The Peggy Lee Bio-Discography:
A Photographic Showcase Of Lee's Movie Soundtrack Contributions
by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Sep 12, 2016


Scope And Contents

This page is dedicated to Peggy Lee's movie soundtrack work. In most cases, her participation involved both the writing and the singing of soundtrack lyrics. Occasionally, however, she composed not lyrics but music, or was hired to write a lyric that another artist ended up singing in the soundtrack.

This page also includes two miscellaneous sections. The first section lists lyrics which Peggy Lee set to movie themes. (Those particular lyrics of hers were not included in the movies' soundtracks.) The other miscellaneous section offers a very selective sampling of movies and TV series whose soundtracks contain studio recordings by Peggy Lee.

Not all of Lee's film work is listed in the present page. Excluded are movies for which Peggy Lee not only worked on the soundtrack but also had an acting role. Such cases are covered in this separate page. As for her contributions to the soundtracks of animated movies, they are also separately discussed, in this page.


I. ABOUT MRS. LESLIE




Artwork Shown:

1 & 3. Title: About Mr. Leslie / Note: In the soundtrack of this 1952 Paramount film, Peggy Lee is heard singing a number entitled "I Love You So." Seen above are posters and advertisement for the movie.

2. Title: About Mrs. Leslie / Format: DVD (or DVD-r) / Note: The poster seen on image #2 also serves as the cover of this DVD issue, about which I know very few details. Quite possibly, this is not a commercial DVD but rather a DVDr copy, sold on a collector-to-collector basis. (Such is the case for at least one of the for-sale copies which I tracked on the web. I am less certain about other located copies. Online sellers are not particularly forthcoming with specifics.) This movie does not seem to have ever been released on VHS and, given the point already made in the previous sentences, it might have never been commercially issued on DVD, either.


II. THE WOMAN THEY ALMOST LYNCHED




Artwork Shown:

1 - 3. Title: The Woman They Almost Lynched / Note: Various film websites report that Peggy Lee is heard in the soundtrack of this 1953 Republic Pictures film, singing a number whose lyrics she wrote, "How Strange." Composed by Victor Young, that song had actually been previously heard in another movie (see section VII below), but the earlier version did not feature the Lee lyric. As far as I have been able to ascertain, there has been no VHS and no DVD issue of The Woman They Almost Lynched. Seen above are posters and ads, including one for the French market.


III. JOHNNY GUITAR





Artwork Shown:

1. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: LP / Label: Citadel / Cat. Num.: Ct 7026 / Rel. Year: 1981 / Note: Contains the soundtrack of this 1954 Republic Pictures film, for which Peggy Lee co-wrote and sang the theme. In this LP, Lee is heard singing the movie's theme twice -- first in the opening track and, later, as a reprise, in the closing track. On a different note, I should clarify that these movie soundtrack versions of the song "Johnny Guitar" are different from the studio recording that Lee did for Decca Records.

2. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: CD / Label: Varése Sarabande / Cat. Num.: Vsd 5377 / Rel. Year: 1993 / Note: Same contents as in item #1. Officially sanctioned compact disc.

3. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: CD / Label: Disconforme's Soundtrack Factory / Cat. Num.: (Spain) Sfcd 33509 / Rel. Year: 1999 / Note: Same contents as in item #1 and #2. Public Domain disc, probably copied from item #1.

4. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: CD / Label: Disconforme / Cat. Num.: (Spain) Gv 1341 / Rel. Year: 2002 / Note: Same contents as in previous items. Public Domain disc, apparently a re-designed reissue of item #3.


General Note:
This section features all the VHS, DVD and Blu-Ray editions of the movie Johnny Guitar that I could locate on the web. I do not doubt that there are more, of which I remain unaware. (The large number of editions attests to the film's international popularity as a cult classic.) Bear in mind that my sources for most of these Johnny Guitar images are other online sites, whose reliability varies when it comes to specific data. Such website could have misidentified a few of the images, calling VHS tapes DVDs, and viceversa. Also, in many instances, the image is all what those websites provide; specific data has proven hard to track down.





Artwork Shown:

5. Title: Johnny Guitar / Note: Image #5 shows a movie poster. The images next to the poster show various issues that use it for their front cover; further details below. (See images below for additional issues with the same front cover.)

6. Title: Johnny Guitar ("Martin Scorsese Presents" Series) / Format: VHS / Label: Republic (also listed as CBS-Fox) / Cat. Num.: 2127 / Rel. Year: 1994 (also listed as 1991)

7. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: VHS / Label: 4Front / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: 1999

8. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: Blu-Ray & DVD / Label: Olive Films / Cat. Num.: 448 / Rel. Year: 2012

9. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: Laser Disc / Label: Republic / Cat. Num.: Id6117Re / Rel. Year: 1987 / Note: Distributed by Image Entertainment





Artwork Shown:

10. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: VHS / Label: Nta Home Entertainment / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

11. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: VHS / Label: Nta Home Entertainment / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

12. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: VHS / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

13. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: VHS / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

14. Title: Johnny Guitar (Wenn Frauen Hassen) / Format: VHS / Label: / Cat. Num.: (Germany) unknown / Rel. Year: unknown





Artwork Shown:

15. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Universal / Cat. Num.: (United Kingdom) unknown / Discs: 2 / Rel. Year: 2005

16. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Metro Goldwin Meyer / Cat. Num.: (France) unknown / Rel. Year: 2000

17. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Paramount / Cat. Num.: (France) unknown / Rel. Year: 2007

18. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Art Haus / Cat. Num.: (Germany) unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

19. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Art Haus / Cat. Num.: (Germany) unknown / Rel. Year: 2003 / Note: Appears to be a reissue of item #17.





Artwork Shown:

20. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Enjoy Movies - Univideo / Cat. Num.: (Italy) unknown / Rel. Year: 2009

21. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: (Spain) unknown / Rel. Year: 2003

22. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: (Portugal) unknown / Rel. Year: 2003

23. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Ydm ___ / Cat. Num.: (South Korea) unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

24. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown





Artwork Shown:

25. Title: Johnny Guitar (Video Graph Classic Library) / Format: VHS / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: (Japan) Vz 948 / Rel. Year: unknown

26. Title: Johnny Guitar / Format: DVD / Label: Euro International / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

27. Title: Johnny Guitar (Wild West Collection) / Format: DVD / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown


IV. THE RAWHIDE YEARS
[SONGWRITING ONLY - VOCAL PERFORMANCE BY COLLEEEN MILLER]





Artwork Shown:

1. Title: The Rawhide Years / Format: DVDr / Label: Loving The Classics / Cat. Num: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown / Note: Sold by the collectors' commercial website lovingtheclassics.com , which specialized in issuing Public Domain movies.

2 & 3. Title: The Rawhide Years / Note: In 1954, Laurindo Almeida and Peggy Lee co-wrote the number "The Gypsy With Fire In His Shoes." The song was then performed by leading lady Colleen Miller in the movie The Rawhide Years, which Universal released in 1956. Peggy Lee had recorded her own interpretation for Decca Records back in 1954, with tap dancing by Sammy Davis, Jr. Decca did not issue the Lee version until 1957. Shown in the above-seen images are movie ads and posters.


V. THE RACERS




Artwork Shown:

1 & 2. Title: The Racers / Note: In the soundtrack of this 1955 film from 20th Century Fox, Peggy Lee is heard singing the movie's love theme, "I Belong To You." The vocal seems to be the same one that Decca released on the 1955 single 29429 (78 rpm) and 9-29429 (78 rpm). Image #1 shows a movie card, image #2 a movie poster.

3. Title: The Racers / Format: VHS / Label: 20th Century Fox / Cat. Num.: 1879 / Rel. Year: 1991 / Note: As far as I have been able to ascertain, this movie has not been released on DVD.

4. Title: The Racers - Daddy Long Legs ("Masters Film Music" Series) / Format: CD / Label: Varése Sarabande / Cat. Num.: Srs 2015 / Rel. Year: 2002 / Note: Contains the movie's soundtrack, including Peggy Lee's love theme. Also includes the ballet piece that Alex North composed for the movie Daddy Long Legs.


VI. MY MAN GODFREY
[SONGWRITING ONLY - VOCAL PERFORMANCE BY SARAH VAUGHAN]





Artwork Shown:

1 - 3. Title: My Man Godfrey / Note: Starring David Niven and June Allyson, the film under consideration is a remake of the 1936 William Powell - Carole Lombard classic. Shown above, in image #1, #2, and #3 are movie posters and ads. According to various internet sites, including Turner Movie Classics (at http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/84365/My-Man-Godfrey/music.html ), the theme of this 1957 Universal movie was co-written by Peggy Lee with Sonny Burke, and is heard over the opening credits in the voice of Sarah Vaughan. Nevertheless, the commercial video listed below features no such vocal. Instead, instrumental music is played over the opening credits of the VHS release. One possibility is that, for the commercial issue, the vocal was substituted for the instrumental. Obviously, another possibility is that TMC and other websites are mistaken on this matter. (For the time being, and while I keep doing research on the topic, I shall keep this entry herein, rather than deleting it. If any readers have a definitive answer about the alleged vocal, I would appreciate hearing from you at ivansantiagomercado@earthlink.net . )

4. Title: My Man Godfrey / Format: VHS / Label: MCA Universal / Cat. Num.: 81318 / Rel. Year: 1994


VII. THE PRIDE AND THE PASSION
[MUSIC COMPOSITION ONLY - NO VOCAL PERFORMANCE]





Artwork And General Commentary:

1. Title: The Pride And The Passion / Note: Primarily a lyricist, Peggy Lee occasionally wrote music, too. Online movie sites credit Lee with the instrumental theme of this 1957 United Artists movie. Reputable commercial sites, such as Amazon and Barnes And Noble, credits Lee as songwriter for the movie, too. Unfortunately, I have found no solid corroboration for this claim. For what is worth, notice that Lee's friends Cary Grant and Frank Sinatra co-starred in the movie, thereby establishing a (tenuous) connection between her and the film. See also note #2. On display in image #1 is a movie poster.

2. Title: The Pride And The Passion / Format: LP / Label: Capitol / Cat. Num.: W 873 / Rel Year: 1957 / Note: This soundtrack album makes no mention whatoever of Lee. The album's entire contents are credited to composer George Antheil. (Since Lee was a Capitol artist at this point in time, one would have expected, at the very least, a mention in the back cover's liner notes.)

3. Title: The Pride And The Passion / Format: DVD / Label: MGM / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel Year: 2002

4. Title: The Pride And The Passion / Format: VHS / Label: MGM / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel Year: 1992


VIII. JOHNNY TROUBLE
[SONGWRITING ONLY - VOCAL PERFORMANCE BY EDDIE ROBERSTON]





Artwork And General Commentary:

1 - 4 . Title: Johnny Trouble / Note: Frank DeVol did the score and Peggy Lee wrote the theme for this 1957 Warner Brothers movie. Her songwriting assignment might have actually been done in collaboration with Victor Young, who would pass away in late 1956. Lee is also known to have done demo records of the song, which are still extant. (I will be further researching the matter of Young’s involvement and Lee’s demos when I create this discography’s page for movie soundtrack sessions.) But in the film the lyrics was sung by a male vocalist (Eddie Robertson), not by Lee. The above-seen images show movie ads, cards, and posters.


IX. THE SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS
[SONGWRITING ONLY - UNUSED SONG]





Artwork And General Commentary:

1 - 4 . Title: The Spirit Of St. Louis / Note: In 1955, Peggy Lee and harpist Stella Castellucci co-wrote a song for this biopic about aviation maverick Charles Lindbergh, which premiered in 1957. Ultimately, their song, called “We,” was not used. Warner Brothers opted to use instrumentals instead, except for an uncredited vocal version of the late 1920s tune “Rio Rita,” heard through a phonograph. “My first collaboration with Peggy was a song called We,” commented Castellucci in her autobiography Diving Deep For Sea Shells. “Peg wrote the lyrics and I wrote the music … Peg submitted it for the main title and it was almost chosen.” The above-seen images show movie ads and posters.


X. THE TIME MACHINE
[SONGWRITING ONLY - UNUSED SONG]





Artwork And General Commentary:

1 - 2. Title: H.G. Well's The Time Machine / Note: Peggy Lee is credited with writing both words and music for the theme of this 1960 George Pal film. Entitled "The Land Of Leal," the theme was even incorporated to David Duncan's original script (viewable, as of July 2011, at http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/TheTimeMachine_1959.html ). Unfortunately, however, the song ended up being dropped from the final movie product.

The very effective opening of H.G. Well's The Time Machine spotlights a battery of clock sounds. According to the script, Peggy Lee's composition was to follow that opening. In its place, the actual movie features a typical, sweepingly dramatic music score. (Russ Garcia was responsible for the film's full music score.) Through the rest of the movie, there were two or three additional spots where the melody was to be heard, according to the script. The protagonist himself (The Time Traveler) was expected to whistle the melody, identified in the script as his favorite tune. In the final movie product, the protagonist shows a penchant for voiceovers but not for whistling.


XI. PIECES OF DREAMS




Artwork Shown:

4. Title: Pieces Of Dreams ("Warner Archives Collection" Series) / Format: DVD / Label: Warner / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: 2013 / Note: "on demand" or "made to orderr" DVD.

2 - 4. Title: Pieces Of Dreams / Note: In this 1970 United Artists movie, Peggy Lee is heard singing the debut vocal of a number that many other artists would record later on. The song in question is the film's theme, "Pieces of Dreams," also known as "Little Boy Lost." The number also went on to become an Academy award nominee in the category of Best Song. Shown above are posters and stills from the film.

Missing Artwork:

5. Title: Pieces Of Dreams / Format: VHS / Label: unknown / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown / Note: I am not entirely sure of the existence of this video. All claims come from anecdotal, vague stories.


XII. ARRUZA
[INDIRECT PEGGY LEE CONNECTION]





Artwork And General Commentary:

1 & 2. Title: Arruza / Note: In this 1971 Avco Embassy documentary, Anthony Quinn narrates the life of Mexican matador Carlos Arruza. A movie poster is shown in image #1. The documentary was released once on VHS (image #2). Although Peggy Lee was not involved at all in the making of this particular film, there was a connection between her and the movie's subject. As will be shortly explained, that connection raises in turn the possibility of her involvement in an prospective, earlier version of the movie. According to an article published in a 1957 magazine, the matador was friends with Lee's third husband, Dewey Martin, and even dedicated a bull to her. One year later, she composed a number entitled "The Walk To The Ring (Theme For Carlos)." I have not heard it, and cannot categorically assert that the "Carlos" in question was Arruza -- but I'm assuming such to be the case. Because the song identifies itself as a theme, I am left to wonder if it was conceived for a prospective movie -- and if such hypothetical movie could have been an early, pre-production version of this 1971 documentary.


XIII. SHARKY'S MACHINE




Artwork Shown:

1. Title: The Soundtrack Music From Burt Reynolds Sharky's Machine / Format: LP / Label: Warner Brothers / Cat. Num.: Bsk 3653 / Rel. Year: 1981 / Note: For this movie's soundtrack, Burt Reynolds and company hired a constellation of jazz and pop stars. Peggy Lee was enlisted to sing a number entitled "Let's Keep Dancing."

2. Title: Sharky's Machine / Note: movie poster.

3 - 5. Title: Sharky's Machine / Format: VHS & DVD / Label: Warner Home Video / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: 1994 (VHS) & 1998 (DVD) / Note: Image #5 shows the most commonly found DVD. The VHS counterpart, not shown here, bears the same front cover. I am less certain about the identity of the items seen in images #3 and #4. Both are described online as DVDs, without any further details. (Are they earlier or later editions of the 1998 DVD? Domestic or foreign? Could one or both images show just a deluxe box, which would have housed the DVD and its DVD case?)





6. Title: Sharky's Machine / Format: CED / Label: Warner Brothers - RCA / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: possibly 1981; no later than 1986 / Note: This item is a so-called videodisc or capacitance electronic disc, which requires its own videodisc machine to play. (This video technology competed with laser discs, and lost the battle. By 1987, CEDs were not being manufactured any longer.)

7. Title: Sharky's Machine / Format: VHS / Label: Warner's Orion / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: 1982

8. Title: Sharky's Machine / Format: VHS / Label: Warner's Orion / Cat. Num.: unknown / Rel. Year: unknown / Note: Apparently a reprint of item #7, with minor differences in the cover's design (color, picture size).





Artwork Shown:

9. Title: Sharky's Machine / Format: VHS / Label: Warner Brothers / Cat. Num.: (Australia?) unknown / Rel. Year: unknown

10. Title: Sharky's Machine / Format: VHS / Label: Warner Brothers / Cat. Num.: (United Kingdom?) unknown / Rel. Year: unknown


General Note
Since I have not watched this flick, I can neither confirm nor deny that Lee's vocal "Let's Keep Dancing" is heard during the film itself. I have come across one movie viewer's report indicating that the vocal is heard, but that viewer's report struck me as vague and not entirely reliable.


XIV. MISCELLANEA, PART 1: PEGGY LEE LYRICS INSPIRED BY PRE-EXISTING MOVIE THEMES

General Note
For movies such as Johnny Guitar, About Mrs. Leslie, and Lady And The Tramp, Peggy Lee was hired to write lyrics before the film was completed. In other instances, Lee was not part of the given film's hired songwriters, however, but instead acted independently. Usually at the request of (or otherwise with encouragement from) the film's composer, she would write lyrics to music featured in recently completed movies. (The best-known of such cases happened after Duke Ellington asked Lee to write lyrics to his theme for Anatomy Of A Murder.) Below is a chronologically arranged list of all the films for which Lee followed that modus operandi, or a similar one.






Artwork And General Commentary:

1. Title: The Bullfighter And The Lady / Note: Victor Young composed the theme for this 1951 Republic Pictures film. In the movie, the theme is heard both as an instrumental and in a version with Spanish lyrics. One year later, Peggy Lee wrote English lyrics for it. Renamed "How Strange," the Young - Lee number was then re-used as the theme of the 1953 Republic Pictures film The Woman They Almost Lynched (discussed in section II above).

2. Title: Anatomy Of A Murder / Note: Some time in 1959, Duke Ellington asked Peggy Lee to write a lyric set to the theme of his score for the Columbia film Anatomy Of A Murder, which premiered that same year. She came up with "I'm Gonna Go Fishin'," a piece which has been much recorded by other jazz artists. As far as I can ascertain, the Lee lyric was written after the movie had already been completed, and therefore was never intended for inclusion in the film itself. For more details, consult my notes under the session at which Lee recorded the song (July 26, 1960), in this page.

3. Title: Joy House (aka Les Felins) / Note: In 1964, Peggy Lee wrote a lyric to Lalo Schrifrin's theme for this MGM thriller. Lee's lyric is not heard in the movie. Since it was written on the same year in which the film premiered, perhaps it was slated for inclusion in an album soundtrack which never materialized. In any case, Lee herself recorded the song for Capitol Records on July 6, 1964, under the title "Just Call Me Lovebird." Capitol incorporated it to her album In The Name of Love.





Artwork And General Commentary:

4. Title: Walk, Don't Run / Note: With composer Quincy Jones, Peggy Lee wrote two numbers ("Stay With Me, Stay With Me" and "Happy Feet") for this 1966 Columbia Pictures film, which was Cary Grant's swan song. Lee was also slated to record them for the movie's soundtrack, but illness prevented her from doing so within the scheduled time. Hence Tony Clementi sings "Stay With Me, Stay With Me" in the movie soundtrack, and The Don Elliott Voices take care of "Happy feet." Later on, though, she did go on to record both numbers for Capitol Records (May 21, 1966).

5. Title: The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming / Note: Johnny Mandel asked Peggy Lee to write a lyric to the love theme from his score for this 1966 United Artists film. The result was "The Shining Sea," one of the better-known ballads from Lee's songwriting catalogue. Mandel was not commissioning the song for the soundtrack of the film (which was completed by then, and where this number is heard only as an instrumental), but for the United Artists 1966 LP The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming; Original Motion Picture Score. Irene Kral sings Peggy Lee's lyric in that album. Lee recorded her own version for Capitol Records on May 21, 1966.

6 & 7. Title: The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter / Note: Dave Grusin wrote the music for this 1968 Warner Brothers film. Lee wrote lyrics to the movie's theme that same year, but did not record them until 1974, when she and Grusin worked together on Let's Love, her one album for Atlantic Records. The intention with which the lyric was originally written remains unclear. As with the aforementioned Theme From Joy House, it could be that the song was originally planned for inclusion in an album soundtrack which never materialized.





Artwork And General Commentary:

8. Title: The Nickel Ride / Note: This entry shares various similarities with the previous one. The Nickel Ride is a Twenty Century Fox 1974 movie scored by Dave Grusin. Peggy Lee wrote a lyric for the movie's theme while she was working with Grusin at Atlantic Records. The number is not heard in the movie, and Lee's own recording of the (seemingly autobiographical) lyric remained unreleased until its appearance as a bonus track in the 2003 CD edition of the Atlantic album Let's Love from Rhino Handmade Records.

9 & 10. Title: Rider On The Rain (aka Le Passager de la Pluie) / Note: Peggy Lee wrote an English lyric to Francis Lai's main theme for this French - Italian film, which was produced by Greenwich Films and Medusa Produzione in 1970. I do not know if Lee had any connection to the film, in which her lyric is not heard. She did record the number herself, and included it in her 1970 Capitol album Make It With You.


XV. MISCELLANEA, PART 2: SELECTED MOVIES THAT HAVE FEATURED PEGGY LEE'S STUDIO RECORDINGS

General Note
Over the last few decades, Capitol and Decca have leased selected studio recordings by Peggy Lee for inclusion in movie soundtracks. Not surprisingly, the most commonly requested numbers have been her best-known hits (with "Fever" leading the pack) and her own hit compositions (primarily, "It's A Good Day"). Below, I am offering just a sample of films for which other Lee recordings were chosen, so as to give an idea of the variety of movie genres at hand.





Artwork Shown:

1. Title: Monkey Shines / Note: Peggy Lee's recordings of "There'll Be Another Spring," "Ain't We Got Fun," "The Glory Of Love" and "That's All" were incorporated to the soundtrack of this 1988 George Romero horror flick. "That's All" is prominently heard in the film's climactic scene, to particularly sardonic effect. An Orion picture.

2. Title: Gorillas In The Mist; The Story of Dian Fossey / Note: Peggy Lee's recordings of "September In The Rain," "It's A Good Day" and "Sugar" are listed as part of this 1988 Warner Brothers film's soundtrack.

3. Title: King Kong / Note: Peggy Lee Decca recording of "Bye, Bye, Blackbird" is used to memorable impact in a scene of this 2005 Universal Pictures film, which is one among Hollywood's various remakes of the 1930s classic tale.





Artwork Shown:

4. Title: American Beauty / Note: Written by Alan Ball and directed by Sam Mendes, the Oscars' Best Picture for the year 1999 brought long-overdue attention to Peggy Lee's excellent but long-neglected 1949 recording of "Bali Ha'i." A Dreamworks film.

5. Title: The Notorious Betty Page / Note: Along with Julie London and Jeri Southern, Peggy Lee is one of the three "luscious blondes" from the 1950s heard in the soundtrack of this 2005 movie about the raven-haired 1950s pinup girl. "Goody Goody" and "It's A Good Day" are the Lee recordings used. Co-produced by Killer Films and HBO.





Artwork Shown:

6. Title: After Hours / Note: Peggy Lee's recording of "Is That All There Is" was put to very effective use in the soundtrack of this 1985 Martin Scorsese film. To this day, some fans of Lee identify their viewing of this movie as the time in which they became either acquainted with or interested in the singer. Produced by Geffen Pictures and Warner Brothers.

7. Title: Va Savoir / Note: Peggy Lee's 1964 Capitol recording of "Senza Fine" was included in the soundtrack of this 2001 French romantic comedy, produced by Films du Losange. The inclusion in the soundtrack elicited in turn EMI's release of a promotional CD single, containing only that Lee recording.





Artwork Shown:

8. Title: About Adam / Note: Peggy Lee's recording of "Sisters" is part of the soundtrack of this 2005 BBC-produced romantic comedy.

9. Title: This World, Then The Fireworks / Note: Peggy Lee's rendition of "My Silent Love" is included in the Chet Baker-favored soundtrack of this 1997 Orion noir.





Artwork Shown:

10. Title: La Tête De Maman / Note: Peggy Lee's version of "You're So Right For Me" is one of the numbers heard in the soundtrack of this 2007 French coming-of-age film.

11. Title: The Yards / Note: This family crime drama was released by Miramax in 1999. Peggy Lee's recording of "I'm Beginning To See The Light" is part of its soundtrack.




Artwork Shown:

12. Title: Savages / Note: Peggy Lee's Decca recording of the children song "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard" graces the soundtrack of this siblings story, released by Fox Searchlight in 2007.

13. Title: The Two Jakes / Note: Renditions by Peggy Lee ("Don't Smoke In Bed") and Jo Stafford ("Haunted Heart") are heard in this 1990 Paramount sequel to the 1975 neo-noir classic Chinatown.





14. Title: Cafe Society / Note: Peggy Lee, June Christy, and Kurt Elling are heard in the soundtrack of this period drama (1950s) directed by Raymond de Felitta, who would go on to film the documentary 'Tis Autumn: The Search for Jackie Paris 10 years later. The song "Remind Me" is heard as recorded by Peggy Lee and also as performed by some of the movie's actors.

15. Title: Bugsy / Note: Peggy Lee's Capitol renditions of "Waiting For The Train To Come In" and "Why Don't You Do Right?" are part of the soundtrack of this 1991 film about gangster Bugsy Siegel. Capitol artists Johnny Mercer, Jo Stafford, and Margaret Whiting are among the other acts whose recordings grace the film's soundtrack.


XVI. MISCELLANEA, PART 3: SELECT TV SHOWS THAT HAVE FEATURED PEGGY LEE'S STUDIO RECORDINGS

General Note
Over the last few decades, Capitol and Decca have leased selected studio recordings by Peggy Lee for inclusion in TV soundtracks. Below, I have listed only the two most worthwhile entries in this category.





Artwork Shown:

1-3. Title: Bernard And Doris / Note: Written by Hugh Costello, produced by Mark Kassen and directed by Bob Babalan, this noteworthy 2006 HBO TV movie features a well-integrated all-Peggy Lee soundtrack. The film popularized "I Love The Way You're Breaking My Heart," a very obscure 1951 Peggy Lee recording that had remained unreleased until 2000. That number is heard in two versions, one by Lee and another by stars Susan Sarandon and Ralph Fiennes. Sarandon also sings "All I Need Is You," a relatively obscure number that Lee recorded in 1941, when she was the vocalist of The Benny Goodman Orchestra. "Somebody Nobody Loves" and "The Best Is Yet To Come" are the other two songs heard during the film, both in Peggy Lee's voice. The movie's real-life story centers on the relationship between wealthy socialite Doris Duke and her butler Bernard Lafferty, a recovering alcoholic who had previously left Peggy Lee's employ in order to enter a rehabilitation center.





Artwork Shown:

4-12. Title: Six Feet Under / Note: During the 7 seasons of Alan Ball's arresting HBO series Six Feet Under (2001-2005), Peggy Lee's voice was heard in 7 episodes. "I Love Being Here With You" was featured in the pilot. That scene from the pilot was partially reprised in the second episode from that same season, and also in the first episode of the second season. "Things Are Swingin' " was also played during the first season's second episode, and "Everything's Moving Too Fast" during the twelfth. Two more Lee recordings were used: "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town" (third season's first episode, broadcast in 2003) and "Take A Little Time To Smile" (fourth season's ninth episode, broadcast in 2004). Furthermore, "I Love Being Here With You" was included in the 2002 Universal CD Six Feet Under; Music From The HBO Original Series (#440 017 031 2).