that strikes me as superior is the one under discussion, on master #1240.)

This session's performance of "Don't Be So Mean To Baby" was first issued in 1948, while a recording ban had led to scarcity of newly recorded material. Hence the ban compelled record labels to release old, previously unissued masters from their vaults. In the case of Peggy Lee's self-penned "Don't Be So Mean To Baby," the fact that Duke Ellington had previously recorded a well-received version -- with a vocal by Al Hibbler -- might have served as extra impetus for Capitol to make it available during the ban period.

2. "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot", Master #1241
This version of "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" was not issued until 2008. For the version that Capitol released in 1947, see session dated January 29, 1947.


Arrangements

1. "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"
No arranging credit for this session's version of "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" has been located, but a later version (1947) of this traditional number is known to have been adapted by Peggy Lee and her husband Dave Barbour. Given the strong similarities of the two arrangements, chances are that the couple is also responsible for the one from this date.

Peggy Lee's sheet music library contains two arrangements of this song. One, known to have been written for a Decca master, is by Neal Hefti and Peggy Lee. The other library arrangement is of greater interest to this session: it is credited to Billy May, but no further details are known about it.

Personnel

1. Musicians
The musicians that accompanied Barbour and Lee in this session are unknown. It stands to reason, however, that they are the same ones, or mostly the same ones listed in the next session.

2. James Conkling (Producer)
3. Paul Weston (Producer)
The sources at hand do not reveal the identity of the producer who was in charge of Lee's October dates in New York. However, both Pau Weston and Jim Conkling can be cited as potential candidates. Variety and Capitol News from September 1946 mention that these Hollywood-based producers had separately flown to New York with the purpose of recording Capitol artists who were temporarily staying in the Big Apple. (From such reports, it might be gathered that no record producers had been hired at the New York branch, but I do not have any information on the matter.)
Pointing to Weston, Variety's report has already been quoted in the preceding New York session (September 23, 1946.)

Here is the report from Capitol News: "Margaret Whiting recorded a new batch of Capitol wax in N. Y. in August with James B. Conkling flying in from Hollywood to supervise the session." Conkling was a Capitol executive who, like Whiting and Lee, resided in California but visited the Big Apple in the second half of 1946. Granted that quite a few days separate Lee's sessions from Whiting's date (August 1, 1946), Conkling could have flown back a second time. Or Conkling (who began his days at Capitol as an assistant manager of A&R and raised to the vice-presidency of the company) could have just stayed in New York for months, perhaps tending to some of Capitol's operations in the city. In any case, Conkling involvement with this session is being presented here merely as a possibility. Unless more specific and reliable data comes forward, neither his name nor Weston's shall be entered in these October 1946 sessions' personnel. (Among various other conceivable possibilities: this time around, rather than Conkling or Weston, the producer flying to New York could have been Lee Gillette, or somebody else -- e.g., Dave Dexter, Jr.)


Date: October 18, 1946
Location: unclear; possibly WMGM Radio Studio, located then at either Loew's State Theatre or 711 5th Av, New York (city confirmed; exact venue unclear)
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #369

Peggy Lee (ldr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Hank D'Amico (cl), Jake Koven (t), Dave Barbour (g), Bob Haggart (b), Sanford Gold (p), Johnny Blowers (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1254-2Master Take (Capitol) It's The Bluest Kind Of Blues (Nuages) - 3:06(Jean Reinhardt, Spencer Williams)
CAPITOL CD72435 27564 2 1 — RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES [aka Capitol's Collectors Series, Vol. 2]   (2000)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
Global Journey Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gj 2303 — Peggy Lee ("Unique" Series)   (2005)
CAPITOL©EMI CD(Korea) 8806344820326 — The Very Best Of Peggy Lee; The Capitol Years   (2006)
Global Journey Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) GJ7710 — Peggy Lee ("Legends" Series)   (2012)
b. 1255-2Master Take (Capitol) You Can Depend On Me - 2:50(Charlie Carpenter, Louis Dunlap, Earl 'Fatha' Hines)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Gallerie/Music Collection Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gale 442 — A Portrait Of Peggy Lee   (1999)
Rajon ?Public Domain CD(Australia) Red 021 — The Great Peggy Lee ("The Great" Series)   (2000)
c. 1256-2Master Take (Capitol) Trouble Is A Man - 3:12(Alec Wilder)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)
d. 1257-5Master Take (Capitol) Music, Maestro, Please - 3:04(Herb Magidson, Allie Wrubel)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)


The Recording Session

Because Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour recorded this and the previous session consecutively, during a brief sojourn to New York, and because the total amount of resulting masters is eight (i.e., the usual number of tracks in albums from the 1940s), I suspect that these masters were planned for release on a prospective Lee-Barbour 78-rpm album. If so, plans for the album must have been abandoned. See related comments under previous session.


Songs And Songwriters

1. "(It's) The Bluest Kind Of Blues"
2. Django Reinhardt
In the Capitol CD Rare Gems And Hidden Treasures, annotator Gene Lees erroneously refers to this song as a vocal version of the Theme for The Jackie Gleason Show. "(It's) The Bluest Kind Of Blues" is instead a vocal version of "Nuages," the celebrated instrumental by guitarist Django Reinhardt, whose birth name was Jean Baptiste -- hence the songwriter credit above.

3. "Trouble Is A Man"
Peggy Lee made one of the earliest recordings of "Trouble Is A Man," a number composed by her friend Alec Wilder. (It was possibly the earliest of them all.) Lee also sang and promoted the number on radio and in concerts. Regrettably, Capitol never issued Lee's version. As a result, music listeners became better acquainted with the 1947 recordings of Sarah Vaughan and Ginnie Powell. The Peggy Lee treatment was finally released by the label Collectors' Choice in 2008.


Dating

1. "You Can Depend On Me"
Whereas "You Can Depend On Me" is dated October 17 in the Capitol CD set Miss Peggy Lee, Peggy Lee's Capitol session files list it under this October 18 date. I have put more trust in the session file.


Session Photo

This image shows Peggy Lee at a Capitol studio, recording with a set of musicians that include a bassist and a pianist. Possibly from 1946, the photo is undated. I have no details that may allow me to pinpoint the session which it portrays. Therefore, my current placement of this picture under the present session is random. Hopefully, information allowing for a correct placement of the photo will be forthcoming in the future.






Date: November 22, 1946
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #442

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour (con, g), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Henry J. "Heinie" Beau (cl, as), Dave Cavanaugh (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Bill Davis (b), Tommy Linehan (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1530-5Master Take (Capitol) It's Lovin' Time - 2:48(Harry Harris, J. Chalmers "Chummy" MacGregor) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)
b. 1531-5Master Take (Capitol) Everything's Movin' Too Fast - 2:57(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) Cl 13069 — {Caramba! It's The Samba! / Everything's Movin' Too Fast} [Different pairing than in USA singles]   (1949)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
Castle Pie Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Piesd 045 — Mañana    (1999)
Both titles on: CAPITOL 78343 — {Everything's Movin' Too Fast / It's Lovin' Time}   (1946)
Asv/Living Era Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Aja 5237 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 25 Early Hits   (1997)
ABM (Audio Book & Music) Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Abmmcd 1092 — It's Lovin' Time   (1999)


Songs

1. "Everythin's Movin' Too Fast" In The Music Charts
After entering the Billboard charts during the week of February 8, 1947, "Everythin's Movin' Too Fast" became the third song composed by the Barbour-Lee team that climbed the music charts. The tune, which was also the vocalist's seventh solo hit, peaked at #21.


Arrangements

This session's arrangements are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. The library credits "It's Lovin' Time" to Heinie Beau. The arrangement of "Everythin's Moving Too Fast" does not identify its author.


Date: January 29, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #523

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (sax, t, tb), Dave Barbour (g), Phil Stephens (b), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Tommy Romersa (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1613-5Master Take (Capitol) Swing Low, Sweet Chariot - 2:23(Traditional) / arr: Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee
CAPITOL 78375 — {Speaking Of Angels / Swing Low, Sweet Chariot}   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 763 - P 764 — Basic Music Library [Frank Sinatra, Jean Sablon, Margaret Whiting, Peggy Lee]   (1947)
CAPITOL (10") LPH 204 — My Best To You   (1950)
b. 1614-5Master Take (Capitol) Speaking Of Angels - 2:48(Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78375 — {Speaking Of Angels / Swing Low, Sweet Chariot}   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 763 - P 764 — Basic Music Library [Frank Sinatra, Jean Sablon, Margaret Whiting, Peggy Lee]   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 2871 - P 2872 — Basic Music Library [4 Peggy Lee vocals]   (1953)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
c. 1615-2Master Take (Capitol) Somebody Loves Me - 2:55(Buddy G. DeSylva, George Gershwin, Ballard MacDonald) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78-rpm albumCd 49 (10085-10088) — [Various Artists] Somebody Loves Me: The Beloved Songs Of Buddy DeSylva (Criterion Series)   (1947)
CAPITOL (10") LP(United Kingdom) Lc 6584 — Capitol Presents ... Peggy Lee   (1953)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Ttp/Tp 352 — The Fabulous Miss Lee   (1963)


Issues, Masters And Sources



1. Somebody Loves Me: The Beloved Songs Of Buddy De Sylva [78-rpm album]
This album has never been issued on compact disc. If paired with the similarly oriented Jerome Kern's Music (see session dated September 23, 1946), it could make for a fine CD twofer. DRG Records would be a prime candidate to issue such a twofer. That noteworthy record company has already released a disc which similarly combined two 1940s albums featuring Capitol's roster of artists at the time: Kiss Me, Kate and South Pacific. (For details about the latter, see 1949 sessions dated March 11 and April 18).



The songs and acts featured in Somebody Loves Me: The Beloved Songs Of Buddy De Sylva are:

If I Had A Talking Picture Of You - Johnny Mercer and Martha Tilton
Just A Memory - Andy Russell
You're The Cream In My Coffee - The Nat King Cole Trio
Somebody Loves Me - Peggy Lee
Avalon - The Pied Pipers
April Showers - Margaret Whiting
When Day Is Done - Hal Derwin
Together - Clark Dennis

The album consists of four 78-rpm discs. Peggy Lee's "Somebody Loves Me" can be found on disc #10085, whose flip side has the Andy Russell performance.

2. Trav'lin' Light [CD] And "Somebody Loves Me"
3. The Capitol Label Discography
According to The Capitol Label Discography by Michel Ruppli et al., this session's master of "Somebody Loves Me" can be found in a CD with catalogue number 5 23567 2. That's the Capitol Jazz CD Trav'lin' Light. It does contain a performance of "Somebody Loves Me," but it is not the same one that was recorded during this session. It is instead a Capitol radio transcription that Lee waxed on June 11, 1946. This error presumably originates in the official Capitol documentation that Ruppli and company consulted.

4. "A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues" [CD] And "Somebody Loves Me"
The 5-CD set A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues includes three tracks titled "Somebody Loves Me." One of them (track #18 of the set's second CD, sub-titled Sugar) is Lee's Capitol studio version (recorded on January 29, 1947). Another version is Lee's Capitol transcription version, which can be found as track #7 on the same CD from this set. The third appearance of "Somebody Loves Me" (track #7 of the set's fourth CD, sub-titled Oh! You Crazy Moon) turns out to be a duplication: it is, once again, the Capitol transcription version.


Personnel

The source for this session's personnel is The Capitol Label Discography. None of my other sources identifies the musicians.


Arrangements

1. "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"
This version of the traditional song "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" was adapted by Dave Barbour and Peggy Lee.

Peggy Lee's sheet music library contains two arrangements of this song. One, known to have been written for a Decca master, is by Neal Hefti and Peggy Lee. The other one is by Billy May.

2. "Speaking Of Angels"
3. "Somebody Loves Me"
The arrangements for "Speaking Of Angels" and "Somebody Loves Me" are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. Both are credited to Heinie Beau. Another Capitol studio version, recorded on October 17, 1946, was issued for the first time in 2008.


Cross-references

1. "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"
Lee recorded this number four more times. In addition to this session's studio version, there's an earlier one, dated October 17, 1946. Of her remaining two recordings of "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," one was made for Capitol's radio transcription service (June 11, 1946) and the other for the Decca label (in a markedly different style and arrangement; January 6, 1956).


Date: March 28, 1947
Location: Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Sessions #567 And #568

Benny Goodman (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), The Benny Goodman Sextet (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Dave Barbour (g), Harry Babasin (b), Tommy Todd (p), Ernie Felice (pac), Tommy Romersa (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 1801-5Master Take (Capitol) Eight, Nine And Ten - 2:55(Eddie Gardner, Fletcher Henderson, Bobby Troup, Frank Lewis)
Mosaic Licensed LP/CDMq6/Md4 148 — [Benny Goodman] The Complete Capitol Small Group Recordings Of Benny Goodman, 1944-1955   (1993)
CAPITOL CD72435 27564 2 1 — RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES [aka Capitol's Collectors Series, Vol. 2]   (2000)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1385 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOLOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1946-1947   (2005)


Recording Location

My source for this date's recording location is the booklet of Mosaic's set The Complete Capitol Small Group Recordings Of Benny Goodman, 1944-1955, which lists Radio Recorders as the location for all 1947 Capitol sessions by Benny Goodman.


Masters (And Royalties)

1. "Eight, Nine And Ten"
Benny Goodman, who had joined Capitol in January of 1947, recorded "Eight, Nine And Ten" twice during his first year on the label. Peggy Lee sang only in this version. In the second version, which was recorded on June 3, 1947, Goodman himself fulfilled vocal duties. (Furthermore, the second version consists of two parts, each with its own matrix, one featuring the Goodman vocal and the other all-instrumental. Part 1 carries matrix number 2022-7. Then there is Part 2, whose matrix number is 2023-5. Part 1 has an additional title, too: "No, Baby, No.")

The official paperwork indicates that royalties for this March 28, 1947 date were to be split between Goodman and Lee. Could this financial arrangement account for Goodman's decision to re-record the tune with himself as vocalist? See also personnel notes under session #818, dated December 2, 1947.

2. Non-Lee Masters
3. Benny Goodman
Also recorded during this Benny Goodman date were the following instrumentals:

1800-6 The Bannister Slide
1802-3 I Never Knew


Cross-references

1. Benny Goodman With Peggy Lee
For other Capitol collaborations between Lee and Goodman, see 1947 sessions dated September 12 (session #695) and December 2 (session #818).


Photo

The date of the photo seen below is unknown to me, and so are the location and context under which it was taken. Judging from Peggy Lee's looks, I am inclined to give it a 1946 date, with 1947 and 1945 as alternatives. The likeliest occasion would have been, in my estimation, Lee's guest appearance on Goodman's radio (The Victor Borge Show, Starring Benny Goodman, August 26, 1946) or the present session. Though the visibility is poor, the surroundings suggest a recording session. The possibility that the photo is from a later Lee-and-Goodman recording session (December 2, 1947) should not be discarded, even if Lee's looks lead me to doubt that such is the case.

The larger version of the photo was used by Cash Box magazine on its April 24, 1948 issue, with a caption that starts out as follows: "That's maestro Benny Goodman congratulating chirp Peggy Lee, one of the hottest fem vocalists in the nation, on her recent sensational success with Golden Earrings, I'll Dance At Your Wedding, All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart, and last, but certainly not least, her rendition of Mañana ... Benny's recent Beyond The Sea and For Every Man There's A Woman started the storm breaking again for the maestro. The latter side also teamed the trush and tootler, to every music lover's delight ..." I believe the caption's implication that the photo had been taken in 1948 to be misleading, and still feel certain that it dates back to 1947 or 1946.









Date: April 21, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #585

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 1853-4Master Take (Capitol) Aintcha Ever Comin' Back? - 2:41(Axel Stordahl, Irving Taylor, Paul Weston) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
Sepia Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 1055 — Songs From The Jazz Singer {Danny Thomas, Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)
b. 1854-3Master Take (Capitol) Chi-Baba, Chi-Baba (My Bambino, Go To Sleep) - 2:59(Mack David, Al Hoffman, Jerry Livingston) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 184 — Jill's Juke Box [Harry James,, Margaret Whiting, Others]   (1947)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Both titles on: CAPITOL 78419 — {Aintcha Ever Comin' Back? / Chi-Baba, Chi-Baba (My Bambino, Go To Sleep)}   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 829 - P 830 — Basic Music Library [Frankie Carle, Peggy Lee]   (1947)


Songs

"Chi-Baba, Chi-Baba" In The Music Charts
This novelty was assigned to Peggy Lee at Capitol, to Perry Como at RCA Victor, to The Charioteers at Columbia, and to Blue Barron at MGM. Como, the king of novelties at this point of his career, took it to the top spot. Peggy Lee's version, which was in more of a lullaby mode and included even three or four words in Italian, entered the music charts during the week of June 28, 1947 and reached #10. The two other versions peaked at #14 (Blue Barron) and #16 (The Charioteers).


Arrangements

The arrangements for this session are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. Both are credited to Heinie Beau.


Date: July 3, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #651

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour All-Stars (acc), Unknown (sax, g, b, p, cel), Ray Linn (t), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2105-6Master Take (Capitol) Why Should I Cry Over You? - 2:35(Chester Conn, Ned Miller)
CAPITOL CD72435 27564 2 1 — RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES [aka Capitol's Collectors Series, Vol. 2]   (2000)
b. 2106-3Master Take (Capitol) It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose - 3:06(Dick Charles, Lawrence W. Markes, Jr.) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78445 — {It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose / Just An Old Love of Mine}   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 829 - P 830 — Basic Music Library [Frankie Carle, Peggy Lee]   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1682 — G.I. Jive [Tex Beneke, Billy Butterfield, Woody Herman]   (1947)
c. 2107-3Master Take (Capitol) Just An Old Love Of Mine - 3:14(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78445 — {It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose / Just An Old Love of Mine}   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 829 - P 830 — Basic Music Library [Frankie Carle, Peggy Lee]   (1947)
Dutton Vocalion Licensed CD(United Kingdom) Cdus 3008 — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (2000)


Arrangements

1. Source
The arrangements for two of this session's masters ("It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Big Caboose" and "Just An Old Love Of Mine") were kept in Capitol's library of music scores, and have thus been preserved. Heinie Beau is credited on both scores.


Personnel And Instruments

1. Source
My source for the identification of this session's musical instruments is The Capitol Label Discography.


Date: August 14, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #669

Frank DeVol, Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Frank DeVol (con), Frank Devol and His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 2162-4Master Take (Capitol) There'll Be Some Changes Made - 3:08(Billy Higgins, William Benton Overstreet) / arr: Frank DeVol
CAPITOL 7815001 — {There'll Be Some Changes Made / A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues}   (1947)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Gallerie/Music Collection Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gale 442 — A Portrait Of Peggy Lee   (1999)


Sessions And Masters

1. A Date With Frank DeVol
2. Non-Lee Masters: Split With Margaret Whiting
Session #669 is essentially a Frank DeVol date in which his conducting was shared by Margaret Whiting and Peggy Lee. Whiting's two masters from the session are:

2160-3 So Far
2161-3 Lazy Countryside

Capitol released the one DeVol-Lee track on 78-rpm single #15001. For the flip side, Capitol choose to retrieve the one additional retail track that they had recorded together, way back in June 10 of 1946. Also worth noting: a news bit from a September 1947 issue of Variety, in which it is claimed that "Peggy Lee last week tracked two for Capitol, backed by Frank DeVol ork. First time she ever has larked when not backed by her husband's (Dave Barbour) combo." The second sentence's claim is incorrect, though there is room for further discussion on the matter. (The are some unanswered questions about the June 10, 1946 master, "A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues." It is not clear if it is truly a new recording, or a transfer of a radio transcription that Lee and DeVol had recorded for broadcasting over the airwaves. Still, even such was the case, Lee had "larked" with DeVol in various such transcriptions and, on record, with a couple of other men who were not Barbour as well -- Bob Crosby, Charles Wolcott).


Arrangements

1. Frank DeVol
The arrangement for this session's performance of "There'll Be Some Changes Made" is extant in Capitol's library of music scores. The library is the source for the credit to Frank DeVol.


Date: September 12, 1947
Location: Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #695

Lee Gillette (pdr), Paul Weston And His Orchestra (acc), Leonard "Lenny" Hartman, Herbert "Herbie" Haymer, Herbert "Happy" Lawson, Julian "Matty" Matlock, Fred Stulce (r), Benny Goodman (cl), Charles Griffard, George Seaberg, Ray Woods, Rubin "Zeke" Zarchy (t), William "Bill" Schaefer, Elmer Smithers, Allan "Al" Thompson (tb), George Van Eps (g), John "Jack" Ryan (b), Milt Raskin (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee, Johnny Mercer, The Pied Pipers, Margaret Whiting (v), The Pied Pipers' Hal Hopper, The Pied Pipers' June Hutton, The Pied Pipers' Chuck Lowry, The Pied Pipers' Clark Yocum (bkv)

a. 2247-4Master Take (Capitol) The Freedom Train - 3:10(Irving Berlin)
CAPITOL 7815003 — {The Freedom Train / God Bless America [vocal by Margaret Whiting and The Pied Pipers]}   (1947)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4/C2 95289 — [The Pied Pipers] The Pied Pipers ("Capitol Collectors" Series)   (1992)
CAPITOL CS/CD98664 [CD: 07777 98664 2 7] — [Various Artists] The Birth of A Dream; Capitol's Early Hits   (1992)




The Recording Session

In her autobiography, Margaret Whiting talks about this recording session: "During the war, Johnny Mercer gave me a cryptic message. Be down at the studio at seven o'clock. Tell no one where you are going. And be there promptly! There were a lot of these messages during the war. When I got there, I found Johnny, Benny Goodman, Paul Weston, and his band, the Pied Pipers, and Peggy Lee all standing around as though preparing to embark on a secret mission. The secret mission was this: Irving Berlin had written a song called The Freedom Train. Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters had already recorded it for Decca. The plan was that if we could record it fast, we could get our version out first. Again, away we went. There was a patter, a riff, where we all had to reel off the names of the performers in rhythm: There-was-Johnny-Mercer-Peggy-Lee-Benny-Goodman-Margaret-Whiting-the-Pied-Pipers-and-Paul-Weston's-band ... Peggy and I could not get it together. We kept screwing up on the names, and it came out Peggy-Whiting-Margaret-Piper ... Oh, it was awful, and the more mistakes we made, the more we kept laughing. They finally had to call a dinner break. Everyone looked at Peggy and me as if we were saboteurs. We were certainly not helping the war effort. After dinner, we came back and performed it brilliantly. I was ready to pack up and go home with the rest, when I was told, Just a minute, you're not through. There's the flip side of the record. You have to sing 'God Bless America'. Kate Smith Whiting did her duty. Well, our record came out quickly. And the Crosby-Andrews Sisters record came out quickly. And two bigger bombs were never heard throughout the entire war, which was extraordinary, for this was during the peak of war patriotism."

Peggy Lee was probably also referring to this date when, during a conversation with radio broadcaster Fred Hall, she made the following comment: "And one time we had an all-star group of all the singers on the whole label on that record. And something happened. We got the giggles in the middle of trying to record this thing, and one would laugh, and then two more, and finally about ten of us were laughing, and it got to be where you can't stop laughing. And we finally had to absolutely stop the session and take a half-an-hour break to get ourselves straightened out."

(These amusing recollections by both singers have a few details that are off or which are in discrepancy from one another -- not surprisingly, given the fact that four decades had elapsed when both Lee and Whiting shared their memories. Even so, each recollection offers the same basic outline.)


Personnel

1. George Seaberg or Seaburg
The last name of this trumpet player is spelled as Seaberg in some sources, Seaburg in others. I have not been able to determine which spelling is correct.


Masters

1. Non-Lee Masters
2. Margaret Whiting
As stated by Margaret Whiting in her above-quoted anecdote, this session generated two masters. The second master (#2248) indeed was Whiting's rendition of "God Bless America."


Arrangements

The arrangement for this session's performance of "The Freedom Train" is extant in Capitol's library of music scores, but it has no author credit.




Date: September 23, 1947
Location: Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #703

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (t, b, p, d), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2270-4Master Take (Capitol) I'll Dance At Your Wedding - 3:00(Herb Magidson, Ben Oakland) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815009 — {Golden Earrings / I'll Dance At Your Wedding}   (1947)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
b. 2271-rejectedMaster Take (Capitol) Golden Earrings(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston, Victor Popular Young) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
unissued
c. 2272-4Master Take (Capitol) Sugar (That Sugar Baby Of Mine) - 2:28(Sidney Mitchell, Edna Alexander Pinkard, Maceo Pinkard) / arr: Benny Carter
CAPITOL 78 & 45810 & F 810 — {Save Your Sorrow For Tomorrow / Sugar (That Sugar Baby Of Mine)}   (1950)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 1603 - P 1604 — Basic Music Library [Peggy Lee]   (1950)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecp 88169 — Peggy Lee With Dave Barbour   (1974)


Songs And Issues

1. Capitol #15009 [78] In The Music Charts
Both sides of Capitol #15009 entered the charts. "Golden Earrings" did so first, during the week of November 15.

2. "Golden Earrings" In The Music Charts
According to Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories, 1890-1954, "Golden Earrings" peaked at #2 and stayed in the Billboard charts for 18 weeks. It was Lee's highest solo chart hit up to that point. (The words solo and up to that point are highlighted because Lee had had a higher-charting vocal before. Back n 1941, Lee had shared a #1 hit with the band for which she was then singing, The Benny Goodman Orchestra. As for her #2 peak achievement as a solo artist in 1947, Lee would beat her own record soon enough: in early 1948, with her #1 hit "Mañana.")

Competition in the Billboard charts came from Columbia's Dinah Shore, whose version of "Golden Earrings" peaked at #25, and from Decca's Bing Crosby, whose masculine take on the song enjoyed smaller chart action. (Abroad, in countries like United States, where there was no distribution of Capitol Records until late 1948, Shore's version might have fared much better.)

During the week of November 22, 1947, Peggy Lee's "Golden Earrings" also entered the popular radio program Hit Parade, a top 15 countdown. Herein Lee's recording peaked at #2, too, just as it had done in Billboard. Incidentally, its peak happened on the same week in which the singer's next hit ("Mañana") debuted.

According to various estimates, Lee's version of "Golden Earrings" fared similarly well abroad. In South America, the Hot100Brasil online project ranks it as the 40th most popular song of 1949. For Europe, a similar project deems it the 79th performance of the entire decade of the 1940s.

There is more. "Golden Earrings" ranked #13 in Capitol's Top 25 Records 1942-1951, a countdown published by Billboard magazine in its January 5, 1952 issue, as part of a special section commemorating Capitol Records' 10th anniversary.

3. "I'll Dance At Your Wedding" In The Music Charts
"I'll Dance At Your Wedding" entered the Billboard charts during the week of December 20 and peaked at #11. Competition came from a Columbia version by Ray Noble with Buddy Clark, which reached #3, and from an RCA Victor version by Tony Martin, which reached #23.


Arrangements And Arrangers

1. "I'll Dance At Your Wedding"
2. "Golden Earrings"
The arrangements for those two performances from this session are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. Both are credited to Heinie Beau. Capitol's library does not have an arrangement of "Sugar."

3. "Sugar"
4. Benny Carter
Peggy Lee kept a Carter-credited arrangement of "Sugar" in her sheet music library. Because it has not been inspected, I cannot guarantee that the arrangement in Lee's library is the same one used for this session's version of "Sugar." Since Carter worked with Lee at later stages of her career, both in the studio and in concert, the library arrangement could date from a later period -- the 1960s, in particular. Hence my credit to Benny Carter for this session's arrangement should be deemed tentative.


Masters, Takes, Instruments, Sources And Cross-references

1. Preserved Takes Of "Golden Earrings"
This session's unreleased performance of "Golden Earrings" has been preserved in two takes: #6 and #7.

2. "Golden Earrings": Released Versus Unreleased Master
For the version of "Golden Earrings" that was commercially issued, see next session. This session's version was apparently deemed unsatisfactory. Looking at the available paperwork from the two sessions, one difference becomes apparent when a comparison of the two sessions' instrumentation is made. Flute and strings are listed for the next date only.

Decades later, Lee reminisced that, on this session, the song had been mistakenly recorded in major, and that on the next day it was correctly re-recorded in minor. Because so many decades had passed since the events took place, Lee's recollection might or might not be accurate. A music insider once told me that there is no such significant difference between the issued and the unissued masters. Even if such is the case, Lee's recollection could still be, at least, partially correct. Maybe takes in both major and minor were recorded during this date. Maybe the takes in minor were erased when the mistake was discovered, and maybe Lee did not remember that both days had produced takes in major.

3. Sources
A discrepancy between two of my sources should also be pointed out. Whereas Capitol's Peggy Lee session file indeed labels this master as unissued, the Capitol Label Discography lists two issues under it. I am assuming that those issues have been erroneously placed, and that they should actually be under next session's master. The issues are identified as Capitol Sl 6914 and Sl 6947. Unfortunately, I have not been able to track down further information about either one. I presume them to be various-artists compilation LPs made by Capitol's Special Markets division.

4. Take Number
The Capitol Label Discography is also my only source for the take number of this date's "Golden Earrings."


Date: September 24, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #705

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (f, b, str, p, d), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2278-3Master Take (Capitol) Golden Earrings - 3:00(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston, Victor Popular Young) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815009 — {Golden Earrings / I'll Dance At Your Wedding}   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1960 — G.I. Jive [Francis Craig, Larry Green, Woody Herman, Artie Shaw]   (1948)
CAPITOL (10") LPH 204 — My Best To You   (1950)


Sessions And Masters

1. Non-Lee Masters
2. Andy Russell
This singles session was actually shared by Peggy Lee and Andy Russell. He recorded the following masters:

2276-3 Muchachita
2277-5 Love For Love


Arrangements

Copies of Heinie Beau's arrangement for "Golden Earrings" can be found in Capitol's and Peggy Lee's respective libraries of music scores. Also in Lee's library is an arrangement of "Golden Earrings" by the composer himself, Victor Young.


Cross-references

For an unissued version of "Golden Earrings," see previous session, dated September 23, 1947, including notes.


Date: October 13, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #728

Lee Gillette (pdr), Ten Cats And A Mouse (acc), Paul Weston (cl), Eddie Miller (as), Benny Carter (ts), Dave Cavanaugh (bar), Dave Barbour (t), Billy May, Bobby Sherwood (tb), Hal Derwin (g), Frank DeVol (b), Red Norvo (p), Peggy Lee (d)

a. 2343-5Master Take (Capitol) Ja-Da - 3:04(Bob Carleton)
b. 2344-4Master Take (Capitol) Three O'Clock Jump - 3:04(Felis Domestica)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Both titles on: CAPITOL 7815015 — {Ja-Da / Three O'Clock Jump [both instrumentals by Ten Cats And A Mouse]}   (1947)
Jazz Unlimited Collectors' Label CD(Denmark) Jucd 2044 — [Various Artists] The Hollywood Sessions; The Capitol Jazzmen   (1995)
Mosaic Licensed LP/CDMq19/Md12 170 (19 LPs, 12 CDs) — [Various Artists] Classic Capitol Jazz Sessions   (1997)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1386 — [Red Norvo] The Chronological Red Norvo And His Orchestra, 1945-1947   (2005)



The Recording Session

An all-star roster came together for this Lee Gillette-produced date. The session was entirely dedicated to the two above-listed instrumentals, which feature a novel twist: each musician performed a different instrument from the one for which he was known. Joining the ten male instrumentalists was Peggy Lee, who instead of singing played the drums.

On the next day, nine of the ten participants met again for a sequel in which they billed themselves as Red Norvo's Nine, and in which they played their own instruments. The tenth member missing from that sequel was, unfortunately, Peggy Lee. The session (#729) generated two masters: #2345 ("Hollyridge Drive") and #2346 ("Under A Blanket Of Blue"). Since both numbers are instrumentals, Peggy Lee's absence is understandable.


Personnel

1. Ten Cats And A Mouse
On the label of the original 78-rpm disc (Capitol #15015), this session is credited to Ten Cats And A Mouse. Peggy Lee is billed as The Mouse.


Songwriters

1. Felis Domestica
The label of the original 78-rpm disc credits "Three O'Clock Jump" to "Felis Domestica." That name is a tongue-in-cheek pseudonym which designated a non-existing individual: "Felis Domestica" is Latin for "house cats" (or, alternatively, either "domestic cats" or "domesticated cats") and hence another allusion to the sessions' musicians.


Songs

1. "Three O'Clock Jump"
2. "Three-Thirty Jump"
In The Music Of Billy May: A Discography, author Jack Mirtle states that master #2344 was just "an untitled blues at the time of recording." Perhaps the lack of a pre-existent title and the informality of the session explain why the song can be found with two different though similar titles. Generally reliable sources such as the Capitol CD set Miss Peggy Lee and the Capitol Label Discography identify this master as "Three-Thirty Jump." Still other important sources (the original 78-rpm disc itself, the Mosaic sets) call it "Three O'Clock Jump".

Presumably, the title was meant to convey memories of the Count Basie jazz standard "One O'Clock Jump," recorded in 1937. A "Two O'Clock Jump" had been recorded as well, and it had proven popular in 1943. Back in 1940, Joe Marsala And His Delta Four had come up with a "Three O'Clock Jump," too. Knowledge of the 1940 Marsala number could have dissuaded Capitol from giving the exact same name to the company's 1947 master.

In addition to its connection to the Basie perennial, the title could have also been a reference to the time of day in which the number was recorded. (This is just a hypothesis. The hours during which this session was recorded are not known to me.)


Date: November 12, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #776

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Henry J. "Heinie" Beau (cl), Benny Carter (as), Herbert "Herbie" Haymer (ts), Ray Linn, Rubin "Zeke" Zarchy (t), Unknown (tb), Dave Barbour (g), George "Red" Callender (b), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Red Norvo (vib), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2454-2Master Take (Capitol) Stormy Weather - 3:09(Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) / arr: Benny Carter
CAPITOL 78-rpm album/EP boxCc 72 (1018-10120) / Ccf 151 {54 511-513} — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 991 - P 992 — Basic Music Library [Songs From Rendezvous With Peggy Lee + Andy Russell vocals]   (1948)
CAPITOL double EP/(10") LPEbf/H 151 (rel. 6/52) — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1949)
b. 2455-4Master Take (Capitol) I Can't Give You Anything But Love - 2:35(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78-rpm album/EP boxCc 72 (1018-10120) / Ccf 151 {54 511-513} — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 991 - P 992 — Basic Music Library [Songs From Rendezvous With Peggy Lee + Andy Russell vocals]   (1948)
CAPITOL double EP/(10") LPEbf/H 151 (rel. 6/52) — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1949)
c. 2456-3Master Take (Capitol) Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe - 3:03(Erwin 'Yip' Harburg, Harold Arlen) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Gallerie/Music Collection Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gale 442 — A Portrait Of Peggy Lee   (1999)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Platcd 716 [reissued by Golden Sounds] — Fever; 24 Favourite Songs [From the 20CD set "Best Of Crooners & Divas Collection"]   (2002)
d. 2457-3Master Take (Capitol) Talkin' To Myself About You - 2:51(Axel Stordahl, Irving Taylor, Paul Weston) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815048 — {Laroo, Laroo, Lilli Bolero / Talkin' To Myself About You}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 965 - P 966 — Basic Music Library [The Brooks Brothers, Peggy Lee, Hal Derwin]   (1948)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
All titles on: Tim International Public Domain CD(Germany) 220838 [220839-220843] — A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues ("Document" Series)   (2004)
Weton-Wesgram Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Mom 641 — Peggy Lee ("Masters Of Music" Series)   (2005)
Tim International Public Domain CD(Germany) 222455 — While We're Young ("Quadromania" Series)   (2005)
Weton-Wesgram Public Domain CD(Netherlands?) Qu 408 — 101 Hits   (2009)


Issues



1. Rendezvous With Peggy Lee In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's very first solo album (a 78-rpm set) spent eight weeks in the top five of Billboard's Best-Selling Popular Record Albums chart. (At the time, the chart consisted of only five slots.) It peaked at #2.

2. Rendezvous With Peggy Lee As A Concept Album
The album's core consists of masters from three consecutive dates (November 12, 19, 20, 1947). Although I do not have full personnel for each session, my listening of the numbers leads me to believe that the musicians were mostly the same ones throughout: a roster of jazz-oriented instrumentalists who give cohesiveness to the trio of sessions, and to the album that was built from them.

Of the masters recorded during these November 1947 dates, five were included in the original 78-rpm set, which has a total of six numbers. As for the sixth picked title, Lee recorded it just a few weeks later, on December 2, 1947.



3. Rendezvous With Peggy Lee (Versions Or Configurations)
Peggy Lee's first original album has a rather complicated issuing history. (An earlier album might have been planned but, if so, it was ultimately left unproduced. See notes under session dated October 17, 1946.) Over a 12-year span, Capitol released and re-released Rendezvous With Peggy Lee in multiple configurations -- a sure indication that it was a popular seller.

Its initial release took place on March 29, 1948. At that time, it was issued as a cardboard 78-rpm album which was part of Capitol's Criterion series (CC 72) and which consisted of three discs. (See top left item in photo above.) The discs and the songs were:

Cap. 10118 - I Can't Give You Anything But Love / Why Don't You Do Right?
Cap. 10119 - Stormy Weather / Them There Eyes
Cap. 10120 - 'Deed I Do / Don't Smoke In Bed

The album was issued as an EP or 45-rpm album box (CCF 151), too. (See bottom item in first photo above.) Also listed as coming out in 1948 (though further confirmation on that date is needed), the box contained the same six numbers, paired in the same manner:

Cap. 511 - I Can't Give You Anything But Love / Why Don't You Do Right?
Cap. 511 - Stormy Weather / Them There Eyes
Cap. 513 - 'Deed I Do / Don't Smoke In Bed

In 1951, Capitol re-released some of the album's songs in various singles (#1601, #1602, #1667).

In June of 1952, the album was expanded from six to eight songs. That eight-song version of Lee's Rendezvous appeared in two configurations: as a 10" LP (H 151, second photo above) and as another EP album (EBF 151, third photo above). The newly added titles were:

While We're Young (recorded November 27, 1947, and thus from the same months as the other six songs)
I Don't Know Enough About You (a hit that had been recorded well before all other songs in the album -- on December 26, 1945).

Notice that, as shown in the just-given data, two 45-rpm album versions of Rendezvous With Peggy Lee exist: the earlier one (CCF 151) which has six songs, and the later one (EBF 151) which has eight. I have not seen physical copies of EBF 151. It is listed in Capitol's files, but the files do not spell out its format or configuration. Based on its prefix and on one of the already presented photos, it appears to be a double EP. In other words, it seems to consist of two 45-rpm discs, with two songs on each disc side. Unlike the earlier release (CCF 151), EBF 151 probably came in a gatefold cover, not inside a box.

Next, on April 1, 1955, the album was expanded yet again, so that it could meet the expectations of the 12" LP configuration. (Top right item in first photo above.) In addition to the eight songs already mentioned, the 12" LP version included (a) one more song from the original sessions and (b) three more well-known hits by Lee:

(a) Hold Me (recorded November 19, 1947)
(b) It's A Good Day (recorded July 12, 1946)
(b) Mañana (recorded November 25, 1947)
(b) Golden Earrings (recorded September 23, 1947)

For later configurations and editions of the album, including CDs and foreign reissues, see this pictorial page and also the corresponding entry in this miscellaneous page.

4. Capitol #511, #512, #513 [45]
A clarification. Although those three 45-rpm discs are often found and sold separately nowadays, Capitol never issued them as singles. Instead, all three were originally part of the (boxed) 45-rpm album Rendezvous With Peggy Lee. With the passing of time, they have become separated from the box that initially contained them. (Their full catalogue numbers are actually Cap. 54-511, 54-512, and 54-513.)


Songs

1. "Talking To Myself About You" In The Music Charts
"Talking To Myself About You" became Peggy Lee's 15th solo hit and her 25th overall hit. This number entered Billboard's charts during the week of April 17, 1948 and peaked at #23. It was released on Capitol #15048, as the flip side of the also-charting "Laroo Lilli Bolero" (recorded November 25, 1947).


Arrangements

1. Heinie Beau, Benny Carter
2. Billy May, Harold Mooney
For this session, Peggy Lee's session file offers arranger information that is problematic. The file lists four arrangers without specifying which of the men is responsible for each arrangement. The four credited men are Heinie Beau, Benny Carter, Billy May, and Harold Mooney. If the file's information is accurate, then the most logical assumption would be that each arranger is responsible for just one of the four arrangements.

Capitol's library of music scores tells a partially different story. Therein, only Heinie Beau and Benny Carter are credited, each for two specific masters. Until more information comes along, I am tentatively trusting the library's claim, and herein I have thus credited Beau and Carter as shown in the library.

(Could it be that May and Mooney are credited in Lee's session file because they had some sort of secondary involvement in arrangements that were by Beau and Carter? I doubt that such was the case, but there's no evidence to either prove or disprove the possibility.)

Neither Berger's discography of Benny Carter nor Mirtle's discography of Billy May include credits for any of this session's arrangements.


Date: November 19, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #786

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (str), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 2493-3Master Take (Capitol) Why Don't You Do Right? - 2:28(Joe McCoy) / arr: Billy May
CAPITOL 78-rpm album/EP boxCc 72 (1018-10120) / Ccf 151 {54 511-513} — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1948)
CAPITOL 7815118 — {Bubble-loo, Bubble-loo / Why Don't You Do Right?}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 991 - P 992 — Basic Music Library [Songs From Rendezvous With Peggy Lee + Andy Russell vocals]   (1948)
b. 2494-5Master Take (Capitol) 'Deed I Do - 3:02(Walter Hirsch, Fred Rose) / arr: Johnny Thompson
CAPITOL 78-rpm album/EP boxCc 72 (1018-10120) / Ccf 151 {54 511-513} — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 991 - P 992 — Basic Music Library [Songs From Rendezvous With Peggy Lee + Andy Russell vocals]   (1948)
CAPITOL double EP/(10") LPEbf/H 151 (rel. 6/52) — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1949)
c. 2495-4Master Take (Capitol) Hold Me - 3:03(Little Jack Little, Dave Oppenheim, Ira Schuster)
CAPITOL 7815298 — {Hold Me / I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy)}   (1948)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) Cl 13164 — {Someone Like You / Hold Me} [Different pairing than in USA singles]   (1949)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 1189 - P 1190 — Basic Music Library [Peggy Lee, Andy Russell]   (1949)
All titles on: CAPITOL LPT 151 — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1955)
CAPITOL LP(Japan) Ecp 88169 — Peggy Lee With Dave Barbour   (1974)
CAPITOL©EMI's Pathé Marconi CS/LP(France) Pm 154 773 4/1 (also Pm 407) — Rendez-Vous With Peggy Lee ("Retrospect" Reissue Series)   (1984)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
Joker Tonverlag/Sarabandas/Promo Sound AG Bootleg CD39106 — Miss Standing Ovation   (2003)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Box 108 — Miss Wonderful    (2006)


Issues




1. The Rendezvous With Peggy Lee Album
The songs for Peggy Lee's first album of original material were recorded on November 12, 19, 20, 1947. See further comments in the Issue notes from the preceding session (November 19).



2. My Best To You (Configurations)
One of my secondary sources indicates that the album My Best To You (to be discussed in further detail below) was issued as a 78-rpm album with catalogue number Cd 204. No such 78-rpm album is listed in Peggy Lee's session file, nor in other reliable sources. The only two configurations of which I am aware are the 10" LP (containing eight songs) and the EP set (containing six songs). Both are seen above. (A greenish rather than bluish tint in sported by their British counterparts, viewable in section II of this pictorial page.)



3. The My Best To You Album
The album My Best To You is a compilation -- essentially, Peggy Lee's earliest package of hits. It naturally grabs masters from many dates, including two from this one ("Why Don't You Do Right?," "Hold Me"). The eight-song batch can be logically divided into two categories. Half of the batch consists of numbers that Lee turned into hits ("Why Don't You Do Right?," "It's A Good Day," "Golden Earrings," "Mañana") and the other half are superior interpretations which did not achieve the widespread popularity that they deserved ("A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues," "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," "Hold Me," and "While We're Young").

Given the album's title, the possibility that Peggy Lee actively participated in the selection of its songs cannot be discarded. However, I am more inclined to believe that Capitol Records put it together without any heavy input from the vocalist. Ultimately, the 1950 album comes off as an attempt at condensing Peggy Lee's previous decade of recordings into a handful of selections.


Songs

1. "Hold Me"
2. "Rapsodie Spagnole"
According to some attentive listeners, the melody of "Hold Me" is a variation on Ravel's "Rapsodie Spagnole" -- especially its instrumental introduction. (However, the credits given in official Capitol issues do not corroborate this alleged inspiration from the classical world.)

3. "Why Don't You" [Club Version] In The Music Charts
A big hit for Peggy Lee and The Benny Goodman Orchestra in early 1943, "Why Don't You Do Right?" returned to the charts in the twenty-first century, under the guise of a club house version simply titled "Why Don't You." During the week of March 7, 2010, "Why Don't You" climbed to #1 in The Official UK Dance Chart. It also made The UK Singles Chart, where it peaked at #12. "Why Don't You" made another strong dent in Ultratop Top 50 Singles, the official Dutch chart (Flanders, Belgium), peaking at #7. It also received substantial airplay in other parts of Europe, as well as in Australia.

Despite the fact that "Why Don't You" features the exact same 1947 Peggy Lee performance of "Why Don't You Do Right?" (i.e., this session's master) no credit is given to her, or to the backing by Dave Barbour et al. The only credited act is Gramophonedzie, the disc jockey who re-built the number's beat for dance club consumption.

During an interview for the music blog Electroqueer, Marko Milicevic (aka Gramophonedzie) revealed that, although he himself is a fan of big band, jazz and swing music, "[m]y girlfriend is really the one to blame for this track because she is really a fan of Peggy Lee who sings the vocal on this one ... My girlfriend was really into this song and begged me to make a club track out of this song. It was a challenge - I was trying hard to make a groove out of it and it took a good two weeks. Then one day I sat down and did the breaks and it just happened. I really wanted to keep the original track too so that it would be playable in clubs. I didn't quite anticipate it would be this popular or get this big."


Arrangements

1. "Why Don't You Do Right?"
Copies of this session's arrangement of "Why Don't You Do Right?" can be found in Capitol's sheet music library, and also in Peggy Lee's own library. Billy May is the credited arranger. Interestingly, Capitol's library holds not one but two Billy May arrangements for this master. May also receives credit in Gene Lees' notes for Time-Life's Peggy Lee set from the "Legendary Singers" series.

2. " 'Deed I Do"
3. "Hold Me"
Also extant in Capitol's library of music scores are the arrangements of " 'Deed I Do" and "Hold Me." Johnny Thompson, an arranger who is otherwise unmentioned in Peggy Lee's canon, is credited with " 'Deed I Do." In the case of "Hold Me," there is no author credit.


Date: November 20, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #790

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Benny Carter (as), Herbert "Herbie" Haymer (ts), Dave Barbour (g), Unknown (b, d), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Red Norvo (vib), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2558-7Master Take (Capitol) Them There Eyes - 3:00(Maceo Pinkard, Doris Tauber, William Tracey) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 78-rpm album/EP boxCc 72 (1018-10120) / Ccf 151 {54 511-513} — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 991 - P 992 — Basic Music Library [Songs From Rendezvous With Peggy Lee + Andy Russell vocals]   (1948)
CAPITOL double EP/(10") LPEbf/H 151 (rel. 6/52) — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1949)
b. 2559-3Master Take (Capitol) Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me - 3:00(Mack David, Ticker Freeman) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815090 — {Caramba! It's The Samba / Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1928 — G.I. Jive [Woody Herman, Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra]   (1948)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) 13021 — {Everybody Loves Somebody / Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me} [Different pairing than in USA singles]    (1949)
c. 2560-2Master Take (Capitol) Everybody Loves Somebody - 3:13(Ken Lane, Irving Taylor) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815151 — {Don't Smoke in Bed / Everybody Loves Somebody}   (1948)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) 13021 — {Everybody Loves Somebody / Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me} [Different pairing than in USA singles]    (1949)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 1189 - P 1190 — Basic Music Library [Peggy Lee, Andy Russell]   (1949)
d. 2561-5Master Take (Capitol) Foolin' Nobody But Me - 2:44(Powell, Russell)
CAPITOL CD72435 27564 2 1 — RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES [aka Capitol's Collectors Series, Vol. 2]   (2000)


Issues



1. The Rendezvous With Peggy Lee Album
November 12, 19, 20, 1947. See further comments in Issue notes under November 19 session.

2. Capitol Cl 13003 [78; UK]
Capitol Cl 13003 ("For Every Man There's A Woman" by Benny Goodman and Peggy Lee / "On A Slow Boat To China" by Benny Godman with vocal by Al Hendrickson) was part of the first batch of Capitol 78-rpm discs ever issued in the United Kingdom. For further details, see Issues notes under session dated November 25, 1947.


Masters And Takes

1. "Them There Eyes"
The available information about the master take of "Them There Eyes" is conflicting. Capitol's paperwork calls the take #1, yet it is identified as #7 in the code etched on the 78-rpm disc from the original album. In this particular case, I have tentatively trusted the code on the Capitol 78-rpm disc over Capitol's own paperwork; a misidentification of a 7 as an 1 is not a rare occurrence in handwritten and typed documents (As for the other 7 master takes in the album, the code agrees with the Capitol database in all 7 cases.)


Songs

1. "Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me" In The Music Charts
This song entered Billboard's charts during the week of June 5, 1948 and peaked at #21. It was released on Capitol #15090, as the flip side of the also-charting "Caramba! It's the Samba" (recorded November 25, 1947). "Baby Don't Be Mad At Me" became Lee's 18th solo hit.


Arrangements

With the exception of "Fooling Nobody But Me," arrangements for this session's performances are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. As indicated above, all three arrangements are credited to Heinie Beau.


Date: November 25, 1947
Location: Probably Radio Recorders, Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #802

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour (con, g), Dave Barbour And The Brazilians, aka Bando Da Lua (acc), Unknown (f), Harry Vasco de Almeida (p-o, gou), Aloysio de Oliveira (g), Aluísio "Lulu" Antunes Ferreira (t-g), Walter Pinheiro (ttd), José "Russinho" Ferreira Soares (tam), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 2607-bkdnIncomplete Take (Capitol) Caramba! It's The Samba - 0:46(Edward Pola, Irving Taylor, George Wyle)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
b. 2607-4Master Take (Capitol) Caramba! It's The Samba - 2:46(Edward Pola, Irving Taylor, George Wyle) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815090 — {Caramba! It's The Samba / Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1907 — G.I. Jive [Benny Goodman, Woody Herman, Red Norvo]   (1948)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) Cl 13069 — {Caramba! It's The Samba! / Everything's Movin' Too Fast} [Different pairing than in USA singles]   (1949)
c. 2608-5Master Take (Capitol) Laroo Laroo Lilli Bolero - 2:33(Sylvia Dee, Sidney Lippman, Elizabeth Moore) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815048 — {Laroo, Laroo, Lilli Bolero / Talkin' To Myself About You}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 965 - P 966 — Basic Music Library [The Brooks Brothers, Peggy Lee, Hal Derwin]   (1948)
Reader's Digest Licensed CS/CDRf 140 / Krf 140 [also Emi 72434 99216] — The Legendary Peggy Lee; Her Greatest Hits & Finest Performances   (1999)
d. 2609-bkdnIncomplete Take (Capitol) Mañana - 1:28(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
e. 2609-4Master Take (Capitol) Mañana - 2:45(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815022 — {Mañana / All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart}   (1948)
USA Government's War Department, Army-Navy V-Disc Series V-Disc855 — {Mañana, with voiceover / Stan Kenton, Margaret Whiting, Jerry Colonna numbers}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 12" TranscriptionP 983 - P 984 — Basic Music Library [Peggy Lee, Jack Smith, Stan Kenton]   (1948)


The Recording Session

At The Session

1. Photos
Seen above is a shot taken at the session under scrutiny. (This photo was included in Peggy Lee's autobiography.) Another shot from the session can be seen a few paragraph below. As for the pictures to be found further down below, those are 1948 portraits of Carmen Miranda amidst her Bando da lúa, the Brazilian quintet who also backed Lee in the present session.

2. Carmen Miranda And Her Brazilians
In her autobiography, Peggy Lee writes that "Carmen Miranda was often a guest with Durante [i.e., Jimmy Durante, on whose radio show Lee was the regular vocalist from 1947 to 1948], and she had called me about using her musicians. She also recommended classical guitarist Laurindo Almeida, who played with me for quite a while. What a dear lady Carmen was, and The Brazilians were perfect for Mañana."

3. Board Fade (Radio Recorders)
4. Echo Chambers & Equalization (Radio Recorders)
"When we recorded the song," adds Lee in her autobiography, "we used what I believe was the first board fade ... a gradual turning down of the volume on the studio recording equipment until the sound completely fades out. In this case, though, The Brazilians actually sambaed out of the studio and down the street, playing and singing mañana, mañana, mañana is soon enough for me!" I have not been able to corroborate Lee's belief that "Mañana" was the earliest recording to use a board fade. Given the fact that two decades of recording history had preceded this session, chances are that it wasn't. On the other hand, the comments to be quoted in the next paragraph suggest that many in innovation in the realm of record engineering took place during the war and post-war period. (I would still appreciate receiving information about earlier recordings, if any, that use the board fade.)

For what is worth, the session was conducted at Radio Records, whose co-founder and lead engineer Harry Bryant is credited with various innovations in the realm of studio recording, including the use of reverb. During an interview conducted by Ralph Freas published in the October 26, 1959 issue of Billboard magazine, Bryant further voiced his belief that he had been the first to use the echo chamber effect. "The echo chamber resulted from Bryant's stint during the war as a sound engineer," Freas reported. "He had to work with big bands in such far-out auditoriums as airplane hangars and other big 'rooms' .. Because of his early training with effects in radio, it was a logical step for Bryant to introduce echo chamber into some of the records he made." In April 1982, the distinguished engineer and executive also told Linda L. Painter (author of the article"The Rise And Decline If The Standard Transcription Company" published on JMEF Quaterly) that engineers can have "better control over sound if a studio is fairly dead; for a more lively sound, Radio Recorders built an echo chamber from which echo could be put on any microphone, then the sound could be mixed and the echo added in."

Bryant's claims are echoed by Capitol executive Bill Miller in the commemorative Capitol supplement that was published as part of the September 16, 1967 issue of Billboard: "We were the first company to use equalization and the first to use echo chamber. We wanted to do certain technical things, so we asked Harry Bryant, the chief engineer at Radio Recorders ... to check into them. He came up with equalizers in wooden boxes which plugged into the control boards."

5. False Starts
Capitol has issued two breakdowns from this session. Both are charming windows into the date's trial-and-error proceedings.

In the case of "Caramba, It's The Samba," producer Lee Gillete stops the take when Lee sings a few lines in what might have sounded like gibberish to him. Queried by Gillette, Lee explains -- in a good-natured, humorous manner -- that she was "singing in Portuguese." Then the singer adds that she just could no longer hear the flute, which she jokingly calls "my one salvation." Afterwards, they proceed to take #3.

The "Mañana" breakdown occurs as the musicians are chanting the title word. Producer Lee Gillette stops the take and asks the musicians to sing again, without instrumentation. A few seconds into this vocal testing, two of the musicians are asked to change places. Gillette addresses one of them in particular: you, sing down, don't sing loud, 'cause your voice is sticking out. The musician responds with an okay, and Lee with a polite, sympathetic laugh. Thereafter, they proceed to record the next take -- which, also in this case, happens to be #3.


Location

During a radio interview whose transcript was published in 1989, broadcaster Fred Hall asked Peggy Lee if she had ever recorded at Melrose Studios. Lee responded that she had indeed recorded at Melrose and identified "Mañana" as one of the songs that she had waxed there. Due to her remark, previous editions of this discography tentatively listed Capitol's Melrose studio as the venue for the session under discussion. However, at the present time I am inclined to believe that Lee simply misremembered, and that the actual venue was Radio Recorders. Capitol is not estimated to have used its Melrose Studio facilities until 1949 or, at the earliest, late 1948. Radio Recorders is invariably credited in the (few) 1947 Peggy Lee sessions for which I have been able to find location claims. (One of them, itemized below, took place about a week after this one.) According to various viewers in the know, the studio seen in the above-shown photo definitely looks like Radio Recorders.




Personnel

1. Dave Barbour And The Brazilians
2. Bando Da Lúa And Carmen Miranda
3. José Russinho Do Pandeiro And Anjos Do Inferno
"Dave Barbour And The Brazilians" was the one-time-only billing given to the ensemble that played in this session. "The Brazilians" were in reality the members of Bando da lúa, who regularly backed Carmen Miranda. At the time of Lee's recording session, this particular edition of Bando de Lúa was brand new -- thus different from the ensemble that had played with Miranda in her movies and concerts from the late 1930s and the early-to-mid 1940s. She had formally hired the new group of musicians some time in November 1947, as she was preparing for her return to concert venues the following year. According to band member José Russinho, the Brazilian songstress had gone to see these musicians perform at the Embassy Club in New York in October, and had loved their act. One month later, Miranda made an offer; she wanted them to join her act.

At that early point (i.e., before they joined Miranda's act), the group was not called Bando da lúa. Under the name Anjos do inferno, they had been popular in Brazil for years. From Brazil, Anjos do inferno had traveled to Mexico, where they had met with great success. Then, from Mexico City, they had proceeded to try their luck in the United States. During the transition from playing their own concerts to doing supporting work for Miranda, the five-men ensemble would lose one member (singer, arranger and guitarist Lúcio Alves). He was replaced by Aloysio de Oliveira, one of the founding members of the original edition of Bando da lúa.

Besides any (unknown to me but very likely) contractual demands from Capitol, the group's estate of flux in November 1947 might have also played a role in the decision to bill themselves as The Brazilians. Bearing in mind that Carmen Miranda had apparently hired them in that very month, the presumed reason why she recommended them to Peggy Lee might have been financial. Having just moved from their NY gig to LA, they would have been in need of jobs during the interim between rehearsals with Miranda and her actual concert dates in 1948. (Nota bene: due to the aforementioned estate of flux, it is not clear whether the fifth group participant in Lee's session was Oliveira or Alves. The non-Lee-related material that I've read has led me to tentatively assume that it was Oliveira.) Notice also that, if the above-given chronology is accurate, the group probably performed and/or recorded with Peggy Lee even before they were able to publicly do so with Carmen Miranda.

Curiously, the author of a 2009 article and interview with Russinho (published in the Brazilian magazine Carta Capital) mentions how jealous and furious Miranda would become whenever artists like "Peggy Lee, Bing Crosby and Louis Armstrong" called her Bando de lúa for appearances or recording dates with them. (The article, in its original Portuguese, was transcribed by Doni Sacramento for his very worthwhile, recommended Museu Virtual Carmen Miranda.) It is not clear if Lee, Crosby, and Armstrong are brought up in the article merely as hypothetical examples, or if these three American artists specifically arose Miranda's professional sense of possessiveness.

Since the group remained with Miranda until her untimely death in 1955, it would be logical to assume that the offers which angered Miranda took place long after the group's 1947 backing of Lee. In February 1951, Bando de lúa indeed did a recording session with Bing Crosby. Also, in 1950, they made a Snader telescription, as a quartet named the Bando Da Lua Boys, without Miranda. But jealousy does not seem to have been part of the equation in the above-described interactions between Miranda, her musicians, and Lee; on the contrary, the person said to have asked for the hiring was Miranda herself. There are no other known interactions between Peggy Lee and Bando da lúa.

4. Walter Pinheiro
The above-mentioned 1950 telescription features 4 instead of 5 members of Bando da lúa, and so does one of the 1948 photos. I believe that tom-tom drummer Walter Pinheiro is the missing musician. His absence could be an indication that he did not stay long with the newly formed Bando da lúa. He seems to be among those present, however, in the photo of Lee's session.

5. Sources
6. José "Russinho" Ferreira Soares
I do not have official personnel data for this session. Aside from Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour, the participation of the specific individuals listed in this date's personnel (all of them Bando da lúa members) should be deemed tentative. The above-seen session photo does show various Bando da lúä musicians, but it is not clear how many of them are visible, or even present. Seemingly absent from the photo (and from the date?) is tambourine player José "Russinho" Ferreira Soares; the man holding what looks like a tambourine is not him.




Songs

All three novelties from this lively singles session made the Billboard charts.

1. "Mañana" In The Music Charts And In The Polls
Lee's 11th solo hit made its debut during the week of January 24, 1948 and was the first of her nine chart entries for that year. (Among those other entries was the flip side of the 78-rpm disc that contained "Mañana." For further details, see notes under next session).

"Mañana' was one of the top hits of 1948 and one of that year's eventual million sellers. (A 2.5 million seller, according to uncorroborated press reports. Like other numbers from the period, a few years elapsed before the single reached the million mark. It happened in 1951. That was also the year in which the following 1947-1949 Capitol bestsellers achieved the same status: “Timtayshun” (Jo Stafford & Red Ingle), “Twelfth Street Rag” (Pee Wee Hunt), and Slipping Around” (Margaret Whiting & Jimmy Wakely).

As tabulated by Joel Whitburn in Pop Memories 1890-1954, during the year 1948 "Mañana" remained for nine weeks in the #1 position and for twenty-one weeks in the Billboard charts. Billboard also named it Top Disc Jockey Record Of The Year. (Additional lesser honors are mentioned at the end of this page in the Popularity: Peggy In The Polls section.)

In the very popular radio show Hit Parade, "Mañana" made its first appearance during the week of January 24, 1948. That week's top ten actually included two Peggy Lee performances. "Golden Earrings" was at #2, "Mañana" at #9. Six weeks later, on March 6, 1948, "Mañana" claimed the top spot, where it stayed for 9 weeks.

According to various estimates, Lee's version of "Mañana" also fared well abroad. In Brazil, the Hot100Brasil online project ranks it as the 11th most popular song of 1948 -- a feat, especially when considering that all 10 acts above her are Brazilian. (Lee of course counted with the backing of Carmen Miranda's musicians, who were of Brazilian origin.) For Europe, a similar project deems "Mañana" the 89th performance of the entire 1940s decade.

In yet another high accolade, "Mañana" was ranked #2 in Capitol's Top 25 Records 1942-1951. That countdown was part of a Billboard supplement, published as part of the magazine's January 5, 1952 issue, in which Capitol commemorated its 10th anniversary.

2. The Origins And Ethos Of "Mañana"
For my research on the song "Mañana" and its history, consult this supplementary page.

3. "Mañana": Other Versions
As had been the case with the first of Lee's self-penned hits to ever chart ("I Don't Know Enough About You"), her fourth composition was also recorded by The Mills Brothers on Decca Records. Edward Foote Gardner's Popular Songs Of The Twentieth Century: A Charted History shows that the Brothers' version of "Mañana" enjoyed minor, unspecified chart action, as did a version that Edmund Ros made for London Records.

4. "Caramba! It's The Samba" In The Music Charts
Musically a sequel to "Mañana," "Caramba! It's The Samba" entered the charts on the week of June 5, 1948, and peaked at #13. It was Lee's 17th solo hit. Enjoying smaller chart action was a competing version on RCA Victor, interpreted by Fred Martin, with a vocal by Stuart Wade.

5. "Laroo Lilli Bolero" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's 14th solo hit made its appearance on the week of April 3, 1948. Once more she was competing against "novelty king" Perry Como. (Their previous competing number had been "Chi-Baba, Chi-Baba"; see session dated April 21, 1947). This time around, Peggy Lee gave Capitol a #14 hit, whereas RCA and Perry Como had to settle for a #20 hit.


Arrangements

1. Source
The arrangements for this session's three performances are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. All of them are credited to Heinie Beau.

2. "Mañana"
Peggy Lee's sheet music library includes two arrangements of "Mañana." One of them is by Victor Young, the other by Leon Pendarvis. Both were probably written years after this recording date took place.


Issues

1. Capitol Cl 13001 and 13003 [78-rpm Discs; UK]
In December 1948, the 10" Capitol 78-rpm disc Cl 13001 ("All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart" / "Mañana") became the first single ever released by Capitol in the United Kingdom. (There was also a 12" series of 78-rpm discs which was introduced later, and which used 11000 instead of 13000 numbers. Stan Kenton And His Orchestra premiered that 12" series.) At this point in time (1948), EMI did not own Capitol, nor was there any involvement between the UK and the US companies; British Decca issued and distributed all pre-1955 Capitol material in the United Kingdom and in other European lands.

Among the other Capitol 78-rpm discs released in December of 1948 was Cl 13003, by Benny Goodman. This issue included an Al Hendrickson vocal ("On A Slow Boat To China") and, as its main side, Peggy Lee's hit vocal with Goodman, "For Every Man There's A Woman."

Thanks to my friend Ed Chaplin for verifying these details with the help of research conducted by the late Tony Cox. [n.b.: For a full list of Peggy Lee's British releases, including all Capitol 78-rpm singles, see the British Issue Listings page in the Miscellanea section of this discography.]

2. The Hits Of Peggy Lee [LP]
3. "Mañana"
Capitol LP St 2887 (The Hits Of Peggy Lee) is a 1968 stereo release that includes one 1947 master among its tracks: "Mañana" is heard in electronically processed stereo.


Date: November 26, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #806

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Other Individuals Unknown (unk)

a. 2620-3Master Take (Capitol) I've Had My Moments(Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
unissued
b. 2621-3Master Take (Capitol) So Dear To My Heart - 3:04(Ticker Freeman, Irving Taylor) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815232 — {So Dear To My Heart / Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere}   (1948)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) Cl 13165 — {So Dear To My Heart / Through A Long And Sleepless Night} [Different pairing than in USA singles]   (1949)
CAPITOL©EMI CD7243 5 39756 2 3 — THE SINGLES COLLECTION   (2002)
c. 2622-3Master Take (Capitol) All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart - 2:30(Fred Patrick, Claude Reese, Jack Val) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815022 — {Mañana / All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart}   (1948)
CAPITOL CS/CDC4 5/Cdp 7 93195 — THE EARLY YEARS (CAPITOL COLLECTORS SERIES, VOLUME 1)   (1990)
Going-For-A-Song Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gfs 241 — The Fever Of ... Peggy Lee   (1999)
d. 2623-2Master Take (Capitol) Ain't Doin' Bad Doin' Nothin' - 2:52(Lee Jarvis, Joe Venuti)
CAPITOL CD72435 27564 2 1 — RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES [aka Capitol's Collectors Series, Vol. 2]   (2000)


Songs And Cross-references

1. "All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's 12th solo hit made its debut during the week of January 31, 1948 and peaked at #21.

2. "I've Had My Moments"
For earlier studio recordings of "I've Had My Moments," one of them issued, see sessions dated July 12 and 23, 1946, including notes.


Arrangements

The arrangements for this session's performances of "I've Had My Moments," "So Dear To My Heart" and "All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart" are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. They are credited to Heinie Beau. An arrangement of "Ain't Doin' Bad Doin' Nothin' " is also extant at Capitol's library, but it does not include author identification.


Date: November 27, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #806-A

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Dave Barbour (g), Hal Schaefer (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2624-1Master Take (Capitol) While We're Young - 3:19(William Engvick, Morty Palitz, Alec Wilder)
CAPITOL 7815416 — {Similau / While We're Young}   (1949)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 1315 - P 1316 — Basic Music Library [6 Peggy Lee vocals]   (1949)
CAPITOL double EP/(10") LPEbf/H 151 (rel. 6/52) — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1949)
b. 2625-2Master Take (Capitol) A Hundred Years From Today - 3:19(Ned Washington, Joseph "Joe" Young, Victor Popular Young)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)


At The Recording Session

1. "While We're Young"
In his essay for Capitol's set The Singles Collection, Will Friedwald quotes some comments made by pianist Hal Schaefer during a conversation that the two of them had. On the matter of recording "While We're Young," Schaefer told Friedwald that "[w]e made a couple of takes and Peggy wasn't happy. She wasn't satisfied. She didn't get the song the way she wanted to. She had a saying -- she used to say, I don't own it, yet. I guess that something happened there in the studio and she couldn't get in the mood. It was a piano solo in the background. There was no rhythm section. There were a couple of things in her act that she did with me alone which was very wise because it was a change from having a constant quartet sound. So we got this rubato thing going, and then she thought of turning all the lights out in the studio. I said to the engineer, That's okay with me. I've been playing the piano since I was four years of age. I don't need to have the lights to see, you know. I can play in the dark. I already knew the song, so I didn't have to sight read."


Personnel And Musical Instruments

1. Personnel Mostly Unknown
2. "While We're Young": Vocal-And-Piano Duet
3. Hal Schaefer
Peggy Lee's version of "While We're Young" is chiefly a piano-and-vocal performance, except for a few opening and closing notes from a string instrument -- a harp or, if not a harp, perhaps a guitar mimicking the sounds of a harp.

Although my sources do not identify the pianist (of any other session personnel, for that matter), Hal Schaefer's previously quoted comments reliably reveal his involvement. (Schaefer is known to have been Lee's regular concert pianist during the late 1940s. He could very well be the unidentified piano player in Lee's other recording sessions from this period, too.)


Masters And Takes

1. "While We're Young"
In 1947, Capitol's sessions were still being recorded on disc; the company did not begin to record on tape until well into 1948. Hence the songs from the present session were originally committed to disc.

Around 1950, Capitol decided to include this session's "While We're Young" on a 10" LP. By that time, tape had become the default media for recording and storage.

Thereafter (from 1950 to 1999), this tape transfer (not the original acetate) was the one used on all the EMI releases (LPs, CDs, etc.) .

Unfortunately, the tape transfer keeps too much of the hiss or surface noise heard in the acetate's background.

Well aware of the tape's deficiency, the producers of the 2000 Capitol CD Rare Gems And Hidden Treasures (Cy Godfrey, Bob Hyde, and Paul Atkinson) decided to break with tradition, opting to bypass the tape, and to retrieve the acetate. The CD's booklet includes a producer's note on which this decision is acknowledged: "This album ... was originally intended to consist of recordings that were either previously unreleased or extremely rare. As the project progressed, certain conceptual exceptions were made, notably for While We're Young, which had long suffered from an unsatisfactory tape transfer made in 1950 and, in that sense, was considered lost. It has been remastered for this album from the original discs." The decision to go back to the original acetate was laudable. The success of the enterprise is debatable, though: the amount of surface noise is far more evident, and neither the vocal nor the piano sound any better than in the other versions.

Judging by a comment made on EMI's next major Peggy Lee release, attention was apparently paid to the increased amount of surface noise, and the acetate performance underwent a second digital remastering. In The Singles Collection (2002), essayist Will Friedwald states that While We're Young "was remastered for this set from a newly discovered disc to tape transfer with de-noising kept to a minimum to retain the nuances of the original." (I am assuming that the "newly discovered disc to tape transfer" to which Friedwald refers in 2002 is the same one used back in 2000.)

Also worth noting herein is Hal Schaefer's previously quoted reference to various attempted takes. Since Capitol's files list no alternate "While We're Young" takes, it would seem that they were discarded, erased, or simply never committed to acetate.





Songs And Songwriters

1. "While We're Young"
2. Alec Wilder
3. Photos
During the 1940s and 1950s, Peggy Lee was not only a fan but also a friend of songwriter Alec Wilder. (According to some accounts, Wilder even had a crush on Lee.) However, her recording of "While We're Young" drew visceral criticism from Wilder, who did not take kindly to any changes on his songs. (He is known to have been equally unforgiving with other singers.) In reaction an alteration that Lee made as she sang the bridge of the melody, Wilder wittily remarked: "The next time she gets to the bridge, she ought to jump off." In a radio interview, Lee counter-offered: "I sang one note incorrectly. He was so fussy, because it wasn't a bad note that I sang. Just different than he had written, and he wanted it the way he had written it." Three years later, Lee re-recorded the song, probably to Wilder's satisfaction. In that 1950 version (see page for Snader telescriptions, once it opens for viewing), Lee not only sings the melody correctly but also approaches it in a simpler and more overtly sentimental manner -- one which is also likely to have pleased Wilder. Furthermore, the Snader version includes the song's verse, which Lee did not sing on the commercial record.

By the time that her second version of "While We're Young" came out, Lee and Wilder had apparently patched up their differences. Wilder became a regular visitor of Lee's home. "He's family to me," she said to an interviewer, in 1950. That same year, the singer told a Metronome interviewer that she would "like to do Willard [Robison] and Alec [Wilder] all the time." Over the years, she sang about a dozen of his songs. In the 1970s, Wilder made enthusiastic comments about Lee's recording of one particular song of his, "Goodbye, John." (For his comment about that performance, and for a coda to this account of the relationship between singer and songwriter, see notes under session dated June 3, 1949.)

Photos above: Alec Wilder (1907-1980). The first two shots are from the 1940s, the last (in the company of lyricist William Engvick) from 1952.


Arrangements

1. "A Hundred Years From Today"
Peggy Lee's sheet music library includes an arrangement of "A Hundred Years From Today" by Billy Byers. It was probably written many years after this recording session took place.


Date: December 2, 1947
Location: Radio Recorders, 7000 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles - first session
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #818

Benny Goodman (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Benny Goodman (con, cl), The Benny Goodman Orchestra, The Benny Goodman Sextet (acc), Jack Dumont, Paul McLarand (as), Bumps Myers (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), John Best (t), Sinclair Lott (frh), Al Hendrickson (g), Artie Shapiro (b), Mel Powell (p), Red Norvo (vib), Tommy Romersa (d), Louis Kievman (vl), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2721-3Master Take (Capitol) Keep Me In Mind - 2:50(Adrian Zing, Benny Goodman) / arr: Mel Powell
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1016 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 9; 1947-1955   (1986)
Mosaic Licensed LP/CDMq6/Md4 148 — [Benny Goodman] The Complete Capitol Small Group Recordings Of Benny Goodman, 1944-1955   (1993)
Red & Blue Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Blue 2007 — Peggy Lee ("The Blue Collection" Series)   (2007)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)
[unknown label] CDunknown — Peggy Lee ("Female Singers Collection")   
b. 2723-2Master Take (Capitol) For Every Man There's A Woman - 2:46(Leo Robin, Harold Arlen) / arr: Mel Powell
CAPITOL 7815030 — {For Every Man There's A Woman / Beyond The Sea (La Mer) [Benny Goodman instrumental]}   (1948)
CAPITOL 78(United Kingdom) Cl 13003 — {On A Slow Boat To China [Vocal by Al Hendrickson] / For Every Man There's A Woman [Vocal by Peggy Lee]} [Diff. pairing than in USA singles]}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 951 - P 952 — Basic Music Library [Buddy Moreno, Vaughn Monroe, Johnny Mercer, Benny Goodman]   (1948)
Both titles on: COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Signature Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Signcd 2132 — Peggy Lee ("Idols" Box)   (2002)
Legends Of Jazz Public Domain CD18020 2 — My Old Flame   (2003)


Personnel And Cross-references (+ Royalties)

1. Benny Goodman
This is a Benny Goodman session. Peggy Lee was featured on two of the date's four masters. Later on this same day, Lee did a session on her own (i.e., sans Goodman), as shown below. For other Capitol recordings that feature both Lee and Goodman, see sessions dated March 28, 1947 and September 12, 1947.

2. Royalties
Donald Russell Connor, bio-discographer of Benny Goodman, discloses that "Benny's royalties were to be shared with Peggy Lee and Harry James, for those sides in which they participated."

3. "Keep Me In Mind"
This is a sextet performance. In addition to Benny Goodman and Peggy Lee, "Keep Me In Mind" features Red Norvo, Mel Powell, Al Hendrickson, Artie Shapiro, and Tommy Romersa.


Recording Location

In the discographical annotations of the Mosaic CD issue The Complete Capitol Small Group Recordings Of Benny Goodman 1944-1955, Radio Recorders is listed as the venue for Benny Goodman's 1947 Capitol dates. That collective entry is the only basis for my assignation of said recording location to this date.


Masters And Issues

1. "Keep Me In Mind"
2. Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
In Columbia's 1999 CD set Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947, "Keep Me In Mind" is listed as previously unissued. Such a labeling is not entirely accurate: the commercial debut of "Keep Me In Mind" happened many years before 1999, thanks to the collectors' label Blu-Disc. It would thus be more accurate to qualify Columbia's 1999 release as "previously unissued by Capitol, Columbia or any other record company with access to the original master." (Blue-Disc presumably transferred the master performance from a reference tape owned by one of the session's participants, whereas Columbia definitely used the original master disc.) This tendency to ignore non-official releases is an understandable course of (non-)action from the official labels, of course. Since it plays against historical fact, its instances merit qualification, however.

3. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this session were master #2722 ("Shirley Steps Out, an instrumental") and #2724 ("Give Me Those Good Old Days," featuring a vocal by The Sportsmen).


Songs

1. "For Every Man There's A Woman" In The Music Charts
2. "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" In the Music Charts
A Capitol release, "For Every Man There's A Woman" became another addition to the string of hits that Benny Goodman and Peggy Lee had had -- most of them on Columbia Records. This collaboration between the vocalist and her former boss debuted in the Billboard charts during the week of February 28, 1948 and peaked at #25. It became the singer's 13th hit for Capitol Records. Tony Martin's competing version, on RCA Victor, reached #30.

Moreover, "For Every Man There's A Woman" counted as the 11th of Lee and Goodman's dozen of joint entries in the Billboard charts. Their very last hit together would appear this same year, too. It was not a newly recorded number, however, but a re-entry: in June of 1948, Columbia re-released "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place," which had been a #1 hit for the pair back in 1941. On its second outing, it achieved a #30 peak.


Issues

1. Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
2. "Keep Me In Mind"
Columbia 1999 CD set errs in its claim that "Keep Me In Mind" is a previously unissued master take. As already explained above, it had been issued twice before, first in 1986 (on Blu-Disc, a collectors' label) and then in 1993 (on Mosaic, a licensed label).

3. Christmas Seal Party, 1948 [ET]
4. Christmas Seal Campaign, 1948 [ET]
5. "For Every Man There Is A Woman"
Christmas Seal Party and Christmas Seal Campaign are alternative titles given to the same set of transcription discs (two in total, one identifying itself as part 1, the other as part 2). Don Wilson serves as the announcer and Bob Hope as the host of this show, meant for radio broadcasting. The opening segment is fully taken up by comedian Hope, reading from a script filled with middling jokes. A seemingly very tiny audience of men is heard throughout the segment, laughing at every joke. For the rest of the show, and with no audience audible any longer, the semblance of a Hope-hosted party is created with the help of patter from nine so-called guests, all of them Capitol recording artists at the time. Johnny Mercer, Jo Stafford, Paul Weston, Gordon MacRae, Margaret Whiting, Andy Russell, Peggy Lee, Jack Smith, and Nat King Cole are all heard in succession, each one speaking (or rather, exchanging scripted lines) with Hope. They supposedly perform numbers on the spot, too, but in reality, it is their Capitol recordings that are being played instead. Curiously, and perhaps due to time constraints, most of the recordings are not played in their entirety. Benny Goodman, The Clark Sisters, The Pied Pipers, Frank DeVol And His Orchestra are billed by name in the physical label of the discs, but the audio does not mention their presence in the make-believe show. The reason for the billing is that they perform in some of the recordings (e.g, Goodman in "For Every Man There Is A Woman"). My thanks to David Jessup for his kind help with the gathering of information about this issue, which Capitol Records prepared as a donation to the Christmas seal drive of the National Tuberculosis And Health Association. According to Variety magazine, the drive was schedule to start in November of 1947, and the album's contents were sold "to radio stations throughout the country to boost seal sales."


Date: December 2, 1947
Location: Los Angeles - second session
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #819

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (sax, f, o, g, b, str, p, d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 2725-3Master Take (Capitol) Just A Shade On The Blue Side - 3:07(Harold Adamson, Hoagy Carmichael) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815159 — {Don't Be So Mean To Baby / Just A Shade On The Blue Side}   (1948)
CAPITOL (10") LP(United Kingdom) Lc 6584 — Capitol Presents ... Peggy Lee   (1953)
World Record Club Licensed reel/LP(United Kingdom) Ttp/Tp 352 — The Fabulous Miss Lee   (1963)
b. 2726-3Master Take (Capitol) Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere - 3:11(Edmund Goulding, Elsie Janis) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815232 — {So Dear To My Heart / Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere}   (1948)
Dutton Vocalion Licensed CD(United Kingdom) Cdus 3008 — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (2000)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #1]   (2000)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)
c. 2727-2Master Take (Capitol) Bubble-loo, Bubble-loo - 3:01(Hoagy Carmichael, Paul Francis Webster) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815118 — {Bubble-loo, Bubble-loo / Why Don't You Do Right?}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 1189 - P 1190 — Basic Music Library [Peggy Lee, Andy Russell]   (1949)
Reader's Digest Licensed CS/CDRf 140 / Krf 140 [also Emi 72434 99216] — The Legendary Peggy Lee; Her Greatest Hits & Finest Performances   (1999)
d. 2728-4Master Take (Capitol) Don't Smoke In Bed - 3:09(Willard Robison, Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour) / arr: Harold "Hal" Mooney
CAPITOL 78-rpm album/EP boxCc 72 (1018-10120) / Ccf 151 {54 511-513} — Rendezvous With Peggy Lee   (1948)
CAPITOL 7815151 — {Don't Smoke in Bed / Everybody Loves Somebody}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 991 - P 992 — Basic Music Library [Songs From Rendezvous With Peggy Lee + Andy Russell vocals]   (1948)

The Recording Session

1. "Don't Smoke in Bed" As Part Of Peggy Lee's Song Canon
Peggy Lee had to bargain for the right to record "Don't Smoke In Bed." As she told radio broadcaster Fred Hall: "I remember that I made a deal with [producer] Lee Gillette. He said, That song is too arty, or words to that effect. And I said, Well, I'll do one of those things you want me to do if you let me do this song. He said, Fair."

The title of the song that Lee agreed to do in exchange remains a mystery. Presumably, it was a novelty. Among the more logical suspects is this session's "Bubble-loo, Bubble-loo," a pleasant but vapid ditty which benefits from the care and flair with which Lee approaches it. Other possibilities include the obscure tunes that she recorded later this month, especially "What'll Getcha."

This was only one of various times in which Lee's song suggestions were met with opposition from company executives. Two other notable instances happened when she wanted to record the songs "Lover" and "Is That All There Is?" Both numbers went on to become significant hits for her. Further details can be found in the notes under sessions dated May 1, 1952 (Decca page) and January 24 & 29, 1969 (Capitol page, part VII).





Songs And Songwriters

1. The Writing Of "Don't Smoke In Bed" And Its Placement in The Charts
2. Willard Robison
In the 1940s and 1950s, Peggy Lee repeatedly named Willard Robison as one of her favorite songwriters. "I'd like to do [songs by] Willard and Alec [Wilder] all the time," she declared during an interview for the October 1950 issue of the music magazine Metronome. Over the decades, Lee did sing about a dozen of his compositions, including his best known one, the standard "A Cottage For Sale." In addition to holding genuine admiration for his skills, she was good friends with Robison -- and so was Dave Barbour.

Though officially credited to Robison only, much of "Don't Smoke In Bed" was actually composed by Barbour and Lee. Robison contributed the idea, the title, and the line "goodbye, old sleepyhead" before he fell too ill to continue. (It is not clear if the illness in question was connected to Robison's ongoing battle with alcoholism.) Robison is said to have offered a songwriting co-credit to the couple, who graciously declined.

Photos above: Willard Robison (1894-1968). The first photo is estimated to date from the early 1920s. The others remain undated.

Rather surprisingly, the dark rumination that is "Don't Smoke In Bed" made it into the charts, becoming Peggy Lee's 16th hit for Capitol, and validating her faith in the song's worth. (If counted as one of Barbour and Lee's compositions, it would be their fifth to make the charts.) Lee's recording debuted on the week of May 15, 1948 and reached a #22 peak.

I should mention that, in contradiction to the chart position stated in the previous paragraph made, the notes for the CD Capitol Jumps ("From The Vault" Series) declare that Lee's recording of "Don't Smoke in Bed" peaked at #94. My source for the aforementioned #22 peak is Joel Whitburn's book Pop Memories, 1890-1954. Meanwhile, the booklet of the Capitol Jumps CD credits all chart information to "BPI Communications [owner of Billboard magazine] and Joel Whitburn's Record Research Publications." This is not the only discrepancy between the Whitburn text that I consulted (bearing a 1986 copyright) and the information found in the CD. Nellie Lutcher's version of "Fine Brown Frame" peaked at #21 according to Whitburn's book, at #33 according to the CD's annotator. In the case of Johnny Mercer's recording of "My Sugar Is So Refined," there is agreement, on the other hand: both sources give it a #11 peak. Perhaps the apparent contradictions stem from the existence of various Whitburn books that cover the same period. Some of the information used by the CD annotators could have come from Whitburn's 1973 texts Top Pop Records, 1940-1955Top Pop Singles, 1940-1955, which I have not been able to consult (and which could use different or more limited sources n their tabulations).



2. "Bubble-loo, Bubble-loo" In The Music Charts
Peggy Lee's gentle reading of this Hoagy Carmichael novelty entered the charts during the week of July 3, 1948, and peaked at #23. It became Lee's 19th solo hit.


Arrangements And Cross-references

1. Source
With the exception of "Don't Smoke In Bed," the arrangements for this session's performances are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. They are credited to Heinie Beau.

2. "Don't Smoke In Bed"
3. Mike Melvoin, Hal Mooney, Marty Paich
My source for the arranging credit to Hal Mooney is the Peggy Lee set from Time-Life's "Legendary Singers" series, whose informative liner notes were written by Gene Lees.

A copy of the arrangement is kept in Capitol's sheet music library. It does not identify its arranger.

Lee's sheet music library contains three other arrangements of this song. None of them credits Mooney. One of them bears no arranger credit; it could conceivably be by Mooney.

One of the other two arrangements credits Marty Paich. Since Lee is not known to have worked with Paich before her Decca period, I presume that his work was meant for her concert performances in the 1950s.

The third arrangement, written for Lee's haunting 1969 re-recording of "Don't Smoke In Bed," is credited to Mike Melvoin. See session dated October 15, 1969 in this page.


Date: ca. December 26, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #907

Unknown (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 3082-3Master Take (Capitol) Love Ye (One Another) - 2:59(unknown) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
b. 3083-3Master Take (Capitol) What'll It Getcha - 3:00(Trent Christman, Joseph Davis Hooven) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
Both titles on: Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)


Masters And Issues

1. Databases And Archival Matters
This date's masters remained not only unissued but also unknown until 2008, when producer Jim Pierson located them in a phono reel and proceeded to rescue them from the vaults. Part of their utter obscurity resulted from the fact that they were omitted in Peggy Lee's session files, although they are actually listed in other Capitol documents.

The reason why these masters are unlisted in Lee's file is unknown. Perhaps Capitol's hectic pre-ban recording schedule caused oversights such as this one in some of the company's files. (In connection to this point, see also Masters And Songs note located below, before the final General Note). Another factor which contributed to their burial is the type of reel in which they were kept. Phono reels typically hold masters by various artists, not just one. Such reels were reserved for performances slated to be released on singles -- not in albums. Since "Love Ye" and "What'll It Getcha" were not listed in Lee's own file, and since they were not to be found in reels bearing her name, the only way to locate them was by consulting other company documents, or otherwise by happenstance.

2. "Love Ye": Take Number
I am confronted with three sources which each gives a different take number to master 3082; #3, #4, #5. I have chosen to enter the number found in Capitol's documentation.


Dating

When I originally added the present session to this discography, its recording date was unknown. Back then, I entered a date that was a calculation based on the sequence of master numbers. More recently, my consultation of the The Capitol Label Discography (by Michel Ruppli, Bill Daniels and Ed Novitsky, with assistance from Michael Cuscuna) has revealed that my calculation was on the mark.

Notice that the Collectors' Choice CD The Lost '40's & '50's Capitol Masters gives a slightly different date to the session. That date was also a calculation, made before the publication of the aforementioned CD-ROM text by Ruppli et al.


Arrangements

The arrangements for this session's two performances are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. Both are credited to Heinie Beau.


Personnel

Generally, the Capitol artist files that I consulted do not reveal the identities of the musicians who accompanied Barbour and Lee at their sessions. This particular date is no exception. Revelatory documentation may still exist at the American Federation of Musicians. Unfortunately, such documentation is not readily accessible. Herein I can, however, mention the names of the musicians with whom Barbour and Lee were playing live dates two months later, in New York: Hal Schaffer on piano, Harry Babasin on bass and Jackie Mills on drums. Since Schaffer is known to have been Barbour and Lee's regular pianist during this late 1940s period, the chances that he played the ivories on this date (and on many others found in this page) are very high. As for Babasin and Mills, the former is known to have participated in the March 28, 1947 Benny Goodman session that resulted in the Lee vocal "Eight, Nine And Ten," while the latter was one of the four drummers on the February 8, 1949 Dave Barbour session that turned in her eventual hit "Similau." Other strong candidates are drummer Nick Fatool and bassist Phil Stephens, both of whom recorded a large batch of Capitol transcription recordings with the Barbours in April of 1949.


Date: December 26, 1947
Location: Los Angeles
Label: CAPITOL
Capitol Session #914

Peggy Lee (ldr), Lee Gillette (pdr), Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (t, b, p, d), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. 3084-6Master Take (Capitol) (I'm Not Gonna) Let It Bother Me - 2:46(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL CD72435 27564 2 1 — RARE GEMS AND HIDDEN TREASURES [aka Capitol's Collectors Series, Vol. 2]   (2000)
BMG MUSIC PUBLISHING CD[promo] Pub 016 — PEGGY LEE: SONGWRITER   (2001)
b. 3085-3Master Take (Capitol) I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy) - 2:40(Lew Brown, Sidney Clare, Cliff Friend) / arr: Henry J. "Heinie" Beau
CAPITOL 7815298 — {Hold Me / I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy)}   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionP 1189 - P 1190 — Basic Music Library [Peggy Lee, Andy Russell]   (1949)
Sepia Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 1055 — Songs From The Jazz Singer {Danny Thomas, Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)
c. 3086-3Master Take (Capitol) Bye, Bye, Blues - 2:47(Dave Bennett, Chauncey Gray, Fred Hamm, Bert Lown)
Time-Life Music Licensed CS/LP4 Lgd/Slgd 07 — Peggy Lee ("Legendary Singers" Series)   (1985)
CAPITOL Jazz CD0777 7 97826 2 8 — MISS PEGGY LEE    (1998)
Gallerie/Music Collection Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Gale 442 — A Portrait Of Peggy Lee   (1999)
d. 3087-4Master Take (Capitol) I Don't Know What To Do Without You, Baby - 2:45(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Johnny Lehman) / arr: Sonny Burke
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 917 2 — THE LOST '40'S & '50'S CAPITOL MASTERS   (2008)


Arrangements

1. Source
2. "I Wanna Go Where You Go"
With the exception of "Bye, Bye, Blues," the arrangements for this session's performances are extant in Capitol's library of music scores. The library is the source for the arranger credits indicated above. In the case of "I Wanna Go Where You Go," the arranging credit seems to be only for what the library calls an "intro."


The "Darn That Dream" Master

Found in Capitol's vaults is a various-artists reel (i.e., a phono reel) that lists a version of "Darn That Dream" recorded by Peggy Lee and identified as master number 3148. There is no recording date in the reel's label. Based on the sequence of master numbers, my assumption is that the master was recorded on December 31, 1947 or thereabouts.

Unfortunately, aural inspection of the track has revealed that the reel's information is definitely erroneous: the female who interprets the song is not Peggy Lee but Emma Lou Welch, who was The Benny Goodman Orchestra's vocalist around this time. On November 6, they had cut some sides for Capitol, with Teddy Wilson on piano.

Although I do not know why exactly Peggy Lee's name was attached to this "Darn That Dream" master, the Goodman connection between the two thrushes is obviously a likely reason for the confusion ... if it was a confusion. I am left to wonder if Capitol actually asked Lee to record this standard in the company of Goodman, and if she was ultimately unable to come to the studio on the assigned date, thereby opening the room for Welch to take over. (Although such a scenario is not impossible, I must stress that an even simpler scenario is just as likely: a person handling paperwork at Capitol might have become momentarily confused or misinformed about the correct name of the date's vocalist.)




GENERAL NOTES

Capitol Records: Rise In Popularity, 1946-1948

Reports Cards (Charts And Finances)

Capitol's upward pattern of success continued to hold true during the post-war era.  For the year 1946, the company enjoyed almost $14,000 (or, to be exact, $13,802,797) in earnings from 120 singles and 19 albums. Published as part of the company's annual stockholder report, such figures constituted an all-around dramatic increase from those which had been reported for the previous year ($5,100, 48 singles, 14 albums, 3 top sellers).  Billboard magazine further put matters into context when it described the figures as "a 105 per cent increase in sales volume and a 300 per cent increase in net income in 1946." Thanks once again to Johnny Mercer ("Personality," "My Sugar Is So Refined") and also to The Nat King Cole Trio ("For Sentimental Reasons," "The Christmas Song"), there was a slight increase in the total number of singles that qualified as huge sellers. Ella Mae Morse's version of "The House Of Blue Lights" seems to have done very well, too, though not quite within the range of the Mercer and Cole blockbusters.   Of greater impact was the huge success of Capitol's children album Bozo At The Circus, which sold over 100,000 copies just within its first month (November 1946). Next up, December of 1946 brought the top five peak of Stan Kenton's album Artistry In Rhythm, too. But sales and charts were only two of the areas in which the Capitol company had continued to make noteworthy advances in 1946. There had also been corporate expansion. Eight additional sales distribution offices had been opened across the country. Still further (and as will be explained in more detail below), the country's largest pressing plant had been acquired, a brad new one had been opened in the LA area, and an additional building had been rented due to ever-increasing managerial needs.

This pattern of growth remained consistent for the next two years, which nonetheless differed from the previous ones in one matter of particular interest to the present bio-discography:  Peggy Lee entered Capitol's fray of best-selling artists.  The label's top three singles in 1947 were "Smoke, Smoke, Smoke that Cigarette" (Tex Williams), "Temptation (Tim-tay-shun)" (Red Ingle And His Natural Seven, with Jo Stafford under the pseudonym Cinderella G. Stump), and "Golden Earrings" (Peggy Lee).  Also selling well and rounding out Capitol's 1947 top five were "Real Gone Guy" (Nellie Lutcher) and "Serenade Of The Bells" (Stafford again).  End-of-the-year figures were reported by the label as $14,500,000 in sales from 230 singles and 24 albums. (According to the April 10, 1948 issue of Cashbox, the fiscal year statement showed a $422,261 reduction in earnings, but such a reduction was a temporary side effect. The impending 1948 record ban had causes the label to spend in extra sessions. Also factoring into the equation was the "cost of new electrical transcription equipment" as well as some "inventory markdown," according to label president Glenn Wallichs. "But don't let that worry ya," added Cashbox, "Capitol's business is but very verra good these days, what with Peggy Lee's Mañana and the likes.")

Indeed, the figures were dramatically higher at the end of the year 1948 -- as will be discussed in the next page of this sessionography,


Business Expansion

During this period, Capitol Records worked toward the physical expansion of its facilities and transformed from a privately held company to a public corporation. The money to finance the expansion was partially obtained by successfully putting on the market 95,000 shares of public stocks, at a 25-cent par value. In early 1946, the sale of those shares allowed for the final, full purchase ($2,000,000) of the South Scranton, Pennsylvania pressing plants which Capitol had been using since 1944. (The Scranton conglomerate had a long history that went back to the mid-1880s, when it had begun life as, primarily, a button-making factory. Suitably called the Scranton Button Company, it produced its main product out of shellac. By the end of the First World War, it had branched into the production of gramophone discs. The Scranton Button Company Company owners digged deeper into the world of music in 1924, when they purchased the decade-old record Emerson label and made it part of the company. After Emerson merged with other labels and the merged labels were bought by the Brunswick Records Corporation (1931), the Scranton Button Company became better known under the name Brunswick Records Plant. For many years, it was considered to be the largest record plant in the world. By 1946, it was employing 700 individuals.)

A related and important development had begun a few months earlier: the opening of a three-building, 20000 square feet local Capitol record plant located between San Fernando and Glendale (at 2121 North San Fernando Road). With the active cooperation and under the expert advice of the Scranton Record Company, equipment began to be installed there on November 1, 1945, and a late 1945 date was scheduled for the start of the operation. (An additional plant had been recently opened in Indiana, too. Capitol's marketing and promotion manager Don Hassler also makes reference to an LA plant "in Los Angeles at Hyperion and the Golden State." I believe that he is referring to a LA plant on 3061 Fletcher Drive, which that Capitol did not acquire until 1960.)

At home, Capitol furthermore invested on dubbing facilities and sought to acquire yet more office space. The dubbing equipment was said to have been installed amidst the company's executive offices, atop Wallichs' Music City store in Hollywood (northwest corner of Sunset and Vine; consult Photos sub-section below). An annex of sorts was added to the Sunset and Vine offices, too. This so-called annex consisted of two floors at the four-story Palmer Building on 6362 Hollywood Boulevard, leased for the purpose of housing the company's accounting, advertising, promotion, and mailing departments. Comprising 10,000 square feet in total, Palmer's third and fourth floors received their new Capitol tenants in September of 1947 and January of 1948, respectively. (The second floor's 8,000 square feet would be additionally leased by Capitol later on -- starting in April of 1950 -- and would house the label's distribution department. Around 1953, the building further provided merchandise VP Lloyd Dunn and in-house photographer Ken Veeder with a Capitol photo studio, where album cover artwork was devised and shot. Capitol is said to have been the first record label with its own photo department.)

Capitol's expansion drive also led to investment in music business ventures beyond the exclusive sale of commercial records at retail. The label actively advertised itself as a music manufacturer and radio content provider. During the two years under discussion, it set up its own radio transcription sub-company, and began selling phonographs, phonograph needles, even home-recordable 78-rpm discs. It set up yet more sale offices across the country, too.

Still further, Capitol debuted an international division and began to conduct business deals abroad. One of the earliest efforts in that direction was the fulfillment of a distribution arrangement with Bovema NV, the Dutch label that Gerry Oord, Jr. founded in 1946, originally just as a record distribution firm. Oord is said to have taken the initiative. During the days in which the end of the Second World Was was being celebrated, he met an American soldier who happened to be carrying a copy of the magazine Capitol News under an arm. The letter that Oord proceeded to write ago Capitol was answered by Buddy DeSylva, and set in motion the distribution deal that was clinched during Glenn Wallichs' ensuing visit to the Netherlands. Capitol's international endeavors would continue and significantly increase during the first half of the next period (1948-1952) covered by this discography.

Relying on the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, the commonly held aim of these initiatives must have been the elevation of Capitol Records to the top level that had been hitherto occupied only by the East Coast record majors (Columbia, Decca, Victor). That goal was reached in 1946, when the company's official sale numbers led to its being publicly ranked among the top four record labels across the US.

Although roundly successful, Capitol's multi-faceted expansion seems to have been one of the catalysts for the company's all-around enactment of a more bureaucratically oriented approach, which did not meet the full approval of everyone involved. In later years Dave Dexter, Jr., who had originally brought Peggy Lee to Capitol as part of his New American Jazz project, derisively referred to the "covey of lawyers and ivy league business majors" that, in his estimation, had fully taken over the company by the late 1940s.


Photos

Above:  Capitol's executive office exterior, as it looked in the late 1940s and early 1950s.  Possibly taken in 1947 or 1948, the first of these photos suggests that, by then, the label's headquarters were taking up the entire second floor of the building in sight. This building was a two-story structure on the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street, whose first story was primarily occupied by Wallichs' Music City, the celebrated record shop.  The store's corner entrance, located at 1501 N. Vine, is the focus of the second image.   

Showcased in the other two images is Capitol's own main entrance, situated north of Sunset Boulevard, at 1509 N. Vine.  (The label's earlier, original offices had been consigned to a small portion of the same building; back then, the entrance had been on the other side of the corner.  For a photo of that earlier entrance, check the endnotes of this discography's 1944-1945 page. The transition from one office space to the other happened during 1946 and 1947. As late as February 1, 1947, Billboard magazine was still listing the earlier address for Capitol Records. The first issue on which I have found the Capitol 1509 N. Vine address dates from May 31, 1947.)  In passing, I should also note that for many years Wallichs' Music City remained the main though by no means the only store occupying the building's premises.  All through Capitol's second-floor occupancy period, small portions of the first floor were always  allocated to a few other establishments.  The third image shows three of such establishments, all of them to the north of the boulevard (Coffee Dan's at 1511 N. Vine, the tailor shop Benj Gerson at 1515 N. Vine, and Alexander Stationers at 1519 N. Vine).  To the west of the boulevard, two other stores are dimly visible in the first image (a barbershop and a business whose name I cannot discern), filling up space that, earlier in the 1940s, had been occupied by yet other establishments (e.g., Sy Devore's tailor shop).

Capitol' executives continued to work from this Sunset and Vine location until 1956, when the company moved in mass to a brand new facility, the Capitol Tower. (The Tower is actually on the same street as these offices were, but quite a few blocks away, at 1750 N. Vine Street.)  From 1956 onwards, the second floor space on top of Music City proceeded to be the headquarters of another music label, the erstwhile Tennessee-based Dot Records.  

As for the specific dates of the four above-shown images, they can be pinpointed with some confidence.   Images #2 and #4  are stills from the 1952 promotional short Capitol Presents ... Wanna Buy A Record?, most of which was filmed around April of that year.  The third photo is part of Water And Power Associates' Mulholland-Scattergood Virtual Museum, where the car in front of the stationery shop is identified as a 1948 Chevrolet Fleetline Aerosedan. The original source for the first image is unknown to me, and so is the year in which it was taken; as already intimated, I presume it to date from 1947 or 1948.   

Below: two Capitol recording artists visit their label's aforementioned Los Angeles record pressing plant on San Fernando Road, which began operating within the last two months of 1946.  These photos actually date from later years:  1948 in the case of Peggy Lee (seen with a line of female employees behind her) and 1955 in Tennessee Ernie Ford's case (in the suit, with a male employee to his left).  Signs of their respective times (and evidence of the years that have elapsed between these visits), the Ford photos concentrate on a stack of 45-rpm singles (possibly copies of his 1955 megahit "Sixteen Tons"), whereas the first Lee picture highlights stacks of 78-rpm singles (copies of her 1948 megahit "Mañana").  Locally, Capitol kept using this plant until it acquired a more fashionable one at Fletcher Drive (1960).
 




The "Old" Guard

Capitol's re-orientation toward a more overtly bureaucratic business model probably gained momentum during the temporary absence of Johnny Mercer, who was the most artistically oriented of the company's three owners. Early in 1946, Mercer was busy writing his St. Louis Woman show and overseeing that musical's development before its New York premiere. It was during the songwriter's absence (though obviously with his knowledge and, at the very least, tacit approval) that the company went public and acquired stockholders.Furia summarizes the record label's financial history (up to that point) as follows: "[o]riginally a small, elite company that maintained the highest artistic and technical standards, Capitol now expected to sell 3 million records a month. By the end of 1946, its net sales were $13, 082, 927, nearly double its sales for 1945 and more than all the money the company had earned since it was founded in 1942. Capitol sold 42 millions that year — one-sixth of all the records sold in the United States. The company, which had until then been renting recording space, floated a $3 million stock issue in order to buy its own recording studio; instead of being controlled by three men, Mercer, Wallichs, and DeSylva, Capitol would become 'Capital,' with stockholders interested not in artistic quality but in the size of the dividends."

In Skylark: The Life & Times Of Johnny Mercer, Philip Furia states that the songwriter felt deep disappointment over the direction that the label had begun to take. Furia continues by quoting Billy May's recollection of Mercer's general mood. "John got upset when the company got so successful. He liked it when it was just a little company, and he could write a song in the morning and record it in the afternoon and have it a hit a week later ... [...] ... He got mad when they started competing with the majors and everything like that ... [...] ... And Glenn [Wallichs] was, of course, the other way. Glenn was a business man: 'Let's get ahead here and make it' ... [...] ... John got upset when the company violated his policy of not covering hit songs by other companies with versions by their own artists. And this was one of the things that got John mad about Capitol because they started recording pop tunes. Decca would have a hit and Capitol would cover it ... And it was fast, you know, 'Get the tunes in.' ... And we would do them, and sometimes we were more successful, but John didn't like the competitive business that the record industry became." (For an example of the modus operandi described by May, see an above-shown September 12, 1947 session, in which Mercer was actively and paradoxically involved.)

Something else that Mercer did not particular enjoy was the ever-growing amount of paperwork that he was expected to handle, in his capacity as the label's nominal president. In the recollection of Capitol music publisher Michael Goldsen (which he shared with Chris Paton for a 1998 interview that is nowadays part of the Johnny Mercer Collection at Georgia State University): "after a while the routine got a little bit too much for Johnny. He had to okay title pages and everything, and he would be out playing golf or out at a party the night before, and he couldn't get in the ffce n time to do the work. You know, it got piled up so that they realized eventually that Johnny was not going to be able to handle all the work that was piled up; and it was also interfering with his career as a writer and performer."

One upshot of this situation was that Mercer -- who, despite his presidential role, had never been too willing to spend time going through office paperwork -- ended up giving up his company title to Wallichs. Thus, on September 8, 1947, Wallichs formally changed position from vice-president to president. Thereafter, Mercer was only informally active in the company. According to Furia's main source (Billy May), the former president "still sat in on recording sessions and gave advice," but was rumored to frequently fall asleep during them.

Paul Weston, the company's first musical director, also intimated that the company underwent a behavioral reorientation after 1947. Asked to share his recollections on the occasion of the company's 50th anniversary, he remarked that "[t]hrough 1948, Capitol was like family. We would finish at NBC and come across the street and go up in the office and hang around, and everybody knew everybody else. There were very few interoffice arguments. I mean, it was a very nice operation -- if you can use that word, and maybe it's the proper word. Every night when you'd go down to record, you'd have a wonderful group of friends and great players. You looked forward to making the records."

Remarks about the company's modus operandi during its earliest period have also been made by Mike Maitland, who from 1946 to 1961 held successively higher Capitol positions in the areas of sales management and record distribution. "Most of us [at Capitol], fortunately, didn't have the burden of a decade of experience in the record business," he pointed out in 1961. "The prevalent moods were what if? and why not? rather than but... and well, seven years ago... If the idea made sense, it went into effect immediately, and that meant right now, not next Friday, not after it cleared legal, not after it went through the accounting department or the board of directors." (Dissatisfied after having been passed over for the position of Capitol president, Maitland accepted that same position at Warner Brothers in December 1961. Nearly a decade later, on April 1970, he moved on to MCA, where a year later he was once again being installed into the presidential chair.)


Other Capitol Men

Among the other recording producers working for the company during this time were Paul Weston (a regular presence, being Capitol's first musical director, particularly during the 1943-1945 period), James Conkling, and the aforementioned Dave Dexter, Jr. Photos and/or further biographical details about some of these gentlemen (Conkling in particular) are provided in the endnotes to this discography's 1948-1952 sessions. In addition to Weston at the top of the ladder, the other men who are known to have served as music arrangers during Capitol's first years were Gordon Jenkins, Eddie Miller, and Glenn Osser. (Peggy Lee's husband, Dave Barbour, and more particularly his music associates, clarinetist Heinie Beau and trumpeter Billy May, are presumed to have arranged most of Peggy Lee's material from this period.)

Also very prevalent at Capitol in the mid- to late-1940s (and beyond) was the presence of Lee Gillette. Formerly an employee at Chicago's WJJD and WAAF radio stations, the commercially oriented Gillette was hired by Wallichs in 1944, to be the label's A&R country chief.  Gillette promptly signed the man who would become the company's most successful 1940s country act (Tex Williams), with whom he would record Capitol's first million seller ("Smoke, Smoke, Smoke That Cigarette") four years later. Next (1949), Gillette heard and immediately signed Tennessee Ernie Ford, the country act who would give Capitol some of its major hits of the 1950s, and who would stay with the label for over two decades. By that time, his job title had already transitioned from country to pop A&R man, a titular shift that might have benefitted the recruitment of country artists in particular.  Capitol country stars Hank Thompson and Merle Travis are also reported to have been Gillette recruits. Mr. Gillette was also the mastermind behind the late 1940s and early 1950s best-selling pairings of country singers such as Jimmy Wakely with pop singers such as Margaret Whiting.

(Still further, Gillette would be responsible for bringing Ken Nelson, another former WJJD disc jockey, into the fold. Hired around August of 1948, Nelson would initially be put in charge of the label's radio transcription business, to which Gillette had been tied up until then. The new appointment seems to have been triggered by Gillette's need to concentrate on the demands expected from his own new appointment at the time, in the newly former position of Capitol's director of folk and western repertoire. In the early 1950s, Nelson would once again take over Gillette's duties, at that particular time in the country field. He would go on to establish his own track record as a Capitol A&R man, bringing to the label yet more country artists of note, and producing major hits for them.)  

From 1944 to 1964, Leland Gillette's proven track record as a commercial hit maker would actually lead him to work regularly with most of the classic pop/jazz artists in the roster, including Stan Kenton and the top act during that period, his close friend Nat King Cole.  Gillette is also believed to have produced most of Peggy Lee's sessions from the 1940s.  (However, she was closer and seems to have preferred to work with Dave Cavanaugh, who produced the immense majority of her Capitol sessions from the 1950s and the first half of the 1960s.)  

Among the new men who became part of the label's change in orientation was Alan Livingston. The holder of a B.A. degree in Economics from the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce and an ad man for the three years that followed his graduation, Livingston began working for Capitol in January 1946, within the newly created children's record division. His creation of the character Bozo the Clown provided Capitol with a huge popular and financial success. By the early 1950s, he was fulfilling the top A&R role that Mercer had basically vacated long ago; eventually he would rise to the top positions of company president and chairman of the board.






Photos

Radio Recorders is the location of all but the second of these images.  This now-vanished facility ranks as the most famous independent recording studio of the twentieth century.  An August 6, 1949 Billboard article calls it "West Coast's largest indie recording studio ... boast[ing] 21 tape recorders, including 12 late model Ampex machines as well as 26 acetate lathes."   Under this very name (i.e., Radio Recorders), it was located at 932 N. Western Avenue during the 1930s and the bulk of the 1940s, but by 1950 it had moved to its better-known 7000 Santa Monica address. Over their many decades of operation, the Radio Recorders studios were leased by just about every record company of note.  Capitol rented them for nearly all of its 1946-1947 LA sessions, and most of the ones conducted in 1945 -- i.e., during the period that followed the label's cancelled deal with MacGregor studios in February 1945, and which preceded the purchase of the facilities known as Capitol Melrose in late 1948.  During the period in which Capitol's rented Radio Recorders, Harry Bryant was the studio's chief engineer. Reported to have also been one of the studio's founders and owners, Bryant is credited with being the first person to add reverb to phonographic records; he himself expressed his belief that he had been the first engineer to use an echo chamber effect, too. The concept of equalization was also worked there, according to Capitol executive Bill Miller. (For direct quotes on these matters, see session notes above, under date November 25, 1947.)

In the bottom row, the various black & white photos provide a partial view of one of Radio Recorders' studio rooms. Studio B is identified as the space in sight, where Chet Baker is playing trumpet and recording a vocal for "The Thrill Is Gone" next to pianist Russ Freeman and bassist Carson Smith. The date is February 15, 1954. (I would have preferred to feature photos dating from 1946 or 1947, but could not find any satisfactory candidates. Note, however, that various pictures of Lee in the recording studio have been featured earlier in the page. Those from the November 25, 1947 session do show Radio Recorders. Other photos, from earlier sessions, may also be showing the same facilities, but the available data for them does not identify their location.) During an April 9, 1982 interview with Linda L. Painter (for her JMEF Quaterly article "The Rise And Decline Of The Standard Transcription Company"), Radio Recorders' Harry Bryant reminisced that "a moderate size orchestra sounded best in Studio B," whereas "the best [radio] drama programs were recorded in Studio A."

In passing , I should also make allusion to a set of photos from another Baker session that some internet sets misleadingly identify as Radio Recorders, too. The facility is actually the Annex, an offshoot Radio Recorders studio built in 1946 that is not known to have been used by Capitol during the 1946-1947 period of primary interest to this page. These photos come from William Claxton's Young Chet. Many sites that feature one or two of them, rather than the entire set. All of them are viewable at the official website of record engineer and guitarist Scotty Moore, where this helpful description of the rooms at Radio Recorders can also be read: "[a]ll of the studios at the 7000 address were identified alphabetically 'A' thru 'F' with B being the largest. A was a smaller studio, seldom used for music recording. C was strictly for dubbing to tape or disc - mostly for CBS radio network. D was for tape editing, E was for speech only - a table & chair and one mic, and F was disc mastering ... [T]he wall treatment in the studios there featured a series of polycylindrical diffusers,  or rounded walls.  John Palladino, who worked as an engineer there, called  them splays when interviewed by Susan Schmidt Horning.  Other rooms featured a series of slightly curved sections spaced by sections of 1-foot square acoustic tiles.  Again, they serve to dampen, deaden, or diffuse the sound and prevented 'standing waves' allowing engineers much more control during recording and the ability to add effects in the post-mix."

Moving up to the top row of images, the Radio Recorders control booth can be seen in two of them.  Both feature a bespectacled John Palladino, who would be hired to work at Capitol Melrose Studios in 1949 and would arguably become the label's top record engineer. (He had been working for Radio Recorders since some time after his 1942 medical discharge from the Army Air Corps. In the 1960s, he was promoted to the positions of A&R representative and staff producer. Palladino's retirement took place in 1982.) The other men in the first photo are Capitol A&R man Lee Gillette and Capitol executive Bill Miller.  The third photo additionally features Val Valentin, another Radio Recorders engineer who mixed many a Capitol session, but which would become better known for its affiliation to Verve-MGM Records from the 1950s onwards.  

As for the second photo, it showcases a 1946 Capitol promotional ploy on behalf of the 78-rpm album I Never Left Home.  Peggy Lee and Bob Hope are the two individuals on the center. In the clear-colored suits, Capitol president Glenn Wallichs is on the left, Capitol A&R vice-president Jim Conkling on the right.  The other two men are Lloyd Dunn (left) and Dave Fenwick (right), of the advertisement firm Dunn & Fenwick.  (The two men had taken over Capitol's ad account on this year, and would bring it with them after joining the Abbott Kimball agency in 1948.  Dunn would actually go on to become a member of Capitol's fold, starting as its Vice-president of Merchandise and Sales in 1950  For his part, Fenwick would remain at the helm of the Capitol account eve after making a move from Abbott Kimball to Calkins & Holden, also in 1950. In time, Dunn would rise to the presidential position at the Capitol Record International Corporation.)

Below: A 1948 Capitol advertisement spotlights the company's biggest hits of that year and the preceding one.





Preliminary Outcome: In The Year 1948

Capitol Records reached an apex of commercial success in 1948, when four of the label's hits enjoyed extended positions at the top of the chart lists. Paradoxically, those twelve months were problematic ones for most of the record industry. A year-round recording ban forced companies to resort to music which had been recorded either in haste (at the end of 1947) or by unorthodox means (abroad, overdubbed, a cappella). Yet Capitol, far from suffering, reaped benefits through the year thanks especially to the four aforementioned blockbuster recordings: "Mañana" (Peggy Lee), "Nature Boy" (Nat King Cole), "A Tree In The Meadow" (Margaret Whiting) and "Twelfth Street Rag" (Pee Wee Hunt). As Cashbox remarked on its December 25, 1948 issue, "Capitol's ability to come up with the hits this past year have more than amazed the music trade ... [It has been] learned that Capitol sales are running better than 30 per cent ahead of last year, despite the fact that the entire industry has recently gone thru its worst slump in history." Further commentary about Capitol's successes during that year can be found in the end notes for the next page of this sessionography .







Peggy Lee, Capitol Artist: Career Comeback And Rise In Popularity (1944-1948)

Peggy Lee had clearly done well for Capitol Records during the 1944-1945 period, when she had been championed by Johnny Mercer, the primary artistic mind behind the enterprise. However, her Capitol output had been very limited during that couple of years: only four sessions. This scarcity of recording activity suggests that she had not yet officially committed to a career comeback.

As those two years went by, various factors must have heightened Lee's interest in coming back to a full-time career in singing. For starters, the Barbours' household was in financial need -- a need that had been further compounded by the birth of their baby in late 1943. Facing the prospect of having to juggle both motherhood and a professional career, the supportive environment around her and the tough working background of her earlier years must have given Lee qualified confidence in her ability to simultaneously succeed at both tasks. According to Lee herself, a significant factor in her final resolution was the advise that she received from those close to her (most notably, her own husband) to the effect that she should return to her trade, lest she would later regret not having done so. The decision was thus facilitated by the consistent encouragement of her husband (and her husband's friend and eventual manager, Carlos Gastel), and by the married couple's intention to work together as a music team. Then there was the lure of a career about which had dreamed since she was a pre-teen, and to which she had already dedicated well over a decade. There was as well the advantage that such extensive professional experience could potentially give her, if she decided to come back.

Still further, there was no denying the pattern of commercial success evinced by the few solo recordings that she recorded while still in semi-retirement. By the singer's own account, the radio airplay given to her 1944 sides with The Capitol Jazzmen ("Ain't Goin' No Place," "That Old Feeling") was highly gratifying. Bona fide hits also came from her two ensuing 1945 Capitol dates ("Waitin' For The Train To Come In," "I Don't Know Enough About You," "I'm Glad I Waited For You"). The successful string of hits continued with the only session that she did during the first half of 1946 ("Linger In My Arms A Little Longer, Baby"). Even a belatedly released cut from her Benny Goodman years ("How Deep Is The Ocean," recorded in 1942) entered the 1945 airplay lists.

Lee's confidence in her own artistic capabilities must have been further boosted by the positive reception that her peers bestowed on her self-penned work. "I Don't Know Enough About You" generated successful versions by Lee's former boss Benny Goodman and by the very popular Mills Brothers. "What More Can A Woman Do?" found favor from Sarah Vaughan and Joe Mooney, whose versions date from 1945 and 1947, respectively. Lee's 1946 lyric for "Don't Be So Mean To Baby" would be promptly covered by Duke Ellington. Another mid-1946 lyric, "It's A Good Day," would become a major success for Lee herself and, from that year onwards, would be frequently picked by other artists for either studio recording or radio and television performances.

When all the above-mentioned factors are taking into consideration, it should come as no surprise that, during the second half of 1946, Peggy Lee finally returned to the music business in full force. From then on, she kept a steady rate of studio sessions, radio shows, and concert appearances -- most of them in the company of Barbour, with the concerts taking place in both US coasts.

After showing the makings of a successful, versatile and tastefully bluesy artist while still in her earliest years with Capitol (1944-1945), Peggy Lee continued to do very well in the more commercially oriented environment that permeated the label's premises during the 1946-1948 period. In fact, Lee more than met the company's expectations, generating hit after hit, including the two aforementioned bestsellers, on of them in 1947 ("Golden Earrings") and the other in 1948 ("Mañana"). Yet she still maintained a balance in the ratio of commercial/artistic material, as shown by the combination of standards (or 'quality' selections) and novelties (or plug tunes) that are listed in this discographical page. (For an example of the negotiations that Lee had to make in order to achieve this balance, see notes about the song "Don't Smoke In Bed," under session dated December 2, 1947.)

In summary, three stages can be detected in the artist's journey through the Capitol ranks during the 1940s. After going through a gradual process of integration to the Capitol roster (1944-1945) which she passed with flying colors, Lee become a full-fledged (as well as frequent chart-making) member in 1946, and then turned into one of the label's top acts during the next two years. (A fourth stage, starting around 1949 and moving into the early 1950s, will be covered in the next page of this chronological bio-discography.)






Popularity: Peggy In The Polls (1946-1947)

As detailed in the previous page of this sessionography, Peggy Lee had placed at #4 in Downbeat's 1945 poll for female singers. Ahead of her had been Jo Stafford (#1, with 838 votes), Billie Holiday (#2) and Dinah Shore (#3).

Peggy Lee topped the 1946 poll. She received 1145 votes. Behind her were Stafford (1027 votes), Holiday (830 votes), Shore (730 votes), and Anita O'Day (685 votes). Newcomer Sarah Vaughan (479 votes) took the #6 spot, followed by Margaret Whiting (443 votes) and Ella Fitzgerald (443 votes; transferring from the Band, Female poll to the poll for female solo artists). Lee also topped Metronome's 1946 Singer Of The Year poll.

For the year 1947, the 870 votes sent on behalf of Peggy Lee placed her at #2 in Downbeat's female singers poll. With 472 votes, Jo Stafford dropped to #3 and, with 308 votes, Billie Holiday also went down one notch, to #5 . Ella Fitzgerald jumped from #8 to #4 (433 votes). Climbing from #6 all the way to #1, thanks to 1192 votes, was Sarah Vaughan. In a specialized chart called Top Selling Female Vocalists Over Retail Counters, Peggy Lee held the #1 with 344 points, thanks to her recordings of "Mañana" and "Golden Earrings." At #2 was Doris Day (312 points), who also had two hits records, followed by Margaret Whiting (216 points) with just one record.

Meanwhile, Cashbox and Billboard conducted their own annual polls. In the first week of October of 1947, when Cashbox published the early results for the Best Female Vocalist of its Second Annual Poll Of The Automatic Music Industry, Peggy Lee was occupying the mid-position of the countdown. Her 2,100 votes placed her a distant fifth, well behind fourth holder Ella Fitzgerald (6,150 votes) and topper Jo Stafford (12, 367 votes). In the ensuing weeks, however, incoming votes would results in Lee's overtaking of the fourth position. In early December, with the poll about to close, Nelllie Lutcher had surged to overcome Ella Fitzgerald and take over the fifth position. Lutcher's 7,621 votes were still comfortably outdistanced by Peggy Lee's 12,266 votes and Margaret Whiting's 14,453 votes. Whiting and Lee were in turn comfortably outpaced by Dinah Shore (41, 559 votes) and Stafford (45, 528) votes.

As for Billboard, its First Annual Disc Jockey Poll was published in the August 2, 1947 issue of the magazine. The top 10 from the poll's so-called All-Around Popular Female section consisted of Dinah Shore at #1 (3227 votes), followed by Jo Stafford (2420), Peggy Lee at #3 (2371), Margaret Whiting (1542), Martha Tilton, Doris Day, Monica Lewis, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, and Anita O'Day (502 votes). Perhaps because those polled were not general listeners but disc jockeys (for whom recordings from years past might have still mattered heavily), Peggy Lee also managed to make an appearance in Billboard's Female Band Vocalist poll. That canary poll was topped by June Christy (2,695 votes), then in the process of transitioning from a band singer to a solo vocalist, The 428 votes of Lee behalf granted her a #9 position, between Marion Morgan (463) and Jane Russell (331).

In 1946 and 1947, Billboard published its regular annual Collegiate Winners poll, too. For female singers, the top 3 remained the same in both years: Jo Stafford at #1 (moving up one spot from the previous year), Dinah Shore at #2 and, making a huge debut by placing at #3, Peggy Lee. This trio of singers would maintain hold of the top three yet again in 1948, but their respective positions would change, with Stafford and Shore going down one notch, and Lee moving up to the top.

Polls were separately conducted by various renowned disc jockeys as well. For the year of 1946, Margaret Whiting came on top in the separate polls conducted by Hollywood's Gene Norman and New York's Martin Block. In Norman's poll, Peggy Lee grabbed the second spot.





Statistics: Total Number Of Peggy Lee Masters (1946-1947)

This discographical page shows a total of 70 masters, all of them recorded for Capitol Records between 1946 and 1947. Three of those 70 masters are listed in Capitol's files as rejected or re-recorded: "Golden Earrings," dating from September 23, 1947, and two versions of "I've Had My Moments," one from July 12, 1946, the other from November 26, 1947. All other 67 masters have been commercially issued during the digital era. Also included in this page are two breakdowns, both of them commercially released as well.


Photos

Top: The winner of Downbeat Magazine's 1947 polls are listed by name, and images of them are shown in a photographic mosaic. Peggy Lee is number ten. The image in the center shows a portion of a trade advertisement, in which Capitol highlights popular (or, in some instances, potentially popular) jukebox performances for the years 1947 and 1948.

Second row of images: Peggy Lee surrounded by men from the music industry. Among them are Johnny Mercer and Glenn Wallichs, two of the three founders of Capitol. (The other founder, Buddy De Sylva, received attention earlier in this page; see session dated January 29, 1947.) The third photo appeared in an October 1947 publication and probably dates from September of 1947. (Wallichs' election as company president took place at a September 8, 1947 board of directors meeting.) I do not have a date for the second photo. Judging from the fact that its participants are wearing the same attire as in the third image, I would assume the date to be September of 1947, too. If so, its caption is making a somewhat outdated reference: Lee had been the winner of Downbeat's 1946 poll. (Perhaps the plaque was belatedly given. Or perhaps Capitol endeavored to re-report the win at this later date merely as a promotional strategy.) As for the first of these three photos, it also features bandleader Frankie Carle, radio announcer Bill Goodwin, and Lee's husband, guitarist Dave Barbour. It was published in a July 1948 magazine issue, with a caption that points to the preceding month, June, as the one in which it was taken. However, companion shots (found elsewhere) are dated May 12, 1948.

Third row of images: Peggy Lee with three of the Capitol men who, besides husband Dave Barbour, conducted or arranged her 1946-1947 sessions. They are Paul Weston (sessions dated September 23, 1946 and September 12, 1947), Heinie Beau (arranger of many of these numbers, and hence a fundamental figure hovering in the background of these dates), and Frank DeVol (sessions dated July 15, 1946 and August 14, 1947).

Bottom: Peggy Lee in 1946.





Sessions Reported: 27

Performances Reported: 72

Unique Songs Reported: 65

Unique Issues Reported: 327