Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
Chesterfield Supper Club
(On The Radio, Part III)
by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Mar 17, 2017




Chesterfield Supper Club

The Chesterfield Supper Club was an NBC daily show (weekends excepted) that made its debut on Monday, December 11, 1944.   East Coast native Perry Como remained the only host of the 15-minute-long program until the show's first anniversary: on Tuesday, December 11, 1945, Los Angeles resident Jo Stafford took over Tuesdays and Thursdays.  During the first half of 1946, both hosts broadcasted from New York at 7:00 p.m..  (For much of 1945 and the first half of 1946, the songstress stayed in the Big Apple, though making arrangements to occasionally travel back home.)  Stafford had actually been re-hired (rather than merely hired) by the show's sponsor:  she had previously co-hosted another Chesterfield radio series.  As a matter of fact, The Supper Club was successor to two earlier Chesterfield incarnations, one of them a long running edition hosted by Fred Waring (Chesterfield Time, 1939-1944), the other a summer edition led by Johnny Mercer in the company of Miss Stafford (Chesterfield Music Shop, 1944, though the initial sponsor was not Chesterfield).  

On September 30, 1948, another singer from the Hollywood area joined the show's roster of hosts:  Peggy Lee.  She took over Thursdays, while Jo Stafford kept Tuesdays and Perry Como continued to host on the other three days of the workweek.  As will be shown below, the new permanent hostess was no stranger to the program:  Lee had actually appeared in ten earlier episodes (March 26, 1946 - June 1, 1948), half of which had featured her as a guest. The other half had granted the status of substitute hostess.  In such hosting appearances, Peggy Lee had sometimes replaced Como, and sometimes Stafford, at times when either of the permanent hosts had been momentarily unavailable. 

Though Peggy Lee was by no means the only artist that the show's runners enlisted in a guest-hosting capacity, she certainly was the only one who earned a permanent hosting contract in 1948. Lee seems to have been under consideration for the position since 1946, when Stafford was wavering on the notion of coming back to the program. "Whether or not Jo Stafford continues with the Chesterfield Supper Club," the trade periodical Variety revealed in September of that year, "may depend on the decision to keep the program in New York or move to the Coast. Miss Stafford is reported anxious to move on to the Coast; if Supper Club continues its N. Y.-origination, she may check out. Peggy Lee, who has frequently guested on the program, is considered a likely successor. Miss Lee's also slated to go into the new Bing Crosby disk show for Philco." Fortunately, Chesterfield granted Stafford's wish to move her edition of the program to Hollywood, beginning with her anniversary episode on Tuesday, December 11, 1946 and remaining at the new location for its duration -- i.e., until 1949. Meanwhile, Lee continued to guest on various radio series and acquired further hosting experience as well. She co-hosted two 1947 summer shows, Rhapsody In Rhythm and The Summer Electric Hour.  Thus, with her incorporation to The Chesterfield Supper Club in 1948, she was moving on to her third -- and, up to that point, most substantial -- job as a radio hostess. (Incidentally, her contract with ABC's The Chesterfield Supper Club still allowed her to serve as a semi-regular of NBC's Philco Radio Time, the latter hosted by her pal, Bing Crosby.)

For the entire duration of Peggy Lee's tenure at the Club (1948-1949), Tom Reddy served as her announcer, Robert “Bob" Packham as the show's director, and Joe Kay as its engineer.  Fred Heider was the program's writer, Marge Moline his so-called script girl.  As previously mentioned, Lee's episodes ran on Tuesdays.  Every Tuesday, Mrs. Barbour was naturally accompanied by her husband Dave, just like each Tuesday fellow clubber Miss Jo Stafford was being backed by Paul Weston, the man with whom she had been romantically involved since 1945. (Stafford and Weston would finally get married in 1952, and would stay married until his passing away 44 years later.  Weston had been an active participant of the Supper Club since around the second anniversary of the show, on Tuesday, December 10, 1946, when the future Mrs. Weston began to regularly do her Chesterfield episodes from Hollywood.  Before that date, Jo Stafford and Perry Como had been sharing the services of Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra -- who had succeeded the series' very first, pre-Stafford ensemble, The Ted Steele Orchestra.  Como would continue to work with Shaffer until the start of the 1948-1949 season, at which time Mitchel Ayres And His Orchestra took over.)  Peggy Lee's edition of the Supper Club originated in Hollywood, too.  Presumably due to the time difference between coasts, the majority of Lee's shows aired at 5:00 p.m., while the East Coast edition of her shows was most frequently broadcast at 9:00 p.m.  

Among the features that distinguished Peggy Lee's installments from those of the other hosts was a segment named Smoke Dream.  It consisted of recitation set to music.  The recited texts had an aphoristic or poetic bent, and were presented to the audience as food for thought.  The segment's name had been clearly inspired by The Chesterfield Super Club's theme song ("Smoke Dreams"), even if the segment itself made no use of the tune.  A regular fixture of the early episodes of Lee's show (and probably her own concept or contribution to the program's format), Smoke Dream was eventually dropped, its time allotted to additional musical performances.  (The other hosts had their own special features as well -- e.g., folk music and phone contests in Stafford's case, reading of poetry in the case of Sammy Kaye's summer-only editions.)

Like the other hosts, Peggy Lee also had guests.   The earliest Lee episodes counted with the royal presence of Nat King Cole, accompanied by the other members of his trio.  Temporarily becoming a regular fixture, Cole kept Lee company for five consecutive episodes.  Later on, Frankie Laine was similarly hired as a resident guest of sorts, turning up in a dozen episodes. Nearly all the other acts who visited Lee's edition of the show were of the male persuasion as well.  The sole exception was  Capitol labelmate Nellie Lutcher, with whom Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour might have been on friendly terms.  (In the 1950s, after the Barbours' divorce, Barbour would lead a Lutcher session in which one of Lee's rarer compositions was waxed.)   In addition to Lutcher and Cole, a third African-American act who appeared on the show was The Mills Brothers, who were not affiliated with Capitol Records.

Among the more noticeable traits of the Chesterfield Supper Club (in all its editions -- Lee's, Stafford's, Como's, and later ones) was the repetition of some songs over multiple episodes.  Chart popularity and instigation from sponsors or songpluggers might have motivated the hosts' frequent return to certain tunes, but other reasons are similarly plausible. Some of the songs, including two or three of Peggy Lee's own compositions, were allegedly reprised at the request of listeners, or even at the stated wishes of Lee herself.




   
Both Stafford and Lee stayed with the show until the end of the 1948-1949 season.  Stafford's goodbye episode took place on Tuesday, June 7, Lee's on Thursday, June 9, 1949.  The reason for the termination of their respective Supper Club editions is not known to me, but I can certainly speculate.  Most likely, NBC and Chesterfield had set their sights on transitioning from radio to television. (As will be elaborated in the next paragraph, simulcasts had been happening since late 1948.) At that time (i.e., late 1940s), televised programming originated in New York only.  Being in the right location at the right time, Perry Como would have become the most immediate beneficiary of the network's and the sponsor's plans.  Besides, Como clearly ranked first among all the personalities who hosted or worked regularly on the show: he was not only the original host of the series but also an incontestably popular act on his own.  It is also possible that the show's popularity and financial resources were in decline -- a  situation that many radio staples faced in the late 1940s.  During this period, the total number of episodes apparently dwindled from five to one or two a week — though, on the other hand, they would be not only televised but also expanded from 15 to 30 minutes. In any case, I am inclined to think that the Supper Club's production team made the decision to fully concentrate on the primary, New York-located operations, with Como at the helm, thus shutting down its Hollywood branch in the process.  Como did become the Club's sole host on September 8, 1949, staying for the duration of the season, which turned out to be the show's final one on the radio. 

The Chesterfield Supper Club had actually made its TV debut on Friday, December 24, 1948 (i.e., before Lee's and Stafford's departures), with an episode that NBC had simulcast on radio and television as part of a three-Friday trial period.  The experiment had proven successful enough for the network: after the trial, NBC kept on telecasting the Friday episodes until the end of the season. According to Tim Brooks and Earle F. Marsh in their Complete Directory To Prime Time Network And Cable TV Shows, those early telecasts "made few concessions to the new medium.  Cameras were simply brought into the radio studio and Como and his guests were seen in front of a radio microphone, with scripts and music stands in full view.  In succeeding months this was gradually modified, with simple backdrops and props being added."

Although there were no longer three of them per week, Como's editions of The Chesterfield Supper Club continued to air on radio and television until the end of the 1949-1950 season, in mid-June.  (The number of episodes was either one or two per week, if the vague information at hand is accurate.)  Afterwards, Perry Como left the Club, opting instead for a three-times-a-week 15-minute Chesterfield-sponsored TV series under his own name, on CBS.  The Supper Club thus lasted only one more season after the departures of Jo Stafford and Peggy Lee. (Various online reports state that, after a four-year-long hiatus, this radio show went back on the air for one final season, with Jo Stafford as its hostess.  The source of most of these reports is probably Donald Garza's interesting text Jo Stafford -- 226 Success Facts You Need To Know.  Nevertheless, I have found no actual evidence for a 1954-1955 Stafford edition of The Chesterfield Supper Club.  I am thus wondering if the information is erroneous -- a conflation of the NBC radio edition of The Chesterfied Supper Club hosted by Stafford in the 1940s with the CBS TV series The Jo Stafford Show, which aired from 1954 to 1955 and was sponsored by the Gold Seal Company.)
 
Chesterfield did create another edition of its show, though one meant just for the TV medium.  Scheduled for the 1951-1952 season, Chesterfield Sound Off Time had Fred Allen and Bob Hope as its main rotating hosts.  It was not a success.  Then there was The Perry Como Chesterfield Show, which certainly was successful.   Essentially a televised continuation of Como's edition of the Supper Club, it employed most of the same cast and, naturally,  advertised for the same sponsor.  Incidentally, Chesterfield's then-current slogan was heavily used in both Como's program and a contemporaneous show called Sound Off For Chesterfield.

As for the two former hostesses of The Chesterfield Supper Club, both received various offers to host other radio shows of note.  In 1949, the songstresses were separately approached to join Campbell Soup's Club 15, a well-known program that had patterned itself after the Club and which was, conceptually, its competitor.  Both singers rejected the offer at that time.  However, Stafford ended joining the show in 1950, after a larger salary was offered as an incentive.

Meanwhile, Peggy Lee was spent much of the 1949-1950 radio season on the road, per the arrangements that had been made for her by Carlos Gastel (a close personal friend of Dave Barbour, and the couple's manager).  Lee still scored a fair share of guest appearances on the airwaves of Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York during these two years. She would go on to resume hosting duties in 1951, just a couple of months after her divorce and change of management.  That year, Lee acquired her own summer program on CBS radio, and in 1952 she hosted another CBS show under her name for the full year.  (From 1949 to 1952, Lee naturally did recording work for Capitol as well.) 

Like Lee's, the post-Supper Club schedule of Jo Stafford was reserved for a concert tour.  In Stafford's case, the tour took her from a Michigan State Fair in September to New York's Paramount in November of 1949.  (This road trip had actually been slated to start off in July at the Chicago Theater but, for reasons unknown to me, it wounded up being postponed until September 5.  Stafford enjoyed neither the road nor live performing.*)

After those three months, and unlike Lee, Jo Stafford concentrated on the airwaves. She was never lacking for radio work during the late 1940s and early 1950s.  Since November 11, 1948, the senior songstress of The Chesterfield Supper Club had been concurrently hosting her own  weekly  (Thursdays) Jo Stafford Show on ABC, sponsored by the Revere Camera Company, which lasted one season.   Next, in addition to appearing as the featured vocalist of Club 15 on Tuesdays and Thursdays from May 28, 1950 onwards (with Wednesdays added to her schedule in 1951), Stafford co-hosted The Carnation Contented Hour on Sundays, between 1949 and 1951.  Still further, the early 1950s found Stafford recording weekly broadcasts for both the Voice of America and Radio Luxembourg, thereby making her name known across most of the Old Continent's radio audience.  And her Jo Stafford Show would be revived for half a season in 1953.

*[Essentially a marginal side note placed within brackets, the present remarks elaborate on Stafford's views about live appearances.  Stafford disliked concert engagements for a variety of reasons, including the prospect of having to stay away from home for a long period of time, insecurity over her appearance -- during the early 1940s, her weight, in particular -- and reticence over adopting an assertive or vivacious persona for the sake of engaging audiences.  Moreover, her extensive pre-1943 background as a group singer had probably conditioned her to prefer to not have the spotlight shine directly on her.  A sense of modesty could have played a role, too.  “I'm basically a singer, period, and I think I’m really lousy up in front of an audience,” a wise Stafford conclusively told The New Yorker's Nancy Franklin in 1996. “It’s just not me.”

Just about every report that I have read on his matter claims that her only nightclub engagement was in 1945 at La Martinique in New York. ("Nightclub" is the operative word here, since we know of other concert work.  Besides the aforementioned tour in 1949, she did a very well-received engagement at the London Palladium in 1952, during her honeymoon days with Weston).  Many of the reports also claim that the Martinique gig lasted six months, which strikes me as astounding.  Further research is leading me to believe that, far from a half-a-year-long engagement, there were at least two different engagements at La Martinique:  one that began on Thursday, February 8, 1945 and a return gig to the venue in September of the same year.  Billboard reviewed both engagements, and naturally praised Stafford for both her singing ability and the quality of her voice.  "But she is stiff, sells poorly and makes no effort to reach the table-squatters," complained the reviewer who saw Stafford on the night of her debut.  When the same reviewer went to see her in September, he began by noting that she was "looking trimmer and smarter."  He welcomed the addition of rhythm tunes to her repertoire, but bemoaned her floor manner -- "Miss Stafford should lower the mike a little ... On selling, she is still weak in projecting to the penholders.  Possibly the room is not right for her, for all vocalizing  done in this spot seems to be robbed of color and vivacity.")]





Peggy Lee appeared in 47 episodes of The Chesterfield Supper Club, out of which 37 featured her as one of the series' two regular hostesses.  (As already mentioned, the remainder are split between five turns as a substitute host, and five guest visits.)  From these 47 episodes, there is a total of 151 Peggy Lee musical performances.  (One additional episode, with Stan Jones as her guest, might have been transcribed yet left unaired. It would have been one of the few Peggy Lee episodes to be transcribed, most of them aired "live.") For further specifics, consult the Indexes at the bottom of this page.

Photos above: Chesterfield Supper Club ads can be seen in all but the fourth of these seven images. Directly above, the fifth and seventh predate Peggy Lee's full incorporation to the club, and show not only the host but also the rest of the so-called family of singers, conductors, and announcers. The sixth ad announces Lee's integration, and the first shows her as a full established hostess, next to her "senior siblings." The fourth picture presents the sheet music for "Smoke Dreams," the club's theme. It was recorded by some members of the family, including Stafford, and sung by Peggy Lee during one of her hosting episodes (October 7, 1948).


Date: March 26, 1946
Location: Manhattan, New York

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) You Was Right, Baby - 2:00(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Waiting For The Train To Come In - 2:00(Martin Block, Sunny Skylar)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Don't Know Enough About You - 3:14(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc282 — Supper Club   (1946)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD2017 — The Supper Club   

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Hostess
Peggy Lee appears in this episode as a substitute hostess for Jo Stafford. Announcer Martin Block opens the show with these words: "The Chesterfield Supper Club with Peggy Lee pinch-hitting for Jo Stafford, the Chesterfield Orchestra and a whole week of star entertainment." Her entrance happens while Block and orchestra leader Lloyd Shaffer are bantering. Lee herself is actually the subject of the banter, which stresses that she is both a songwriter and an attractive female. "Pardon me, fellers," Lee interjects, "but Jo Stafford told me to drop in tonight. My name's Peggy Lee."

Previous installments of The Chesterfield Supper Club had set the stage for Lee's arrival. On the preceding episode (Monday, March 25), hosted by Perry Como, his announcer had closed the program with the following words: "see you tomorrow night at the Chesterfield Supper Club for songs by Peggy Lee. And for cigarettes, buy Chesterfield." Similarly, on Stafford's last show (Thursday, March 21), listeners had heard her say that she was "leaving for the coast" and that "a friend of mine -- a swell gal and a swell singer -- has promised to pitch for me next Tuesday and Thursday ... The name's Peggy Lee." As shown below, Lee indeed hosts this week's Thursday edition of the show as well.

2. Other Performers
In addition to Peggy Lee, the episode features series regulars Helen Carroll And The Satisfiers, who sing the novelty "I've Got A Walkie-Talkie."


Performances

1. "You Was Right, Baby"
This radio performance of "You Was Right, Baby" sports various differences from Lee's Capitol recording. Among them are some added lyrics and a few modified lines. Most notably: ""But hold on, baby / I'm on my way back," and "I said, honey, that's a big fat lie." Also different from the commercial recording is the fact that no male chorus is heard. (Some of Lee's other radio versions of "You Was Right, Baby" drop the chorus, too, and use one or both of the line variants quoted.)


Songwriters

1. Martin Block
Jo Stafford's regular announcer, Martin Block, happened to be one of the composers of the song "Waitin' For The Train To Come In," with which Peggy Lee had had a hit, and which she sings in this episode. Stafford had also sung it in her shows. Of course, Block's authorship is pointed out during the episode's banter.


Dating And Location

This Tuesday episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club was broadcast at its regular time: 7:00 p.m. for the East Coast and 11:00 p.m. for the West Coast. At this point in time, every episode of the show was beamed from New York, and thus required Hollywood resident Jo Stafford to either stay in or travel to the Big Apple. For the most part, Stafford stayed in New York, though occasionally she travelled back home to vacation and take care of business affairs. This was one of such times. As reported by the magazine Capitol News, "Jo [will be] for a week away from Chesterfield while recording for Capitol and visiting family." Since Peggy Lee resided in Los Angeles as well, her acquiescence to hosting The Chesterfield Supper Club meant that she too had to travel to New York. (On December 10, 1946, at the first anniversary of Stafford's edition of the show, a relocation to Hollywood took place. Lee's own edition, to be discussed later in this page, was beamed from Hollywood as well.)


Peggy Lee's Memories

In her autobiography, Peggy Lee makes reference to the difficulties that she faced shortly before the broadcasting of this show: "I went back East to substitute for Jo Stafford on the Chesterfield Supper Club radio show. When I arrived in New York, I had such a stomach flu I couldn't even drink water. [My manager] Carlos [Gastel] had to sit in my suite, because I couldn't be alone. On the day of the show, I couldn't get out of bed. Carlos rang Dr. Palmer, who came over, took a look at me and said, You can't make it. It would be unwise of you to even try. I wasn't convinced. How could I fly all the way from California -- it was a very big deal in the days of prop planes -- and not do this show? I called [Christian Science founder and spiritual advisor] Ernest Holmes in Los Angeles and explained my predicament. Just lie back down and rest for a minute, he said, then told me to affirm the omnipresence of God, and the omniscience of God, who knows what needs to be done. Affirm, too, His omnipotence, so nothing is impossible to God. Finally, Ernest stressed the value of being grateful and of giving thanks. It worked, I got well enough and went on for Jo Stafford and did the show."


Photos

Capitol artists Jo Stafford and Johnny Johnston are pictured in the sheet music of "Waiting For The Train To Come In." But neither Johnston nor Stafford turned the tune into the hit. Their Capitol labelmate Peggy Lee was the one who did the feat, taking the 1945 composition to the top 4 of the music charts.

One of the songwriters, Martin Block, was a radio personality who served as announcer for both Stafford's Chesterfield Supper Club and Johnston's self-titled radio show on WNEW. (Johnston had also hosted the Chesterfield Supper Club for an extended period, from July 20 to the end of August 1945. Como had had to spend that month and a half in California and, perhaps through Block's recommendation, Johnston had been enrolled as the temporary replacement.)

Obviously a far-reaching figure in the world of radio, Martin Block (seen in the second photo below) inspired Walter Winchell's invention of the term disc jockey. Among Block's many accomplishments was his creation of the Chesterfield slogan "ABC-Always Buy Chesterfield" (heard in every episode listed herein) and his hosting of WNEW's popular show Make Believe Ballroom from its inception in 1935 until 1954.




Date: March 28, 1946
Location: Manhattan, New York

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Can See It Your Way, Baby - 2:25(Inez James, Sidney Miller)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I'm Glad I Waited For You - 2:27(Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne)
Both titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc284 — Supper Club   (1946)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD2017 — The Supper Club   

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Thursday Hostess
Peggy Lee appears in this episode not as a guest but as a temporary hostess. She was replacing Jo Stafford, who regularly hosted the Tuesdays and Thursdays editions of the New York-based Chesterfield Supper Club, and whose absence was vaguely attributed to her need to be back at her home on the East Coast for the week. Additional details about this hosting gig can be found in the notes under the preceding session.

2. Other Performers
In addition to Peggy Lee, the other singing act heard during this installment of the show is Helen Carroll And The Satisfiers. They sing "Them There Eyes."

3. Dick and Gene Wesson
As was customary every Thursday during this season of Chesterfield's Supper Club, the comedic banter of brothers Dick and Gene Wesson filled a portion of the 15-minute program.

4. Peggy Lee, Departing Hostess
Near the end of this episode, Martin Block and Peggy Lee utter the lines of dialogue quoted below.
Block: "Well, Peggy, in about five hours you'll be boarding that TWA Constellation and heading West ... [W]e all appreciate your pinch-hitting for Jo this week. You did a swell job."
Lee: "Thanks, Martin. I enjoyed working with all of you and it was a privilege to help Jo out."
Block: "Thanks again for your help and I'll be seein' you."
The audience then applauds.

In the episode of the Supper Club that was broadcast on Tuesday, April 2, 1946, returning hostess Jo Stafford and announcer Martin Block gracefully acknowledge Peggy Lee's visit the previous week.
Block: "But, seriously, Jo, Peggy did a grand job."
Stafford: "I know. I heard the shows and she was swell. And if I may, I'd like to say thanks a lot, Peggy, for filling in last week. If you ever need a pinch-hitter, don't forget my number."

[Nota bene: Block's reference to TWA was not casual, nor was it an isolated mention. Jo Stafford's flight back to New York was also said to have been on TWA; furthermore, Stafford would make a point of telling the audience how fast it was. Besides serving as promotion for the airline, these mentions were being made as part of the publicity for the Club's much vaunted April 5, 1946 episode, during which Perry Como broadcast his show literally on the air -- from a TWA Constellation plane, said to be flying 20,000 feet over New York. Stafford was among those accompanying Como while he was up in (and on) the air. The flight was also portrayed as a farewell party to Como, who was temporarily going away to Hollywood, for the purpose of filming a picture. Starting the following week, the two hosts actually shifted schedules: Stafford took over Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays in New York, while Como broadcast on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even more notably, the Tuesday and Thursdays shows were broadcast from Hollywood for the first time. After the conclusion of Como's filming schedule, Tuesdays and Thursday were re-assigned to Stafford, and all the shows were again beamed from New York. But notice that Como informally debuted the Hollywood edition of the show, even if at that point in time such an edition was about eight months away from becoming a regular, permanent event.]


Dating

This episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club was broadcast at 7:00 p.m. for the East Coast, and redone at 11:00 p.m. for the West Coast. Those were the regular times for Stafford's episodes on Thursdays.


Photo

Jo Stafford and Peggy Lee -- friends, Capitol recording artists, and hostesses of The Chesterfield Supper Club -- strike singing poses while sitting on twin pianos. See also companion photo, a couple of sessions below (August 6, 1946).




Date: May 7, 1946
Location: Hollywood, Los Angeles

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantGuest Spot (NBC) I Don't Know Enough About You(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc310 — Supper Club   (1946)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 824 — [Perry Como] At The Supper Club   (2010)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD2020 — The Supper Club   

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Not Just A Guest
Although Peggy Lee officially appears in this episode as Perry Como's guest, the writer of the script makes a point of calling her "a friend" of the show. Additionally, Lee is heard saying that "this sure is old home, Perry." Como replies: "we can't call you a guest, Peggy, remembering how you stepped in for Jo Stafford not so long ago."


Dating

This Tuesday episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club was broadcast during a temporary shift in the schedule of the show's two hosts. As previously mentioned, Perry Como had left New York and gone to do a movie in Hollywood. Probably in an attempt at accommodating his busy movie schedule, Chesterfield had given the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday slots to Stafford, in New York. Meanwhile, from Hollywood, Como took over Tuesdays and Thursdays. This shift had become effective on Monday, April 8, 1946, and would continue for the duration of his movie venture.


Date: August 6, 1946
Location: Manhattan, New York

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant? Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Why Don't You Do Right?(Joe McCoy)
b. Not Extant? Peggy Lee Show (NBC) A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues(Dick Charles, Lawrence W. Markes, Jr.)
c. Not Extant? Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I Don't Know Enough About You(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Hostess
With Jo Stafford again unavailable to host her show (this time so that she could reportedly enjoy a vacation), Peggy Lee filled the Tuesday and Thursday hosting spots of The Chesterfield Supper Club as she had done before. In the East coast, this episode was heard at 7:00 p.m.


Performances

1. Preface To "I Don't Know Enough About You"
Peggy Lee: "You know, folks, there's a little tune my family likes called I Don't Know Enough About You."
Martin Block: "And well they might ... because the words are by wife Peggy Lee ... the music by husband Dave Barbour ..."
Lee: "And according to baby daughter Nicki, it's her favorite melody ..."
Block: "To tell you the truth, Peggy, it's a favorite around the Supper Club, too! How's about singing the 'ballad of the Barbours' ... the Dave Barbours, that is!"


Photo

Jo Stafford and Peggy Lee, hostesses of The Chesterfield Supper Club's Hollywood editions, in a publicity shot. (A companion shot can be seen above, under the broadcast dated March 28.) During the summer and fall of 1948, this particular shot made the rounds in the music magazine industry. Most notably, Downbeat chose it for the front cover of its June 30, 1948 issue.

Peggy Lee's first official episode as a Chesterfield hostess was broadcast about three months later, on September 30, 1948. (This subject matter will naturally be discussed in more detail once this page reaches that date). On the next day, Lee and Stafford made a joint guest appearance on the fall season's opening episode of The Jimmy Durante Show. (I have not listened to that episode, and my data about it is sparse. There is a bit of uncertainty about the Durante connection. It is alternatively possible that Durante's show premiered on October 8, with Lee and Stafford simply appearing sans the comedian one week earlier, doing a special in his show's planned slot.)

Obviously, these publicity shots were taken quite a few weeks before the airing of the September and October episodes. The shots might have been intended to serve -- along with the joint guest appearance in Durante's program -- as promotion for the Hollywood editions of The Chesterfield Supper Club.





Date: August 8, 1946
Location: Manhattan, New York

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Baby, You Can Count On Me(Freddie Stewart)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Linger In My Arms A Little Longer(Herb Magidson)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Come Rain Or Come Shine(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Thursday Hostess
With Jo Stafford gone on vacation, Peggy Lee served as hostess of The Chesterfield Supper Club during Stafford's two regular broadcasts for the week of August 5-9, 1946. This so-called vacation was actually quite a few weeks long. (It was essentially, a summer vacation, which regular-season hosts such as Como and Stafford were expected to take.) Peggy Lee was but the last of various acts to successively fill in for Ms. Stafford. Mrs. Barbour had been preceded by Ella Logan, Connee Boswell, Vivian Blaine, Rise Stevens, Martha Tilton, and Elliott Lawrence. All of them would be properly thanked by Stafford upon her return, on Tuesday, August 13, 1946.


Personnel

1. Dave Barbour
The script for this particular episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club makes amply clear that Dave Barbour is present as an active player. Right before the second of Lee's three selections, the show's orchestra leader 'inviting' Barbour to play. The exchange is quoted immediately below.
Lloyd Shaffer: "Before you begin, Peggy, tell me, isn't that your husband, Dave Barbour, over there at one of the tables?"
Peggy Lee: "Yep! That's my boy."
Shaffer: "Well, let's get him up here ... Folks, meet Dave Barbour!"
(Applause)
Shaffer: "Dave, how about sittin' in with my boys and doin' some guitar strummin' like you do on records with Peggy?"
Dave Barbour: "Glad to, Lloyd. Always happy to help this little lady out."
Martin Block: "Well, they're settin' up a special stool for you over there ... Go to it, Dave ... Folks, it's Mr. and Mrs Dave Barbour and Linger In Your Arms A Little Longer, Baby."

Lee's last selection for the episode is also preceded by a credit to Barbour.
Block: "Say, Peggy, do you think you can persuade the 'old man' to join you for another tune?"
Lee: "Hmmm ... Maybe ... Whadda you say, Dave?"
Barbour: "I say come rain come shine!"
Lee: "He said it ... and I'm glad!"
Barbour: "Shall we, Mrs. Barbour?"
Lee: "Let's , Mr. Barbour!"


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, a reel copy from the NBC Radio Collection survives at the Library of Congress (shelf no. RWA 8217 A4).


Photo

A Lloyd Shaffer showcase. Shaffer probably was the best-known of all the conductors of the Chesterfield Supper Club. He is with Perry Como in the first photograph, with Jo Stafford and Martin Block in the last one. Shaffer served as Stafford's conductor until December of 1946, when the duty was re-assigned to the man whom she would eventually marry, Paul Weston. Shaffer continued to conduct the Perry Como episodes until the end of the 1947-1948 season. Maestro Shaffer can also be seen conducting for Peggy Lee and Peggy Como below, under the session dated April 22, 1948.





Guess Who's Not Coming For Supper: A Peggy Lee Non-Club Appearance

On the August 22, 1946 episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club, we hear the following words from Jo Stafford: "Hi, folks ... and welcome to our Chesterfield get-together. We've got Bob Crosby, the head man of the Bob Cats at the Club tonight ... and we've also got a tune that was put together by two folks who paid us a visit not long ago ... my good friends, Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour. It's their I Don't Know About You!"

I have yet to locate and listen to this August 22, 1946 episode; my familiarity with it relies entirely on my reading of its script. Stafford's above-quoted words suggest to me that Bob Crosby was her only guest. Since neither Lee nor Barbour have any lines of script, I do not believe that they were actually present.

I originally (and somewhat thoughtlessly) assumed Stafford's above-quoted wording to mean that Lee's recording of "I Don't Know About You" was about to be played (or, if not the commercial recording, then an acetate from one of her previous performances in the Chesterfield Supper Club). Fellow researcher and friend Adrian Daff has set me straight on this point, promptly making me realize that the wording is much more likely to have preceded Stafford's own singing of "I Don't Know Enough About You" during this episode.

Since "I Don't Know About You" had become a top ten hit for Peggy Lee during the recent summer, Stafford might have been answering to requests or expectations that she would cover it in her radio show. Lee herself had sung this number in The Chesterfield Supper Club earlier in the month (August 6, 1946), when she had substituted for Stafford. (On the matter of Lee songs being requested in the show, see also the Patter quoted under session dated February 12, 1948.) The fact that the two singers were on friendly terms might have also contributed to the playing of a Lee record on a Stafford show.

(Below: a shot of Peggy Lee with a Capitol representative who is holding a 78-rpm disc -- possibly, Jo Stafford's Capitol single "Cindy/I've Never Forgotten." Also provided below, as a "visual bonus," is a photo of the date at which the songs from that single were recorded. Stafford is the only female in sight; Nat King Cole is at the piano.)




Date: September 16, 1946
Location: Manhattan, New York

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Guest Spot (NBC) Linger In My Arms A Little Longer(Herb Magidson)
unissued

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Guest
While in New York for the purpose of doing a series of concert appearances, Peggy Lee also made a visit to this Monday episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club, serving as Perry Como's guest. During the broadcast, Como made quick allusion to her engagement at the Paramount Theatre.


Photo

In this somewhat blurry and small photo, a script is being inspected by Peggy Lee, Perry Como, and The Modernaires' Paula Kelly. Date, location, and other specifics unknown. The likeliest scenario is a rehearsal before one of Lee's guests appearances in Como's edition of The Chesterfield Supper Club. If so, either of Lee's two visits in September 1946 would be logical candidates for the day in which the photo was taken.



Date: September 20, 1946
Location: Manhatan, New York

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Baby, You Can Count On Me(Freddie Stewart)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) You Was Right, Baby(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues(Dick Charles, Lawrence W. Markes, Jr.)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Hostess (And Adopted Daughter)
Once more, Peggy Lee appears in a 1946 episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club not as a guest but as a hostess. On this particular occasion, she substituted for Perry Como. Unlike all other previous occasions, this time the substitution had not been pre-announced. (At the end of the September 19 episode, announcer Martin Block had invited audiences to come in "tomorrow night for Perry Como's family party.") As quoted below, the script of this September 20 episode provides a mild, vague explanation for the change of plans.
Peggy Lee: "... I was very worried when I got a rush call to substitute for Perry, but I understand there's nothing wrong."
Martin Block: "Nothing that a day's rest won't fix, Peggy."

The script also continues to strengthen the notion -- brought out in previous scripts -- that Peggy Lee ranked as more than a guest. After Lee sings Baby, You Can Count On Me, the exchange noted below takes place.
Block: "We'll always count on you, Peggy Lee. You know, with the number of times you have graced the Chesterfield Supper Club, it seems to me it's about time we made you an adopted daughter on our Chesterfield family."
Lee: "Martin, that's a beautiful compliment."
Block: "A beautiful compliment - you even speak in ABC language, Peggy ... That settles it! From now on, you're our adopted daughter!"

2. Paula Kelly And The Modernaires
This episode marked the last of Paula Kelly And The Modernaires' temporary appearances on the show. They had been filling in for Helen Carroll And The Satisfiers, who were said to have been on vacation.


Patter

1. On Nicki Lee Foster
Block: "Well, Peggy, now that you're an adopted daughter of our Chesterfield family, how's your family?"
Lee: "Frankly, Martin, since I started this engagement of the Paramount Theatre, my daughter has become involved in a love affair."
Block: "Your daughter! Why, Nicki is only two and a half years old! Who is the man in the case?"
Lee: "It's Bob Evans, the ventriloquist on the bill with us at the Paramount."
Block: "Why, the cradle snatcher out to be ashamed of himself."
Lee: "But it isn't Bob. It's his dummy, Jerry O'Leary, whom Nicki's in love with ... When they call my dressing room from home, Nicki gets on the phone and insists on talking to Jerry ... So we have to call in Bob Evans to talk to her."
Block: "A backstage romance at the Paramount. Wait till [Walter] Winchell gets a hold of this ..."


Photo

An audience ticket for one of the 1946 broadcasts of Perry Como's Chesterfield Supper Club. One of Como's renditions that evening was "Seems Like Old Times" -- a brand new song back then. The guest star was soprano Helen Jepson, with whom Como did a duet version of "If I Loved You;" she also sang a solo version of "Zigeuner."




Date: February 12, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California

Paul Weston And His Orchestra (acc), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Guest Spot (NBC) Mañana(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
unissued

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Prodigal Daughter, Guests At Her Sister's Club
After a long absence from the Club that had adopted her as their daughter, Peggy Lee re-appears in this episode of the Chesterfield show, guesting under the auspices of "stepsister" Jo Stafford. (Lee had spent the previous year hosting two summer shows, and serving as the female singer on the regular seasons of two others -- i.e., Bing Crosby's and Jimmy Durante's. As this page will shortly show, 1948 would become the year in which Lee would officially join the Chesterfield Club's roster of hosts.)

2. Dave Barbour
See patter below.


Patter

1. Preface To "Mañana"
Jo Stafford: "It's a sort of a rule at the Club; if there's something new goin' around the country that you folks want to hear, we try and get it for you. For instance, you asked for Tex Williams and Smoke, Smoke, Smoke and for Red Ingle And His Natural Seven with Tim-tay-shun. We got 'em! ..... Well, lately we've had a lot of letters and we've heard a lot of talk about a song called Mañana and the wonderful way a certain gal sings it. Were running true to form, folks, 'cause here she is, my very good friend, Peggy Lee!" (Applause)
Peggy Lee: "Thank you, and hiya, Jo!"
Stafford: "Hi, Peg, glad you're with us!"
Lee: "Lookee here, will you. You really got things set up for me!"
Stafford: "Just wanta make you feel at home!"
Lee: "I see you've added three 'dyed-in-the-wool' bongo players to Paul's gang!"
Stafford: "Special for tonight. Three, count 'em!"
Lee: "And who's the good-looking guy behind the guitar?"
Stafford: "Another special for tonight: his name's Dave Barbour! I believe you married him!"
Lee: "That's right, I did! And besides that, I wrote Mañana with him!"
Stafford: "Well, folks, looks like we're entertainin' the Orson Welles of the music world. Let's have it, Peg. Peggy Lee and Mañana!" (Applause)


Date: April 22, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Como, Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Guest Spot (NBC) Nature Boy(Eden Ahbez)
b. Not Extant?Guest Spot (NBC) Laroo Laroo Lilli Bolero(Sylvia Dee, Sidney Lippman, Elizabeth Moore)
Both titles unissued.


Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Prodigal Daughter, Guests At Her Brother's Club
A couple of months after visiting the Jo Stafford edition of The Chesterfield Supper Club, Peggy Lee pays visit to Perry Como's edition of the Club. At the end of the episode, announcer Wendell Niles lets us know that she "can be heard on the Jimmy Durante show sponsored by the Rexall Drug Company." For more details on this matter, see notes under next episode.

2. Perry Como
3. The Starlighters
Perry Como and Peggy Lee sing together in the two above-listed versions of "Laroo Lilli Bolero," which was a chart hit for both of them. The other song ("Nature Boy") is a Lee solo.


Dating And Location

This Thursday episode of Como's show was broadcast from Hollywood. The original broadcast aired at 7:00 p.m., its reprise at 11:00 p.m. Perry Como had arrived in California on April 17, 1948, and would stay until July 14 for the express purpose of filming the movie Words And Music. During this filming period, Como and Stafford switched schedules. The male host was thus heard on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the hostess on the other days.


Patter

1. A Triangle: Perry Como, Bing Crosby, And Peggy Lee
Wendell Niles (the episode's announcer): "Say, Perry, here's a flower for your buttonhole. Here are the Chesterfields. And here ..."
Perry Como: "Wait a minute. Wait a minute, Wendell ... What's all this for?"
Niles: "For your date tonight!"
Como: "My date? Oh ... That's right ..."
Niles: "And the lady awaits without ..."
Como: "Well, let's not keep the lady awaiting without any longer. Supper Clubbers: Miss Peggy Mañana Lee."
(Applause)
Peggy Lee: "Well, Como, so you almost forgot our date. You know, Crosby would never do this to me ... And I have a message from him. He wants to make a date for golf with you. He said he'd like to pin your ears back!"
Como: "I got news for you, Peg. He can pin my ears back in a lot of ways. I think maybe ... But enough about Crosby. Let's talk about you. And I'd like to talk about you and the real reason you're here: a wonderful song I hear you do called Nature Boy."
(The orchestra and Lee proceed to perform the number.)

2. Preamble To "Laroo Lilli Bolero"
Niles: "Well, Perry, it's time to salute the disc jockeys of Louisville, Kentucky. And they have picked your Victor recording of Laroo Lilli Bolero."
Como: "Well, good, Wendell. We're very happy to do it for Allan Stephens, Jim Loundsbury, Bud Abbott, Jim Walton, and Bob Kay!"
Niles: "By the way, isn't that the same song Peggy Lee recorded?"
Como: "Yes, it is. And that's why tonight's bargain night at the Supper Club -- because Peggy's gonna join me and we hope the boys in Louisville will enjoy it."


Photo

Published in June of 1948, this photo captures Peggy Como and Peggy Lee in rehearsal, under the baton of Lloyd Shaffer. Presumably, the singers were practicing on the version of "Mañana" that they were set to perform on the June 1, 1948 broadcast (to be detailed immediately below).




Date: June 1, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California

Lloyd Shaffer And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Como, Peggy Lee (v), The Starlighters (Pauline Byrns, Vince Degen, Jerry Duane, Howard Hudson, Tony Paris) (bkv)

a. Not Extant?Guest Spot (NBC) Trouble Is A Man(Alec Wilder)
b. Not Extant?Guest Spot (NBC) Mañana(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
c. Not Extant?Guest Spot (NBC) Mañana [Chesterfield Version](Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee, Composer Unknown)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Peggy Lee, Rexall Sponsor
At the end of this episode hosted by Perry Como, announcer Martin Block lets us know that guest Peggy Lee has "appeared through the courtesy of her sponsor, the Rexall Drug Company." This is an indirect reference to the Rexall-sponsored Jimmy Durante Show, on which Lee was serving as the regular girl singer during the 1947-1948 season. That season of the Rexall show would end on June the 23rd. At the beginning of the ensuing season, Peggy Lee would sign under a different sponsor: Chesterfield (as we will see in the broadcast session that follows this one).

2. Perry Como
3. The Starlighters
Perry Como and The Starlighters sing along with Peggy Lee in the two above-listed versions of "Mañana." The other song ("Trouble Is A Man") is a Lee solo.


Dating And Location

This Tuesday episode of Como's show was broadcast from Hollywood. The original broadcast aired at 4:00 p.m., its reprise at 8:00 p.m. (Once again, Como was filming a movie; hence he and Stafford had temporarily switched schedules. The male host was being heard on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the hostess on the other days. The switch had begun on Monday, April 19.)


Patter

1. On The Road
Perry Como: "Say, Peggy Lee, you came in here tonight like gangbusters; we didn't get a chance to talk about you. I understand you and David will be hittin' the road soon."
Peggy Lee: "That's right, Perry. We're going on a Middle West and Eastern tour and I guess we'll end up at the Paramount in New York."


Songs

1. "Mañana (The Chesterfield Version)"
After finishing Mañana, Lee joins Como and The Starlighters for a Chesterfield jingle, which consists of the music of "Mañana" set to special lyrics. A portion of the lyric promotes Chesterfield, but the bulk of the lyrics targets Como and Lee as objects of good-natured teasing. Here is one of the bantering choruses that Perry Como sings:

There's a girl named Peggy
And that gal's a double threat
She writes the songs and sings 'em
Her Mañana's goin' yet
She really is ambitious
No one can call her lax
But I would hate to have to pay
Her income tax!


Photo

Probably taken in 1948, this photo catches the oldest host of The Chesterfield Supper Club in the act of kissing the show's newest host(ess). The occasion was a party thrown by Arthur Freed for Perry Como. Peggy Lee was obviously among those invited to the event. The setting was the elite Champagne Room at El Morocco nightclub in New York.







Peggy Lee Officially Joins The Chesterfield Supper Club

After a summer in which Sammy Kaye had hosted the show every weekday from Monday through Friday, the 1948-1949 season of The Chesterfield Supper Club started on September 27. Perry Como continued to host all Monday, Wednesday, and Friday installments, while Jo Stafford kept one of her two former spots (Tuesdays). On Thursdays, a new hostess joined the roster: Peggy Lee. She shared announcer Tom Reddy with Stafford, but not the musical accompaniment. Nominally referred to as an orchestra during the episodes, a septet under the leadership of Lee's husband (Dave Barbour) backed her.

In preparation for Lee's official incorporation to the Club's hosting membership, each of the already established hosts made suitable announcements during the days which preceded her debut. Sammy Kaye concluded the last day of his summer replacement show (Friday, September 24) with a short goodbye that included the following words: "So long, everybody. And don't forget, Monday night, same time, same NBC station, for Chesterfield's great fall season of entertainment with Perry Como, Jo Stafford, and Peggy Lee."

Beginning with the September 27 installment, the show's announcer would open every episode with these words: "It's showtime at the Chesterfield Supper Club, on the air five nights a week, with America's greatest singing stars: Perry Como [fanfare music], Jo Stafford [fanfare music], Peggy Lee [fanfare music] ..." On Tuesday the 28th, Jo Stafford added: "Tomorrow night, it'll be Perry Como and the Fontane Sisters. Thursday night, my friend Peggy Lee will join the Chesterfield Supper Club with her guests, The King Cole Trio." On Wednesday the 29th, announcer Martin Block concluded Perry Como's show as follows: "Tomorrow night, the Hollywood branch of the Supper Club takes over, with Peggy Lee in charge. Dave Barbour's orchestra will be here, along with Peggy's special guests, The King Cole Trio."

The September 30, 1948 episode became the first of 37 consecutive Thursday installments hosted by Peggy Lee (in addition to five previous ones as a substitute hostess, along with five additional appearances as a guest). Bob Packham served as director, Joe Kay as the show's engineer. Fred Heider did the writing, Marge Moline the scriptwriting duties. With his combo, Dave Barbour's musical accompaniment remained in place through the duration of the season. As shall be seen below, a guesting act was welcomed on almost every single episode and, periodically, a backing vocal groups became a fixture of the show.

Lee's and Stafford's editions of The Chesterfield Supper Club are presumed to have been broadcast from NBC studios, but the available data is not specific on the matter. The only reference of significance which I have found is in the January 1947 issue of Capitol News, where we are told that, having stopped broadcasting from Manhattan, Jo Stafford's edition of the show was newly airing "from 6000 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood."


Date: September 30, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Fine And Dandy (The Peggy Lee Overture) (Paul James, Kay Swift, possibly Peggy Lee)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) It's Magic(Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Stormy Weather(Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler)
All titles unissued.

Songs And Patter

1. "Fine And Dandy": The Peggy Lee Opener
The script of Peggy Lee's debut episode as an official Chesterfield hostess naturally starts with the greetings or main credits uttered by the show's announcer, Tom Reddy. (Such will be the case for nearly all the episodes. A couple of Lee programs exceptionally start off with brief dialogue, followed by Reddy's announcements.) After Reddy's introduction, this episode features an appearance by a messenger boy, who tells Lee that Jo Stafford, Perry Como, Arthur Godfrey (the latter being the host of the companion show Chesterfield Arthur Godfrey Time), and even the boy himself "wish you luck on your opening night." Lee then sings the following words, set to the melody of "Fine And Dandy:"

You're so nice to wish us well
And you know we think you're swell.
Chesterfields, we're glad to be with you
ABC-ing it the whole year through.

We hope you like our little show.
If you do, please let us know
'Cause we wanna do things right
For all of you each Thursday night.

2. Preamble To "It's Magic"
Before delivering her rendition of the then-current song It's Magic, Peggy Lee says: You know, when I heard Perry Como sing It's Magic Monday night, I thought, 'uh oh, Peg, can't do it Thursday.' But then, well, it's the kind of song that's good every night of the week ... It's that good kind of song." The scripted justification notwithstanding, other reasons are just as likely. In particular, there is the likelihood of a deal struck between the songpluggers and Chesterfield (the show's sponsor), by which the hosts might have been expected to repeatedly sing this song.

3. Promotional Spots
Unlike most previous seasons, promotion of Chesterfield cigarettes during this season is not circumscribed to the show's announcer alone. This time around, Como, Stafford, and Lee also pitch in. "A better cigarette because it's milder," Lee is heard to say, among various other scripted phrases.


Personnel

1. Dave Barbour And His Orchestra
Although printed advertisements and formal announcements made reference to an orchestra, Dave Barbour's group was actually a septet, Barbour included. All seven musicians are identified by name in a couple of shows; their participation in every single episode is an educated guess of mine.

2. The King Cole Trio
Peggy Lee's very first guest is her Capitol labelmate Nat King Cole. He brings company, and has no plans to leave anytime soon. The Nat King Cole Trio (Irving Ashby on guitar, Joe Comfort on bass, Cole on piano) guest on not only this episode but also the next four.
Through the five-episode arc, Cole is heard playing, singing, and talking with Lee.

3. Peggy Lee Duet With Nat King Cole
In Straighten Up And Fly Right: A Chronology And Discography Of Nat King Cole, Klaus Teubig quotes an October 6, 1948 Variety review which includes the following statement: "King Cole worked with Miss Lee, doing Little Girl in fine fashion." The equivocal phrasing may give the impression that "Little Girl" featured both Peggy Lee and Nat King on vocals. It did not; Lee's involvement was restricted to the introduction of the act and the number: "Just want you to know, Nat, we're really looking forward to havin' you around on Thursday nights for the next few weeks. It'll give us a chance to hear things like your latest hit of that old favorite, Little Girl. How about it, King Cole Trio?"


Dating

1. Airing Time
During this season (fall 1948 - spring 1949), Perry Como's edition of The Chesterfield Supper Club continued to be broadcast from New York, while Jo Stafford's and Peggy Lee' editions were beamed from Hollywood. All three editions occupied a 15-minute slot. Como's episodes aired at 7:00 p.m. in the East Coast and 11:00 p.m. in the West Coast.

In trade ads and reviews, a 7:00 p.m. airing time is also listed for the Stafford and Lee installments. Extant copies of the show's script tell a different story. Both songstresses' editions are shown as airing at 5:00 p.m. (presumably on the West coast) and at 9:00 p.m. (presumably on the East coast). Also, occasional fluctuations happened as time went by: the Hollywood shows are listed as airing sometimes at 4:00 or even 3:00 p.m., instead of 5:00 p.m. (On the other hand, the 7:00 p.m. timing of the New York - Como edition seems to have been set in stone.)


Photo

Chesterfield's new hostess poses for your viewing pleasure. She sends you her best wishes, too.




Date: October 7, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) 'Tain't So, Honey, 'Tain't So(Willard Robison)
unissued
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Smoke Dream(possibly Peggy Lee)
unissued
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Love Somebody - 2:08(Alex Kramer, Joan Whitney)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [1st of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1948)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3409 — The Supper Club   

Songs

1. Preamble To "Smoke Dream"
Smoke Dreams was the theme song of The Chesterfield Supper Club. (Most notably, Jo Stafford's shows started with her rendition of the number.) In this episode, Peggy Lee embarks on the rendition of a special lyric that she ties to that theme song (and to the show's sponsor) by posing the following queries: "Friends, did you ever sit back and watch someone smoke a Chesterfield? Ever try to figure out what was runnin' through their minds? Those little homespun philosophies spinnin' around ... Well, Dave and I have, for a long time. We call 'em 'smoke dreams.' And from time to time we'd like to bring one to you. Like this, our smoke dream for tonight."

2. Spotlight On Peggy Lee's "Smoke Dream"
The above-quoted preamble suggests that this episode inaugurated a regular or semi-regular segment within Lee's program: a segment in which the theme of The Chesterfield Supper Club was used as a prelude to Lee's delivery of either poetry or special lyrics. Lee herself restates the concept in the October 14 episode of the show: "A smoke dream, friends. That's what we call the little thoughts or philosophies that folks get when they relax or smoke a Chesterfield."

Having read the show's scripts but not having listened to more than just a few of Lee's Supper Club episodes, I am not able to offer much more in the way of specifics about this segment's format. If the one and only Smoke Dream segment to which I have listened is a good indication, Lee delivered the lyrics as sung poetry. It also seems that (contrary to what the segment's setup might lead us to believe) the melody of "Smoke Dreams" did not serve as backing music. Instead, the background music consisted of a simple riff produced by a harp or a harp-imitating instrument. As for the special lyrics used in each episode's segment, the scripts fortunately supply transcriptions of most of them. This episode's script is an exception, however: no lyrics are supplied. Hence, faced with the lack of any knowledge about the lyric's contents, authorship, or title, I have resorted to naming them after the song itself -- Smoke Dream.

Peggy Lee's keen interest in poetry and philosophy makes it likely that the shows' Smoke Dream features were her own idea. After just a few installments, however, no further references to the segment are ever made again. Though the segment has been formally dropped, its spirit persists in an informal manner, through evocative commentary made by Lee before her singing of certain songs. For instance, her December 16, 1948 interpretation ofThe Christmas Song is preceded by the following bit of homey evocation: "This time of the year every city of the country becomes like a little village. I guess it's the friendliness of the Christmas season that does it. The lights and decorations, the big smile that everyone wears, and the forest of tinseled trees that have sprung over night. You know, this is one time of the year you can count on [starts singing the The Christmas Song]."

The same general concept (i.e., recitation of poetry, in combination with songs) would be re-introduced by the singer in The Peggy Lee Show, a radio program that she would go on to host in a few years (1951-1952).


Personnel: Accolades For Peggy Lee And Nat King Cole

1. Billboard Polls
Amidst audience applause, announcer Tom Reddy gives the following report: "Yes, Chesterfields are tops ... and so are Chesterfield's stars. Listen to this. According to Billboard's survey among the country's disc jockeys, the top girl singer ... Peggy Lee! Top small instrumental group ... The King Cole Trio! Number two in popular record albums ... Peggy Lee's Rendezvous ! The two top records of the past year ... King Cole's Nature Boy ... and Peggy Lee's Mañana!"

Peggy Lee speaks next: "This is a real proud moment for us around here at the Supper Club. Thanks, Billboard, and thanks, disc jockeys." Nat King Cole then adds: "And my thanks, too, to all of you." Naturally, these words are followed by Cole's rendition of "Nature Boy" and Lee's rendition of "Mañana."


Photo

Nat King Cole, Dave Barbour, and Peggy Lee, apparently in the process of arranging one of the show's numbers -- most likely, one of the duets that the vocalists sang on the last three of Cole's five appearances.




Date: October 14, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra, The Nat King Cole Trio (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Nat King Cole, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) You Call Everybody 'Darling' - 1:07(Sam Martin, Ben L. Trace, Clem Watts aka Albert J. Trace)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [1st of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1948)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3409 — The Supper Club   
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Smoke Dream: You, The Stone, And Your Nose (possibly Peggy Lee)
unissued
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere - 3:06(Edmund Goulding, Elsie Janis)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [1st of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1948)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3409 — The Supper Club   
d. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) It's A Most Unusual Day(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
unissued

Patter

1. Intro
This episode starts off in a fresh, non-customary manner. Before we listen to announcer Tom Reddy's habitual greetings, the script makes us privy to a brief exchange between him and the hostess. I have copied it below.
Tom Reddy: "Say, Peggy Lee, do you really love to clean house?"
Peggy Lee: "What????
Reddy: "Well, that's one of the things it says about you in October's America" magazine!"
Lee: "So, help me, Tom, it's true ... But if we don't get the Supper Club on the air, I won't have a house to clean!"


Songs

1. The "Smoke Dream" Segment
Apparently, the homey and good-natured tone of the aforementioned intro was carried through the episode's Smoke Dream segment. Rather than sung, this segment's special lyrics might have been recited to music accompaniment.

If your nose is close
To the grindstone rought,
And you hold it down
There long enough,
In time you'll say
There's no such thing
As brooks that babble
And birds that sing.
These three will all
Your world compose
Just you, the stone
And your silly old nose.

The script from which I copied this lyric does not provide a title for it. Hence I am responsible for coming up with the title found above.


Personnel

1. Nat King Cole
Of the above-listed songs, only "It's A Most Unusual Day" features Nat King Cole, in a duet with Peggy Lee. Along with Cole and Lee, the number features both the Cole trio and the Barbour septet as well.


Date: October 21, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Nat King Cole, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy)(Lew Brown, Sidney Clare, Cliff Friend)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Smoke Dream: Little Old Car(Henry J. "Heinie" Beau, Peggy Lee)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Maybe You'll Be There(Rube Bloom, Sammy Gallop)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Don't Paint A Mustache On The Girl In The Cigarette Ad(Composer Unknown)
All titles unissued.




Songs

1. The "Smoke Dream" Segment
For this episode's poetic segment, Peggy Lee intones the words of "Little Old Car," a composition that she would record seven years later, and which Decca would include in her album Sea Shells. The version from this broadcast concludes with a moral, which is not heard at all in the recorded version.

2. "Don't Paint A Mustache On The Girl In The Cigarette Ad"
This novelty is a duet between Nat King Cole and Peggy Lee. Sample lyrics: "She's a doll, she's a queen, and she loves to be seen, so why make the lady feel bad? Please don't paint a mustache on the girl in the cigarette ad."

The song's exact origins and raison d'être are unknown to me. The piece sounds like an inside joke, perhaps concocted in reaction to an event witnessed by the show's cast. In that regard, it is worth quoting the following (scripted) comment, uttered by Lee right before the rendition: "Oh, Nat, look what they have done. They just painted a mustache on the girl on the Chesterfield ad."

Since the lyrics of "Don't Paint A Mustache On The Girl In The Cigarette Ad" also make mention of Chesterfield, the number functions as promotional material as well. In any case, Lee and Cole's swinging interpretation is met with appreciative whistling and enthusiastic applause from the audience.


Performances (And Performers)

1. "Lillette"
2. The Nat King Cole Trio
3. Peggy Lee
4. Tom Reddy
For this episode, The Nat King Cole Trio performs "Lillette." An introduction sung by Peggy Lee, Tom Reddy, and Cole precedes the number. Here are the lines sung by Lee: "I'm surprised, Tom Reddy, that you haven't heard yet / And here's King Cole / Ready to reveal / About the gal / and her great appeal."


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Photo

Peggy Lee, in an unidentified photo. Her looks suggest that the year is 1948, while the presence of a NBC microphone points to The Chesterfield Supper Club as the likeliest site, out of various possible ones. (I know of one print of this photo which bears the date December 25, 1949 on its back. However, I assume that date to relate to its publication on a periodical, or its acquisition by an agency, or some other matter unrelated to the time and place on which it was originally taken.)


Date: October 28, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra, The Nat King Cole Trio (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Nat King Cole, Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) 'Tain't So, Honey, 'Tain't So(Willard Robison)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) It's A Most Unusual Day(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
Both titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Nat King Cole
Of the above-listed numbers, only "It's A Most Unusual Day," features Cole, singing in a duo with Lee. Backing the two vocalsits are both the trio and the Barbour septet.

2. The Nat King Cole Trio
This was the last of the guest appearances that Cole and his trio made in Peggy Lee's show. They had thus been contracted for five consecutive weeks.

3. Hawthorne & Tedder
In addition to the Nat King Cole Trio, Peggy Lee has [Jim] Hawthorne (aka Enrohtwah) and Karen Tedder as her guests. The pairs performs "Serutan Yob," their hillbilly parody of "Nature Boy."


Patter

1. Intro
Preceding the fanfare and the announcer's greetings to the audience, this episode actually starts off with dialogue between Peggy Lee and Enrohtwah. He's trying to sing "Serutan Yob," and she's trying to tell him that it is not time to do so yet.


Photos

Capitol's 78 rpm release of the parody number "Serutan Yob." Next to the record is a 1970s photo of Enrohtwah, the main man behind the 1948 novelty.




Date: November 4, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Fine And Dandy(Paul James, Kay Swift)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Ain't Doin' Bad Doin' Nothin'(Lee Jarvis, Joe Venuti)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) On A Slow Boat To China(Frank Loesser)
All titles unissued.

Patter

1. Dave Barbour
In this episode, Peggy Lee's husband is the subject of some mild-mannered banter. Listeners of previous episodes had heard Barbour say mostly one single word: hi. Only once had he been heard uttering a full sentence. (In response to comments that Lee was making about the song "Maybe You'll Be There," Barbour had specified that the tune had been first heard in early 1947 radio.)
Tom Reddy: "Say, Peg, you know, we've been together for six Thursday nights now and I've only heard your husband, Dave Barbour, say about four words ..."
Peggy Lee: "Well, he's shy, Tom. He's more the musical type; what he doesn't say, his guitar does. It's a sorta special Barbour language. Come over here and say something, Dave!"
Dave Barbour: (Plays the distinctive three notes of the Chesterfield jingle.)
Reddy: Hey, even I know what that is. That's Chesterfield and, incidentally, that's the best cigarette for you to smoke.
{n.b: Most of the spoken exchanges heard in The Chesterfield Supper Club tended to devolve into opportunistic promotions of the show's sponsor. }


Personnel

1. The Masked Spooner
This episode's guest was The Masked Spooner. A mysterious radio personality, he was said to have never appeared in public without wearing his mask and cape. It was all a publicity stunt. The rags of the day raved about the masked man, 'identifying' him as a Hollywood star who had resorted to performing incognito for fear of repercussions from the strict movie company to which he was signed. Not surprisingly, audiences were struck with curiosity about such claims, which were actually false. The Masked mystery was 'managed' by producer Jack Rourke -- the word 'managed' being synonymous in this case with the word 'impersonated.' In the recording studio, The Masked Spooner became known for a technique that he dubbed as 'spooning' -- essentially, close-miked recitation of love poetry or love lyrics, set to music.


Photos

Two publicity shots of Jack Rourke, photographed under his guise as the Masked Spooner.




Date: November 11, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Dick Haymes, Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Buttons And Bows(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Smoke Dream: Lullaby For Nicki Lee Foster(possibly Peggy Lee)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Somebody Else Is Taking My Place(Bob Ellsworth, Dick Howard, Russ Morgan)
d. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Why Don't You Do Right?(Joe McCoy)
e. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) On The Sunny Side Of The Street(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller)
f. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere(Edmund Goulding, Elsie Janis)
All titles unissued.

Songs

1. Prelude To The "Smoke Dream" Segment
2. Nicki Lee Foster's Birthday
This episode's segment of Smoke Dream is presented as a dedication to Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour's daughter. Lee prefaces her rendition with the following words: "You know, friends, Dave and I have a little girl at home, and it was just five years ago today that we first said, 'hello, Nicki.' You won't mind if we do a Smoke Dream for her that she loves very much, will you? She's listening right now."

3. Lyrics Of This Episode's Smoke Dream

Blessed is the forest
In which grew the tree
From which came the wood
That made the crib
In which we rocked thee.

2. "Love, Your Magic Spell Is Everywhere"
This song is presented by Peggy Lee as a tribute to its songwriter, Elsie Janis, and to the thirtieth anniversary of Armistice Day.


Personnel

1. Dick Haymes
Peggy Lee's guest is Dick Haymes. Back in the summer of 1942, when he had been the male vocalist of The Benny Goodman Orchestra for a short span, Haymes and Lee had sat side by side onstage, waiting for their respective turns to sing with the band. In the present episode, the brief dialogue between hostess and guest emphasizes their shared experience. After their exchange, each proceeds to sing a solo number that they had popularized and/or recorded with Goodman. They also do one duet, "On The Sunny Side Of The Street." (All other numbers listed above feature solo vocals by Lee.)


Photos

Peggy Lee and her daughter Nicki enact the five-year-old's bedtime routine (1948).




Date: November 18, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) You Call Everybody 'Darling'(Sam Martin, Ben L. Trace, Clem Watts aka Albert J. Trace)
unissued
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) So Dear To My Heart(Ticker Freeman, Irving Taylor)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [1st of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1948)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3409 — The Supper Club   
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Maybe You'll Be There - 3:20(Rube Bloom, Sammy Gallop)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [1st of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1948)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3409 — The Supper Club   

Personnel

1. Guest
This week, Peggy Lee's guest is Ercil (also spelled Ersel) Twing, a caricaturesque radio character that Pat Patrick played mostly in The Charlie McCarthy Show.


Date: November 25, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb, v), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee, Tom Reddy, Andy Russell (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) You Was Right, Baby(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Just For Now(Dick Redmond)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Mañana [Thanksgiving Version](Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
On this Thanksgiving Supper Club show, Andy Russell is the visiting guest. The hostess asks him to do the song "that you sang in the movie Make Mine Music." He does sing the movie's ballad, titled Without You.

2. Dave Barbour, Singer
This episode's script calls for Dave Barbour and Peggy Lee to sing together a few lines, in promotion of Chesterfield.

3. Quartet
Four singing voices are featured in this installment's special version of "Mañana." Peggy Lee sings the first chorus and also the last two choruses. Andy Russell sings the second chorus, announcer Tom Reddy the third, and trombonist Joe Howard the fourth. Russell, Reddy, and Howard do not sing in any of the other above-listed numbers.


Songs

1. Preamble To " Just For Now"
Peggy Lee prefaces her rendition of the song "Just For Now" as follows: "I was reading in the papers a few Sundays back, friends, about a song called Just For Now. It began in a London nightclub during the war ... The orchestra was playing. Couples were dancing on the floor and suddenly ... a buzz bomb hit its mark about a block away. The music stopped ... and the people hurriedly ran to the nearest shelter ... all except the piano player ... the drummer ... and one solitary couple ... He was an American serviceman, she an English girl ... They danced through the danger ... and the phrase 'just for now' kept running through his mind ... He remembered it through the war and into peacetime ... And the memory of it made his first song, for from that night came the beautiful ballad Just For Now."

2. Preamble To "Mañana"
Before tackling her then-current million-selling hit, Peggy Lee makes the following comment: "I know, friends, you've heard Mañana a lot of times. And to tell you the truth, we hadn't planned on doing it tonight, but we have a request. It's from a little girl in Chicago. Two-year-old Pamela Lamphere. Maybe you recall her picture on the front page of your newspaper some time ago. She had a very serious operation -- and, I'm happy to say, a successful operation. Someone asked her, not long ago, what she wanted. She could have anything her heart desired. Little Pam asked to hear Mañana. Well, here's your Mañana, Pam, and Andy Russell is going to sing with me -- with some special Thanksgiving lyrics." The special lyrics end with a chorus in which lyricist Lee addresses the two-year-old directly, sending her get-well wishes. (See also photos under the next session.)


Photo

In this episode, guest singer Andy Russell asks Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour for some pointers on the subject of touring, because he is about to embark on a nightclub tour with his wife, Della Russell. Naturally, Barbour and Lee's immediate response is to sing, in unison, the following 'advice': "tell the folks where'er you go / there's just one thing that they should know / that Chesterfield's the cigarette for you / etc." Shortly after this advice, the Mexican-American singer (best-known for his hit renditions of tunes such as Bésame Mucho and Amor) participates in Lee's rendition of the novelty Mañana. This photo captures Andy and Della in full mañanesque regalia; it is actually a promotional shot for the couple's Capitol single Rosita And Joe.




Date: December 2, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) It's A Good Day(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) What More Can A Woman Do(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) My Darling, My Darling(Frank Loesser)
All titles unissued.

Songs

1. Preamble To "It's A Good Day"
Near the start of this episode, Peggy Lee greets her audience in this manner: "Hello there! And a special hello to the Rajahs in Fargo, North Dakota. Rajah is the name of a college club, friends, and the students were very good to me when I was a very young singer in the Powers Hotel there. They've asked for a song, so there's one they used last year as their annual homecoming song. Love you. Rajahs!"


Personnel

1. Guests
This is the first of three consecutive episodes that feature The Mills Brothers as Peggy Lee's guests. The group and the solo vocalist sing together only in the last episode. (Seven years later, they would get together again, to wax a couple of duets for Decca Records.)


Photos

Photos of Pamela Lamphere, to whom Peggy Lee had dedicated her version of "Mañana" in the previous episode (November 25, 1948). Since birth, the two-year-old girl had been living with exstrophy -- a condition in which a person's bladder is located outside of his abdomen. The case caught the hearts and minds of many Americans in late 1948, when her separated parents argued on opposite sides over the wisdom of performing surgery. The father had resorted to court litigation when the mother had refused to allow the girl to undergo an operation whose chances of survival had been originally estimated at one in a hundred. (Life expectancy without surgery was, on the other hand, no longer than five years.) During the suit, top medical experts were brought in, and they contended that the mother had been significantly misinformed. They assured her that the chances of surviving exstrophy surgery were nine out of ten. After undergoing three operations, the last of them on May 26, 1949, Pamela was said to be safe, healing, and ready to go to the family home in Chicago. The parents had reconciled, too.




Date: December 9, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy)(Lew Brown, Sidney Clare, Cliff Friend)
unissued
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I Got Lucky In The Rain(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
unissued
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) On A Slow Boat To China - 2:26(Frank Loesser)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [2nd of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1949)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3410 — The Supper Club   

Personnel: Peggy Lee Accolades

1. Peggy Lee In The Cash Box Polls
During this episode, Tom Reddy makes the following announcement: "And, friends, we just received word about the poll sponsored and conducted by the Cash Box among the jukebox operators of America. Result: the best female vocalist of 1948 ... Chesterfield's own Peggy Lee!" See also notes under episode dated January 27, 1949.

2. Guests
This is the second of three consecutive episodes to feature The Mills Brothers as Peggy Lee's guests. Unlike the leader of a previous guest act, The Nat King Cole Trio, no member of this quintet ever speaks during the broadcasts. Lee does introduce them with enthusiasm and, after each performance, thanks them as well. But the brothers are not given any reply lines. One instance happens right after she lends a hand to announcer Tom Reddy, helping him exalt the virtues of Chesterfield, the so-called milder and best of all cigarettes. "And we also say," she adds then, "that the best vocal group for you to hear is The Mills Brothers! Here they are! You are on, boys!" After they finish, she adds, "thanks, Mills Brothers. Wonderful wonderful!" There's no audible peep from the quintet.


Songs

1. Preamble To "I Got Lucky In The Rain"
Peggy Lee's rendition of "I Got Lucky In The Rain" is prefaced by a fictional scenario in which she and announcer Tom Reddy play strangers who meet in the rain, share an umbrella, and seem on the path to getting to know one another a lot better.


Issues

1. The Supper Club [CD]
2. "On A Slow Boat To China"
Peggy Lee sang "On A Slow Boat To China" in three different broadcasts of her Chesterfield Supper Club show. I have corroborated that the undated version she sings in Redmond Nostalgia CD #3410 is the one from this broadcast.


Date: December 16, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee, The Mills Brothers (v), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) A Little Bird Told Me(Harvey O. Brooks)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc910 — Supper Club   (1949)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Don't Know Enough About You(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc908 — Supper Club   (1949)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Jingle Bells(James Lord Pierpont)
unissued
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) The Christmas Song(Mel Torme, Robert Wells)
unissued

Personnel

1. Guest
This is the last of three consecutive episodes that feature The Mills Brothers as Peggy Lee's guests. They and the hostess sing together in "Jingle Bells." The Brothers are not heard in any of the other numbers listed above.

2. Session Musicians
The voices of the session musicians are collectively heard only for a few lines (answer-and-response lines) from "A Little Bird Told Me." Two or three interjections are also uttered by them in "Jingle Bells," though very quickly, and in the background.


Issues

1. AFRS Transcription Discs
2. "I Don't Know Enough About You"
3. "A Little Bird Told Me"
Because material such as commercials and promotional comments were consistently dropped by the AFRS engineers that transcribed the main networks' shows to AFRS discs, empty space oftentimes needed to be filled out. I'm confident that the AFRS engineers added this episode's version of "I Don't Know Enough About You" to AFRS disc #908.

I also believe that the version of "A Little Bird Told Me" heard on AFRS disc #910 is from the present episode. However, I'm not fully confident on this matter, because there are three possible versions of the song from which to choose, and the three Club versions are very, very similar. To my ears, the most telling point for differentiation purposes is whether Lee makes a full stop between the lines "I'm sure I love you best" and "A little bird told me we'll be happy." She does make it on the second version, which is from a January 13, 1949 broadcast. In the other two versions (December 18, 1948; February 10, 1949), there's almost no stop; she comes close to singing these lines as a single one. In short: my assignment of this episode's version of "A Little Bird Told Me" to AFRS disc #910 must be deemed tentative.


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it. (I have not listened to it.)


Photo

Peggy Lee and The Mills Brothers, duetting again, nearly six years after doing so during this broadcast. On the later occasion (November 9, 1954), the Brothers were accompanying the former Chesterfield hostess at a recording date in which they sang two songs with both lyrics and music by Lee herself.




Date: December 23, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee (v), The Chesterfield Choir (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town (Big Bad Santa Is On His Way)(Haven Gillespie, John Fred Coots)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) The Christmas Spell(Jack Palmer, Willard Robison)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Silent Night: Christmas Concert Medley(Franz Gruber, Joseph Mohr)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) White Christmas: Christmas Concert Medley(Irving Berlin)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
This is the first of six consecutive Frankie Laine appearances in the Thursday editions of The Chesterfield Supper Club. During her introduction of the guest, Peggy Lee calls Laine a "wonderful Christmas present" that she has received "a little early this year." In a later episode, the script has Lee saying that she "was thrilled when [she] first heard Frankie Laine. He was something new and different."

2. Frankie Laine
3. The Chesterfield Choir
Of the above-listed renditions, only "White Christmas" features The Chesterfield Choir and Frankie Laine (singing along with Lee).


Songs

1. "Christmas Concert Medley"
This medley consisted of the following holiday classics, sung by the indicated performers:
"Joy To The World" (Chesterfield Choir)
"Silent Night" (Peggy Lee)
"White Christmas" (Peggy Lee & Frankie Laine)


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Photo

Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee, and Frankie Laine take a few moments to smile for a photographer. Probably taken during the rehearsal of one of their Chesterfield Supper Club shows.




Date: December 30, 1948

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) [Musical Commercial] There'll Be Some Changes Made: New Year's Chesterfield Resolution(Billy Higgins, William Benton Overstreet, possibly Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Trouble Is A Man(Alec Wilder)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) On A Slow Boat To China(Frank Loesser)
All titles unissued.

Songs

1. "Auld Lang Syne" / "Happy New Year"
2. "There'll Be Some Changes Made"
After Tom Reddy's customary announcements and greetings to the audience, the cast of The Chesterfield Supper Club gathers for the following chorus, sung to the tune of "Auld Lang Syne":

Before we start our show tonight
There is one thing we must do
From Peg, and Dave, and Frankie, too
Happy New Year, folks, to you!

The music of "There'll Be Some Changes Made" is heard immediately after that last line, but the ensuing lyrics are different from the standard ones. Lee sings about resolutions for the New Year. Of course, a bit of Chesterfield promotion is incorporated into the lyric, too.


Personnel

1. Frankie Laine
Of the above-listed numbers, only "On A Slow Boat To China" features guest Frankie Laine, in a duet with Peggy Lee.


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Photo

Part of a Frankie Laine ad placed by Mercury Records on a periodical published on November 27, 1948. The "flash" at the end of the ad proclaims that, "starting December 23 and every Thursday night," Laine will be "starring on the Chesterfield Supper Club with Peggy Lee."




Date: January 6, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Look Up(Floyd Huddleston, Al Rinker)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) My Darling, My Darling(Frank Loesser)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Why Don't You Do Right?(Joe McCoy)
All titles unissued.

Dating

1. Time Schedule
Beginning with this episode, the Thursday and Tuesday editions of the Chesterfield Supper Club move back one hour, airing at 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. The change thus applied to the Hollywood editions (Peggy Lee's, Jo Stafford's) only. Perry Como's New York editions (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays) kept their regular 7:00 and 11:00 airing times. All episodes continued to have a duration of 15 minutes.


Personnel

1. Guest
Unlike the previous two episodes, this one features no duets between Lee and Laine. Conversely, Laine does do more solo vocals than usual -- i.e., two instead of one. As for duet singing between hostess and guest, the practice would return on the next episode.


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Date: January 13, 1949 (Pre-recorded At An Unknown Date)

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee (v), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) A Little Bird Told Me(Harvey O. Brooks)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Hold Me(Little Jack Little, Dave Oppenheim, Ira Schuster)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Baby, I Need You(Al Gannaway, Walton Farrar)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Here I'll Stay(Alan Jay Lerner, Kurt Weill)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc908 — Supper Club   (1949)

Session

During this week, the Hollywood-based episodes of The Chesterfield Supper Club were not broadcast live as usual, but transcribed instead. This modification thus applied to the Jo Stafford and Peggy Lee shows of the week (January 11 and 13, 1949), but not to the week's Perry Como installments, broadcast from New York.

I do not know why the Hollywood chapter of the show resorted to transcribing at this particular time (nor do I know the recording date of the episodes in question). It could have been a matter of experimentation. Jo Stafford would actually continue to have her shows transcribed for a while; Peggy Lee would not. (This is the first of only three Peggy Lee Supper Club broadcasts to be pre-recorded; the other two were the March 10 and June 9 installments.)


Personnel

1. Guest
Of the above-listed songs, the only one that features guest Frankie Laine is "Baby, I Need You," performing a duet with Peggy Lee.

2. Session Musicians
The voices of the session musicians are collectively heard only in a few answer-response lines from "A Little Bird Told Me."


Songs

1. "Baby, I Need You"
At the time of this broadcast, the song "Baby, I Need You" had been recently released on 78 rpm recording by Frankie Laine. Hence the segueway to the song starts off with the following address from the jazzy crooner: "and now, Miss Peggy Lee, how'd you like to
share a little song with me?" Laine actually sings that question, and the answer from Lee is also sung. (This practice of singing some of the script lines was repeatedly employed in Lee's Chesterfield series.)

Only a portion of this radio version features the same lyrics as the contemporaneous recording. The other portion consists of a special chorus, apparently created especially for the show by one or more unidentified lyricists (perhaps Laine and Lee themselves, perhaps somebody else). Here are the special lyrics:
Laine: "The way a yacht needs a harbor / Peggy needs Dave Barbour"
Lee: "The way a window needs a pane /That's My Desire needs Frankie Laine."
Lee: "The way a bed needs a pillow"
Band: "We all need Petrillo"
Lee: "Baby"
Laine: "Baby"
Lee & Laine: "I need you."

2. "A Little Bird Told Me"
Peggy Lee ends this version of "A Little Bird Told Me" with a spoken coda: "that bird has lost its feathers." (All the other versions of hers that I've heard include that coda, too.)


Issues

1. The Supper Club [AFRS Transcription Disc #910]
2. "I Don't Know Enough About You"
AFRS ET #910 contains all the above-listed songs, and also two others: "Rosetta," sung by Frankie Laine, and "I Don't Know Enough About You," sung by Peggy Lee. The latter was not heard on the original broadcast, AFRS probably transferred it from another episode. The likeliest suspect, by far, is the December 16, 1948 episode, because Lee's other versions date from too far back (1946) for AFRS to have sought after them. See also Issue notes under broadcast session dated December 16, 1948.


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Photos

Frankie Laine and Peggy Lee pose behind one of the microphones used for the Chesterfield Supper Club shows. The central image shows a copy of AFRS's transcription of the NBC episode under discussion.




Date: January 20, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee, Tom Reddy (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Little Jack Frost, Get Lost - 1:26(Seger Ellis, Al Stillman)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) So Dear To My Heart - 2:16(Ticker Freeman, Irving Taylor)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) On The Sunny Side Of The Street - 1:53(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man - 2:59(Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern)
Biac Collectors' Label LP(Belgium) Brad 10 530-531 — At Their Rarest Of All Rare Performances {Al Jolson, Peggy Lee}    (1976)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc910 — Supper Club   (1949)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3409 — The Supper Club   

Personnel

1. Frankie Laine
2. Tom Reddy
Of the above-listed performances, "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" is the only one to feature Laine and Reddy (in a trio with Peggy Lee).


Issues And Songs

1. At Their Rarest Of All Rare Performances {Al Jolson, Peggy Lee} [LP]
2. "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man"
The identification of this session's version of "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man" as the one heard in the 1976 Belgian album is tentative. The album gives the year of its performance as 1949, but does not specify the month, nor the day. Before she sings the number, Peggy Lee is heard describing it as follows: "here's a song Helen Morgan introduced in Show Boat. Remember?" At the present time, I am aware of three radio performances of the song (January 20, march 24, June 2), all of them from Chesterfield's Supper Club and all of them broadcast in 1949. But only the present performance is known to have been introduced by Lee with a mention of Helen Morgan. Unfortunately, her wording is different -- and move extensive -- than in the album. It may thus be that the album's performance is from a radio show of which I am not yet aware. Alternatively, it could be the exact same performance heard in this January 20, 1949 show, re-used by AFRS on one of its transcription discs (with a different, shortened introduction newly supplied by Lee). Other possibilities would also be valid, of course. But, for the time being, I have chosen to identify the album's performance as the one from January 20, 1949. Given the tentativeness of my decision about this track, readers should bear in mind that additional commentary, correction or confirmation might be provided in the future, if more data is forthcoming.


Photos

Network transcription discs containing three episodes of The Chesterfield Supper Club, with Peggy Lee: the present installment and the next two below.




Date: January 27, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy) - 1:34(Lew Brown, Sidney Clare, Cliff Friend)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc921 — Supper Club   (1949)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) You Can Depend On Me - 2:22(Charlie Carpenter, Louis Dunlap, Earl 'Fatha' Hines)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) So In Love - 3:45(Cole Porter)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [2nd of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1949)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3410 — The Supper Club   

Personnel

1. Guest
Of the above-listed titles, only the duet "You Can Depend On Me" features Frankie Laine. This was the last of his consecutive guest appearances, for the time being. It is mentioned during the episode that Laine is slated to return to the show in April 1949.


Photos

The March 19, 1949 issue of Cash Box magazine featured this photo, in which Peggy Lee is seen receiving the award for Best Female Singer Of 1948 from that magazine's Lee Simon. I believe that the photo was taken before or after the present broadcast. Clues include the presence of an NBC microphone and, more crucially, two tidbits from the magazine's column 'Round The Wax Circles, whose columnist I believe to have been Simon himself. In the February 5, 1949 column, he tells us that "now we're rubbing elbows with such fine folks and celebrities as the Andrews Sisters, Peggy Lee, T-Texas Tyler, Louis Jordan, and several others, and all on account of those Cash Box 'Oscars' ..." In the subsequent February 12 issue, the columnist adds that he "[p]resented Peggy Lee with her Cash Box award and really enjoyed her gracious cooperation, her singing of So In Love and husband Barbour's terrif arrangement of the same tune, as played over their NBC Chesterfield show ..."





Date: February 3, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Someone Like You(Ralph Blane, Harry Warren)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I'm In The Mood For Love(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Here I'll Stay(Alan Jay Lerner, Kurt Weill)
All titles unissued.




Personnel

1. Guest
This week's guest is Nellie Lutcher. The Real Gone Gal sings two numbers, including her major hit. She also exchanges a few lines of hip dialogue with Lee and a child actor who interrupts to proceedings to ask what is a 'real gone gal.' No duets are attempted.


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.

Photos

Hostess Peggy Lee hovers over guest Nellie Lutcher while the latter plays the piano and sings. Dave Barbour accompanies the singer-pianist on guitar. My thanks to Jeff Mustow for his kind help and provision of the first photo.


Date: February 10, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee, Dean Martin (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) A Little Bird Told Me - 1:49(Harvey O. Brooks)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3409 — The Supper Club   
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Cried For You - 3:03(Gus Arnheim, Arthur Freed, Abe Lyman)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc937 — Supper Club [3rd of 4 discs with number unknown]    (1949)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) You Was - 1:57(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Paul Francis Webster)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc921 — Supper Club   (1949)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 854 — Peggy Lee At The Supper Club   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD3410 — The Supper Club   

Personnel

1. Guests
Peggy Lee introduces the episode's guesting duo as "the nation's newest comedy sensation" and forewarns her audience that she must not be held responsible for whatever ensues during the next few minutes of the show. The guests are Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis.

2. Dean Martin
Of the above-listed numbers, only "You Was" features Dean Martin, in a duet with Lee. The duet was also a radio reprise of their then-current Capitol platter, which had been recorded a couple of months earlier.


Photo

Part of Capitol's publicity campaign, this shot is a literal interpretation of the lyrics of "You Was," the novelty that Peggy Lee and Dean Martin recorded for the label, and which they then went on to reprise during this broadcast.





Date: February 17, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee, Johnny Mercer (v), The Starlighters (Pauline Byrns, Vince Degen, Jerry Duane, Howard Hudson, Tony Paris) (bkv)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) It's A Good Day(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Blum Blum (I Wonder Who I Am)(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Come Rain Or Come Shine(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
d. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive(Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guests
This episode marks the first of two guest appearances by Johnny Mercer and The Starlighters.

At the start of the show, Peggy Lee welcomes them and her audience by rhythmically intoning the following words: "Well, hello, friends / I want to welcome you. / We've got some guests / I want to welcome, too. / The Starlighters [the group answers with a quick 'hello, Miss Lee'] / And here's Johnny Mercer to add to the glee."

Mercer responds next. Following Lee's lead, he rhythmically intones these words: "The old club looks familiar / And I'm glad to be / Back again in Chesterfield's / Big family."

Lee and Mercer continue to use rhythmic intonation for the introductions to the next two songs, which are It's A Good Day and Blues In The Night -- the latter sung by Mercer only.

Of the above-listed numbers, Mercer is heard only in the duets "Blum Blum" and "Ac-cent-tchu-ate the Positive." The latter features The Starlighters as well.


Date: February 24, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee, Johnny Mercer (v), The Starlighters (Pauline Byrns, Vince Degen, Jerry Duane, Howard Hudson, Tony Paris) (bkv)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Look Up(Floyd Huddleston, Al Rinker)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) What More Can A Woman Do(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) When My Sugar Walks Down The Street: Street Parade Medley(Gene Austin, Jimmy McHugh, Irving Mills)
d. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Easy Street: Street Parade Medley(Alan Rankin Jones)
e. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Beale Street Blues: Street Parade Medley(W. C. Handy)
f. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Forty-Second Street: Street Parade Medley(Al Dubin, Harry Warren)
g. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Basin Street Blues: Street Parade Medley(Spencer Williams)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guests
Johnny Mercer and The Starlighters come back for the second (and last) of their joint guest appearances.


Session: I Love A Parade / Proto Cross-Country Blues

1. Street Parade Medley
2. Tentatively Identified Performers
3. "The New Ashmolean (Marching Society And Students Conservatory Band)"
This episode is grounded on the conceit of an ongoing parade and cross-country trip, led by Mercer and Lee, joined by The Starlighters and the in-house audience. Below is a copy of the script's dialogue, built around the parade's numbers.

Lee: "On your toes, Supper Clubbers ... Looks like a big parade is headin' our way . . . and directly front and center is that grand old marchin' Master, Johnny Mercer ..."
[Music: Marching Society]
Lee: "Hey, that's great, Johnny Mercer ... Puts me in a good mood for our little walk."
Mercer: "Our walk...? Where're you takin' me, Miss Lee?"
Lee: "We are gonna cover the country ... I'll meet you right here just as soon as Tom Reddy tells us about those ever lovin' Chesterfields ..."
[Chesterfield commercial, voiced by Tom Reddy]
[Music + street noises. The ensuing lines are either sung or uttered rhythmically.]
Lee: "Well, come along, Johnny Mercer. We're goin' walkin'."
The Starlighters: "Wait a minute folks / We're comin', too. / Johnny and Peg / We wanna go with you!"
Lee: "Get right in, step, Starlighters ... Everybody all set?"
[Entire cast does When My Sugar Walks Down The Street.]
[Quieter noise. Sounds of steps.]
Lee: "You know what? I think if I had my choice of living on any street in the world, I'd make my address 'Peggy Lee, care of Easy Street, USA.' Let's walk there and I'll show you why."
[Easy Street is performed.]
[Street noises, footsteps.]
Mercer: "Say, Peg, thanks for that look into East Street. But long as we're out strollin' I've got a spot I wanta show you ... It's not far ... Just take a sharp turn right here at this corner marked the deep deep south, and here it is."
[Beale Street Blues is performed.]
[Wild street noises. Taxis. Horns. Confusion.]
Lee: "Where are we goin' now?"
Starlighters: "Just follow us down / To the highest street / In New York town."
[Forty-Second Street is performed.]
Lee: "We've covered a lotta territory tonight. But there's one more street we want to visit. Let's take a couple giant steps over to Louisiana, and run alongside the great Mississippi River to New Orleans."
[Basin Street is performed.]
[Applause]
Lee: "Thanks, Johnny, friends."

Unfortunately, I have not found a copy of this show; my knowledge of it relies entirely on a perusal of its script. For that reason, my identification of Lee as the vocalist on some of the medley tunes should be deemed tentative. If we may rely on the quoted dialogue, she most probably sang When My Sugar Walks Down The Street (along with the cast, Mercer included), Easy Street (sans Mercer), and Basin Street Blues. I'd call her participation in the other listed numbers possible, rather than probable.

I should also make mention of a noteworthy point raised by fellow researcher Adrian Daff. Noticing that the starting music of this medley is identified in the script as "Marching Society," Daff strongly suspects that the tune played was Frank Loesser's "New Ashmolean (Marching Society And Students Conservatory Band)." Johnny's own Capitol recording of the tune had taken place earlier this year, and The Starlighters had also backed it. I fully agree with Daff's hypothesis.


Photos

Peggy Lee in the company of Johnny Mercer. The first photo dates from 1945, the second (also showing the other co-founder of Capitol Records, Glenn Wallichs) from 1948.




Date: March 3, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Buddy Clark, Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I Can't Give You Anything But Love(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) A Bluebird Singing In My Heart (The La La La Song)(Michael Emer, Sammy Gallop)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) You Was(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Paul Francis Webster)
d. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) So In Love(Cole Porter)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
On this date, Peggy Lee's guest is Buddy Clark, who duets with her on "You Was." (He is not heard in any of the other above-listed songs.) Clark and Lee also engage in some cross-promotional banter about the meaning of the letters ABC, as heard in the show's jingle. As usual, the dialogue is but another opportunity for promotion, though this time the promoted product was not only the Chesterfield cigarette but also Carnation milk -- Carnation being the company that was sponsoring Clark's own radio show at the time.


Photos

These pictures show Buddy Clark in the recording studio, both solo and with Mitchell Ayres, the latter being the man who also conducted Perry Como's Chesterfield Supper Club from mid-1948 onwards. A Columbia recording artist, Clark had various hits with labelmates Dinah Shore and Doris Day, but on the radio this blonde magnet sang more commonly with Peggy Lee. (The pair co-hosted the 1947 summer edition of Rhapsody In Rhythm. During the next couple of years, they also appeared together in two or three additional episodes from other shows, including the present installment from the Chesterfield Supper Club. The possibility of any further joint appearances was cut short on October 1, 1949, when the small plane that was transporting Clark and five other passengers crashed on LA's Beverly Boulevard. Tragically, the singer did not survive the accident.)




Date: March 10, 1949 (Pre-recorded At An Unknown Date)

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) If You Stub Your Toe On The Moon(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) When Is Sometime?(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Once And For Always(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
On this occasion, the featured guest is Bing Crosby, who duets with Peggy Lee on the numbers "When Is Sometime?" and "If You Stub Your Toe On The Moon." Brought along by Crosby, The Rhythmaires sing background vocals on the "Moon" duet.


Session: A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court

1. Promotional Ties
2. Welcome To The Chesterfield Fold
This guesting appearance by Bing Crosby was a cross-promotional venture: the songs of choice were from Paramount's A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court, starring the Old Groaner. In other promotional news, the singer-actor-host had recently accepted Chesterfield's offer to sponsor The Bing Crosby Show, slated to start in the fall. The present episode could be said to have served as his preliminary welcome to the Chesterfield radio family that comprised Lee, Stafford, Como, and Arthur Godfrey.

2. Transcription
This March 10, 1949 installment of Peggy Lee's Supper Club was transcribed. Back then, the act of transcribing radio shows was but an incipient practice, to which Lee would resort only three times during her full year as a Chesterfield hostess. On this particular occasion, the pre-recording of the episode might have been motivated by the guest. In addition to being a big believer in the advantages of pre-recorded programming, Crosby and his management could have argued that his busy schedule prevented him from being present for the live broadcasts on Thursday the 10th. (He would have also hated having to do the show twice, once for each coast -- not to say anything of the hours-long wait between the first show and its enactment.)


Photos

The first picture presents the movie poster for the film A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court, starring Bing Crosby. The second photo shows Crosby's 78 rpm album of songs from the movie. The album was released by Decca, the record label to which the star was contracted.




Date: March 17, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee, Tom Reddy (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) MacNamara's Band(Shamus O'Connor, John J. Stamford, The Three Jesters' Red Latham, Wamp Carlson, Guy Bonham)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Molly Malone(Traditional)
Both titles unissued.

Session: St. Patrick's Day

This episode proclaims itself a celebration of St. Patrick's Day.


Personnel

1. Guest
In honor of St. Patrick, Peggy Lee enlists Irish tenor, actor, and radio personality Clark Dennis, who sings two songs. The second number ("Molly O'Reilly") is prefaced by Lee's summarized narration of the song's romantic plot.

2. Tom Reddy
Being Irish himself, announcer Tom Reddy takes the reins of the episode's first number. He sings "MacNamara's Band" in duet with Peggy Lee. Reddy does not sing in any of the episode's other numbers.


Photos

Tom Reddy, the expert announcer for the Hollywood editions of The Chesterfield Supper Club, receives attention from hostess Peggy Lee. He was a competent singer, too. This photo is presumed to have been taken on March 17, 1949.




Date: March 24, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v), The Starlighters (Pauline Byrns, Vince Degen, Jerry Duane, Howard Hudson, Tony Paris) (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Someone Like You(Ralph Blane, Harry Warren)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Kinda Peculiar Brown(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man(Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc937 — Supper Club [3rd of 4 discs with number unknown]    (1949)

Personnel

1. Guest
Described by Peggy Lee as a family get-together, this episode features no nominal guests. In addition to the Barbours and his septet, this familial affair counts with the helping hands -- or rather, helping pipes -- of The Starlighters.


Date: March 31, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) This Can't Be Love(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I'll Be Seeing You(Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) So In Love(Cole Porter)
All titles unissued.

Dating

1. Airing Time
This Thursday episode did not air on its regular time slots (4:00 p.m. & 8:00 p.m.). It aired instead at 7:00 p.m. and 11:00 pm.


Personnel

1. Guest
On this date, country star Jimmy Wakely visits Peggy Lee's Supper Club. One of the two numbers that he sings is his top hit from the previous year, "I Love You So Much It Hurts." Countryman Wakely would eventually join forces with pop lady Margaret Whiting for a series of popular duets, but there were no such attempts at duetting on the present date.


Photos

Two pieces of Jimmy Wakely memorabilia: (1) an issue from a comic book series dedicated to the fictional adventures of the country singer and (2) the front jacket of an EP of duets with pop vocalist Margaret Whiting. The 1949 success of their original single "Slippin' Around" / "Wedding Bells" led Capitol to pair them on many other duets; their professional partnership generating generated yet more hits with tradition-oriented numbers such as "Let's Go To Church." Comics centered on country stars were not uncommon in the 1940s.




Date: April 7, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Dick Haymes, Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I Get A Kick Out Of You(Cole Porter)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) You Was(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Paul Francis Webster)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Similau (See-me-lo)(Harry Coleman, Arden Clar, Leopoldo González)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
This date marked Dick Haymes' second guest appearance on Lee's Chesterfield Supper Club. The pair tackle a duet that she had previously sung with Dean Martin, "You Was." (The other above-listed numbers are sung by Lee solo.)


Date: April 14, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Careless Hands(Bob Hilliard, Carl Sigman)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) If I Could Be With You One Hour Tonight(Henry Creamer, James P. Johnson)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Bali Ha'i(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
Peggy Lee's guest is The Great Gildersleeve (aka Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve), a character voiced by Hal Peary. The character had his own series, sponsored by Kraft. Allegedly a bachelor at this point, Gildersleeve is struck by Peggy Lee's 'jet-propelled' beauty, and faints when she kisses him. Much of the episode's dialogue between P. Gildersleeve and P. Lee is sung or rhythmically intoned, to the tune of "It's A Big, Wide Wonderful World."


Photos

Images of The Great Gildersleeve.




Date: April 21, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Dick Haymes, Peggy Lee (v)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Look Up(Floyd Huddleston, Al Rinker)
b. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Here I'll Stay(Alan Jay Lerner, Kurt Weill)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) Molly O'Reilly(Charles Gaynor)
d. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) So In Love(Cole Porter)
e. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) My Darling, My Darling(Frank Loesser)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
"Well, what do you know," exclaims Peggy Lee at the outset of this program. "There's a tall, dark, handsome man I just saw here two weeks ago standin' opposite me ... Dick Haymes!" Thus started Haymes' third guest appearance at the Chesterfield hostess' Club. The pair reads from a script that has them reminiscing about the days they shared in Benny Goodman's band. From reminiscing, they move on to reenacting the happenings of one such day. We hear them on a 1942 summer evening, after work at the Paramount Theatre, as they walk their respective dogs on the streets of New York. During the walk, the sights of the various Manhattan theaters compel them to sing numbers from the shows that were playing. Oddly, however, there is a (rather convenient) fusion of past and present: the playing shows are those that were in town in 1949, not in 1942. Of the four showtunes heard, three are rendered as duets: "Here I'll Stay," "Molly O'Reilly," and "My Darling, My Darling."


Photos

Dick Haymes guested on three episodes of Peggy Lee's Chesterfield Supper Club. In the 1950s, he would also guest on another radio show of hers, and she would return the favor by appearing on a program that he hosted.




Date: April 28, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I've Got You Under My Skin(Cole Porter)
unissued
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Once And For Always(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [3rd of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1949)
c. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) I May Be Wrong (But I Think You're Wonderful)(Harry Ruskin, Henry Sullivan)
unissued
d. Not Extant?Peggy Lee Show (NBC) (Ghost) Riders In The Sky (A Cowboy Legend)(Stan Jones)
unissued

Dating

1. Airing Time
This Thursday installment of The Chesterfield Supper Club did not air at its regular time (4:00 p.m. & 8:00 p.m.). It aired instead at 7:00 p.m. and 11:00 pm.


Personnel

1. Guest
On April 28, 1949, Frankie Laine finally made his way back to the Supper Club. In the interim, he had been touring. The "Black And Blue" hitmaker was returning to the program for another extended period as Peggy Lee's regular guest: reportedly, seven weeks. (Despite this preliminary report -- made on the show -- he actually guested on six, not seven episodes.) Of the above-listed songs, Laine is heard only in the duet "I May Be Wrong."


Photo

Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee, and Frankie Laine, presumably going through the script of one of their Chesterfield Supper Club shows (or perhaps the sheet music of one the show's songs).




Date: May 5, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) This Can't Be Love(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) When Is Sometime?(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Similau (See-me-lo)(Harry Coleman, Arden Clar, Leopoldo González)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc962 — Supper Club   (1949)

Dating

1. Airing Time
The previous week, Peggy Lee's show had aired later than usual. This week it would air earlier than usual: at 3:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.


Personnel

1. Guest
Hostess Peggy Lee and guest Frankie Laine do not sing any duets in this episode.


Date: May 12, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Careless Hands(Bob Hilliard, Carl Sigman)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Again(Dorcas Cochran, Lionel Newman)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) So In Love(Cole Porter)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Discunknown — Supper Club [3rd of 3 discs with number unknown]    (1949)

Dating

1. Airing Time
From this episode onwards, Peggy Lee's program will no longer air at what had long been its regular time (4:00 p.m., with a reprise at 8:00 p.m.). Instead, the show would continued to be broadcast on the same schedule that it had held two weeks earlier (7:00 p.m., with its reprise at 11:00 p.m. The sole exception would turn out to be the very last episode, which would hold the same time slot as last week (3:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. ).


Personnel

1. Dave Barbour
This episode's script contains what amounts to a sequel to an earlier dialogue about Dave Barbour (November 4, 1948): his shyness and muteness becomes a topic again. "But he's got a guitar and sextet that speak for him," his wife helpfully asserts on his behalf.

2. Carl Fischer
Frankie Laine's pianist accompanies him during his solo vocal rendition of "Bebop Spoken Here." Perhaps Fischer had also accompanied Laine in his solo vocals from previous episodes, but if such was the case, the show's scriptwriter had yet to acknowledge him by name. As far as I am able to ascertain, Fischer never played on Lee's numbers.

3. Guest
Guest Frankie Laine does not sing any duets with hostess Peggy Lee during this episode.


Photo

Peggy Lee, caught during a rehearsal for an episode of The Chesterfield Supper Club.





Date: May 19, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Hurry, Hurry, Hurry (Back To Me)(Don Reid)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Kiss Me Sweet(Milton Drake)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) The Hucklebuck(Roy Alfred, Andy Gibson)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) (Ghost) Riders In The Sky (A Cowboy Legend)(Stan Jones)
All titles unissued.

Session: At The Cocoanut Grove

For this installment of her show, Peggy Lee takes an imaginary trip to the Cocoanut Grove, where she and the rest of the audience see Frankie Laine and Carl Fischer perform "You're Just The Kind Of Girl." Supposedly invited to join Laine onstage, Lee duets with him on "The Hucklebuck."

Personnel

1. Guests
Once again, pianist Carl Fischer accompanies Frankie Laine in his solo performances. As for the duet "The Hucklebuck," there is no indication of involvement from Fischer. At the outset of the duet, we do hear Frankie make an exhortation to someone, but his wording ("Gentlemen. . . A one two for hucklebuck!") suggests that he is addressing Barbour's musicians, among whom there was a pianist.


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Date: May 26, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Careless Hands(Bob Hilliard, Carl Sigman)
unissued
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) While We're Young(William Engvick, Morty Palitz, Alec Wilder)
unissued
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues(Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc980 — Supper Club   (1949)

Personnel

1. Happy Birthday
2. Guest
On this day, Frankie Laine leads the singing of 'happy birthday' in honor of Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour, both of whom were about to become one full year older. Specifically, Lee was turning 29 on this very day, whereas Barbour's birthday was just around the corner, (on Saturday the 28th). Laine does no duets with Peggy Lee on this particular occasion.

3. "While We're Young"
4. Hal Schaefer
"While We're Young" is duet between Peggy Lee's voice and Hal Schaefer's piano.

5. Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires
Of the above-listed performances, this vocal group is heard only in "Careless Hands."


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Photo

Frankie Laine and Peggy Lee are seen reading through the script of one of their Chesterfield Supper Club shows. The number three on the curtain could mean that this radio show was broadcast from studio 3 at NBC.




Date: June 2, 1949

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) I Get A Kick Out Of You(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Again(Dorcas Cochran, Lionel Newman)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man(Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern)
All titles unissued.

Personnel

1. Guest
This episode marked Frankie Laine's 12th and last appearance as Peggy Lee's guest. Accompanied by Carl Fischer, Laine sings one solo vocal, "Coquette." No duet with Lee is tackled.


Songs

1. "I Get A Kick Out Of You"
Unlike her 1946 and ca. 1953 transcription recordings of the same song, this radio version of "I Get A Kick Out Of You" is fairly quick-paced and includes a coda ("there's no doubt!," spoken in a clownish voice). Another variant happens right before the coda, when Lee repeats the line I get a kick in a very fast manner.


Preservation

The present program has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Date: June 9, 1949 (Pre-recorded At An Unknown Date)

Dave Barbour And His Orchestra (acc), Ziggy Elman (t), Joe Howard (tb), Dave Barbour, George Van Eps (g), Phil Stephens (b), Hal Schaefer (p), Nick Fatool (d), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) It's A Good Day(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) So In Love(Cole Porter)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) Bali Ha'i(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Show (NBC) (Ghost) Riders In The Sky (A Cowboy Legend)(Stan Jones)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc980 — Supper Club   (1949)





Dating

1. Airing Time
Peggy Lee's last show of the 1948-1949 season was broadcast at 3:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. As with all previous programs of the series, including those hosted by Como and Stafford, it lasted 15 minutes.


Session

1. Transcription
This closing episode was transcribed -- a practice to which Lee and her producer had hitherto resorted only twice. Since Barbour and Lee had scheduled a concert tour that would take them from Texas to -- eventually -- New York, their schedule might have necessitated the performing of this episode in advance.


Songs

1. "Good Day"
2. "It's A Good Day"
Before she sings the show's first number, Peggy Lee makes the following comment: "we've got a bit of a song called Good Day for a kick off tonight. And it is that. ... except for one thing - this is our last show of the season. So, come along, Judd Conlon and bring those Rhythmaires for a shot at Good Day, will you?" Since I am relying on the episode's script and have yet to listen to this broadcast, the identification of the song in question as the Lee-penned hit "It's A Good Day" should be deemed tentative. Her wording and her omission of both the verb and article raises the possibility that she could have sung a different number. That possibility notwithstanding, she is likelier to have been referring to "It's A Good Day."


Personnel

1. Guest
During the Chesterfield Supper Club episode that was broadcast on Wednesday, June 8, 1949, Perry Como said that "tomorrow at the Supper Club, it's Peggy Lee and Frankie Laine." The comment is in line with a statement made in an earlier episode of the series: on April 8, 1949, we had been told that Laine would be on the show for seven weeks. However, Laine bade adieu to the audience and the show's hostess on his sixth appearance (June 2). It thus seems that Laine had been originally scheduled to appear in this closing episode as well; a cancellation might have been made at some point before the sixth appearance. It also seems that there was no awareness of the cancellation amidst New York chapter of the Club (Como, announcer Martin Block and, in particular, the scriptwriter of the New York show). No guest was featured in the season closer.

2. Judd Conlon And The Rhythmaires
This group backs Peggy Lee during her performances of "It's A Good Day" and "(Ghost) Riders In The Sky." Judging from the show's script, The Rhythmaires backed Lee only on those two numbers.


Preservation

This episode has not been commercially issued. Fortunately, Old-Time radio fans have preserved it.


Photos

A 1953 ad in which Peggy Lee promotes Chesterfield cigarettes. By that time, the Chesterfield Supper Club had long ceased to exist, and Lee had made the transition from the increasingly obsolete medium of radio variety shows to television and film. Her movie career in an upward swing with the filming of The Jazz Singer, she had been contracted by Chesterfield expressly to appear, solo, in this ad (as the company had done with many movie stars over the years). Also shown above is the Perry Como ad from the same series.




Unaired Episodes?

Taken from a magazine issue published in June of 1949, the first photo above is accompanied by a caption which claims that Stan Jones "looked like this last month when he dropped in on Peggy Lee's Supper Club show over NBC." No such guest appearance is reported in the detailed, seemingly complete scripts of the show that I have consulted.

If the magazine's information is accurate, various hypothetical explanations could be proposed. Peggy Lee could have pre-recorded additional episodes (or just a guest segments) in May of 1949, to be broadcast only if the show was extended beyond its scheduled June 9 closing date. Another possible explanation would be that the scripts consulted by me do fail to include this Jones guest spot.

Notice that Peggy Lee sang Stan Jones' "(Ghost) Riders In The Sky" composition in episodes from the last three months of the shown. A visit from Jones would have been suitable during any of those episodes. She had also recorded the number for Capitol in April. Her version would find favor on national radio, peaked at #2 in Billboardd's disc jockey chart .





Song Index

The following index lists all the numbers that Peggy Lee is known to have sung for The Chesterfield Supper Club. Most of them were performed while Lee was serving as one of the show's regular hosts. A smaller portion comes from Lee's guest appearances in Supper Club episodes hosted by her peers Perry Como and Jo Stafford. Along with the titles of the songs, this list also includes the date of the episode on which they were performed.

Only one Peggy Lee performance has been left out: Chesterfield's ABC jingle, which Lee usually sang, for just a few seconds, near the start of the episodes which she hosted. Excluded as well are any solos performed not by Lee but by her guests or by hosts Perry Como and Jo Stafford.

A. Solo Vocals
1.+ Again (May 12, 1949)
2.+ Again (June 2, 1949)
3. Ain't Doin' Bad Doin' Nothin' (November 4, 1948)
4.+ Baby, You Can Count On Me (August 8, 1946)
5.+ Baby, You Can Count On Me (September 20, 1946)
6. + Bali Ha'i (April 14, 1949)
7. + Bali Ha'i (June 9, 1949)
8. Bluebird Singing In My Heart, A (March 3, 1949)
9. Buttons And Bows (November 11, 1948)
10.+ Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man (January 20, 1949)
11.+ Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man (March 24, 1949)
12.+ Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man (June 2, 1949)
13.+ Careless Hands (April 14, 1949)
14.+ Careless Hands (May 12, 1949)
15.+ Careless Hands (May 26, 1949)
16. Christmas Song, The (December 16, 1948)
17. Christmas Spell, The (December 23, 1948)
18.+ Come Rain Or Come Shine (August 8, 1946)
19.+ Come Rain Or Come Shine (February 17, 1949)
20. Easy Street: Street Parade Medley (February 24, 1949)
21.+ Fine And Dandy (September 30, 1948)
22.+ Fine And Dandy (November 4, 1948)
23.+ Here I'll Stay (January 13, 1949; for a duet version, see section B below)
24.+ Here I'll Stay (April 21, 1949; for a duet version, see section B below)
25. Hold Me (January 13, 1949)
26. Hurry, Hurry, Hurry (Back To Me) (May 19, 1949)
27. I Can See It Your Way, Baby (March 28, 1946)
28. I Can't Give You Anything But Love (March 3, 1949)
29. I Cried For You (February 10, 1949)
30.+ I Don't Know Enough About You (March 26, 1946)
31.+ I Don't Know Enough About You (May 7, 1946)
32.+ I Don't Know Enough About You (August 6, 1946)
33.+ I Don't Know Enough About You (December 16, 1948)
34.+ I Get A Kick Out Of You (April 7, 1949)
35.+ I Get A Kick Out Of You (June 2, 1949)
36. I Got Lucky In The Rain (December 9, 1948)
37. I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues (May 26, 1949)
38.+ I Wanna Go Where You Go (October 21, 1948)
39.+ I Wanna Go Where You Go (December 9, 1948)
40.+ I Wanna Go Where You Go (January 27, 1949)
41. I'll Be Seeing You (March 31, 1949)
42. I'm Glad I Waited For You (March 28, 1946)
43. I'm In The Mood For Love (February 3, 1949)
44. I've Got You Under My Skin (April 28, 1949)
45. If I Could Be With You One Hour Tonight (April 14, 1949)
46.+ It's A Good Day (December 2, 1948)
47.+ It's A Good Day (February 17, 1949)
48.+ It's A Good Day (June 9, 1949)
49. It's Magic (September 30, 1948)
50. Just For Now (November 25, 1948)
51. Kinda Peculiar Brown (March 24, 1949)
52. Kiss Me Sweet (May 19, 1949)
53. Linger In My Arms A Little Longer (August 8, 1946)
54. Linger In My Arms A Little Longer (September 16, 1946)
55.+ Little Bird Told Me, A (December 16, 1948)
56.+ Little Bird Told Me, A (January 13, 1949)
57.+ Little Bird Told Me, A (February 10, 1949)
58. Little Jack Frost, Get Lost (January 20, 1949)
59. Little Old Car (Smoke Dream) (October 21, 1948)
60.+ Look Up (January 6, 1949)
61.+ Look Up (February 24, 1949)
62.+ Look Up (April 21, 1949)
63. Love Somebody (October 7, 1948)
64.+ Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere (October 14, 1948)
65.+ Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere (November 11, 1948)
66. Lullaby For Nicki Lee Foster (Smoke Dream) (November 11, 1948)
67.+ Mañana (February 12, 1948)
68.+ Mañana [Thanksgiving Version] (November 25, 1948)
69.+ Maybe You'll Be There (October 21, 1948)
70.+ Maybe You'll Be There (November 18, 1948)
71. Molly Malone (March 17, 1949)
72.+ My Darling, My Darling (December 2, 1948; for a duet version, see section B below)
73.+ My Darling, My Darling (January 6, 1949; for a duet version, see section B below)
74. Nature Boy (April 22, 1948)
75.+ Nightingale Can Sing The Blues, A (August 6, 1946)
76.+ Nightingale Can Sing The Blues, A (September 20, 1946)
77.+ On A Slow Boat To China (November 4, 1948; for a duet version, see section B below)
78.+ On A Slow Boat To China (December 9, 1948; for a duet version, see section B below)
79.+ Once And For Always (March 10, 1949)
80.+ Once And For Always (April 28, 1949)
81.+ (Ghost) Riders In The Sky (April 28, 1949)
82.+ (Ghost) Riders In The Sky (May 19, 1949)
83.+ (Ghost) Riders In The Sky (June 9, 1949)
84. Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town (December 23, 1948)
85. Silent Night: Christmas Concert Medley (December 23, 1948)
86.+ Similau (April 7, 1949)
87.+ Similau (May 5, 1949)
88. Smoke Dream, A (October 7, 1948)
89.+ So Dear To My Heart (November 18, 1948)
90.+ So Dear To My Heart (January 20, 1949)
91.+ So In Love (January 27, 1949)
92.+ So In Love (March 3, 1949)
93.+ So In Love (March 31, 1949)
94.+ So In Love (April 21, 1949)
95.+ So In Love (May 12, 1949)
96.+ So In Love (June 9, 1949)
97. Somebody Else Is Taking My Place (November 11, 1948)
98.+ Someone Like You (February 3, 1949)
99.+ Someone Like You (March 24, 1949)
100. Stormy Weather (September 30, 1948)
101.+ 'Tain't So, Honey, 'Tain't So (October 7, 1948)
102.+ 'Tain't So, Honey, 'Tain't So (October 28, 1948)
103. [Musical Commercial] There'll Be Some Changes Made: New Year's Chesterfield Resolution (December 30, 1948)
104.+ This Can't Be Love (March 31, 1949)
105.+ This Can't Be Love (May 5, 1949)
106.+ Trouble Is A Man (June 1, 1948)
107.+ Trouble Is A Man (December 30, 1948)
108. Waiting For The Train To Come In (March 26, 1946)
109.+ What More Can A Woman Do (December 2, 1948)
110.+ What More Can A Woman Do (February 24, 1949)
111.+ When Is Sometime? (May 5, 1949; for a duet version, see section B below)
112. While We're Young (May 26, 1949)
113.+ Why Don't You Do Right? (August 6, 1946)
114.+ Why Don't You Do Right? (November 11, 1948)
115.+ Why Don't You Do Right? (January 6, 1949)
116. You, The Stone, And Your Nose (A Smoke Dream) (October 14, 1948)
117. You Call Everybody 'Darling' (October 14, 1948)
118. You Call Everybody 'Darling' (November 18, 1948)
119.+ You Was Right, Baby (March 26, 1946)
120.+ You Was Right, Baby (September 20, 1946)
121.+ You Was Right, Baby (November 25, 1948)


B. Duets, Trios, And Whole-Cast Performances
122. Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive (Duet with Johnny Mercer; February 17, 1949)
123. Baby, I Need You (Duet with Frankie Laine; January 13, 1949)
124. Basin Street Blues: Street Parade Medley (Duet with Johnny Mercer; February 24, 1949)
125. Beale Street Blues: Street Parade Medley (Duet with Johnny Mercer; February 24, 1949)
126. Blum Blum (I Wonder Who I Am) (Duet with Johnny Mercer; February 17, 1949)
127. Forty-Second Street: Street Parade Medley (Duet with Johnny Mercer; February 24, 1949)
128.+ Here I'll Stay (Duet with Dick Haymes; February 3, 1949; for solo versions, see section A above)
129. Hucklebuck, The (Duet with Frankie Laine; May 19, 1949)
130. I May Be Wrong (Duet with Frankie Laine; April 28, 1949)
131. If You Stub Your Toe On The Moon (Duet with Bing Crosby; March 10, 1949)
132.+ It's A Most Unusual Day (Duet with Nat King Cole; October 14, 1948)
133.+ It's A Most Unusual Day (Duet with Nat King Cole; October 28, 1948)
134. Jingle Bells (Duet with the group The Mills Brothers, December 16, 1948)
135. Laroo Lilli Bolero (Duet with Perry Como; (April 22, 1948)
1367. MacNamara's Band (Duet with Tom Reddy; March 17, 1949)
137.+ Mañana (Duet with Perry Como; June 1, 1948)
138. Molly O'Reilly (Duet with Dick Haymes; April 21, 1949)
139. [Musical Commercial] Don't Paint A Mustache On The Girl In The Cigarette Ad (Duet with Nat King Cole; October 21, 1948)
140. [Musical Commercial] Mañana (Chesterfield Version) (Duet with Perry Como; June 1, 1948)
141.+ My Darling, My Darling (Duet with Dick Haymes; April 21, 1949; for solo versions, see section A above)
142.+ On A Slow Boat To China (Duet with Frankie Laine; December 30, 1948; for solo versions, see section A above)
143.+ On The Sunny Side Of The Street (Duet with Dick Haymes; November 11, 1948)
144.+ On The Sunny Side Of The Street (Trio with Frankie Laine and Tom Reddy; January 20, 1949)
145.+ When Is Sometime? (Duet with Bing Crosby; March 10, 1949; for a solo version, see section A above)
146. When My Sugar Walks Down The Street: Street Parade Medley (Duet with Johnny Mercer, possibly involving the singing of other cast members as well; February 24, 1949)
147. White Christmas: Christmas Concert Medley (Duet With Frankie Laine; December 23, 1948)
148. You Can Depend On Me (Duet with Frankie Laine; January 27, 1949)
149.+ You Was (Duet with Dean Martin; February 10, 1949)
150.+ You Was (Duet with Buddy Clark; March 3, 1949)
151.+ You Was (Duet with Dick Haymes; April 7, 1949)



C. Codes

1. The + Sign
In the listings above, a plus sign serves as indication that Peggy Lee performed the given song more than once in The Chesterfield Supper Club.


D. Inventory

1. Total Number Of Performances
This index's listings show that Peggy Lee turned in about 151 performances for The Chesterfield Supper Club. (This total should be deemed approximate rather than exact because many episodes are not extant (or not known to be extant). As a result, there are performances for which I have only tentative corroboration of her involvement. Unofficially, however, I do believe the list's total to be correct.) Of the 151 performances listed, 121 are solo vocals, 1 is a trio, and 29 are duets (with the possibility that a handful of the duets might have also been joined by additional cast members, for some ensemble line readings).

2. Total Number Of Song Titles
When the reprises are subtracted from the 151 total number of performances, the new, reduced total comes to 91 or 94 songs. (Depending on the viewer's opinion, three of these reprises could be excluded, or they could kept. One reprise is the Thanksgiving version of "Mañana," which features the same music as -- but different lyrics from -- the original version. Ditto for the Chesterfield version of "Mañana." The third number is the earliest of Lee's two versions of "Fine And Dandy," which has the same music as the known standard but, once again, features different lyrics.)

3. Most Reprised Songs
Quite a few of the songs heard in the Supper Club were reprised by the hosts in subsequent episodes. Peggy Lee's most often sung tune (six times) was "So In Love," a Cole Porter composition that was brand new at the time, and which she would go on to wax for Capitol Records nearly a decade later. Also receiving a relatively high number of reprises was Lee's very own composition "I Don't Know Enough About You," which had been a popular hit a few years earlier.

Among the duets, "You Was" received plenty of mileage as well -- and not just within the realms of The Chesterfield Supper Club. In addition to her three performances from this show, Lee had recorded "You Was" with labelmate Dean Martin for Capitol. She would also go on to sing this Burke and Webster novelty with Bing Crosby, on his show. A partially similar pattern applies to the then-popular novelty "A Little Bird Told Me": sung by Lee in two of Crosby's shows, both times with the host, and solo in three episodes of The Chesterfield Supper Club, though not commercially recorded by the songstress.


E. Issues

1. Supper Club [AFRS ET]
As shown through the present page, the Armed Forced Radio Service edited and transcribed at least some episodes of NBC's Supper Club, for use on the Forces' own radio network. Naturally, this page lists only the AFRS transcription discs of which I am aware. Many of the other Peggy Lee episodes listed are also presumed to have been transcribed by AFRS, but I have not been able to find details about the discs.


Acknowledgement

I would like to express my gratitude to Adrian Daff (an expert on The Starlighters and various other vocal groups of the 1940s and 1950s) for his invaluable guidance during my search for specifics about Peggy Lee's appearances in The Chesterfield Supper Club. I am also grateful to Daff for his reading of this page after it was completed, and for recommending various corrections.






Sessions Reported: 47

Performances Reported: 151

Unique Songs Reported: 95

Unique Issues Reported: 19