Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee
(On The Radio, Part V)
by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Jan 28, 2017





The Peggy Lee Shows

This page of The Peggy Lee Bio-Discography focuses on a 1952 CBS program formally known as Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee, though it was more informally called The Peggy Lee Show in contemporary magazines and press releases.  All 82 known episodes of this ten-month-long radio series are chronologically discussed herein. The present page also offers a sizable amount of detail about the show's history, sponsorship, format and personnel. I have placed such general details right after the discussion of the series' last known episode, which bears an October 30, 1952 broadcasting date. (There might have been an episode on November 4, too, but the possibility is awaiting full corroboration. Ditto for the possibility of a January 1, 1952 episode, as will be explained below.) 

Two indexes can be found near the bottom of the page.  The first one lists exactly 400 vocal performances, all of them sung by Peggy Lee. They were culled from the combined logs of Club 88 and The Peggy Lee Rexall Show, the latter being yet another series informally known as The Peggy Lee Show.  (A variety of reasons allow for the qualification of The Peggy Lee Rexall Show as a prequel to her Club 88. In some parts of this discography, including this page's index, I have indeed treated the two series as an unit. Elsewhere, however, I have chosen to discuss the 1951 Rexall series separately, for the sake of greater clarity. Specifics about the connections between the two series can be found in the intro to a page fully dedicated to The Peggy Lee Rexall Show.)  As for the other index in the present page, it names the 54 guests known to have been featured in both Peggy Lee series (1951-1952).
 
I would like to take advantage of the opportunity afforded by these prefatory remarks to acknowledge my gratitude to both Holly Foster Wells, granddaughter of Peggy Lee, and Janet W. McKee, research librarian at the Recorded Sound Research Center of the Library of Congress.  Without their kind assistance, I would have not been able to fill significant gaps in the information that I have provided below.  I also wish to thank David Torresen, webmaster of the official Peggy Lee website, for giving me a set of photocopies which he once received from the Library of Congress.  Supplied by another librarian at the Recorded Sound Research Center, such photocopied pages contained the basic, 'skeletal' documentation on which I originally built the work that evolved into this page. (As might be surmised, the contents of the photocopied material was circumscribed to each episode's songtitles, bandleader’s name, and numerical cataloguing.)  Furthermore, through an appointment kindly set up by Torresen, he and I had the pleasure of spending a few hours listening to some of the show's episodes at LOC, as they have been preserved in the institution's tape library. Obviously, the notes that I took during that brief visit to DC's LOC in 2004 greatly helped in my preparation of the present work, belatedly undertaken ten years later.

(Photos above:  images used to promote Lee's Club 88 show.  The middle one bears the date April 22, 1952, which corresponds with one of the episodes listed below.)





Locations, Dates, Sources, Issues

Location
New York Versus Los Angeles. The show under discussion originally ran on the CBS-radio network, for at least 82 episodes. (Though not highly likely, the possibility that there were a few additional episodes, now lost and undocumented, cannot be discarded.) The first 35 or 36 episodes were broadcast from New York, and the remaining episodes were beamed from Los Angeles.

Dating
1952 Versus 1953. CBS broadcasted Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee (also known as The Peggy Lee Show) from the first week of January 1952 to either October 30 or November 4, 1952. The show was re-aired on the Armed Forces Radio network in 1953. If the early episodes were pre-recorded (there's no official information on that matter), the earliest tapings could have taken place in December of 1951. That possibility can be gathered from the following comment, found in the November 24, 1951 issue of The Cash Box: "Peggy Lee was due in Gotham in the next few days to start her big CBS deal on radio and television."

Sources
CBS & AFRS. The most extensive source of available information about the show is the repository of 1953 AFRS broadcasts at the Library of Congress, as well as the files that LOC keeps of such broadcasts. The files specify, for instance, which songs were heard in each AFRS episode. As for the original CBS broadcasts (1952), there are no equivalent files for them, unfortunately. Worse yet, only about half of the CBS broadcasts is known to be extant. Thus, the following query must be posed: how faithful to the 1952 CBS originals were the 1953 AFRS re-airings? My current answer to this question is partial and multi-layered. Early CBS episodes (i.e., those broadcast from New York) were rather faithfully transcribed by AFRS' engineers: the same songs in the same order are heard in both the NY originals and their AFRS equivalents, with deletions applied just to the spoken segments -- announcements, promotions, and some of the chatter. (This conclusion is based on an ample yet by no means exhaustive sample of episodes.) This pattern of close re-transmission seem to have become far looser, however, when AFRS dealt with CBS episodes from the mid- and late period (i.e., those broadcast from Los Angeles). On a separate matter of interest, I should add that certain details point to a couple of possibilities that would further complicate matters. (1) AFRS might have used songs from some of the LA broadcasts more than once (i.e. the same Peggy Lee vocal would have been incorporated into more than one AFRS episode). (2) AFRS might have inserted songs from the 1951 Peggy Lee Rexall Show in its AFRS rebroadcasts of the 1952 Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee. Nevertheless, the currently available data for all such possibilities and details is too vague to allow for full confirmation, or for me to attempt any further deductions.

Caveats
Tentative Data. Two main caveats should be gathered from the above-explained problems with extant audio and primary sources. First, the song titles listed under each episode (especially, the later ones) are tentative. At the present time, such titles are believed to be generally correct, but discovery of additional information in the future could lead to correction or modification of the data. Second, the versions of songs performed in multiple episodes are in need of further scrutiny. Some of them could actually be the exact same performances, broadcasted in one episode and then re-used in later ones. (Because I do not have direct access to most of the audio, I am not able to determine how many repeat performances there are, if any at all.) I would also like to allude, in passing, to a third caveat. It pertains to the CD set At Last: The Lost Radio Recordings. For the time being, this discography's dating of the tracks on that set is tentative. A clearer explanation as to the reason for the tentativeness is provided below, under the notes for the broadcast dated January 24, 1952.

Photos
Commercial Releases. Pictured at the top of this section is the main and best commercial issue of the music from the radio show to which this page is dedicated. Released in 2015 by Real Gone Music, the 2CD set At Last: The Lost Radio Recordings contains 44 tracks from the show (although one track, "After All, It's Spring," might instead be from The Peggy Lee Rexall Show, a companion CBS radio series broadcast one year earlier.) All 44 CD tracks are numbers that Peggy Lee never recorded commercially -- neither for record labels nor for transcription services. Pictured immediately below are two other commercial issues that consist mainly of material from Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee. Rather than a selection of tracks, both issues actually feature full episodes as they were heard in their re-aired, edited versions on the American Forces Radio (AFR) network. Furthermore, the first issue adds a full episode of an earlier show, The Summer Electric Hour With Peggy Lee And Woody Herman (1947), while the second issue (shown in its three main incarnations) adds a full episode of the 1951 Peggy Lee Rexall Show. As of 2016, these are the only existent CDs and LPs dedicated mainly or in large part
to material from Club 88.






Date: January 1, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

Songs: unknown

Note: Until recently, the limited information at my reach had led me to assume that the first episode of Club 88 was the one broadcast on January 3, 1952. This assumption of mine is now being challenged by my belated discovery that the show was reviewed on the January 2, 1952 issue of Variety. Reviews of radio shows were normally printed only after the premiere of the program under review -- oftentimes on the day after. Hence the existence of a January 1, 1952 debut episode seems likely. (The reason why I am being tentative on the episode's existence is that I neither have access to the review nor know its contents. I am hoping to gain access to it some time this year.)

Guest: unknown, if any. For this hypothetical opening episode, Lee could have had a guest come over, just as she would do for all subsequent episodes of the series. However, it is just as possible that such episode would have not featured a guest, in order to further highlight the hostess' singing on the evening of the show's debut.


Date: January 3, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Richard Hayes, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Fine And Dandy - 1:10(Paul James, Kay Swift)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One More Chance - 2:41(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Insomnia (Is A Lack Of Attitude) - 2:28(Willard Robison)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I've Got My Love To Keep Me Warm - 1:48(Irving Berlin)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 1 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Richard Hayes is the first guest known to appear in the 1952 edition of Peggy Lee's own show, called Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee. Though nearly forgotten nowadays, this male singer was a well-known hitmaker in his heyday. From 1949 to 1952, he rode on a high wave of success, placing a healthy succession of 13 hits in the top 25 of Billboard's main music chart. Hayes' biggest seller remained his debut recording of "The Old Master Painter," which charted in December of 1949, when he was merely 19 years old. Peaking at #2, the teenager's version managed to upstage competing releases by not only the duo of Peggy Lee and Mel Tormé (#9) but also the likes of Frank Sinatra (#13) and Dick Haymes (#4), both of whom were already very well-established crooners by that time (albeit momentarily waning in popularity).

For this singing guest appearance, Richard Hayes picked "Out In The Cold Again," another one of his top ten hits. He also tackled "I've Got My Love To Keep Me Warm" as a duet with the hostess.

A fine baritone who sometimes adopted intonation reminiscent of Frankie Laine and at other times turned to a more non-descript style, Hayes transitioned to television variety programming in the mid-1950s , and later on to radio hosting.


Songs

1. "Insomnia (Is A Lack Of Attitude)"
The title given to this song should be deemed tentative. Before she sings the number, Peggy Lee credits Willard Robison as the songwriter, but does not identify the song by name. My research on Robison and his catalogue of compositions has yet to uncover which of his songs this one could be; it might have not been officially published. The provisional title that I have used above is based on my own listening of the song's lyrics.


Date: January 8, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Johnnie Ray (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Kiss To Build A Dream On - 2:23(Bert Kalmar, Oscar Hammerstein II, Harry Ruby)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Undecided - 2:24(Sid Robin, Charlie Shavers)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Slumming On Park Avenue - 1:39(Irving Berlin)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) When You're Smiling - 1:20(Larry Shay, Joe Goodwin, Marvin Fisher)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 2 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Following in the footsteps of Richard Hayes, another young male singer came to visit Peggy Lee during the subsequent episode of her 1952 show. Like Hayes, Johnnie Ray had his greatest success with his first pop single, "Cry," which topped the 1951 charts for 11 weeks. (Ray's one previous hit had been confined to the rhythm & blues chart.) Twenty-seven years old and hence seven years Lee's junior at the time of this guest appearance, Ray was barely beginning his reign over the pop charts. He would end up scoring 27 hits between 1951 and 1957, collecting along the way a few top ten albums as well.

During the first of various visits to Peggy Lee's radio series, Johnnie Ray chose to sing "The Little White Cloud That Cried." That number had been the flip side of his aforementioned top 1951 single, and had also turned out to be a big hit for him, peaking at number two in the main Billboard singles chart. In addition to doing that solo performance, Ray joined Lee for a duet version of Irving Berlin's "Slumming On Park Avenue."

Ray actually made three visits to Lee's show (January 8, 1952 / April 8, 1952 / April 22, 1952). Such trio of radio appearances would be followed by a fourth one on television (in a 1957 episode of The Jackie Gleason Show, during which Lee served as the program's temporary hostess, while Gleason was away.)


Date: January 10, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

Songs: unknown

All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" Transcription: Program No. 3 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Note: Data about this episode is missing because one of my main sources, the Library of Congress, does not seem to have a copy of it. Although the endnotes of this discography will cover this subject matter in some detail, an overarching explanation might be in order herein, too. The radio series under discussion (Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee) was broadcast by the CBS network in 1952. Only about half of such CBS episodes appear to have survived, and data about the program, as it aired on CBS, is scarce. Fortunately, the show was re-broadcast by the AFRS network in 1952 (under the simpler name The Peggy Lee Show), and that catalogue of re-broadcasts has survived almost in its entirety. AFRS edited and produced a total of 82 episodes, and gave a number to each one of them. The Library of Congress holds copies for 81 of the AFRS episodes. Seemingly missing from LOC is the third program in its series.

Guest: Like most other details about this episode, the identity of its guest remains unknown.


Date: January 15, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Golden Gate Quartet (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'm Gonna Live Till I Die - 2:04(Al Hoffman, Walter Kent, Manny Kurtz)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One More Chance - 2:41(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Solitaire - 2:46(Renee Borek, King Guion, Carl Nutter)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little David, Play On Your Harp - 2:39(Traditional)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 4 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Formed in 1934 and still active today, The Golden Gate Quartet had its first peak in popularity during the prewar years. A second peak took place when the group went on an European tour in the mid 1950s. The tour would reignite audiences' appreciation for their expert handling of both spirituals and secular standards. After the initial touring years, the quartet decided to settle in Europe. As time and music trends kept on going by, they became more of a worldwide traveling group -- one that would also incorporate doo-wop and rhythm & blues to their gospel-grounded repertoire.

Cultivating a style that oftentimes came across as inspired by The Mills Brothers, this quartet brought swing and jazz techniques to the field of gospel music. Their solid reputation in the US from the 1930s to the 1950s is attested by the many record labels for which they recorded back then, including most of the majors (Columbia, Mercury, RCA, Capitol). Around the time when they were invited to appear in Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee, they could also be found sharing the bill with The Duke Ellington Orchestra at populist venues such as New York's Paramount Theatre.

Faced with the first of various visits to Peggy Lee' show, the inspired foursome regaled her audience with a rendition of Louis Armstrong's "Brother Bill." They were subsequently joined by the hostess for a rendition of the spiritual "Little David, Play On Your Harp." The Golden Gate Quartet would go on to make five additional appearances (February 5, 1952 / February 19, 1952 / February 21, 1952 / February 28, 1952 / March 20, 1952), thereby becoming the most frequent guest of the show's New York-based edition. (An LA-based edition would start with the May 6, 1952 episode.)


Songs And Songwriters

1. Solitaire
For the song “Solitaire,” I have listed the three songwriters that are credited in the sheet music. (King Guion is credited with the music, Borek and Nutter with the lyrics.) BMI lists a fourth songwriter by the name of Claire Gaber Wigham. I am not sure that this fourth credit applies to the original composition. Elsewhere, I am seeing Wigham’s name connected to a version of “Solitaire” sung by the doo-wop group The Allures; it might thus be that Wigham is listed at BMI on account of a lyrical or musical addition made to that version in particular.


Date: January 17, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) What Is This Thing Called Love? - 1:28(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Domino - 3:09(Louis Ferrari, Don Raye)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive - 1:58(Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Old Black Magic - 1:38(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) And So To Sleep Again - 2:10(Joe Marsala, Sunny Skylar)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 5 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Best remembered for his frequent appearances as panelist and host of TV game shows that were popular in the 1950s and 1960s, Robert Q. Lewis also made his presence known on the radio, theatre, cinema, nightclub and even lecturing circuits. The above-shown photos bring attention to one of the personality's trademarks: his horn-rimmed eyeglasses. Another trademark was the Q in his name, which he liked to describe as standing for "quizzical."

At the time of this appearance in Club 88, Lee and Lewis counted themselves among those who shared CBS' premises: both hosted their own shows on the network. Robert Q. Waxworks (1951-1952) featured Mr. Quizzical as both a disc jockey (playing vintage records that he often chose for their comedic bent) and an interviewer of music acts (in many cases, established stars of previous decades, no longer in the limelight). From the 1940s to the 1960s, Lewis made a firm dent in the record business as well, releasing singles and albums that variously fell under the categories of nostalgia, comedy, and satire. For his guest spot in this Club 88 installment, he plugged his then-current single "Grand Central Station," on MGM Records. No duets were performed.


Performances

1. "Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive"
In this and other episodes of her show, Peggy Lee's interpretation of that Johnny Mercer standard included the song's verse. The presence of the verse is worth mentioning because her only actual recording of the song made for the World Transcription Service, lacks it. (The exclusion was probably dictated by space limitations in the prospective transcription disc).


Date: January 22, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Button Up Your Overcoat - 1:17(Lew Brown, Buddy G. DeSylva, Ray Henderson)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Unforgettable - 2:09(Irving Gordon)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Mañana - 2:22(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 6 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Continuing her spotlight on up-and-coming male artists (which so far had featured Richard Hayes and Johnnie Ray), this episode of Peggy Lee's 1952 show turned its attention on Tommy Edwards. After spending most of the 1940s working as a club pianist and demo singer, Edwards had first attracted widespread attention in 1951, thanks to his top 20 hits "The Other Side Of The Mountain" and "It's All In The Game," both on MGM Records.

Edwards' recording career would find him alternating between the trends of the day and a more traditional style, the latter applied mostly to the ballads that he sang. Case in point: Edwards' approach to his most famous record. In 1951, he had sung "It's All In The Game" as a soft ballad, backed with strings -- to no great success. In 1958, he would re-record the number as a midtempo with a more contemporary streak (a bit r&b, a bit doo-wop). The 1958 version climbed all the way to the top of Billboard's main chart. Even after such phenomenal success, he did not completely or inexorably move on to the modern sounds of the day, but still cultivated a more traditional balladic style as well. (Incidentally, such a style betrayed the enormous influence that Nat King Cole once exerted over young African-American crooners.) Two years Lee's junior, Edwards regrettably died of a brain aneurysm at the relatively young age of 47.

For this 1952 guest appearance in Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee, Tommy Edwards sang two solos. Being also a songwriter, the singer-pianist picked as his first choice a novelty which he had composed, "That Chick's Too Young To Fry." The ditty had actually given him solid access to the music business back in 1946, when Louis Jordan had picked it up and taken it to #3 in the music charts. Edwards' second offering for this broadcast was his then-current hit "Please, Mr. Sun" (#22), which Lee herself would go on to reprise in many future shows. Lee and Edwards did not sing any duets during the episode, but perhaps they did so on the tube four days later, when they both guested on the CBS TV show Songs For Sale.


Date: January 24, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Most Unusual Day - 1:17(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'll See You In My Dreams - 1:58(Gus Kahn, Isham Jones)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Kiss To Build A Dream On - 2:25(Bert Kalmar, Oscar Hammerstein II, Harry Ruby)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 7 — Peggy Lee   (1953)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)

Guest




Peggy Lee's spotlight on up-and-coming male singers kept on shining, focusing during this episode on a then 24-year-old New Yorker of Caribbean descent. She captured Harry Belafonte at a time when the future Hollywood actor (film debut: 1953), recording star and multiple-award winner (Grammy, Tony, Emmy, etc.) had yet to record an album or even have a hit single. His 1949 masters on Roost (one single) and Capitol (one EP) had failed to attract much of a buying audience. He had sung them mostly in a traditional pop vein. Fortunately, despite the lack of record sales and chart action, his concurrent career as a nightclub performer was booming.

Change was afoot, though. Dissatisfaction with racial segregation, especially as practiced in nightclubs, led Belafonte to quit singing altogether, though fortunately the withdrawal turned out to be brief. In late 1951, he recast himself as a folk singer and, the following year, joined the RCA label as such.

It was thus during his first year with RCA that Harry Belafonte accepted the invitation to perform in Club 88 from Peggy Lee and her team. The traditional European folk ballad "O, No, John" (aka "The Spanish Merchant's Daughter") was Belafonte's choice for the first of his two guest appearances in Lee's show. He did not duet with Lee on this particular occasion, but he would do so on his second guest appearance (March 11, 1952).

The young man would finally enjoy three top 20 hits between 1953 and 1954, along with a top 3 debut album (1954), but his music career would not kick into high gear until the 1956-1957 period, when he would place two albums in the top of the charts, the second of them being the ultra popular Calypso.


Issues

1. At Last: The Lost Radio Recordings [CD]
This 2CD set consists of 45 tracks, all of them from Peggy Lee's own 1951-1952 shows on the CBS-radio network. As can be seen above, three of the tracks are listed under the present episode of her 1952 show.

One of the 45 tracks is called "Peggy Lee Show Opening," and does not feature a song. All the other 44 tracks comprise vocals sung by Lee.

Be advised that many of the set's 45 tracks, including those listed above, are not definitively dated. They fall instead under an umbrella of tentative dates. The tentativeness is due to lack of enough specific information about the versions featured in the CD set. Let's take, for instance, the tune "It's A Most Unusual Day," which was sung by Lee in two episodes of Club 88 (January 24 & March 27, 1952). I simply do not know from which of the two episodes the CD's version comes. Faced with such a dilemma, I have picked the earliest of the logical possibilities. In the case of "It's A Most Unusual Day," the earliest possibility was, obviously, this broadcast's version. The same dilemma applies to 30 additional tracks from the set.

For the record, here is an alphabetically organized list of the other 14 CD tracks, all of which have already been conclusively identified: "And So To Sleep Again," "Come On-A My House," "Cry," "Domino," "Getting To Know You," "Go, Go, Go," "Heigh-Ho (It's Off To Work We Go)," "I'll Never Smile Again," "I'll See You In My Dreams," "Just One More Chance," "Little White Cloud That Cried (The)," "My Darling, My Darling," "Pretty-Eyed Baby," and "Singing In The Rain." (There is one additional CD track, titled "Peggy Lee Radio Show Opening," which has not been factored into this account.)

Crucial for the solution of this dilemma is the ability to do a close listening of the relevant audio sources, in order to pinpoint which of the reprised titles are the ones heard in the CD set. Unfortunately, I do not currently have access to the relevant audio sources -- hence, then, my decision to identify all 30 'dubious" tracks through educated guesses, at least for the time being. I do hope to be able to conclusively date each track in the future, once additional information is forthcoming.


Date: January 29, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Danny Scholl (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You - 1:20(Harold Adamson, Walter Donaldson)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Since My Love Has Gone (Addio, Del Passato) - 2:39(Giuseppe Verdi, Herbert Wasserman)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Don't Know Enough About You - 2:05(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Singing In The Rain - 1:45(Arthur Freed, Nacio Herb Brown)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) What Is This Thing Called Love? - 1:26(Cole Porter)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 8 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Coming to visit Peggy Lee during this episode was her contemporary Danny Scholl (born 1921), an actor who boasted a sizable physical build (6'4") and a similarly impressive resume. Spanning the worlds of Broadway, film, television, and music, such a resume included appearances as Glenn Miller's boy vocalist, roles in Johnny Mercer's Texas, Lil' Darlin' and Phil Silver's Top Banana, an Emmy-nominated turn in the TV series The Texan, singles recorded on major labels -- Decca, Coral, RCA Victor -- and exposure in numerous music variety TV programs. Most notably, he is said to have guested in over 40 episodes of Jack Paar's TV show (a claim that I have not confirmed).

Scholl also gained attention for his patriotism. Nicknamed "the singing soldier," he began his military career by spending about four years singing overseas with Miller's band, and later without him. Then he volunteered in the Air Force, spending various additional years as an active member. Regrettably, his well-earned rewards (e.g., one medal and two bronze stars for Bravery) were offset by a serious injury, incurred while stationed overseas: a broken spine, which directly led to relief from duty.

His health rapidly deteriorated afterwards. Not yet 40, Scholl suffered two strokes in the late 1950s, requiring brain surgery and extensive therapy. In or around 1961, a third stroke left him in a wheelchair, unable to walk for the remainder of his life. A fourth stroke hit him in 1979. Scholl was then told that he would never be able to sing again -- a grim verdict that his doctors had actually passed after the previous strokes, too. Once again, his vocal chords defied the odds. In 1983, he even self-released an album, whose front cover is shown above. The choice of title for the album (No Man Is An Island taken from a 1954 single) is telling, and so are some of the other numbers in the track listing: "The Impossible Dream," "With A Song In My Heart," and "My Way." The year of this album's release also brought about his passing, at age 63.

One curious chapter in this unfortunate artist's life revolves around his marriage -- the only matrimonial tie mentioned in the sources that I consulted. On Valentine's Day of 1965, a 44-year-old Scholl tied the knot with 71-year-old silent movie star Corinne Griffith. She is said to have sought an annulment within days, on the grounds that the marriage had not been consummated. (Gossip rags claimed that, during the court date, Scholl collapsed on the stand, while a possibly dementia-addled Griffith shocked witnesses with the absurd claims that she was not Corinne but her own -- and much younger -- sister, and that she was guilty of identity theft.)

But, back in 1952, Danny Scholl was a lucky thirty-year-old actor basking in the success of both Texas, Lil' Darlin' and Top Banana (with the Hollywood version of the latter in his near future). A happy camper while staying at Club 88, Scholl obliged hostess Peggy Lee with a solo version of "Undecided." In Lee's company, Scholl also took a pleasant musical stroll, as they merrily went "Singing In The Rain" together.


Date: January 31, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Jack Haskell, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:40(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:24(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? - 1:56(Traditional)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Let's Get Away From It All - 1:50(Matt Dennis, Tom Adair)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 9" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 9 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




This episode's guest was Jack Haskell, best remembered nowadays as a TV personality who served as sidekick for Dave Garroway, as substitute announcer for Jack Paar, and even as occasional stand-in for Ed McMahon in Johnny Carson's show. His credits in the area of TV announcement were particularly extensive, comprising the shows of Mike Douglas, Gary Moore, and Ed Sullivan, in addition to some of the ones mentioned in the previous sentence. Haskell was actually a capable singer, too. In fact, his earlier years had been spent as a big band vocalist in the local Chicago area, from which he had graduated to a national stint with the orchestra of Les Brown (doing crooning duties next to female counterpart Doris Day). After his big band period, Haskell tried for a solo recording career (to no great success, despite fine singing ability) and also did a fair amount of acting in summer stock theater. But the work that he did on television remains his greater claim to recognition.

Jack Haskell and Peggy Lee probably became acquainted with one another through the TV show Songs For Sale, where they served as co-singers in at least one episode, broadcast on December 22, 1951. In the month that followed, Haskell made the guest appearance currently under discussion, and one month later the show's audience was treated to a second serving from the male singer (March 4, 1952). For this first appearance, Haskell sang of "Women, Wine And Song" solo, and shared with Lee a desire to "Let's Get Away From It All."


Sponsorship

A listener of this episode has kindly shared with me the observation that "[a]t the end of this program there was a short jingle/commercial for Mercury."


Date: February 5, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Golden Gate Quartet (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World - 1:18(John Rox)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One More Chance - 2:21(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Could Write A Book - 2:00(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Shadrack - 2:44(Robert MacGimsey)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 10" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 10 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




The Golden Gate Quartet made a total of six appearances in Peggy Lee's radio series, all of them during the months in which the show was New York-based. (Beginning with a program dated May 6, 1952, Club 88 moved its headquarters to Los Angeles.) During their second appearance, the quartet accompanied Peggy Lee in a rendition of "Shadrack" and performed their own interpretation of "The Preacher And The Bear." For general comments about this group, consult the notes under the episode in which they made their first appearance (January 15, 1952).


Date: February 7, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Bob Carroll, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Life Is A Beautiful Thing - 1:27(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Trust In Me - 2:44(Milton Ager, Ned Wever, Jean Schwartz)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Lady Is A Tramp - 2:09(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Something Sort Of Grandish - 1:20(Burton Lane, Alan Jay Lerner)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 11" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 11 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




On board for the first of two guest appearances in her show, New Yorker Bob Carroll took on "Something Sort Of Grandish" with Peggy Lee. When all by himself, he tackled "Flamingo," the Herb Jeffries-Duke Ellington hit that was over ten years old by that time.

A baritone with enough vocal flexibility to work within both light opera and vintage pop genres, Carroll spent most of one decade as a boy singer with the big bands (1940s), and parts of a later decade as a soloist with Los Angeles Philharmonic, The New York Pops, and The Florida Orchestra. Between 1940 and 1948, Carroll sang for Henry King (e.g., "I Fell All Over Myself," 1940) Ted Fio Rito (e.g., "Rio Rita," 1942, that song becoming the band's theme shortly afterwards), Dick McIntyre (e.g., "Now Is The Hour," 1948), and Glenn Miller's Air Force Band. He hit the charts twice as Charlie Barnet's boy singer in 1941 (one of the hits being the #2 chartbuster "I Hear A Rhapsody") and thrice as Jimmy Dorsey's male vocalist, from 1946 to 1948 ("Ballerina" reaching the highest peak of the three, at #10).

Singing was not the only trade to which Carroll applied himself. He acted extensively in film, television, and on the stage. His work in professional theater began with the role of Ligniére The Poet in Mel Ferrer's Cyrano De Bergerac at the Alvin Theatre (1946-1947). A couple of years later, he would reprise the role on television, in The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse's own production of Cyrano De Bergerac (1949).

Nowadays, Bob Carroll is best remembered for his well-received portrayals in two Harold Prince productions that toured nationally, Fiorello! (role: mayor La Guardia, August 8, 1960 - March 31, 1962) and The Fiddler In The Roof (role: Tevye, second national tour, December 27, 1969 - July 1971, and again in a revival, May 1993). Carroll actually performed in various other productions of The Fiddler In The Roof as well, filling in different roles (Lazar, Morcha). An album that he released around 1970 (second picture above) capitalized on those credits, sporting a front cover that showed images of him as La Guardia (second of the LP's four images) and Tevye (third of the LP's four images). Moreover, the album opened with "Sunrise, Sunset" and closed with "If I Were A Rich Man."

In spite of his extensive experience as a boy vocalist, Carroll's solo singing career never reached great heights. Before his two appearances in Peggy Lee's show, his only solo hit had not been really solo, nor his: "Charmaine" (1951) was released under Gordon Jenkins' name, with the singer credited merely as the single's 'soloist.' (I should mention in passing, my vague suspicion that Carroll might have served as sort of an utility player -- or rather, an utility vocalist -- for Decca Records. Can the fact that so many of the bands with which he sang were signed to Decca be purely coincidental?) Given Peggy Lee's extensive work with Jenkins on Decca during 1952, this connection might have factored in her decision to extend an invitation to Carroll.

Carroll had two additional solo hits, both in 1953, on Derby Records. The highest-peaking of these post-big band outings was "Say It With Your Heart" (#14), whose sheet music is seen above. His aforementioned appearances as a featured soloist with various light classic orchestras took place in the 1980s.


Date: February 12, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Merv Griffin, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'm Gonna Live Till I Die - 1:14(Al Hoffman, Walter Kent, Manny Kurtz)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Bermuda - 2:20(Cynthia Strother, Eugene Strother)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Slumming On Park Avenue - 1:43(Irving Berlin)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:24(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 12" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 12 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




On this occasion, Peggy Lee welcomed a young man by the name of Merv Griffin, later to become nationally famous through his long-lasting association with the tube. On TV, he would variously serve as game show host (1958-1963), music variety host (1965-1985), and creator/producer of two top game shows, Jeopardy and The Wheel of Fortune. After his television years, the 15-Emmy award winner would take on the world of real estate, becoming the owner of the Beverly Hilton Hotel and other large properties.

Naturally, owning real estate and hosting TV shows were not among the feats of his youth. When he was in his early teens, Griffin's earliest displays of talent had been as a pianist and church organist. Next, in his late teens and early twenties, he had moved on to a career as a vocalist. (He had also tried his hand at songwriting and would eventually dabble in film acting.) The youngster first sang professionally on a nationally syndicated show emanating from San Francisco. Next, he spent four years with The Freddy Martin Orchestra, mostly on the road. Griffin's period under Martin's fold resulted in various hits, including the multi-million seller "I've Got A Lovely Bunch of Cocoanuts" (1949).

Attempts at careers as both a solo singer and actor would follow shortly afterwards. In fact, this visit to Peggy Lee's Club 88 catches Griffin near the start of his period as a solo vocalist. After he familiarizes the audience with what seems to have been an obscure number, suitably identified in my sources under the title of "Never Before," the guest and his hostess can't help but succumb to their ritziest desires: "Let's Go Slumming (On Park Avenue)" turns out to be their choice of a duet.

During the early 1950s, Merv Griffin managed to land contracts with both Columbia Records and Warner Brothers, the latter being the same film company under which Peggy Lee made the 1953 movie The Jazz Singer. Unlike Lee, Griffin was apparently more interested in acting than singing, but neither career took off for him. By the late 1950s, he was ensconced in the world of TV hosting. In the decades to come, Peggy Lee would make various guest visits to Merv Griffin's music variety show -- including one in which she and fellow singer Tony Bennett performed together.


Date: February 14, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra, The Red Norvo Trio (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) My Funny Valentine(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Got Rhythm - 1:53(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
Both titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 13" — "Club 88"   (1952)

Guest




On this Valentine's date, vibraphonist Red Norvo and the two other members of his trio dandily accompanied Peggy Lee during a rendition of "I Got Rhythm." The trio probably performed an instrumental selection as well, but information on this matter does not appear to be extant. After this February 14 turn, The Red Norvo Trio made a return about three months later (episode dated ca. May 29, 1952).

Nicknamed "Mr. Swing," Red Norvo had once been married to one of Peggy Lee's vocal influences, Mildred Bailey -- herself naturally known as "Mrs. Swing." Lee's own husband, guitarist Dave Barbour, had worked for Mr. and Mrs. Swing in the mid-1930s. (Mildred Bailey passed away on December 12, 1951 -- i.e., about two months before this broadcast. Her divorce from Norvo had taken place some eight years before.) Norvo had also been part of The Benny Goodman Orchestra, with which Lee had spent a couple of formative years in the early 1940s. Lee must have become even better acquainted with Norvo's musicianship in 1947, when he played vibes in the sessions for her album Rendezvous With Peggy Lee. It was probably among his earliest album dates for a singer. Afterwards, Mr. Swing continued to accompany singers on both records and live dates, most notably during the late 1950s and the first half of the 1960s, when Frank Sinatra, Dinah Shore, and Norvo's then-partner Mavis Rivers benefitted from his musical dexterity. (Of course, he recorded albums on his own, too, as exemplified by the front covers pictured above.) After the early 1960s, health issues allowed Norvo to perform only sporadically, but he was still active in the mid-1980s, and remained alive until 1999.

A note about the members of Norvo's Trio. Although no file or oral identification is known to exist, we can confidently propose that the trio two other members were the same ones heard in the other Norvo episode below: Tal Farlow and Red Mitchell. (As for Charles Mingus, also known to have been a member around this period, he had actually quit the trio in 1951, and hence did not come over to Peggy Lee's show. Mingus seems to have connected with Lee on a personal basis at a later period, though. One of his biographers mentions various occasions in the 1960s on which Mingus and one of his wives went to see Lee perform live. Elsewhere, I have also read passing comments to the effect that he was actually friends with Lee, but I have yet to come across a reliable source on this particular matter. Corroboration or rebuttal would be appreciated. Mingus' high regard for the careers of both Peggy Lee and Frank Sinatra is certainly apparent in some comments that he made for an interview conducted in the 1970s.)


Patter

1. "My Funny Valentine"
Peggy Lee sings this number as a dedication to a girl that she does not identify. She confides the following to the listening audience: I’d like to sing a song for a very special little girl. Her pet name is Plum Blossom. Today I’m going to call her my funny valentine. And by the way, her looks are not laughable, and she is photographable. Given Lee's silence about this girl's identity (whom Lee must have expected to be listening) and given the implication that she was Lee's own valentine, the mystery girl might have been the singer's only daughter, Nicki.


Sources

1. AFRS
As will be more extensively explained in the notes near the bottom of this page, Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee was originally broadcast on CBS and re-aired a year later on AFRS stations. In some instances, both the AFRS and CBS versions survive; in most cases, only the AFRS version does. The episode under discussion is a very unfortunate exception: AFRS seems to have skipped producing its own version of the episode. We are thus lucky that at least a fragment of the original CBS broadcast, containing the above-listed songs, has survived.


Date: February 19, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Golden Gate Quartet (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Good Day - 1:53(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Little White Cloud That Cried - 2:27(Johnnie Ray)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Button Up Your Overcoat - 1:17(Lew Brown, Buddy G. DeSylva, Ray Henderson)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Wheel Of Fortune - 1:58(Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho - 2:03(Traditional)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 13 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




The Golden Gate Quartet made a total of six guest appearances in Peggy Lee's radio series. Their third appearance found them applying their harmonies to both the "Lonesome Road" and the spiritual "(Joshua Fit The Battle Of) Jericho." The latter was sung with Lee. For general comments about this group, consult the notes under the program dated January 15, 1952.


Date: February 21, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Golden Gate Quartet (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) This Can't Be Love - 1:11(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Kiss To Build A Dream On - 2:07(Bert Kalmar, Oscar Hammerstein II, Harry Ruby)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) When The World Was Young (Ah, The Apple Trees) - 3:23(Gerard Philippe Bloch, Johnny Mercer, Marie T. Angele Vannier)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little David, Play On Your Harp - 2:38(Traditional)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 14 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During the fourth of their six guest appearances, The Golden Gate Quartet offered their interpretation of "Dry Bones" and accompanied Peggy Lee in a rendition of "Little David, Play On The Harp." General comments about this group's career and about their first Club 88 appearance can be found under the episode dated January 15, 1952.


Date: February 26, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

The Barbara Carroll Trio, Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Night And Day - 1:21(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Since My Love Has Gone (Addio, Del Passato) - 2:40(Giuseppe Verdi, Herbert Wasserman)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Whee, Baby - 2:17(Alice Larson, Peggy Lee)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Lullaby Of Broadway - 2:16(Al Dubin, Harry Warren)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 15 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




A visitor of Peggy Lee's Club 88 more than 60 years ago, pianist Barbara Carroll still remains happily active at the time of this writing, when she close to reach the 90th birthday mark (January 25, 2015). Skilled at playing the keys since her childhood, Carroll has more than earned the moniker by which she has become known in recent decades: “the first lady of jazz piano.” Naturally, the bulk of her recorded work has consisted of of instrumental performances, but vocal interpretations have also been an active part of the lady's repertoire, especially during the last two or three decades. Among the numbers which Carroll has favored in recent times is, in fact, the Peggy Lee-penned "(I'm) In Love Again"; it can be found in her CDs One Morning In May (2002) and Live At Birdland (2005).

Back in 1952, Barbara Carroll came to Peggy Lee's program with the two other members of her trio, drummer Herb Wasserman and bassist Joe Shulman. An in-demand session musician who had joined the trio in 1951, Shulman might have served as a link between the two women: during the three preceding years, he had played bass for Lee on various dates. This time around, while in her show, Shulman and the other members of the trio accompanied Lee on a version of "Lullaby Of Broadway" and, when left on their own, offered an instrumental rendition of "Taking A Chance On Love." Love and chances were, indeed, in the air: marriage vows would be exchanged by the trio's bassist and pianist in 1954, though Shulman would sadly pass away just three years later (at age 33, of a heart attack).

In addition to bassist Joe Shulman, another human link between Peggy Lee and Barbara Carroll was Benny Goodman: both ladies had worked for the King of Swing. Around 1948, the woman who was then known as "the first girl ever to play bebop piano" had enrolled in Goodman's recently formed bebop combo, which would not prove long-lasting. It is worth noting, in passing, that The Barbara Carroll Trio had been hired as a replacement for The Mary Lou Williams Trio, with whom Goodman had had a disagreement. As will be shown shortly (program dated March 13, 1952), The Mary Lou Williams Trio would also become a guest of Peggy Lee's show.


Date: February 28, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Golden Gate Quartet (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Life Is A Beautiful Thing - 1:22(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Come What May (The Gypsy Song) - 1:58(Vaughn Horton)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Love Me Or Leave Me - 2:22(Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Yes, Lord - 2:08(Willard Robison)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 16 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




For their fifth and penultimate guest appearance in Peggy Lee's radio series, The Golden Gate Quartet accompanied Peggy Lee in a rendition of Willard Robison's "Yes, Lord" and performed their own version of "Fare You Well, Fare You Well," a spiritual that they had recorded for Columbia Records in 1947. Commentary about this group's career can be found above, in the notes under the January 15, 1952 broadcast.


Songs

1. "Come What May"
A 1952 top 10 pop hit for Patti Page, the song "Come What May" is credited to Allen Schiller (lyrics) and Al Sanchez (music) in sources such as Wikipedia and its many derivates. those credits seem mistaken. Vaughn Horton is listed as the sole songwriter in three other sources that qualify as more reliable: ASCAP (1), Page's Mercury 45 rpm single (2), and the song's sheet music (3).

This crediting error can also be found in the 2005 music chart book, Hit Records, 1950-1975. I do not know if the 2005 text, an United Kingdom publication, originated or just perpetuated the error. The fact that the book had been published in the UK made me wonder if the credits for the British hit version of "Come What May" could be the source for the error under discussion. But such is not the case, I subsequently found out: Lita Roza's Decca hit single also credits Horton.


Date: March 4, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Jack Haskell, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) From This Moment On - 1:20(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Did Anyone Call? - 2:25(Percy Faith, Carl Sigman)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Lady Is A Tramp - 2:03(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Mountain Greenery - 1:52(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 17 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




For his second appearance in Peggy Lee's show, "Weaver Of Dreams" was Jack Haskell's solo number, and "Mountain Greenery" his duet with the hostess. The first image above is a publicity shot of a young Jack Haskell. The shot bears a 1956 date on its back but is likelier to be from around the year in which he visited Lee's show, or even slightly earlier. The picture of a more mature-looking Haskell was taken around 1960. It was cropped from the 1961 LP Jack [Haskell] Swings For Jack [Paar], one of the three albums that he made. Viewers interested in a few additional details about Haskell's career are invited to consult the notes under the first of his two appearances (program dated January 31, 1952).


Date: March 6, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, The Mariners (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) When You're Smiling - 1:13(Larry Shay, Joe Goodwin, Marvin Fisher)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:37(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Bermuda - 2:23(Cynthia Strother, Eugene Strother)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Great Come-And-Get-It Day - 1:40(Burton Lane, Erwin 'Yip' Harburg)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 18 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




One of the earliest integrated vocal groups to become nationally known, The Mariners graced this episode of Club 88. These four men (Nathaniel Dickerson, Martin Karl, James O. Lewis, Thomas Lockard) had first become acquainted with one another as members of the Coast Guard in Manhattan Beach, New York. At the request of one of their officers, they performed together for the first time in 1942 -- or thereabouts. The quartet's trajectory progressed from local, regional and Pacific military bases to national exposure on network radio. Such nation-wide exposure was made possible by Arthur Godfrey, who hired them for his popular radio show, and subsequently took them with him to his even more popular TV show.

The Mariners had their heyday in the early 1950s. From 1950 to 1952, while recording for Columbia, they placed three numbers within the top 30 of Billboard's main music chart, one of them being "They Call The Wind Maria." Though they certainly performed many secular pop numbers, including those with which they hit the charts, the quartet was primarily deemed a gospel group, with a sound that might come off as old-fashioned to modern-day ears. Later in the decade, work for Cadence Records commendably proved less old-fashioned and more swinging, but did not fare as well. By the 1960s, the group had unfortunately begun to fall into oblivion.

The first of their two guest appearances in Club 88 found the former service men fervidly declaring (in song) that "There Is Nothing Like A Dame." They also harmonized about "That Great Come-And-Get-It Day" with Peggy Lee.


Date: March 11, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Harry Belafonte, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Be My Life's Companion - 1:13(Milton DeLugg, Bob Hilliard)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Cry - 2:07(Churchill Kohlman)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'm Gonna Live Till I Die - 1:13(Al Hoffman, Walter Kent, Manny Kurtz)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Baia - 3:05(Ary Barroso)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Johnny One Note - 1:47(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 19 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Harry Belafonte's second guest appearance in Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee found him in a bit of a funerary mood, as he personified the narrator of "Streets Of Laredo (The Cowboy's Lament)." He also exchanged lines from "Johnny One Note" with the show's hostess. Remarks about Belafonte's career can be found above, in the notes under the January 24 episode of this 1952 series.


Date: March 13, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra, The Mary Lou Williams Trio (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World - 1:24(John Rox)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Unforgettable - 2:01(Irving Gordon)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Could Write A Book - 2:14(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Pretty-Eyed Baby - 2:31(William Johnson, Mary Lou Williams)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 21" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 20 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Two of the many guests that Peggy Lee welcomed to her 1952 show were female pianists who led their own trios: Barbara Carroll (program dated February 26, 1952) and Mary Lou Williams. Though merely in her early 40s at this point in time, triple treat Williams (composer, arranger, pianist) had already been widely touted as one of the greatest -- or even the greatest -- female jazz instrumentalist, a high rank that she would keep and strengthen over the succeeding decades. In addition to the respect that the quality of her own trio and solo work commanded, the artist's promoters could rightfully boast about the fact that she had worked for bandleaders as varied and prestigious as Duke Ellington, Woody Herman, Earl Hines, and Benny Goodman.

What's more, one of Benny Goodman's best-remembered instrumentals had been composed and arranged by Williams in 1937, after he had asked her to write a blues for him. She had instead come up with a boogie woogie that came to be called "Roll 'Em," and which would become a popular Goodman item. It is worth noting that Peggy Lee sang a vocal version of this Mary Lou Williams instrumental in 1942, while serving as Goodman's canary. (The identity of that version's lyricist is not known.) A decade later, in the present episode of Club 88, Lee would sing yet another version of a Mary Lou Williams composition. On this occasion, the number was one called "Pretty-Eyed Baby," which Williams had co-written and published in 1951. During the rendition, Lee is accompanied by Williams and the other members of the trio. On their own, the trio performed an instrumental version of "Caravan," too.

Seen in one of the photos above is a 1944 edition of the trio (trumpeter Bill Coleman, pianist Williams, and bassist Al Hall). The 1952 edition heard in Peggy Lee's show might have instead featured bassist Carl Pruitt and drummer Bill Clark, both of whom had also joined Williams earlier that month (March 1952) for the recording of their 10" Atlantic LP (& EP) Piano Panorama, Volume 2.

Later this year, Williams would leave for the United Kingdom, with the intention of performing for just two weeks at the Royal Albert Hall, as part of the Big Rhythm Show Of 1952. The prospective two-week visit would turn into a two-year European stay, partially in response to the warm reception with which her music was met there, and partially an outcome of her dissatisfaction with various aspects of her career in the USA (e.g., relatively ineffective management, insufficient recording opportunities, and copyright battles such as the one set in motion by her claim that elements from the melody of her "What's The Story, Morning Glory" had been re-used by the songwriters of "Black Coffee"). But America still beckoned, and her enchantment with Europe might have faded. After two additional years spent in premature retirement, Williams returned to the American jazz scene, where she remained active until at least 1978, passing away in 1981.


Date: March 18, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Larry Douglas, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Heigh-Ho (It's Off To Work We Go) - 1:17(Frank E. Churchill, Larry Morey)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Wheel Of Fortune - 1:57(Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Unforgettable - 2:04(Irving Gordon)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Blacksmith Blues - 1:52(Jack Holmes)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Let's Call The Whole Thing Off - 2:13(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 21 — Peggy Lee   (1953)




Having appeared in the very last episode of Peggy Lee's 1951 radio series, Broadway staple Larry Douglas joined the 1952 sequel for the first of two encores. He regaled Lee's listeners with a solo version of "Never Before" and accompanied the hostess in a duet presentation of "Let's Call The Whole Thing Off."

The first of the above-seen photos presents Douglas in the company of classic pop singer Fran Warren. Douglas and Warren had the lead roles in what might have been the earliest West Coast production of The Pajama Game (1955); it had had its Broadway premiere in 1954. Earlier Broadway shows of note had included the Rodgers & Hart-scored Jumbo (1935-1936), starring Jimmy Durante, and the Cole Porter-scored Panama Hattie (1940-1942), starring Ethel Merman.

Douglas also served as Robert Preston's understudy for the lead role of The Music Man, an immensely popular Broadway show (1957-1961). Trivia: Douglas' first wife (Onna White) choreographed the Broadway show version of The Music Man, whereas Douglas' second wife (Susan Lackey, m. 1964) acted in the movie version, playing the role of Zaneeta Shinn (1962). That second marriage lasted until his passing in 1996, at the age of 82.

See also notes under Douglas' aforementioned first visit to the show, on July 29, 1951. His third guest appearance seems to have been broadcast about six months after the present one; see notes under entry dated ca. September 4, 1952.


Date: March 20, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Golden Gate Quartet (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) From This Moment On - 1:46(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Come What May (The Gypsy Song) - 1:57(Vaughn Horton)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Why Don't You Do Right? - 2:15(Joe McCoy)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Swing Low, Sweet Chariot - 2:35(Traditional)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 23" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 22 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




The Golden Gate Quartet made a total of six guest appearances in Peggy Lee's radio series (programs dated January 15, 1952 / February 5, 1952 / February 19, 1952 / February 21, 1952 / February 28, 1952 / March 20, 1952), thereby becoming semi-regulars during the program's earlier months. In their last appearance, the quartet accompanied Peggy Lee through a rendition of "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" and, when left to their own devices, tried "Runnin' Wild" and "Tiger Rag" as a medley. General details about this group's career can be found in the notes under the earliest of the programs.


Date: March 25, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Louis Prima (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:26(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Trust In Me - 2:02(Milton Ager, Ned Wever, Jean Schwartz)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Mañana - 2:22(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Basin Street Blues - 2:05(Spencer Williams)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 24" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 23 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




For the second of his five guest appearances in The Peggy Lee Show, Louis Prima offered "The Bigger The Figure" as his solo of choice and sang "Basin Street Blues" as a duet with Lee. Viewers interested in reading additional details about the Prima-and-Lee combination are invited to consult the notes under the first of his appearances, which actually took place in 1951 (July 8). See also next episode.


Date: March 27, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Most Unusual Day - 1:14(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Bermuda - 2:21(Cynthia Strother, Eugene Strother)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:41(Cole Porter)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Lover - 3:10(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 25" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 24 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




"Boney Bones" was one of the two numbers sung by Louis Prima during the third of his five guest appearances in Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee. His other number from this episode is "Exactly Like You," sung in a duet with Peggy Lee. For commentary about his career, consult the notes under the first of his appearances, dated July 8, 1951.

Two of Louis Prima's big loves can be seen in the photos above: trumpets and horses. (Other loves: women and clothing.) Horse racing became his most expensive addiction during the 1940s, when he often spent far more money than what he was earning. He continued to indulge in the races throughout the decade of the 1950s, which found him in far less of a financial bing, thanks to the large revenue that his increasingly popular nightclub act was generating. At one time, he owned a full dozen horses, having paid over $30,000 for just five of them. One of the equine possessions was named after the third of his five wives (Tracelene). Three others honored his catchphrase play pretty for the people, through names that played on that phrase. The second photo seen above is from 1952 (the same year as this episode's appearance), and captures Prima serenading one of the animals, which in those days was housed, along with the others, at the Aqueduct Racetrack Casino in Queens, New York. (No word on whether the serenaded horse was King Pretty, That's Pretty, Play Pretty, or even Tracelene, but he certainly seems mighty pleased with Prima's pretty playing.


Date: April 1, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Jackie Paris (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Night And Day - 1:22(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Wheel Of Fortune - 1:52(Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 2:58(Oscar Brand)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Oh! Look At Me Now - 2:21(Joe Bushkin, John De Vries)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World - 1:19(John Rox)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 26" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 25 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




An appealing vocalist who developed a strong cult following, Jackie Paris counted Peggy Lee, Sarah Vaughan, and Ella Fitzgerald among his most notable admirers. Vaughan and Fitzgerald manifested their admiration through the praise that they bestowed on him publicly and in the press. Meanwhile, Peggy Lee proved a more proactive admirer: she tried to convince Capitol to sign Paris to a record contract. Unfortunately, Capitol Records ended up passing on the man with the kissy voice -- per Vaughan's praises. (Although he never made it to Capitol, Paris did record for more than a handful other companies, including ABC's jazz branch Impulse!, Atlantic's Eastwest, Decca's Coral, Mercury's Wing Records, and MGM's music label.)

During the early and mid-years of his singing career, Paris achieved quite a few noteworthy distinctions in the realm of jazz. He was the only professional male singer to appear with Charlie Parker (and Quintette). Paris was also Charles Mingus' pick for the vocal parts of the recordings that the bassist made on his own label. The singer worked with Dizzy Gillespie's big band as well, and is said to have been the first Caucasian vocalist to tour with Lionel Hampton. Still further, Paris introduced both Thelonius Monk's " 'Round Midnight" (i.e., the vocal version) and Hoagy Carmichael's "Skylark." The latter was enthusiastically endorsed by Carmichael, and certainly ranks among the very best interpretations of that standard.

Through this invitation to her nationally broadcast show, Peggy Lee provided the relatively young Jackie Paris (then 27 years old) with an opportunity to expand his profile beyond inner jazz circles. Raising to the occasion, Paris performed a tasteful rendition of "My Kinda Love." Lee's invitation also resulted in a charming version of "Oh, Look At Me Now," which guest and hostess sang in conjunction. (Side note: Another great singer whom Peggy Lee admired and asked to appear in her show was David Allyn. Unlike Paris, that excellent balladeer did not raise to the occasion. Allyn's personal demons kept him away from taking full advantage of the opportunity.) (Second side note: Other ardent and proactive admirers of Jackie Paris included bassist Charles Mingus and comic Lenny Bruce. As it had happened to Lee when she pitched Paris to Capitol, Lenny Bruce was also unsuccessful in his attempts: the comedian could not talk his manager into signing the singer. Critic Leonard Feather and vocalist Anita O'Day spoke favorably about Paris, too.)

Despite a childhood career as a tapper in the vaudeville circuit and an adult life during which he had the option of supplementing his singing with his fine guitar playing, Jackie Paris never lived up to his full potential. Temper(ament) and circumstance contributed to keeping him away from the limelight, and many good opportunities ended up passing him by. By the 1970s, his voice had begun to lose its luster, and the increasingly hip elements of his singing had worn out their welcome. Still, he continued to record on a sporadic basis until five years before his passing in 2004. Made in 1999 but released in 2001, the swan-song album The Intimate Jackie Paris signified a return to form for both the singer and the guitarist in him.


Performances

1. CBS Versus AFRS Episodes
2. "It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World"
Club 88 first aired over the CBS radio airwaves, then re-aired on the American Forces Radio Service network. (The notes found near the bottom of this page explain matters pertaining to AFRS in greater detail.) "It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World," one of the songs listed as part of this episode's repertoire, seems to have been heard only in the AFRS version of the show, not in the original CBS broadcast. Most likely, AFRS simply edited in another episode’s version of the song, but this possibility cannot be confirmed at the present time, unfortunately. (I do not have access to the sources needed for comparison.) Faced with a dilemma, I have decided to enter “It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World" as if it were a brand new performance, despite my suspicion that it is not. If and when I am able the listen to the sources, the matter will be rectified as needed. (There are three other Lee versions of "It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World" listed in this page. They are from the CBS episodes broadcast on February 5, March 13, and September 11, 1952. Due to chronological proximity, the March 13 version stands as the prime suspect to have been incorporated to AFRS episode no. 25.)


Date: April 3, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Bob Carroll, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Life Is A Beautiful Thing - 1:22(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Did Anyone Call? - 2:43(Percy Faith, Carl Sigman)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) This Can't Be Love - 1:09(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Blacksmith Blues - 1:33(Jack Holmes)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Something Sort Of Grandish - 1:24(Burton Lane, Alan Jay Lerner)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 27" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 26 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During the second of his two guest visits to Peggy Lee's show, Bob Carroll did a solo rendition of "At Last." In the company of the female vocalist, he reprised "Something Sort Of Grandish," the song from Finian's Rainbow that they had also tackled during his previous visit (program dated February 7, 1952). For details about Carroll's career, see notes under that earlier appearance. As for the above-seen photos, the first one is a publicity shot highlighting Carroll's lead role as Mayor La Guardia in an early 1960s national tour of Fiorello. Notice that the second picture was autographed.


Date: April 8, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Johnnie Ray (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Old Black Magic - 1:37(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Life Is A Beautiful Thing - 1:22(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Be Anything (But Be Mine) - 2:12(Irving Gordon)
USA Government's Office Of Price Stabilization 16" TranscriptionPrograms No. 13 & No. 14 — Stars For Defense (Connie Haines, Peggy Lee)   (1953)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Lady Is A Tramp - 2:21(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
USA Government's Office Of Price Stabilization 16" TranscriptionPrograms No. 13 & No. 14 — Stars For Defense (Connie Haines, Peggy Lee)   (1953)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Walkin' My Baby Back Home - 1:52(Roy Turk, Fred E. Ahlert)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 27 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Staying true to his reputation as an emotionally charged interpreter of weepy ballads, Johnnie Ray sang about being "Brokenhearted" during this episode, which marked the second of his three appearances in Peggy Lee's show. Shifting to a more joyous mood, Ray then joined Lee for a duet version of "Walkin' My Baby Back Home." Additional details about Ray and his guest appearances in Club 88 can be found in the notes under the second episode of this series.


Issues

1. Stars For Defense, Program No. 14 [Transcription Disc]
I have not listened to this 16" transcription disc. I know it to contain a program hosted by Peggy Lee in the company of announcer Olen Tice, bandleader Russ Case, and the latter's orchestra. Lee is heard pitching for the Defense Program and introducing Case's instrumental rendition of "Sophisticated Lady." Given the personnel, I strongly believe this Stars Of Defense program to be a variation of Club 88. Following a pattern that I have noticed for other governmental/AFRS shows, the episode probably culled performances from Club 88 and added new dialogue around them.

In data about Stars For Defense, Program no. 14, three songs are listed as sung by Lee: "Just One Of Those Things," "Be Anything," and "The Lady Is A Tramp." The question to be pondered is: from which episodes of Club 88 do these versions stem? The primary difficulty lies in the fact that all three titles were heard in multiple episodes of Club 88. Out of the various possible choices, I have tentatively selected two of the titles from the present episode precisely because they are together in one single episode. (Among the other episodes from which to choose, none includes more than one of the three pertinent songs.)

In the case of "Just One Of Those Things," I picked the version from the show's April 15, 1952 episode only because it is chronologically the closest to the afoementioned renditions of "Be Anything" and "The Lady Is A Tramp.". Another sensible candidate would be the version of "Just One Of Those Things" from the episode dated March 25, 1952.


Date: April 10, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Louis Prima (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You Will Never Grow Old - 1:24(Ruth Rand)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Night And Day - 1:21(Cole Porter)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:20(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ev'rytime - 3:25(Tony Iavello, Mel Leven)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) My Baby Just Cares For Me - 1:55(Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 29" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 28 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Fulfilling the fourth of his five guest spots in Peggy Lee's Club 88, Louis Prima came armed with the tongue-in-cheek novelty "Basta." Keeping the humorous and playful mood, "My Baby Just Cares For Me" was the guest and hostess' pick for a duet. Viewers interested in basic details about Prima's career are invited to consult the notes under the first of his appearances (July 8, 1951).


Performances

1. "My Baby Just Cares For Me"
Sung by Peggy Lee and Louis Prima as a hip duet, this version of "My Baby Just Cares For Me" includes special material about minxs, stoles, the Riviera and, of course, lasagna.


Date: April 15, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, The Mariners (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:42(Cole Porter)
USA Government's Office Of Price Stabilization 16" TranscriptionPrograms No. 13 & No. 14 — Stars For Defense (Connie Haines, Peggy Lee)   (1953)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Jump Through The Ring (You, Fool) - 2:46(Jeanne Cherdak, Jack Manus, Guy Wood)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Blacksmith Blues - 1:31(Jack Holmes)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive - 3:14(Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 30" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 29 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




In this episode of Peggy Lee's show, The Mariners returned to celebrate all good things in life, singing "Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive" with the hostess as company. While by themselves, the vocal quartet rhapsodized about a "Jeanine." General information about this Arthur-Godfrey-connected group can be found in the notes under their other guest appearance (program dated March 6, 1952).


Performances

1. "Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive"
Unlike her more widely available version on World Transcription Records, this Peggy Lee interpretation of "Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive" includes the song's verse.


Issues

1. Stars For Defense [Transcription Disc]
See full comments about this issue under notes for episode dated April 8, 1952.


Date: April 17, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra, The Mary Lou Williams Trio (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) From This Moment On - 1:58(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Forgive Me - 2:01(Milton Ager, Jack Yellen)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) At Last - 2:52(Harry Warren, Mack Gordon)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Got Rhythm - 2:00(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 31" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 30 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




While guesting for a second time in Peggy Lee's radio show, Mary Lou Williams performed "Fine And Dandy" with the members of her trio. All three members accompanied Lee in a rendition of "I Got Rhythm," too. For basic commentary about Williams' career, consult the notes under her first guest appearance (program dated March 13, 1952).


Date: April 22, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Johnnie Ray (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Goin' On A Hayride - 1:37(Ralph Blane)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Wheel Of Fortune - 1:52(Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 2:56(Oscar Brand)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Oh! Look At Me Now - 2:17(Joe Bushkin, John De Vries)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 32" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 31 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




The last of Johnnie Ray's three guest appearances in Club 88 found the popular singer tackling "The Wheel Of Fortune," a then-hot-and-current number that would turn into a bestseller for one of his influences, Lee's labelmate and friend Kay Starr. When it came to performing a duet, "Oh, Look At Me Know" was the ambivalent lament chosen by Ray and Lee. Additional commentary about Johnnie Ray and his guest appearances in this radio series can be found in the notes under the second episode of the series.


Date: April 24, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) What Is This Thing Called Love? - 0:48(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Be Anything (But Be Mine) - 2:26(Irving Gordon)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Lover - 3:13(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 32 — Peggy Lee   (1953)




Louis Prima's fifth and last guest appearance in the show generated two solo renditions: a reprise of "The Bigger The Figure" (previously heard in episode #23) and a newly attempted "Pennies From Heaven." No duets were performed on this occasion.


Date: April 29, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Alan Dale, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) This Can't Be Love - 1:35(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Be Anything (But Be Mine) - 2:29(Irving Gordon)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Goin' On A Hayride - 1:51(Ralph Blane)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Let's Call The Whole Thing Off - 2:11(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 34" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 33 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During this episode, guest Alan Dale offered his interpretation of Cole Porter's "Night And Day" and injected Italian flavor into the lyrics of "Let's Call The Whole Thing Off," which he rendered as a duet with Peggy Lee. Then 26 years old, the Italian-American crooner had begun his professional career on the radio. (His father, a comedian, had his own show). In the mid-1940s, the former Aldo Sigismondi had also sung at a casino and done vocal duties with a couple of big bands (Carmen Cavallaro, George Paxton). Going solo in 1947, he promptly acquired not only a record contract (on Signature Records) but also a gig on a radio show (Sing It Again, a popular music quiz program led by Roy Bloch with His Orchestra, beginning in late 1948 or thereabouts) and two solid spots on television. One of those two solid gigs was actually a televised edition of Sing It Again (1950-1951), and the other was a program of his own, The Alan Dale Show (1948: Dumont; 1950-1951: CBS). During this period, he also made recordings that were released on Columbia and its subsidiary Harmony.

A rough patch lay ahead, however. Overtaxed at work and overwhelmed at home (due to marital problems), the spring of 1951 found him hospitalized and undergoing abdominal surgery to treat an ulcer. The ulcer had actually caused him to faint while performing live, on camera, during a 1950 episode of his TV show. Among the adverse side effects of this medical situation was the loss of both TV and radio programs. Meanwhile, differences with Mitch Miller, newly brought into Columbia Records as a producer, had compelled the temperamental Dale to quit the label (ca. mid-1951). Fortunately, by November of 1951 the singer had already grabbed a contract with Decca, and then with its subsidiary Coral. It was during this period of transition that Lee extended him an invitation to be her guest.

Dale was definitely back on track by 1953, when his contract with Coral resulted in a couple of hits. One of them was the top ten record "Heart Of My Heart," sung in a trio with Don Cornell and Johnny Desmond. (All three male vocalists happened to become guests of Peggy Lee, Cornell in 1951, the other two in 1952). Dale's success continued with his acquisition of not one but two million sellers in 1956 ("Sweet And Gentle," "Cherry Pink And Apple Bosom White"). Forays into the world of rock 'n' roll would follow next, with moderate success.

Unfortunately, no other career triumphs would ensue. Allegedly beaten up for refusing to cater to a criminal organization's request to manage him, Dale believed the mafia to be behind the many doors that closed for him afterwards. Though on a smaller scale and without success at the national level, he still continued to perform for decades, passing away at the age of 76.


Dating And Crossreferences

As part of her chatter, Peggy Lee mentions that she has just returned from Chicago.


Promotion And Sponsorship

During this episode, announcer Olen Tice promotes two CBS shows: the network news, with Edward R. Murrow, and Life With Luigi (a situational comedy about the misadventures of an Italian immigrant in Chicago, starring Irish-American actor J. Carroll Naish and airing on Tuesdays from 9:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.). Right after the conclusion of the show, listeners also heard an advertisement for Collier's magazine (known as Collier's Weekly then -- a year before its transition into a biweekly publication).


Date: May 1, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Russ Case And His Orchestra (acc), Johnny Desmond, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'm Gonna Live Till I Die - 1:18(Al Hoffman, Walter Kent, Manny Kurtz)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Jump Through The Ring (You, Fool) - 2:12(Jeanne Cherdak, Jack Manus, Guy Wood)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Louisville Lou - 2:58(Milton Ager, Jack Yellen)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Let's Get Away From It All - 1:51(Matt Dennis, Tom Adair)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 34 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




American crooners of Italian descent filled the last two guest spots of The Peggy Lee Show's New York edition. Following in the footsteps of Alan Dale, Johnny Desmond was the featured guest during the very last episode. As his solo, the man who had been baptized as Giovanni Alfredo De Simone chose "At Last." Shortly afterwards, he was heard singing "Let's Get Away From It All" with the woman who had been originally known as Norma Deloris Egstrom. This was the first of two guest appearances for the Italian crooner; the second appearance would take place a few months later in LA, while he was visiting that city (episode #61).

Johnny Desmond first entered the nationwide leagues of music as part of a vocal group called The Downbeats, which he had apparently formed. In 1940, they were permanently hired by orchestra leader Bob Crosby and renamed The Bob-o-links. Fairly soon afterwards, Desmond made attempts at having a separate career, promptly finding work as the boy vocalist of The Gene Krupa Orchestra (1941). An additional year brought another transition to the singer's career: starting in 1942, he performed with Glenn Miller's Army Air Forces Orchestra (mostly abroad, while on the Army). Desmond did well under all three aforementioned bandleaders, earning top 20 hits with both Krupa and Crosby, as well as his fair share of attention in the role of Miller's wartime crooner. In fact, while the members of Miller's ensemble were stationed in Europe, the British took to calling Desmond "the G.I. Sinatra" and the French "Le Cremaire," or "the creamer."

Still, Desmond's greater period of commercial success did not come until after his return from war. Between 1946 and 1957, he hoarded 22 hits, including the #3 charter "The Yellow Heart Of Texas" and the #23 "Trying" -- this last one being number that he would sing during the second of his guest appearances in Club 88. Within the first decades of the LP era, Desmond would also record a string of albums for Coral and Columbia. Furthermore, he participated in two radio shows. One of them became a long-running affair for him: six years as the vocalist of the Chicago-based morning program The Breakfast Club.

Johnny Desmond's acting credits were not insubstantial, either, especially within the world of theater. In 1958, he would make his debut on Broadway, performing in Say, Darling with Vivian Blaine, Robert Morse and David Wayne (the latter a guest of Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee as well). In 1964, he would begin a four-year-period as the successor to Sydney Chaplin's male lead role in Funny Girl, performing first with Barbra Streisand and then with Mimi Hines. Though never achieving top-tier fame, Desmond also acted and sang steadily on television, film, and nightclubs. Illness cut his still ongoing career in the mid-1980s, when he passed away at the age of 65.


Date: May 6, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Dick Haymes, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Old Black Magic - 1:44(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Unforgettable - 2:05(Irving Gordon)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 2:45(Oscar Brand)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Walkin' My Baby Back Home - 1:54(Roy Turk, Fred E. Ahlert)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 36" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 35 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Hollywood-based balladeer and actor Dick Haymes joined Peggy Lee and Sonny Burke in the first LA-beamed episode of her radio series. "Welcome home, Peggy," Haymes says to Lee right at the start of his guest singing appearance, which consists of a solo vocal ("Nice Work If You Can Get It") and a duet with the songstress ("Walkin' My Baby Back Home"). Once deemed Frank Sinatra's greatest rival for the title of best -- and most popular -- crooner, Haymes' huge mainstream potential went to waste due to the man's unwise handling of both his business career and personal life. Among his six wives, Haymes counted both Hollywood star Rita Hayworth and comely singer Fran Jeffries; among his problems, financial debt, costly alimony demands, tax troubles, stormy relationships, and heavy alcoholism. Even so, he still had a very strong run in the world of Hollywood entertainment, working steadily on film and television during two long periods (1943-1956, 1965-1976) and amassing 50 hits from 1941 to 1951, including three chart-toppers that would become American Songbook standards ("I'll Get By," "It Can't Be Wrong," and "You'll Never Know").

Dick Haymes first crossed paths with Peggy Lee in the summer of 1942, when he joined The Benny Goodman Orchestra as its boy vocalist for a couple of months. She had been fulfilling the position of girl vocalist since August of 1941, and would continue to do so during those two months. Later on, between 1948 and 1949, Lee would bring Haymes in as a guest of The Chesterfield Supper Club (the radio show which she was hosting at that time) on three separate occasions. The present episode of Club 88 thus marked his fourth appearance as her guest. Lee would reciprocate in the mid-1950s, when she made one guest turn in the Haymes-hosted radio show Club 15.


Dating (And Photo)

My source for this particular episode's date is the caption under the above-seen press photo. The older gentleman man who shares space with Haymes and Lee is bandleader Sonny Burke. (My main sources offer broadcast dates for only a few Club 88 episodes, and this episode is among them. One source gives a 4/6/52 dating to the episode, but I believe the number 4 to be one of the occasional typos or errors found in that source. April the sixth was a Sunday, which would have been an unlikely day for either taping or broadcasting of the show.)


Date: May 8, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) To Be Loved By You - 1:41(Alex Kramer, Joan Whitney, Hy Zaret)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Forgive Me - 2:12(Milton Ager, Jack Yellen)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? - 1:15(Traditional)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Lady Is A Tramp - 2:20(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Blacksmith Blues - 1:51(Jack Holmes)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 36 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




This episode of Club 88 featured the piano playing of Liberace, a consummate showman who became known for his overtly friendly, sentimental, even nostalgic approach to music, and for the ornate opulence of his settings (both onstage and at home). An expert pianist, Liberace also sang serviceably well. However, his Club 88 appearance was limited to an instrumental performance of "We Kiss In A Shadow;" there was no singing from him. The episode was broadcast in the same month that Liberace scored his first Billboard hit, "September Song" (#27).

Born in 1919 (one year before Peggy Lee), Władziu Valentino Liberace had spent his teens and part of his tweens playing primarily within the realm of classical music, where his talent was well regarded. As the 1940s progressed and his drive for fame grew, the young pianist of Italian-Polish descent increased the degree of attention that he had been paying to popular music, shifting the emphasis of his repertoire from classical numbers to pop fare with light classical touches.

As part of his search for success in the entertainment industry, the Wisconsinite moved across the nation. During the early 1940s, he sought out fame and fortune in New York, with limited success. By 1947, he had (according to the writer of his Wikipedia page) moved to the Los Angeles neighborhood of North Hollywood and was performing at local clubs such as Ciro's and The Mocambo [mostly as an intermission act] for stars such as Rosalind Russell, Clark Gable, Gloria Swanson, and Shirley Temple. He had also been adding visual flash to his performances -- a practice that he had been known to favor since his school days.

At the time of this visit to Lee's show, Liberace was making the transition from increasingly successful LA-based performer to nationally known and, eventually, high-grossing entertainer. In the early 1950s, Liberace would score not only a performance at the White House (for president Truman) but also his own network television show, which would debut on July 1, 1952 -- about a month after this episode of Club 88. A summer replacement on the advantageous Dinah Shore Show slot, Liberace's program would become a bona fide national success after its return as a syndicated program in 1953. The program was a tasteful and friendly albeit relatively formal affair, for which Liberace wore three-piece concert suits, with tie, handkerchief, and tails also in sight. He made a trademark out of his penchant for placing a candelabra on top of his piano, and occasionally winked at the audiences. But, otherwise, the performer stayed away from any hijinks or gaudiness at this point in time. His skills on the piano were the focus of the episodes, which also had the ring of a family affair: his violin-playing brother functioned as the leader of the backing orchestra.

Liberace's years of greatest success would not really kick into full gear until the mid-1950s, when mass audiences began to flock to see him live, or simply continued to watch him on the tube. Previously kept in check, the flashiness of his presentational style increasingly took over in the next two decades. Without foregoing the fast-playing skills for which he had been long admired, the showman also heightened the sentimentality conveyed by his piano, in a style that attracted adult female audiences in particular. A more gimmicky source of attraction was the ever-increasing amount of jewelry and sartorial ostentation in his visual presentation, which kept audiences intrigued. As an entertainer in need of a high salary to support a very lavish lifestyle, Liberace knew was he was doing. By 1978, the Guinness Book of World Records was declaring him holder of the title of "highest paid musician."


Date: May 13, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Goody Goody - 1:01(Matt Malneck, Johnny Mercer)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:19(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'm Gonna Live Till I Die - 1:58(Al Hoffman, Walter Kent, Manny Kurtz)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) When The World Was Young (Ah, The Apple Trees) - 1:53(Gerard Philippe Bloch, Johnny Mercer, Marie T. Angele Vannier)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 37 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Following in the flamboyant footsteps of Liberace, Peggy Lee's show enjoyed the presence of yet another showman with a gift for a sentimental approach: Max Bygraves (1922-2012), the all-around British entertainer who would in time become a household name in his native land. Early signs of a possibly successful career in showbusiness were already apparent back in 1935, when the artistic activities of then-13-year-old altar boy progressed from school talent competitions to singing a Handel piece at Westminster Cathedral. His next noteworthy brush with success would happen during the war years, while he was serving as an airframe fitter at the Royal Air Force: his impressions of various celebrities were cherished by the troops.

Around 1946, Bygraves formally adopted a professional career in entertainment, focusing on comedy and singing, and touring the United Kingdom's theatrical circuit. Within the next three years, he would make his first appearances on film and would participate on two successful radio shows, one of them being the comedy Educating Archie, which brought national recognition to his comic style and trademark phrases.

Bygraves' path toward (inter)national recognition continued at the London Palladium. Some time around 1949, he happened to fill in for another comedian. His three appearances as a substitute were to the liking of the Palladium's Val Parnell, and the impresario's seal of approval led to a total of 14 concert engagements at the top venue, over a ten-year period. One of those engagements featured Judy Garland as the bill's main attraction. It started on April 9, 1950, lasting four weeks. The shows must have gone very well: Garland took Bygraves to New York, where he appeared as her opening act at the Palace Theatre.

But that was not all there was to the connection with Miss Showbusiness: in the words of The New York Times, Judy Garland then chose him to open for her on tours of the United States from 1950 to 1952. The above-seen photos of Bygraves could be pointing to the connection with Garland, but are likelier to be a more direct allusion to his best-remembered hit, the self-penned "You Need Hands," for which he was awarded the 1958 Ivor Novello Songwriter Of The Year award.

Max Bygraves' guest appearance in Peggy Lee's show seems to belong to the tail end of his USA period with Garland. It consisted of just one solo performance -- a number or routine called "The Mixed-up Vocalist." There were no duets with Lee.

During this same period, Bygraves' five-year-old son would make headlines when the pair of Frank Sinatra and James Mason came to his rescue, as the boy was reportedly drowning in a pool. (ByGraves and his family were at Mason's house for a get-together that also included Sinatra and Ava Gardner. In ByGraves' own account of the story, only Mason came to the child's rescue -- not Sinatra.)

Max ByGraves would soon return to the United Kingdom for good, solidly cementing a career in entertainment there. The entertainer's success is more than apparent from the 31 gold records that he earned in his lifetime, and from a very large number of appearances on television, among various other factors. After the advent of Beatlemania, he became more of a nostalgia act, concentrating in recording music hall songs and singalong albums, still with considerable success. Nowadays, he is also remembered for his multimillionaire status, his collection of 53 Roll Royces, and his 69-year-long marriage (that last feat regrettably marred by public revelations of at least three sons sired out of wedlock with different women).


Date: May 15, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Hoagy Carmichael (p, v), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ole Buttermilk Sky - 1:25(Jack Brooks, Hoagy Carmichael)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Skylark - 2:00(Hoagy Carmichael, Johnny Mercer)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Jump Through The Ring (You, Fool) - 2:45(Jeanne Cherdak, Jack Manus, Guy Wood)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Georgia On My Mind: Hoagy Carmichael Medley - 0:28(Hoagy Carmichael, Stuart Gorrell)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Get Along Without You Very Well: Hoagy Carmichael Medley - 0:33(Hoagy Carmichael, Jane Brown Thompson)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Rockin' Chair: Hoagy Carmichael Medley - 0:28(Hoagy Carmichael)
g. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little Old Lady: Hoagy Carmichael Medley - 0:23(Stanley Adams, Hoagy Carmichael)
h. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Small Fry: Hoagy Carmichael Medley - 0:26(Hoagy Carmichael, Frank Loesser)
i. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Two Sleepy People: Hoagy Carmichael Medley - 0:26(Hoagy Carmichael, Frank Loesser)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 38 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Peggy Lee dedicated four episodes of her radio show to the work of a particular songwriter. In each of the four programs, the feted songwriter was present as a guest: Johnny Mercer (episode dated ca. May 22, 1952), Matt Dennis (ca. August 12, 1952), Frank Loesser (ca. August 21, 1952) and, in the instance under discussion, Hoagy Carmichael. As part of the proceedings, Carmichael offered a solo version of "In The Cool, Cool, Of The Evening," one of his own compositions. He also joined forces with Lee in the above-listed medley of his songs. Vocals for all the medley selections were handled by Lee alone, except for the closer "Two Sleepy People," during which Carmichael vocalized with her.

Being such a famous figure in American music, there is no need for an account of Hoagland Howard Carmichael's life here. Suffice it to point out that the composer, pianist, and singer was also a good actor, scoring about 15 acting credits in Hollywood's filmland. Mister Carmichael and Miss Peggy Lee actually appeared together, both in lead acting roles, during an episode of the legal series Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law (1972). According to Carmichael himself, he also owed the title of his second autobiography (Sometimes I Wonder, 1965) to Lee, who suggested it while they were sitting next to one another on a plane trip.


Performances

1. Hoagy Carmichael Medley
Each performance from this medley is preceded by an information byte, uttered by Lee. For instance, Carmichael's recent Academy Award for "In The Cool, Cool Of The Evening" receives mention right before the song is performed. "Rockin' Chair" is prefaced with credit to Mildred Bailey for recording the version that made the song known.


Personnel

1. Hoagy Carmichael
During the entire medley of compositions written by Hoagy Carmichael, he is presumed to be playing piano behind Lee.


Date: May 20, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Good Day - 1:08(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Forgive Me - 1:56(Milton Ager, Jack Yellen)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Undecided - 2:23(Sid Robin, Charlie Shavers)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 2:23(Oscar Brand)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little David, Play On Your Harp - 2:28(Traditional)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 39 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Though billed as guests, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires qualify as semi-regulars of Club 88. In addition to this broadcast, they would also be featured in many other episodes (ca. June 10, ca. August 7, ca. August 19, September 2, October 2, October 16, October 21, October 23, October 28, and October 30, 1952). The total is 11 episodes -- far more than any other act who nominally guested in this series. (The group might have actually participated in additional episodes, where they would have functioned as background vocalists for Lee and other guests. However, this possibility cannot be confirmed or denied at the moment; I have only listened to a tiny fraction of the series' 81 installments.)

On this initial visit to Club 88, the quintet backed the songstress during an interpretation of "Little David, Play On Your Harp." Sans Lee, they sang a number that my main sources simply identify as "Wonder." One of the other sources at hand calls it "Wonder If You're Ever Lonely." (As long as the correct full title remains unclear, the theme of the Disney movie Alice in Wonderland is also a possible candidate, albeit a less likely one. The theme's title: "Wonder Where.")

In the sources that I have consulted, the five individuals identified as members of The Rhythmaires are Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood and, naturally, the group's leader. In a later episode of the show (September 4, 1952), the presence of all five members is confirmed by the hostess herself, who calls them by name -- "Judd, Loulie Jean, Gloria, Mac, Charlie. During that same episode, Lee chats with Conlon, too. They were well acquainted with one another due to the many radio shows and recording sessions for which he and his musical partners were regularly hired to sing background vocals. After multiple joint appearances in episodes of Bing Crosby's show, Lee herself had hired the Rhythmaires for about five episodes of an earlier radio show of hers, the Thursday edition of The Chesterfied Supper Club (1949-1950). Then there were the handful of 1949 and 1950 Lee sessions on which the leader and his companions had been alternatively billed as The Jud Conlon Singers or The Jud Conlon Choir. (More can be added to this topic; see notes under session dated September 2, 1952, on this page.)

Like many other acts of their day, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires appear to have made a satisfactory transition from radio to television. The second of the above-seen photos is from one of their musical contributions to the debut episode of Dinah Shore's TV show (1952). The quintet was still active on television programs and record dates in 1958, when they were featured in Alvino Rey's Decca album My Reverie and in the earlier episodes of Milton Berle's TV show. Afterwards, their track grows cold.

Nowadays, Jud Conlon's name (also printed under the variant Judd Conlon, and more rarely as Justin Conlon, his birth name) is more readily associated with classic Disney films such as The Adventures Of Ichabod And Mr. Toad (1949), Alice In Wonderland (1951) and Peter Pan (1953), in all of which he contributed to the scores and the choral singing. Another Disney flick, Babes In Toyland (1961), is the last Conlon credit of which I have become aware; the Wisconsonite would pass away in 1966, at the age of 56. As for the quintet's other members, three of whom had separate solo careers, consult the notes under episodes dated June 10 (Mack McLean), August 7 (Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman), October 2 (Gloria Wood), and October 16 (Charles Parlato).


Date: May 22, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Johnny Mercer (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Old Black Magic - 1:24(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Come Rain Or Come Shine - 1:58(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Since My Love Has Gone (Addio, Del Passato) - 2:36(Giuseppe Verdi, Herbert Wasserman)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Jeepers Creepers: Johnny Mercer Medley(Johnny Mercer, Harry Warren)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Too Marvelous For Words: Johnny Mercer Medley(Johnny Mercer, Richard Whiting)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Blues In The Night: Johnny Mercer Medley(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
g. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive: Johnny Mercer Medley - 0:32(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 40 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Peggy Lee dedicated four episodes of her radio show to the work of particular songwriter. In each of the four programs, the feted songwriter was present as a guest: Hoagy Carmichael (episode dated ca. May 15, 1952), Matt Dennis (ca. August 12, 1952), Frank Loesser (ca. August 21, 1952) and, in the instance under discussion, Johnny Mercer. As part of the proceedings, Lee and Mercer alternated numbers in a medley of his songs, during which Mercer offered solo renditions of "Goody Goody," "One For My Baby," and "Mandy Is Two." Together, Mercer and Lee finished their medley with "Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive." This episode marked the second of Mercer's three guest appearances in Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee; for a few additional details on the matter, consult the notes under the first appearance (July 22, 1951).


Performances

1. "Mandy Is Two" [Or Is That Three?]
The song "Mandy Is Two" is actually sung by Johnny Mercer as "Mandy Is Three," to reflect the fact that his daughter Amanda had become one year older since the writing of the song. Mercer also incorporates some new lyrics, in which he enthuses about how sharp his girl is becoming.


Date: May 27, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Jeff Chandler, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) What Does It Take (To Make You Take To Me)? - 1:12(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Danny Boy - 2:18(Traditional, Fred E. Weatherly)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:24(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) To Be Loved By You - 1:45(Alex Kramer, Joan Whitney, Hy Zaret)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Walkin' My Baby Back Home - 1:45(Roy Turk, Fred E. Ahlert)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 41 — Peggy Lee   (1953)








Guest

This episode's guest was Hollywood star Jeff Chandler, a Jewish-American actor best remembered for playing American Indian roles. In fact, the former Ira Grossel became the first actor to receive an Academy Award nomination for portraying a Native American (Cochise, in Broken Arrow, opposite James Stewart, 1950). Chandler also dabbled in singing, releasing various singles (on Decca & Liberty), one EP (on Decca), and two LPs (on Liberty, one of them reissued on Sunset; for photos of the front covers, see episode dated ca. September 25, 1952). Lee had Chandler as her guest three times, beginning with this episode. (Next: June 24, 1952.) All but the last of the above-seen photos probably comes from a rehearsal for the present episode. (One additional photo from this session can be found amidst this page's final notes, as well as photos from one of Chandler's other guest appearances.) "You Made Me Love You" was Chandler's solo selection for the episode, which also featured him doing some "Walkin' My Baby Back Home" with Peggy Lee.

Although Chandler had a steadily active film career from 1945 until his death in 1962, the aforementioned 1950 flick Broken Arrow remained its peak. Notwithstanding appearances in about 50 movies and earlier acting work in radio shows, he never achieved further notoriety for any other role, and remained mostly within the realm of B pictures. It must be said, however, that the opportunities to branch out into more solid roles were cut short much too soon for the imposingly tall (6'4") actor. He died at age 42, under circumstances that led to a successful malpractice lawsuit. (After having injured his back while playing baseball, he would undergo what sounds like a botched surgery. During the procedure, one of his arteries was hit, with subsequent hemorrhaging and lethal blood poisoning.)


Date: May 29, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra, The Red Norvo Trio (acc), Tal Farlow (g), Red Mitchell (b), Red Norvo (vib), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Johnny One Note - 1:35(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Watermelon Weather - 1:08(Paul Francis Webster, Hoagy Carmichael)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Solitaire - 2:44(Renee Borek, King Guion, Carl Nutter)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Be Anything (But Be Mine) - 2:13(Irving Gordon)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Got Rhythm - 1:48(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 42 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest






Making their second guest appearance in Club 88, The Red Norvo Trio played an instrumental version of "I Get A Kick Out Of You" and, with Peggy Lee again on vocals, did an encore of "I Got Rhythm." The photos above show two editions of the trio. The first, featuring Tal Farlow on guitar and Charles Mingus on bass, was active in 1950 and 1951. The second, featuring Jimmy Rainey on guitar and Red Mitchell on bass, was active in 1953. The 1952 edition that came to Peggy Lee's show featured Farlow and Mitchell (both also pictured individually above).


Personnel

1. The Red Norvo Trio
Before they embark in their joint version of "I Got Rhythm," Peggy Lee identifies each member of the trio by name. She also states that the Trio was currently fulfilling an engagement at the Encore Club, and makes mention of the industry people who had gone to see Norvo and company on the previous night (Axel Stordhal, Mitch Miller, Percy Faith).


Date: June 3, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)
Location: Hollywood, California

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Sonny Burke (p), Desi Arnaz, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:30(Cole Porter)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 or Bia 4208 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #2]   (2000)
Direct Source Licensed CS/CD(Canada) 14652 — Peggy Lee ("Star Power" Series)   (2001)
Delta's Xtra Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 20050501 — Blues In The Night   (2005)
Forever Gold/Solo/Pacific Entertainment Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Fg 262 — Peggy Lee    (2007)
[unknown label] CDunknown — Blonde Ambitions {Peggy Lee, Marilyn Monroe}   
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Perfidia - 1:36(Alberto Dominguez, Milton Leeds)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Jump Through The Ring (You, Fool) - 2:49(Jeanne Cherdak, Jack Manus, Guy Wood)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 3279 — Peggy Lee, Volume 1   (2004)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 34572 — Peggy Lee, Volumes 1 & 2 [Volumes also sold separately]   (2005)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Mañana - 1:20(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 or Bia 4208 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #2]   (2000)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 44 — Peggy Lee   (1953)
Jazz Band/Flyright Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Ebdcd 2115 2 — LIVE, 1947 & 1952   (1993)

Guest




Cuban-American personality Desi Arnaz made a guest appearance in this episode of Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee. Though primarily remembered as the husband of comedienne Lucille Ball (in real life and also in the classic TV sitcom I Love Lucy), Desiderio Alberto Arnaz y de Acha had had his very own career in music long before getting married. His years as a professional entertainer had begun in Miami nightclubs, where he sang and played both conga and guitar (though the latter far less dexterously than the former). After also spending half a year as a member of The Xavier Cugat Orchestra, he went on his own, forming The Congra Orchestra in late 1939 or early 1940, and recording a few sides for Columbia at that time. In the ensuing decade, he continued to actively play with his band at a variety of nightclubs, but his recording career did not really kick into full gear until the decade's second half, when The Congra Orchestra was signed by RCA (1946-1947) and Decca (1949). The band's repertoire mixed Latin-oriented numbers ("Babalu," "Holiday In Havana," "Cuban Pete," etc.) with the big band-era numbers of the day ("Green Eyes," "Mr. Five By Five, " etc.), though naturally leaning toward the ethnic material. Various female vocalists sang with and/or were part of the band in those years, but the bandleader -- Desi Arnaz -- still assigned a fair share of the vocal repertoire to the band's boy vocalist -- Desi himself. Transitioning into acting around the time when he married Ball, he played an orchestra leader in I Love Lucy (1951-1956). Naturally, the extremely popular show showcased his singing and playing skills from time to time. During this visit to Lee's program, Arnaz sings "Similau," a Caribbean chant that both he and Lee had separately recorded in 1949. Together, they tackle her self-penned 1948 hit "Mañana."


Performances

1. "Mambo Jambo"
As part of an episode to which Lee refers as Latin-flavored, Sunny Burke And His Orchestra perform their version of the instrumental "Mambo Jambo."

2. "Mañana"
This episode's duet is peppered with various interjected phrases from Arnaz, all of them uttered in Spanish. Those include "mucho frío" (after the line "I'll be soaking through my skin") and "¡Arriba, linda!"


Poetry

1. Frederick William Thomas
"You got that poetic look in your eyes," says the show's announcer. Lee's response: "Well, Frederick William Thomas said it, Bob." She proceeds to recite the opening lines of Thomas' long Song, from which she segues into her version of "Perfidia." The lines:

’T IS said that absence conquers love!
But, oh! believe it not;
I’ve tried, alas, its power to prove,
But thou art not forgot.

Thomas' poem can be found in An American Anthology, 1787–1900, edited by Edmund Clarence Stedman and published in 1900.


Date: June 5, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Tommy Dorsey (tb), Sonny Burke (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 1:21(Oscar Brand)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
Hallmark Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 300862 [Reissue: 1999] — The Lady Is A Tramp [aka These Foolish Things] & Other Great Standards; from box Ladies Of Song]   (1995)
Hallmark Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 705462 — Peggy Lee Gold (Hallmark's Series)   (1995)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) These Foolish Things - 2:16(Harry Link, Eric Maschwitz aka Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
Castle Communications' Kaz Division Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Trt Mc/Cd Cd 153 — Let There Be Love (TrueTrax Sub-Label)   (1995)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One More Chance - 2:21(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
Castle Communications' Kaz Division Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Trt Mc/Cd Cd 153 — Let There Be Love (TrueTrax Sub-Label)   (1995)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'll Never Smile Again: Sinatra-Dorsey Medley - 1:39(Ruth Lowe)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) This Love Of Mine: Sinatra-Dorsey Medley - 1:01(Sol Parker, Hank Sanicola, Frank Sinatra)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Lady Is A Tramp - 2:09(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
Castle Communications' Kaz Division Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Trt Mc/Cd Cd 153 — Let There Be Love (TrueTrax Sub-Label)   (1995)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 43 — Peggy Lee   (1953)
Starline's Sounds Rare Collectors' Label LPSr 5008 — If I Could Be With You   (1986)
Jasmine Collectors' Label CS/LP/CD(United Kingdom) Jasmc/Jasm/Jascd 2534 — If I Could Be With You [Reissue of 1986 album; CD released in 1993]   (1989)

Guest




Guest

Following the guest appearance of vibraphonist Red "Mr. Swing" Norvo in the previous episode, Peggy Lee invited another instrumentalist to guest in the present program: trombonist and bandleader Tommy "The Sentimental Gentleman Of Swing" Dorsey. Continuously working with big bands from 1920 until his death in 1956, Tommy Dorsey had an extensive music career, during which he amassed a grand total of 286 hits in Billboard singles chart. This episode finds him reprising -- while accompanied by Peggy Lee on vocals -- some of his biggest hits, including those which had featured Frank Sinatra as Dorsey's boy vocalist: "This Love Of Mine" (#3) and "I'll Never Smile Again" (#1 for 12 weeks, and thus the bandleader's greatest hit). As part of this hits medley, Dorsey also performed instrumental versions of his staples "Marie" and "Song Of India."

Lee and Dorsey had probably become well acquainted with one another in July and August of 1949, when they shared a bill at New York's Paramount Theatre. The photos above show them backstage during that engagement. Along with them is her then-husband, guitarist Dave Barbour.


Poetry

1. William Butler Yeats
You know, we have been getting a lot of mail on your poetic introductions to song. You have one tonight?," asks the show's announcer, Bob LeMond. "Yes, I have, Bob," replies Lee. "This is by William Butler Yeats:

The cry of a child by the roadway,
The creek of a lumbering cart,
Are wronging your image that blossoms
A rose in the deeps of my heart."

Lee's recitation of these lines function as the verse of her rendition of "These Foolish Things." She culled them from Yeats' poem "Aedh Tells Of The Rose In His Heart" (more generally known as "The Rose In The Deeps Of My Heart"), anthologized in the poet's 1899 collection The Wind Among The Reeds.

The sequence of the poem's first half, from which the above-quoted lines were taken, is actually as follows:

All things uncomely and broken,
All things worn-out and old,
The cry of a child by the roadway,
The creak of a lumbering cart,

The heavy steps of the ploughman,
Splashing the wintry mould,
Are wronging your image that blossoms
A rose in the deeps of my heart.


Performances

1. Dorsey Medley
This episode includes a segment dedicated to songs popularized by Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra. The issue If I Could Be With You suitably groups them together under the title "Dorsey Medley." As already suggested above, the medley consists of two instrumentals ("Marie," "Song Of India") and two vocals ("This Love Of Mine," "I'll Never Smile Again").


Issues

1. At Last:  The Lost Radio Recordings [CD]
2. If I Could Be With You [LP, CD]
3. "Just One More Chance" [Song]
The 2015 Real Gone Music CD At Last:  The Lost Radio Recordings contains tracks from The Peggy Lee Show only. It does not include recording or broadcast dates, however. Many of the numbers in that CD cannot be dated with full certainty because Lee sang such numbers in more than one episode, and because original episodes are, for the most part, unavailable for listening. One exception is, of course, this episode, readily available thanks to its release on the various LP and CD incarnations of If I Could Be With You. Listening and comparison of the latter with the Real Gone Music CD reveal that they contain the same versions of "Just One More Chance" and "I'll Never Smile Again." (No other songs are shared by these issues.)


Technical Note

This session features blue arrowheads. Click on them to see a longer list of issues containing songs from the session.


Date: June 10, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Great Come-And-Get-It Day - 1:06(Burton Lane, Erwin 'Yip' Harburg)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Could Write A Book - 1:32(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) At Last - 2:53(Harry Warren, Mack Gordon)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Jericho (Joshua Fit The Battle) - 1:23(Traditional)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Lover - 3:15(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 45 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During their second guest appearance in The Peggy Lee Show, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires backed the hostess as she sang "That Great Come-And-Get-It Day" and "Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho." When performing by themselves, the quintet picked a tune titled "Wonder," which they had sung in their previous appearance as well. For more general details about Conlon and company (including pictures of the group), consult the notes under that previous episode, dated May 20, 1952. As for specifics about individual Rhythmaires (besides Conlon), they can be found under some of the notes for the additional ten episodes which featured the quintet, beginning with the present one.

Arguably the least documented member of the group, Mack McLean worked extensively in the world of choral and vocal-group music. Unlike the other members, however, he did not have a solo career as a music performer. McLean is actually credited with over a dozen film appearances in musicals and shorts dating from 1940 (e.g., Torrid Tempos) to 1954 (i.e., Brigadoon). But he made all such movie appearances either as part of the vocal groups to which he belonged (e.g., the musical short Torrid Tempos, featuring Six Hits And A Miss) or as an often uncredited background/choir singer (e.g., the number "Sons Of A Desert" from Abbot & Costello's Lost In a Harem, in which McLean's voice is just one among various accompanying actor Adia Kuznetzoff). Ditto for his radio and record session credits. Before joining Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires in the late 1940s, he had been one of the so-called Hits in the group Six Hits And A Miss. All six group members are seen above, in a color shot from the 1940 Twentieth Century Fox film Down Argentine Way. McLean is the second man from the left. (This nice photo is included herein only on account of McLean's presence. Six Hits And A Miss were at the height of their joint activity between the years 1937 and 1944; they did not appear in Lee's 1952 series.) McLean appears to have kept on performing as a member of the Rhythmaires through the 1950s, and is said to have passed in 2002, short just a year from becoming a nonagerian. The Internet Movie Database lists a TV appearance in an 1970 episode from the third season of the Lucille Ball series Here's Lucy. After auditioning a print of the episode, called Lucy And Rudy Valle, I regret having to report that there are no traces of either Mack McLean or Gloria Wood (another Rhythmaire credited with an appearance in this episode). Perhaps a scene featuring the voices of McLean, Wood, and other singers (e.g., Sue Allen) was cut. My thanks to Adrian Daff for his kind assistance during the search of information and photos for this date.


Date: June 12, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Dan Dailey, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) What Does It Take (To Make You Take To Me)? - 1:15(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Summertime - 2:16(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Dubose Heyward)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Trust In Me - 2:45(Milton Ager, Ned Wever, Jean Schwartz)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ev'rytime - 2:08(Tony Iavello, Mel Leven)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Oh! Look At Me Now - 2:07(Joe Bushkin, John De Vries)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 46 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




A multi-talented entertainer, Dan Dailey acted, sang, and danced in Hollywood musicals, thereby putting to good use the lessons that he had learned back when he was a child performer in the minstrel and vaudeville circuits. Three years after Babes In Arms served as his Broadway debut, Dailey started his Hollywood career on MGM (1940). Though probably best remembered for musical films such as There's No Business Like Show Business (1951), Meet Me At The Fair (1953), and Give My Regards To Broadway (1948), he also took non-acting lead roles, such as that of Jerome "Dizzy" Dean (a 1930s and 1940s baseball player for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs) in the biopic The Pride Of St. Louis (1952), which Daily had happened to wrap shortly before his visit to Club 88. After years spent in Hollywood, the New York-born man transitioned into TV acting. For the first of his three guest appearances in Peggy Lee's show, Dailey sang "Tea For Two" solo, "Oh! Look At Me Now" as a duet with her. Listeners of Lee's CBS program would hear from Dailey again in the episodes herein dated ca. July 8 and October 14, 1952.


Date: June 17, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), George Jessel, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Goody Goody - 1:31(Matt Malneck, Johnny Mercer)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night - 2:20(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:37(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Sans Souci - 2:48(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Peggy Lee)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Wait Till The Sun Shines, Nellie - 1:10(Andrew Sterling, Harry Von Tilzer)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) For You - 1:10(Al Dubin, Joe Burke)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 47 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Following Dan Dailey's guest appearance in the previous broadcast, this episode of Peggy Lee's radio series showcased George Jessel, another New Yorker with roots in minstrel shows and the vaudeville circuit. Raised by a mother who worked as a ticket seller in one of the theaters near 42nd Street (The Imperial Theatre), Jessel was also able to infiltrate the world of Broadway at a young age, thereby acquiring ample experience in the world of entertainment before he had reached his twenties. During the ensuing decades, the entertainer's varied career found him acting in Hollywood films of the silent era, writing songs with a sentimental or old-fashioned bent (his best-known one being "My Mother's Eyes," which he recorded in 1929), and producing musicals for 20th Century Fox.

At the time that the present episode of Club 88 went on the air, Jessel's latest film production was Wait Till The Sun Shines, Nellie, inspired by the 1905 hit song of that title, and starring a man who was also slated to visit Lee's program, David Wayne (episode dated August 19, 1952). The film's imminent release was probably the reason why guest Jessel and hostess Lee decided to sing the old-time song as a duet. Jessel's parts during "Wait Till The Sun Shines, Nellie" were his only singing contributions to the proceedings.

George Jessel was a recording artist as well, with a discography dating back to the 78 rpm era. During the vinyl era, he made nostalgia LPs filled with songs from the end of the nineteenth century (e.g., George Jessel Sings Tear Jerkers Of The Not-So-Gay Nineties) and retrospective albums in which he fulfilled the role of narrator (e.g., From Vaude To Video). There were also comedy LPs (e.g., Bedtime Stories For Grownups) and albums with various assorted themes (i.e., Seeing Israel With George Jessel). As a comedian, his work is said to have had a slant toward Jewish-flavored humor.

As the years passed, Jessel would become a Hollywood staple, serving as either master of ceremonies or featured speaker at numerous (celebrity, charity, political) events, and rightfully earning the nickname "Toastmaster General of the United States." In the second of the above-shown photos, Lee and Jessel are seen together in 1953, at a fundraiser for victims of cerebral palsy. That same year, the program George Jessel Salutes premiered on the radio airwaves, and the next year The George Jessel Show would debut on television.

One noteworthy detail mentioned in most of Jessel's biographical capsules is the fact that, having played the lead role in the original Broadway version of The Jazz Singer, he was originally slated to play in the film version (1927), too. Disagreements over Jessel's salary led to Warner Brothers' eventual pick of Al Jolson.


Date: June 19, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Gordon MacRae (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) From This Moment On - 1:20(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Here In My Heart - 2:12(Bill Borelli, Pat Genaro, Lou Levinson)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Since My Love Has Gone (Addio, Del Passato) - 2:42(Giuseppe Verdi, Herbert Wasserman)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Alone Together - 2:43(Harold Dietz, Arthur Schwartz)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Tea For Two - 1:25(Vincent Youmans, Irving Caesar)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 48 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Gordon MacRae graced this episode of Club 88 with his healthy pipes and all-American guy presence. A baritone whose robust voice suggested the breadth and training of an opera singer, MacRae was actually untrained, and did not sing opera. He operated instead in the worlds of pop and Hollywood musicals, achieving the peak of his popularity through lead roles in the now-classic film versions of Oklahoma! (1955) and Carousel (1956). MacRae thus made his greatest impact in Hollywood and, secondarily, on record, even though he also appeared on Broadway, radio, and television. Those three fields -- television in particular -- sheltered MacRae after the decline of movie musicals.

As both a singer and actor, his professional career started off in the early 1940s, when he spent two years as the boy vocalist of Horace Heidt's band and replaced a secondary character in the Broadway play Junior Miss. During the second half of the 1940s (with his service in the Air Force over), he played another minor yet attention-grabbing role in a Broadway show (Three To Make Ready), which led to contracts with Warner Brothers and Capitol Records. On the matter of records, he went on to share with Peggy Lee a notable distinction: both were Capitol recording artists for 22 years -- longer than just about any other pop artist on that label (MacRae: 1947-1969; Lee: 1944-1951 & 1957-1972).

The singer Gordon MacRae is especially remembered for his duet partnerships with Jo Stafford (on Capitol Records) and Doris Day (in Hollywood films). As for eggy Lee, she and MacRae did not record together while both were on Capitol, but they made up for such an omission by duetting in this radio show ("Tea For Two") and on TV ("Long Ago And Far Away" & "The Birth Of The Blues," heard during an episode of the The Colgate Comedy Hour, 1955). His visit to Club 88 in the summer of 1952 also produced a solo interpretation of "Cuban Love Song." Listeners of the show would heard from him again a few months later (on October 7, 1952).


Date: June 24, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)
Location: Hollywood, Calfornia

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Jeff Chandler, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive - 1:19(Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 or Bia 4208 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #2]   (2000)
Direct Source Licensed CS/CD(Canada) 14652 — Peggy Lee ("Star Power" Series)   (2001)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 3279 — Peggy Lee, Volume 1   (2004)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 34572 — Peggy Lee, Volumes 1 & 2 [Volumes also sold separately]   (2005)
Forever Gold/Solo/Pacific Entertainment Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Fg 262 — Peggy Lee    (2007)
[unknown label] CDunknown — Blonde Ambitions {Peggy Lee, Marilyn Monroe}   
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Frenesí - 1:36(Alberto Dominguez, Ray Charles, Sidney Keith Russell)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Bermuda - 2:24(Cynthia Strother, Eugene Strother)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) We're One - 2:13(Larry Berns)
Direct Source Licensed CS/CD(Canada) 14652 — Peggy Lee ("Star Power" Series)   (2001)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 3280 2 — Peggy Lee, Volume 2   (2004)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 34572 — Peggy Lee, Volumes 1 & 2 [Volumes also sold separately]   (2005)
Forever Gold/Solo/Pacific Entertainment Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Fg 262 — Peggy Lee    (2007)
[unknown label] CDunknown — Blonde Ambitions {Peggy Lee, Marilyn Monroe}   
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Slumming On Park Avenue - 1:47(Irving Berlin)
Direct Source Licensed CS/CD(Canada) 14652 — Peggy Lee ("Star Power" Series)   (2001)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 3280 2 — Peggy Lee, Volume 2   (2004)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 34572 — Peggy Lee, Volumes 1 & 2 [Volumes also sold separately]   (2005)
Forever Gold/Solo/Pacific Entertainment Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Fg 262 — Peggy Lee    (2007)
[unknown label] CDunknown — Blonde Ambitions {Peggy Lee, Marilyn Monroe}   
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Good Day: Radio Show Theme - 1:28(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Starline's Sounds Rare Collectors' Label LPSr 5008 — If I Could Be With You   (1986)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 49 — Peggy Lee   (1953)
Jazz Band/Flyright Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Ebdcd 2115 2 — LIVE, 1947 & 1952   (1993)

Guest




Introduced by Peggy Lee as "the virile and versatile star of Universal Pictures," this episode's guest was Jeff Chandler, making the second of his three appearances in the show. "That Old Black Magic" was his choice for a solo, "Slumming On Park Avenue" his duet with Lee. For details about this singer and actor's career, consult the notes under program dated ca. May 27, 1952.


Performances

1. "It's A Good Day"
2. Dating
The above-listed performance of "It's A Good Day" is, for the most part, an instrumental. The vocal parts amount to just a couple of lines sung by Lee ("yes, it's a good day for singing a song and it's a good day for moving along"). Also heard are the words "this is the United States Armed Forces Radio Service," spoken by an announcer. Obviously, this rendition of "It's A Good Day" served as the closer for the episodes in their AFRS edition.

Since I have been not been able to listen to more than a handful of the show's episodes, I could not confidently ascertain how often this closer was heard. My current belief is that the AFRS episodes ended with the number, and that many of the CBS episodes beamed from LA did too. (Not so in the case of the NY-beamed episodes.) The "It's A Good Day" theme might have also opened some episodes.

Dating this theme is problematic. It is not listed in my main sources. In the Jazz Band CD Live, 1947 & 1952, it shows up last (track #25); the tracks that immediately precede it are from AFRS program no. 49. Hence, in the absence of concrete dating, and due to my need to place the track somewhere in the discography, I decided that the present session was my best option.

This closing theme could of course be an edit of any of the six versions that Lee sang in full during the show’s history. Those versions were heard on the episodes with the following datings: February 19, ca. May 20, ca. August 14, September 23, October 23, and October 30, 1952.


Poetry

1. Alexander Pope
"Hi Peggy; you've got that poetic look in your eyes," declares Bob LeMond, the show's announcer. "Alexander Pope said it, Bob," Lee replies. She then recites the following lines:

Unlearned, he knew no schoolman's subtle art,
No language, but the language of the heart.

This couplet comes from Alexander Pope's 1734 Epistle To Dr. Arbuthnot, which served as the prologue to his poetic anthology Imitations Of Horace. In the present episode of Lee's program, the couplet served as a preface to her rendition of "Frenesí."


Photos

In addition to two publicity shots (above), this section includes a photo (below) of Peggy Lee in the company of not only Jeff Chandler but also Frankie Laine, the guest of the next broadcast, along with Laine's pianist, Carl Fischer. Part of the CBS Photo Archive and available through Getty Images, this picture bears a June 26, 1952 date. (It should be noted, however, that dates on stock photos are not highly reliable. Sometimes they refer to matters other than the actual day of shooting.)




Date: June 26, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Frankie Laine, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) What Does It Take (To Make You Take To Me)? - 1:11(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Somewhere Along The Way - 2:29(Sammy Gallop, Jimmy Van Heusen aka Kurt Adams)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) At Last - 2:53(Harry Warren, Mack Gordon)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard - 2:40(Henry W. Petrie, Henry Sawyer, Philip Wingate)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Tea For Two - 1:03(Vincent Youmans, Irving Caesar)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 50 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest





Singer Frankie Laine was no stranger to playing the role of Peggy Lee's guest in the radio airwaves. He had filled that position a dozen times in The Chesterfield Supper Club, another radio series that she had hosted (1948-1949). Making the total number a lucky 13, this Club 88 guest appearance found the former Frank LoVecchio exchanging"Tea For Two" choruses with the former Norma Deloris Egstrom. Solo, he also sang the standard "On The Sunny Of The Street," probably as a promotional strategy on behalf of the 1951 low-budget musical feature Sunny Side Of The Street, which counted him among the cast's performers.

Seven years Lee's senior, Chicagoan Laine had spent 17 years trying to make it in Hollywood, finally achieving success around the age of 34, with the top 4 hit "That's My Desire" (1947). Subsequently, his steady, long-lasting career as both a concert and recording artist made up for the long, arduous road to success that he had once endured. It is not surprising, then, that he continued to cultivate his career until the twilight of his lifetime. Even after quadruple bypass surgery in the 1980s, he kept on making periodic visits to recording studios and performing venues. His last public appearance happened in 2005, when he had reached the age of 91, and was merely two years away from passing away. The longevous artist would manage to hit the charts posthumously, too: a compilation of his hits would enter the British album chart in 2011, climbing to its top 20.

The man's peak in popularity had happened much earlier, of course -- in the first half of the 1950s, when his producer established Laine as one of the defining voices of pre-rock pop. Under the guidance of Columbia's gimmickmeister Mitch Miller, the man nicknamed "Old Leather Lungs" enjoyed a string of belted-out, boomingly voiced but catchily entertaining top 3 sellers, most of them falling within the categories of novelties and/or melodrama (e.g., "Mule Train," "The Cry Of The Wild Goose," "Jezebel," "Jealousy"). However, Laine's roots were elsewhere: he had spent the previous decade singing in a more jazz-oriented manner, to which he would return periodically in the 1950s. Country would become another genre that he would eventually cultivate as well, due in part to his success as a singer of western themes for both television and film (e.g., Rawhide, Gunfight At The O.K. Corral, 3:10 To Yuma, Blazing Saddles).

It is worth noting that Frankie Laine shared with Peggy Lee a talent for writing hit-making lyrics. As a songwriter, Laine is remembered for his numbers "It Only Happens Once" and, in particular, "We'll Be Together Again."

During the broadcast, we hear Peggy Lee introduce her guest as someone who had come in "zooming between plane connections." Reference is then made to his recent concert engagements in London.


Personnel And Photos

1. Frankie Laine
The two above-seen photos of Lee in Laine's company are from either the rehearsal or the taping of this episode. They form part of the CBS Photo Archive that is viewable through Getty Images, and are among various shots that bear a June 26, 1952 date,

2. Carl Fischer
Frankie Laine's pianist Carl Fischer was shown in a preceding image also featuring Lee and Laine (and Jeff Chandler). That photo bears the same date as the two that were included in this section; all three were presumably taken during the same rehearsal and/or taping. Given the pictorial proof of Fischer's presence, we can naturally assume that the pianist performed in the show as well, at least for the duration of Laine's solo.


Performances

1. "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard"
Unlike her better-known studio recording on Decca, Peggy Lee's radio versions of "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard" included the song's fairly long verse. (There is a total of three radio versions, all from Club 88, programs dated ca. June 26, ca. August 12, and September 18, 1952.)


Date: July 1, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Bill Lechner, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I've Got You Under My Skin - 1:38(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Summertime - 2:16(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Dubose Heyward)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Louisville Lou - 2:58(Milton Ager, Jack Yellen)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Be Anything (But Be Mine) - 2:22(Irving Gordon)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Something Sort Of Grandish - 1:31(Burton Lane, Alan Jay Lerner)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 51 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Out of the dozens of guests featured by Peggy Lee in her Club 88 show, Bill Lechner (1924-1994) is easily the most obscure name of them all. Primarily an actor, he actually has over 60 credits in that field, some from Hollywood movies and some from television series, all of them accumulated within a span of about 30 years (1938-1970). The quality of the credited roles is not as impressive as the quantity, however: they are bit appearances in minor features -- so bitty that many of the characters played by him bear no name. However, in this one episode of Club 88, Lee gives Lechner his due, showcasing him as a capable singer and worthy guest. He sings "It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World" solo, and tackles "Something Sort Of Grandish" in Lee's company.

Why was the spotlight shone on such an obscure actor? Though no household name, Bill Lechner certainly was a star in the world of the Oldsmobile-sponsored Club 88 show: he played one of the two leads in the company's TV commercials of the early 1950s, which featured an Oldsmobile-loving fictional couple named Lucille and Johnny. Part of the sponsor's promotional machine, Lucille and Johnny were also regulars of Peggy Lee's show, being heard from time to time in the radio commercials that eulogized Oldsmobile's 88 brand of cars.

Bill Lechner also starred in promotional Oldmobile shorts such as The Lady And The Rocket. That 1952 color film tells the story of Johnny (Lechner), a talent scout who falls head over heels for Lucille (Jean Ruth), a nightclub singer, star actress and, naturally, expert driver of Oldsmobile cars. "Terrific engine, terrific girl," the script declares at one point. The above-seen photos are shots of Lechner, playing Johnny in two scenes from The Lady And The Rocket. Both of them find him on the wheel of an oldsmobile. In the first, he and Lucille are in hot pursuit of the villain, who is on a motorcycle -- no rocket for him. (Incidentally, Lechner was one among various actors who played the role of Johnny over the years. He is not, for instance, the actor who appears as Johnny in the 1951 black & white short Trail Of The Rocket. This one is, incidentally, a science fiction spoof in which Johnny faces the tall prospect of having to stop, all by himself, a branch of extraterrestrial invaders eager to uncover the secrets behind Oldsmobile's "88 rocket" line.)


Date: July 3, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, The Merry Macs (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ole Buttermilk Sky - 1:32(Jack Brooks, Hoagy Carmichael)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'm Confessin' (That I Love You) - 1:55(Don Dougherty, Al J. Neiburg, Ellis Reynolds)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 2:55(Oscar Brand)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Here In My Heart - 1:41(Bill Borelli, Pat Genaro, Lou Levinson)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Singing In The Rain - 2:00(Arthur Freed, Nacio Herb Brown)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 52 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




The founding members of The Merry Macs first hit the radio airwaves in the mid-to-late 1920s, when they were temporarily known as The Mystery Trio and, subsequently, as The Personality Boys. The boy group consisted of three brothers who actually sang in the company of their unbilled mother. (She vocalized the melodies.) In 1930, the hitherto unbilled female role was re-assigned to a young girl named Cheri McKay. With McKay's official incorporation and ensuing billing as part of the group, the ensemble became a quartet. Needing a new name, the McMichael brothers focused on the fact that all members of the quartet had last names that started with 'Mc.' Hence the group ended up calling itself The Merry Macs.

They had their heyday during the first half of the 1940s, scoring a dozen hits for Decca Records. One of them was "Mairzy Doats," a chartbuster that stayed five weeks at the top. Among their other top ten hits were "Sentimental Journey" and "Praise The Lord And Pass The Ammunition." Later recordings on Capitol (from 1949 onwards) did not prove as successful; none made it to the singles chart.

In 1950, both The Merry Macs and Peggy Lee performed (separately) in the Bing Crosby vehicle Mr. Music. To be more specific, Peggy Lee was one of three guest acts to interpret the movie's theme ("Life Is So Peculiar"), and The Merry Macs was another. (Groucho Marx was the third guest who performed "Life Is So Peculiar." The versions by both Lee and Marx were rendered as duets with Crosby.)

Happening two years after that movie's release, this episode of Club 88 would have been the perfect get-together for Peggy Lee and The Merry Macs to reenact "Life Is So Peculiar" together. However, the participants apparently were in a happier, less pseudo philosophical mood, as the Merry quartet took to "Singing In The Rain" with the hostess. By themselves, the group went on a trip down memory lane. They did a close-harmony medley which consisted of three songs that had been erstwhile hits for them: "The Hut Hut Song" (1939) "Ta Hu Wa Nu Wa," aka "Hawaiian War Chant" (1941) and "Sentimental Journey" (1945).

Naturally, The Merry Macs underwent personnel changes over the years. Four different vocalists would successively take over the female role in the group. Blonde-haired Marjory Garland turned out to be the last and longest-lasting choice. By the time of this 1952 appearance in Club 88, she was already in place. Moreover, the wartime death of the youngest of one of the brothers (Joe) would result three or four additional replacements over the years. In 1952, brothers Ted and Judd counted with the presence of 'non-brother' Dick Baldwin.

The group remained active until at least the 1960s. A concert billed as a reunion took place in 1968 at the Hollywood Bowl. A new edition, formed by their offspring, was operating at the beginning of the twenty-first century.


Date: July 8, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Dan Dailey, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Botch-a-me - 1:27(Luigi Astore, Riccardo Morbelli, Eddie Y. Stanley)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You Go To My Head - 3:00(John Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Summertime - 2:16(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Dubose Heyward)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Watermelon Weather - 1:17(Paul Francis Webster, Hoagy Carmichael)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Walkin' My Baby Back Home - 1:48(Roy Turk, Fred E. Ahlert)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 53 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




The second of Dan Dailey's three appearances in Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee found the guest singing "This Can't Be Love" as a solo and "Walkin' My Baby Back Home" as a duet with Lee. For general comments about this song-and-dance man's career, see notes under his first appearance (program dated ca. June 12, 1952).


Date: July 10, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Johnny One Note - 1:36(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Somewhere Along The Way - 2:21(Sammy Gallop, Jimmy Van Heusen aka Kurt Adams)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Skylark - 2:00(Hoagy Carmichael, Johnny Mercer)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:33(Cole Porter)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 54 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




In this episode of Club 88, married couple Andy & Della Russell paid a visit to their former Capitol labelmate, Peggy Lee. After an apprenticeship period as both drummer and vocalist with a variety of bands (Ramón Cruz, Gus Arnheim, Alvino Rey, Johnny Richards, Sonny Dunham, Stan Kenton), Andy had done his first session for Capitol on December 17, 1943 (less than 15 days before Peggy). Bilingual versions of "Bésame Mucho" and "Amor" can be found among the earliest Capitol singles released by the former Andrés Rabago Pérez. Both numbers would become top 10 hits for him, and would greatly benefit Capitol as well, by providing the then-starting record company with access to the international Spanish-speaking market. A third and lesser Russell hit from 1944, "What A Difference A Day Made," was entirely sung in English, but its melody had been written by Mexican composer María Grever, and originally sung to a Spanish lyric ("Cuando Vuelva A Tu Lado"). Another María Grever tune, "Magic Is The Moonlight," would be used for the flip side of Russell's 4th hit, "I Dream Of You" (1944).

The Mexican-American vocalist continued to do well during most of the 1940s. From 1945 to 1948, he scored eight additional hits on Capitol, nearly all of them in a more traditionally American mold. Afterwards, the hits dried up, but his work on radio and television did not. He had had his first radio show in late 1943 or early 1944. His second show was actually one of the earliest radio programs to feature Peggy Lee as a solo guest, on March 31, 1945. Russell's next and third radio gig was on the popular Your Hit Parade (1946), where he succeeded Frank Sinatra and Lawrence Tibbett as featured male singer.




Little has been publicly written about Andy's first wife, to whom he was already married by 1946. Her husband's career seems to have provided an opportunity for Della to be noticed as someone with her own set of artistic skills, including singing. By 1947, she was doing the occasional duet number with her husband, on Capitol Records. In late 1950 and 1951, they hosted and sang together in Cook's Champagne Party, a five-minute musical program that TV stations used as filler between regularly scheduled programs. Besides such credits in her husband's company, Della's career had one additional credit of significance -- though one that Mrs. Russell once again shared with others. A devout Catholic, she enjoyed a million-selling single in 1954, when she joined voices with three other religiously-oriented Hollywood artists (Beryl Davis, Connie Haines, and Jane Russell) for the recording of "Do Lord." The four women -- who belonged to different religious denominations but participated in the same non-denominational gatherings -- did four additional masters for Coral Records. Subsequent activity by the female ensemble on Capitol Records did not involve Della Russell.

For their 1952 appearance in Peggy Lee's show, Andy and Della Russell did a comedy routine called "The Honeymoon Is Over," and Della's husband sang "Tell Me Why" solo. There were no duets with Peggy Lee. After this initial visit with his wife, Andy Russell would make a second visit to Club 88, that time on his own. The second visit would generate a duet performance with Lee (program dated September 11, 1952).

Oftentimes seen together on radio, television, and at celebrity events, the Russells were perceived as one of Hollywood's most stable marriages. In the mid-1950s, the dissolution of their marital partnership would draw a fair share of criticism from certain Catholic and Mexican-American sectors, who felt deeply disappointed by the rupture of an union which they had put on a pedestal. The balladeer's once prosperous career was seriously hit by such criticism, coming as it did from a large portion of his fanbase. To make matters worse, Capitol had parted company with him around 1950 and there is no indication of a recording contract during the first half of that decade. Facing another adverse factor in the advent of rock 'n' roll, Russell's decision to relocate to Mexico City proved a wise one. It generated quite a few years of solid success as a recording artist, theatre performer and, especially, television star within the Spanish-speaking world. He even ended up signing again with Capitol Records (and re-marrying) in the mid-1960s. Less felicitous was his decision to return and permanently stay in the United States. The last few decades of his life (d. 1992) found him doing the occasional, periodic appearance, and lamenting his native land's penchant for marginalization and typecasting.


Club 88's Breach

As this page's final notes will explain in more detail, the broadcasting history of Club 88 is only partially known.  The fragmented picture at my disposal has allowed me to date (sometimes exactly, sometimes approximately) all the listed episodes of the original 1952 show. 

But, after revising the show's episode log, a lacuna has become apparent. Either six broadcasts are missing or the program did not air on six occasions.  Facing a lack of evidence to pick between these alternatives, I have chosen to believe that Club 88 went on a three-week hiatus.  

I have also deemed the second half of July the likeliest candidate for such a time gap.  If it truly happened, the reason for the hiatus could have been as simple as Lee's need for a vacation.  Or Lee might have wanted to spend most of her time focused on her preparation for the then-upcoming filming of The Jazz Singer, a movie in which would not only sing but also play the female lead.  An even likelier possibility:  the hiatus might have been pre-scheduled on account of the filming.  The cameras were originally expected to roll on July 14. (Delays ensued. The filming finally started on August the first.)

At any rate, viewers of this discography must bear in mind that I do not have corroboration for the off-air Club 88 period that I am proposing.  The only clear matter is that there is no episode material for six of the show's prospective slots.  Here is hoping that further research will allow for the verification or rejection of the proposal at some point in the future.


Date: August 5, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), MacDonald Carey, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) In The Good Old Summertime - 1:04(George Evans, Ren Shields)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) These Foolish Things - 3:26(Harry Link, Eric Maschwitz aka Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Here In My Heart - 2:12(Bill Borelli, Pat Genaro, Lou Levinson)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Let's Get Away From It All - 1:48(Matt Dennis, Tom Adair)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Mountain Greenery - 1:37(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 55 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




"Like sand through the hourglass, so are the days of our lives ...” Heard as part of the voiceover that starts each episode of the still ongoing soap opera Days Of Our Lives, such words were famously uttered by MacDonald Carey, the man who for decades would play the central, patriarchal role of Dr. Tom Horton, Senior. The good doctor was introduced in the soap's very first episode (November 1965) and would make his last showing in February of 1994 (episode #7214), merely a month before the actor's actual death. Peggy Lee had extended Carey an invitation to appear in her Club 88 forty-two years earlier, at a time when the thespian was more than a decade away from achieving such TV stardom.

An actor through and through, MacDonald Carey (1913-1994) did his masters degree in drama -- or in speech, according to other sources which might be more precise. While in school, he had also sung baritone in choirs and played lead roles in Gilbert & Sullivan operettas. Beginning in 1937, he cultivated dual careers on the radio airwaves, performing as both vocalist and soap opera actor. Also trying his hand at a theatrical career, he made his Broadway debut with a minor appearance in Jerome Kern's 1939 drama Mamba's Daughters. (That drama seems to have included only one musical performance, sung by Ethel Waters, the star of the show.) His second Broadway experience gave him a more sizable role. In Kurt Weill's and Ira Gershwin's 1941 production of Lady In The Dark, Carey played the role of Charley Johnson and joined the other male lead, Victor Mature, for the singing of the number "The Best Years Of His Life."

Through the decade of the 1940s, Carey turned himself into a staple of the B movie world, too. The actor was cast in at least 30 flicks, beginning around 1942 and continuing into the mid 1950s. Oftentimes he played the lead male role, (In one of the more prestigious films to come his way, Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow Of A Doubt, he settled for second lead.) A handful of his 30 flicks were musicals, and two of them were released just a year before his singing participation in Peggy Lee's series (Meet Me After The Show, Excuse My Dust). However, I have found no clear indication that Carey did any singing or dancing in either musical.

For this Club 88 appearance, Carey poured a solo rendition of "My Heart Stood Still." Next, "Let's Get Away From It All" was the wish jointly expressed by the future patriarch of Days Of Our Lives and the future interpreter of "Is That All There Is?" Seen above are publicity shots, probably taken during the rehearsal for the episode.

From the 1950s to the 1990s, this steady professional enjoyed a very extensive career in television, appearing as an actor not only in the aforementioned soap opera but also in many TV movies and TV series. Around 1966, he was chosen to hold the position of First Vice President of the Screen Actors Guild.


Dating

My sources offer broadcast dates for only a few episodes of Club 88. The source for this episode's dating is the following caption, found under the above-shown press photo: "Blonde vocal star Peggy Lee beams happily with the screen's McDonald Carey, who makes his singing debut on her CBS radio Peggy Lee Show on Tuesday, August 5 (KNX-CBS Radio, 9:45 to 10:00 PM, PDT. From Hollywood.)


Date: August 7, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? - 1:01(Traditional)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Once In A While - 2:22(Michael Edwards, Bud Green)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 2:22(Oscar Brand)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little David, Play On Your Harp - 1:42(Traditional)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Lover - 3:05(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 56 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During the third of their 11 guest appearances in Peggy Lee's show, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires backed the hostess as she sang "O Dear, What Can The Matter Be?," "Once In A While," and "Little David, Play On Your Harp." When performing by themselves, the quintet's tune of choice was "On The Alamo." In addition to reading the next paragraphs, curious viewers wanting to know more about this group and its connections to Peggy Lee should consult the notes under the episode dated ca. May 20, 1952.

Loulie Jean Norman, one of the quintet's two female members, can be seen in the two photos presented above. The first photo is a publicity shot from her young years, when she also worked as a model. The other picture is a candid from her later years. Norman began her singing days as a member of The Mel-Tones, a vocal group led by singer Mel Tormé. Following her years working as a member of The Rhythmaires, Louilie Jean proceeded to join The Ray Conniff Singers. She also formed part of various other groups that are less widely remembered, or which were created only for special occasions (e.g., The Belvederes and G-6, the former an ensemble devised for Ray Anthony's TV show, the latter a recording studio group that can be heard in the Judy Garland-Gordon Jenkins album The Letter).

Mrs. Norman had a solid solo career as well, though one that kept her backstage, away from the limelight. In some instances, she served as the movie dubber of better known acts, including Diahann Carroll (Porgy And Bess), Jane Powell (Athena; vocalese sections only) and Juliet Prowse (G. I. Blues). In other instances, she was the memorable yet unbilled or second-billed act of performances that became hits: "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" (as immortalized by The Tokens), the Star Trek theme (original version), the singing ghost of Disney's "Haunted Mansion" theme park attraction, and the titular "Swamp Girl" of Frankie Laine's top twelve hit. There was also work done for various Frank Sinatra projects, including his Trilogy (Future album). Nearly reaching the ripe age of 90, Loulie Jean Norman passed away in 2005.


Date: August 12, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Matt Dennis, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Oh! Look At Me Now - 2:13(Joe Bushkin, John De Vries)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Everything Happens To Me - 2:27(Matt Dennis, Tom Adair)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard - 2:39(Henry W. Petrie, Henry Sawyer, Philip Wingate)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Show Me The Way To Get Out Of This World - 0:43(Matt Dennis, Les Clark)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) We Belong Together: Matt Dennis Medley - 0:43(Matt Dennis, Don Lodice)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Angel Eyes: Matt Dennis Medley - 0:46(Earl K. Brent, Matt Dennis)
g. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Let's Get Away From It All: Matt Dennis Medley - 0:45(Tom Adair, Matt Dennis)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 57 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Peggy Lee dedicated four episodes of her radio show to the work of a particular songwriter. In each of the four episodes, the feted songwriter was present as a guest. There was Hoagy Carmichael (episode dated ca. May 15, 1952), Johnny Mercer (ca. May 22, 1952), Frank Loesser in an installment to be discussed below (ca. August 21, 1952) and, in the present episode, Matt Dennis. A composer who also stood out as a pianist-singer, the multi-talented Dennis both accompanied himself and sang with Peggy Lee during this show. Together, they interpreted four of Dennis' compositions as a medley. The medley's opener ("We Belong Together") was performed as a duet. Vocal duties for the next two numbers were evenly split between the two artists, with Dennis tackling "Old Uncle Fud" and Lee going for "Angel Eyes" next. Also sung by Lee alone was the closer "Let's Get Away From It All" -- a number that she had constantly performed as a vocal duet with her guests in earlier shows. Separately from the medley, Dennis also sang and played piano on "Violets For Your Furs," a song that he had composed around 1941, and which would be popularized by Frank Sinatra. (On record, the song had been debuted by Sinatra at that time, when he was the boy vocalist of Tommy Dorsey's Orchestra. Back then, it did not become a hit, but eventually it would reach the status of a standard from the Great American Songbook. The version through which the song became immortalized was not the one from the early 1940s, but a Sinatra reprise from his 1954 Capitol album Songs For Young Lovers, conducted by Nelson Riddle.)

The least known of Lee's songwriting honorees (but just as noteworthy), Matthew Loveland Dennis (1914-2002) came from a musical family with roots in vaudeville -- his father a singer, his mother a violinist. Young pianist Dennis would go through stints with the big bands of Horace Heidt (1933, just one season) and Paul Weston (late 1940-1942).

Being an above-average musician who not only played and sang but also composed and arranged, Dennis worked closely with various vocalists. He was a vocal coach for The Stafford Sisters, Martha Tilton, and Margaret Whiting. Sister Jo Stafford recommended him to her then-boss, Tommy Dorsey. (Having gotten married to Paul Weston, Jo Stafford might have also served, along with Weston, as catalysts to Dennis' signing of a short-term contract with Capitol Records.)

Dorsey was a particular beneficiary of Matt Dennis’ talents. Many of Dennis' compositions (done almost exclusively in partnership with lyricist Tom Adair) were first recorded by the Dorsey band, with a handful of them becoming hits right away, and various others reaching the rank of standards as the decades went by. Then there was Dennis' association with Frank Sinatra, which dated back to this Dorsey period, when the bandleader assigned to his boy vocalist some of Dennis' compositions ("Let's Get Away From It All," "Everything Happens To Me," "The Night We Called It A Day," etc.).

Dennis also established a close link with Dick Haymes, one of Sinatra's music rivals of the 1940s, and another guest of Peggy Lee (May 6, 1952). In the late 1930s, Dennis hired Haymes as the vocalist and nominal leader of the band that he (Dennis) had formed. Haymes repaid the favor in the mid-1940s, by hiring Dennis as the musical director of his (Haymes') radio program. Naturally, Dennis held other radio and television jobs over the years, including his own 15-minute Matt Dennis Show on NBC-TV in the summer of 1955.

On his own, Matt Dennis made half a dozen albums on various labels (RCA, Jubilee, Trend/Kapp), all of them featuring both singing and piano playing, and all of them worthwhile to a greater or lesser extent. In 1947, he also released various vocal singles on Capitol. All his Capitol material -- including two earlier and hitherto unissued masters -- was recorded in the company of conductor and presumed friend Paul Weston.

The bulk of Dennis' professional life was spent not in the studios, however, but as a pianist-singer at nightclubs in the LA area (Lighthouse Café, The Encore, Tally Ho's, The Captain's Table, Howard Manor, etc.). The man also became a regular at nightclubs elsewhere: he usually performed in New York (The Living Room), Toronto (Town Tavern), and other big cities. It should come as no surprise, then, that Matt Dennis is nowadays remembered as both an excellent composer and a lounge nigthclub act -- with the word 'lounge' carrying strictly positive connotations in this instance.


Personnel

1, Matt Dennis
Peggy Lee introduces her guest as "the very versatile and extremely talented Matt Dennis."


Performances

1. Poetry: Tennyson
2. "Everything Happens To Me"
As a prelude (or verse) to her version of "Everything Happens To Me," Peggy Lee recites the lines "For man is man and master of his fate." These words are from Lord Alfred Tennyson's The Marriage of Geraint, which is in turn part of his epic text Idylls Of The King.

3. "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard"
Unlike her better-known studio recording on Decca Records, Peggy Lee's radio versions of "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard" included the song's fairly long verse. (There is a total of three radio versions, all of them sung for the show under discussion during the following episodes: ca. June 26, ca. August 12, and September 18, 1952.


Date: August 14, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Nat King Cole, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Good Day - 1:08(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart - 2:13(John Sexton, Eberhard Storch, John Turner)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night - 2:19(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Johnny One Note - 1:38(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:25(Cole Porter)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 58 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




This episode of Club 88 finds singer-pianist Nat King Cole and singer-songwriter Miss Peggy Lee duetting on Rodgers & Hart's "Johnny One Note." For his solo spotlight, Cole further offers "Somewhere Along The Way," a number that had recently become a top ten hit for him. With the present broadcast, he was actually making his sixth appearance as a guest of a Peggy Lee-hosted radio show. The other guest appearances had taken place in September and October of 1948, when the King had graced the first five episodes of her previous hosting gig, at The Chesterfield Supper Club. Conversely, Peggy Lee had served as a guest of Cole's own radio show, King Cole Trio Time, at least once, in 1947. The next year, with her husband Dave Barbour in tow, Peggy had further gone on to guest-host one episode of King Cole Trio Time, while Nat was reportedly enjoying a honeymoon vacation with his wife Maria Cole. After the 1952 get-together under discussion, another joint Cole-Lee appearance would take place in 1957. On that occasion, the medium was not radio but television, and the artist making the guest appearance was Lee, on NBC's Nat King Cole Show. Regrettably, the legendary pianist and crooner would prematurely pass away less than a decade later (in 1965), at the age of 45. Also turning 45 that same year, Peggy Lee was among the fellow artists who attended his funeral (as seen in footage incorporated to the DVD The World Of Nat King Cole). In later decades, Lee would join the voices of the many artists who have expressed great admiration for Cole's talents, thereby honoring the memory of the man who had been a long-term labelmate at Capitol and, occasionally, her duet partner over the radio airwaves.


Personnel

1. Nat King Cole
In this episode, songbird Peggy Lee gives us a bird's eye view of her guest's touring itinerary: he had just finished engagements in New York (at the Paramount) and Los Angeles. His next stop was alter to be Lake Tahoe, in Nevada.


Performances

1. Poetry: Shakespeare
2. "Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart"
As a poetic introduction to her singing of the number "Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart," Peggy Lee recites from the second act of William Shakespeare's play Romeo And Juliet ("parting is such sweet sorrow").


Date: August 19, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, David Wayne (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Botch-a-me - 1:32(Luigi Astore, Riccardo Morbelli, Eddie Y. Stanley)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Here In My Heart - 2:12(Bill Borelli, Pat Genaro, Lou Levinson)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Danny Boy - 2:18(Traditional, Fred E. Weatherly)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Great Come-And-Get-It Day - 0:57(Burton Lane, Erwin 'Yip' Harburg)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Something Sort Of Grandish - 1:27(Burton Lane, Alan Jay Lerner)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 59 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Enlisted as this episode's guest was David Wayne, the man who is best-remembered in popular culture as the villainous Mad Hatter of the 1966 TV series Batman (1966-1967; first photo above). That role was merely one, however, in a long list of Hollywood, Broadway, and TV land credits that stretched from the 1940s into the 1980s.

As a Hollywood actor, Wayne played mostly secondary but solid roles near luminaries such as Marilyn Monroe (How To Marry A Millionaire, 1953) and Frank Sinatra (The Tender Trap, 1955). Premiering about four months before his guest appearance in Lee's show, the Susan Hayward vehicle With A Song Of My Heart featured Wayne as the pianist who accompanied the biopic's real-life character, Jane Froman. (Incidentally, that movie's soundtrack includes one of Peggy Lee's self-penned numbers, "It's A Good Day," sung onscreen by an overdubbing Jane Froman.)

In Broadway, the Irish-American actor's career was even more distinguished, boasting roles in musicals such as Finian's Rainbow (1947-1948) and comedies along the lines of Say, Darling. Peer recognition came with his reception of the very first Tony Award in the category of Best Actor Featured In A Musical (1947, for personifying Finian's Rainbow's Og The Leprechaun). There would be two more nominations, one of them being for his characterization of Grandpère Bonnard in the 1968 musical The Happy Time. The other nomination, for his role as the Japanese interpreter Sakini in The Teahouse Of The August Moon, led to his reception of the 8th Tony Award in the category of Best Actor Featured In A Play (1954).

Fresh out of his appearances in the aforementioned films With A Song Of My Heart (April 1952 premiere) and Wait Till The Sun Shines, Nellie (July 1952 premiere), Wayne came to Lee's show in a Finian's Rainbow mindframe: he tackled "Something Sort of Grandish" with Lee, and "When I'm Not Near The Girl I Love" as a solo.

Also listed as being on board for this episode were Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires. They were making the fourth of their 11 guest appearances in Peggy Lee's show. The act did not perform by itself, but they did back the hostess as she sang "That Great Come-And-Get-It Day." Viewers interested in learning more about this group and its connections to Lee should also consult the notes under program dated ca. May 20, 1952.


Personnel

1. David Wayne
Peggy Lee introduces her guest as the star of the original version of Finian's Rainbow, and makes reference to his then-current movie, Wait Till The Sun Shines, Nellie.


Performances

1. Finian's Rainbow
In a mini-tribute to Finian's Rainbow, three songs from that musical are consecutively sung in this episode: "When I'm Not Near The Girl I Love," "That Great Come-And-Get-It Day," and "Something Sort Of Grandish."

2. "Botch-a Me"
If my ears did not deceive me, Peggy Lee makes a sly, coily self-referential change to this novelty. Instead of "tra-la-la-la-la-loo," Lee sings "tra-la-la-la-la-lee."


Date: August 21, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Frank Loesser (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Hoop Dee Doo - 1:46(Milton DeLugg, Frank Loesser)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) My Darling, My Darling - 1:19(Frank Loesser)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Did Anyone Call? - 2:42(Percy Faith, Carl Sigman)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) If I Were A Bell: Frank Loesser Medley(Frank Loesser)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) On A Slow Boat To China: Frank Loesser Medley(Frank Loesser)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Bushel And A Peck: Frank Loesser Medley(Frank Loesser)
g. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Baby, It's Cold Outside: Frank Loesser Medley(Frank Loesser)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 60 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Peggy Lee dedicated four episodes of her radio show to the work of a particular songwriter. In each of the four programs, the feted songwriter was present as a guest: Hoagy Carmichael (episode dated ca. May 15, 1952), Johnny Mercer (ca. May 22, 1952), Matt Dennis (ca. August 12, 1952), and, last but not least, Frank Loesser. As part of the proceedings, Lee and Loesser performed the above-listed medley, through which all four numbers were treated as vocal duets except for "On A Slow Boat To China," sung by Lee solo. Although not as famous a name as Carmichael and Mercer, Frank Henry Loesser (1910-1969) is still too well-known a songwriter to require extensive biographical commentary herein. He is primarily remembered for his Broadway musicals Guys And Dolls (1950), The Most Happy Fella (1956), and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1961). When these musicals were still running on Broadway, Peggy Lee happened to perform one song from each: "A Bushel And A Peck" (from Guys And Dolls, sung by Lee on the radio in 1950), "Joey, Joey, Joey" (from The Most Happy Fella, recorded by Lee for Decca in 1956), and "I Believe In You" (from How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, recorded for Decca in early 1962). She also recorded his ballads "Moments Like This" and "I Wish I Didn't Love You So," as well as his upbeat tune "I Hear Music." Loesser's most popular song is probably "Baby, It's Cold Outside," often performed as a duet and frequently tied to the holiday season.


Personnel

1. Frank Loesser
Peggy Lee introduces her guest as "Mr. Guys & Dolls himself." Being a songwriter who also knew how to play the piano and sing, Loesser might have accompanied Lee on that instrument while the two of them went through the medley of his songs. However, I have no corroboration on the matter. (The singing credits have been, on the other hand, corroborated.)


Performances

1. Poetry: Rupert Brooke
2. "My Darling, My Darling"
Peggy Lee prefaces her version of "My Darling, My Darling" with lines from a poem by Rupert Brooke. Unfortunately, the content of the lines is not known to me; hence I am not able to identify the poem at the present time.


Date: August 26, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)
Location: Hollywood, California

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra, Sonny Burke (acc), Johnny Desmond, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Zing A Little Zong - 1:09(Leo Robin, Harry Warren)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 or Bia 4208 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #2]   (2000)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Half As Much - 1:52(Curley Williams)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Alone Together - 2:44(Harold Dietz, Arthur Schwartz)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It Never Happen' To Me - 2:20(Joe Elly)
Hallmark Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 705462 — Peggy Lee Gold (Hallmark's Series)   (1995)
Janda Public Domain CS/CD(New Zealand) Plat 078 & Cdplat 078 — The Lady Is A Tramp ("Platinum Collection" Series)    (1996)
V & H Public Domain CD(Australia) Cd Plat 237 — Peggy Lee Gold ("Platinum Collection")   (2003)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 3279 — Peggy Lee, Volume 1   (2004)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 34572 — Peggy Lee, Volumes 1 & 2 [Volumes also sold separately]   (2005)
Forever Gold/Solo/Pacific Entertainment Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Fg 262 — Peggy Lee    (2007)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) For Me And My Gal - 1:56(Edgar Leslie, E. Ray Goetz, George W. Meyer)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 or Bia 4208 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #2]   (2000)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 3279 — Peggy Lee, Volume 1   (2004)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 34572 — Peggy Lee, Volumes 1 & 2 [Volumes also sold separately]   (2005)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 61 — Peggy Lee   (1953)
Jazz Band/Flyright Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Ebdcd 2115 2 — LIVE, 1947 & 1952   (1993)

Guest




During the second of his two visits to Peggy Lee's series, Johnny Desmond did a solo rendition of "Trying." Desmond's previous Club 88 appearance (May 1, 1952) had taken place in New York. This appearance in an LA-based episode happened while he was, according to Lee, vacationing in California. "For Me And My Gal" was his duet with Lee.


Performances

1. "For Me And My Gal"
Before Peggy Lee and Johnny Desmond sing together, she states that the duet "For Me And My Gal" will be a reprise of a performance that they had done about four months earlier, while she was still in New York. Although she does not specify on which program the duet was first attempted, it would be natural to assume that she was referring to an earlier episode of her own show. Indeed, Desmond had first come to Club 88 about four months earlier, making an appearance in an episode dated May 1, 1952. However, that episode did not include a version of "For Me And My Gal." After a bit of additional research, I have come across the correct entry. Desmond and Lee appeared on an episode of the radio series MGM Musical Comedy Theater Of The Air. The episode itself was titled For Me And My Gal and it was first broadcast on May 14, 1952 (although it might have been a pre-recorded or transcribed show).


Personnel

1. Johnny Desmond
Peggy Lee introduces Johnny Desmond as a "Chicago breakfast clubber" who is "skipping his coffee and cake while he is here on vacation." The reference is clearly to The Breakfast Club, a variety show that ran in the mornings on the ABC network, and in which Desmond appeared regularly.


Poetry

1. Aline Kilmer
Queried by the show's announcer, who declares himself intrigued by her noticeably meditative mood, Peggy Lee replies that she was "just thinking about something I read by Mrs. Aline Kilmer." She immediately recites the following stanza:

SMILINGLY, out of my pain,
I have woven a little song;
You may take it with you.
I shall not sing it again.

Without any interruption in-between, Lee segues from this recitation into her singing of "Half As Much."

Her source for those poetic lines was probably Aline Murray Kilmer's 1921 book Vigils. Here is Kilmer's full poem, named "Tour De Force":

Smilingly, out of my pain,
I have woven a little song;
You may take it away with you.
I shall not sing it again,
But when you have learned it through
It will keep you brave and strong.
I wove it out of my pain:
There is not a word of it true.


Issues

1. At Last:  The Lost Radio Recordings [CD]
2. Live, 1947-1952 [CD]
3. "Half As Much" [Song]
4. "Zing A Little Zong" [Song]
The 2015 Real Gone Music CD At Last:  The Lost Radio Recordings contains tracks from The Peggy Lee Show only. It does not include recording or broadcast dates, however. Many of the numbers in that CD cannot be dated with full certainty because Lee sang such numbers in more than one episode, and because original episodes are, for the most part, unavailable for listening. One exception is, of course, this episode, readily available thanks to its release on the Jazz Band CD Live, 1947-1952. Listening and comparison of the Jazz Band and Real Gone Music CDs reveal that they contain the same version of "Half As Much" but a different version of "Zing A Little Zong." (No other songs are shared by the two CDs.)


Date: August 28, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Charles "Chuck" Nelson (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'm Gonna Live Till I Die - 1:17(Al Hoffman, Walter Kent, Manny Kurtz)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) We're One - 2:13(Larry Berns)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Please, Mr. Sun - 2:16(Sid Frank, Ray Getzov)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Walkin' My Baby Back Home - 1:44(Roy Turk, Fred E. Ahlert)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart - 2:08(John Sexton, Eberhard Storch, John Turner)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 62 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest





This episode's guest was Charles Nelson (aka Chuck Nelson), a young singer for whom 1949 turned out to be a very, very good year. Within the first four months of that year, the 15-year-old student from Salina, Kansas won each round of a 20th Century Fox nationwide talent contest. (Serving as co-sponsor was a chain named National, which comprised about 550 theaters). Thanks, in particular, to a praiseworthy version of "Without A Song," the young baritone successively advanced from the local, regional, and statewide stages of the competition to the finals in Hollywood, where he ended up emerging as the top winner, too. Approximately 15,000 acts were reported to have entered the contest. (It was open to both professionals and amateurs of all ages.) Nelson's achievement is impressive even by the standards of today, when national talent competitions are so widespread and auditioning for them has become a popular, relatively easy-to-enter endeavor.

After his triumph in front of a Hollywood audience estimated to consist of about 2100 heads, the teenager was awarded material prizes (a diamond ring, a custom-made watch), money ($1,000, which qualified as a hefty sum at the time), a screen test at 20th Century Fox, and other perks (e.g., having his handprints and footprints cemented for posterity at the forecourt of Grauman's Chinese Theater, in Hollywood). He was also presented with the opportunity of auditioning for guest appearances on various radio and television programs. The aforementioned screen test at 20th Century Fox does not seem to have led anywhere, but the auditions did. He promptly scored radio and television appearances, a prospective contract with Capitol Records (which apparently went unrealized, for reasons unknown) and a several-months-long gig in the Blackouts Of 1949 (a theatrical revue that played first in Hollywood, then on Broadway).

For better or for worse, however, the youngster still had an education to complete. He proceeded to fulfill that goal, graduating from high school in May 1951. Next, the fall of 1951 found Nelson in the possession of a music scholarship that allowed him to enroll at Wichita University. Unfortunately, the spring of 1952 did not find the freshman in the same position: with his ailing grandparents and single mother in need of financial support, he left school and started earning a living right away.

Thus, out of college after just one semester, Nelson moved to Las Vegas, where he pursued a full-time career as a singer. He promptly found work within the Las Vegas hotel circuit (the Sands, the Riviera), performing as both a vocalist and a master of ceremonies for about three years.

Making frequent trips to Los Angeles, the young man successfully pursued recording and performing opportunities in Hollywood, too. He signed with Columbia Records and made appearances in both TV variety shows (Arthur Godfrey, Lawrence Welk) and radio programs such as the one under discussion -- which was among his earliest appearances after dropping out from college. Accompanied (or perhaps we should say 'chaperoned') by Peggy Lee, the 19-year-old crooner sang "Walkin' My Baby Back Home." Solo, he reprised his career-making rendition of "Without A Song."

In the recording front, his association with Columbia Records resulted in at least two singles, one released in 1952, the other in 1953. Although the press reported that he had signed a five-year contract, there is no indication of any further releases on Columbia, though. In the middle of the decade, he landed on the small Era label, where he released four singles between 1955 and 1957. Unfortunately, neither of these short-lived record contracts generated the hits that could have catapulted him to nationwide fame and career-sustaining wealth. Las Vegas would also become a thing of the past for Nelson; he left that city in 1957.

In late 1957, Charles Nelson joined Fred Waring And The Pennsylvanians, touring and recording with them as both choral member and soloist. He stayed with Waring until 1960. Then he became the owner and headliner of a restaurant in San Diego (The Gypsy Cellar), where he appears to have spent the next 25 years (or so) of his life. Settling in Orange County in the mid-1980s, Nelson transitioned into a charity performer, spending his time helping to raise funds for institutions such as the Pacific Symphony. Health issues led to his retirement in 1995 or thereabouts, at age 61. He passed aways in 2003.

For a more extensive account of this obscure singer's life, and for links to audio files of his Columbia singles, consult Phil Rinard's excellent research essay, available as a Word document at the bottom of this page. (The page belongs to a website dedicated to the Salina High School, the institution that Nelson was attending when his singing career took off.) Phil's work is my primary source for the above-given account (photos included). Phil and I would appreciate receiving additional biographical details from any readers who know more about the life and career of Charles Nelson (also known as Chuck Nelson).

Nelson can be seen in all of the above-shown photos. The first graces the front cover of a sheet music piece with a 1955-1956 copyright. The song notated in this piece is "Slap Leather," which was one of the singles that Nelson recorded for the Era label.

The second picture shows Chuck Nelson's homecoming to his alma mater -- the aforementioned Salina High School. This shot was taken on January 11, 1957. Surrounded by autograph pursuers who were at least five years younger than he, the baby-faced Nelson still looks like he could be their fellow classmate, despite being 23 years of age at the time.

The third photo is believed to date from 1956. (A version of it, showing Chuck's mother to his right, appeared on the December 30, 1956 issue of The Salina Journal.) Lying on the piano is the sheet music for the song "And This Is My Beloved."

In the last shot seen above, Tallulah Bankhead is caught on the act, at the Sands in the mid-1950s. The legendarily husky-voiced lady of Broadway is accompanied by an unidentified man that both Phil Rinard and myself believe to be Charles Nelson. One reason for our belief is the following press notice, uncovered by Rinard in the August 1955 issue of the Salina Journal: “Charles Nelson, son of Mrs. Vivian C. Nelson, is now starring in a night club performance in Las Vegas, Nev. He is featured with Tallulah Bankhead in a production of the Ziegfeld Follies. Nelson has been working on productions for two years at The Sands in Las Vegas. Lyrics and music for the show are by two big Hollywood names, Bob Hilliard and Milton De Lugg [sic; DeLugg].”


Date: September 2, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. Peggy Lee Shows (CBS) Slumming On Park Avenue(Irving Berlin)
b. Peggy Lee Shows (CBS) You Belong To Me(Pee Wee King, Chilton Price, Redd Stewart)
c. Peggy Lee Shows (CBS) [Musical Commercial] Behind The Wheel Of The Newest Oldsmobile(Composer Unknown)
d. Peggy Lee Shows (CBS) Danny Boy(Traditional, Fred E. Weatherly)
e. Peggy Lee Shows (CBS) Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho(Traditional)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 63" — "Club 88"   (1952)

Guest




"Just You, Just Me" served as their feature number of Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires, who were making their fifth guest appearance in the show. They also accompanied Lee in all numbers from this date, except for "You Belong To Me."

Though billed as guests, Conlon and company were, in essence, semi-regular members of Club 88's personnel. Peggy Lee had had ample previous experience performing with Conlon and the various editions of his group (The Jud Conlon Singers, The Jud Conlon Choir, The Rhythmaires, et cetera). These Conlon-assembled groups sang background vocals for Lee on recordings made at both Capitol and Decca. Most notably, the Rhythmaires provided harmonies all through the holiday tune "It's Christmas Time Again" (on Decca). The so-called Jud Conlon Singers did the same for her Capitol hit "Ghost Riders In The Sky," while the Jud Conlon Choir is heard in the singer's self-penned novelty "Ay Ay Chug A Chug." (Those are but three examples; more could certainly be mentioned. Naturally, Conlon and the group's members also accompanied such Capitol artists as Tennessee Ernie Ford and, for his children's album, Nat King Cole.) Still further, The Rhythmaires and Peggy Lee often co-appeared in episodes of Bing Crosby's radio show, where the group's members were long-time regulars and Lee was a semi-regular for various seasons. As a matter of fact, The Rhythmaires accompanied Lee in over 20 numbers from Crosby's radio show, all of them performed within a five-year span (1948-1953).


Episode

This episode exists only in its CBS broadcast version. There is no equivalent AFRS program. I suspect that AFRS incorporated the songs from this CBS date into the later episodes that are listed in this page (many of which feature, again and agin, The Rhythmaires as guests).


Poetry

1. Rudyard Kipling
2. "You Belong To Me""
This episode includes one of the customary exchanges between inquiring announcer Bob LeMond and poetic hostess Peggy Lee. When the announcer asks the hostess if she has her 1952 poetic license, Lee answers as follows: Yes, I have, Bob. It’s RK1886. The RK for Rudyard Kipling. Then she recites the lines If you love me as I love you, what knife can cut our love in two?. She follows these lines with a rendition of the song "You Belong To Me."

The lines are indeed from Kipling's poem "An Old Song," published in his 1886 collection Departmental Ditties And Ballads, And Barrack-Room Ballads. Here is the full stanza from which Lee took the lines she recited:

So long as Aces take the King,
Or backers take the bet,
So long as debt leads men to wed,
Or marriage leads to debt,
So long as little luncheons, Love,
And scandal hold their vogue,
While there is sport at Annandale
Or whisky at Jutogh,
If you love me as I love you
What knife can cut our love in two?

3. "Behind The Wheel Of The Newest Oldsmobile"
After Peggy Lee finishes singing "You Belong To Me" and Bob LeMond compliments her on the rendition, singer and announcer proceed to banter on the matter of Oldsmobile and its hydraulic steering. Oldmobile's representatives Lucille and Johnny join in on the conversation. Finally, this Oldsmobile jingle is sung by Lee:

You’ve gotta get behind the wheel
Of the newest Oldsmobile.
Take the key and get inside
Got to try that rocket ride.
There's a super power thrill
On each highway, curve and hill.
Got to make a date with an 88
Got to drive an Oldsmobile.

In the absence of any specific identification, I have created the title "Behind The Wheel Of The Newest Oldsmobile" for this particular version of the jingle.


Date: ca. September 2, 1952 (Mock Date; For Indexing Purposes)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Johnny Mercer (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Come On-A My House - 2:03(Ross Bagdasarian, William Saroyan)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) These Foolish Things - 3:08(Harry Link, Eric Maschwitz aka Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive - 2:02(Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Go, Go, Go - 2:04(Mack David, Jerry Livingston)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 63 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Episode

The contents listed herein are from a 1953 AFRS episode. Based on the chronological calculations that allowed me to date the CBS episodes listed in this page, the original CBS airing of this AFRS program should have happened on September 2, 1952. However, there is already a CBS episode with that date. (I suspect that the songs listed in this AFRS program were just culled from various CBS episodes.) In any case, this problematic situation puts into relief how tentative my dating for this material is, and how limited the sources at my reach are.


Guest




During his third and last guest appearance in The Peggy Lee Show, lyricist Johnny Mercer sang "In The Cool, Cool Of The Evening" and, with Lee, duetted on "Acent-tchu-ate The Positive." Both songs were co-written by the lyricist. The latter was actually a reprise: the same pair of singer-songwriters had performed the number in a previous show (program dated ca. May 22, 1952). For additional details about Mercer and his other guest appearances, consult the notes under the episode dated July 22, 1951, too.


Date: September 4, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Bob Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Botch-a-me(Luigi Astore, Riccardo Morbelli, Eddie Y. Stanley)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You're Mine, You(Johnny Green, Edward Heyman)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Don't Know Enough About You(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Zing A Little Zong - 1:15(Leo Robin, Harry Warren)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 64" — "Club 88"   (1952)

Episode

This episode exists only in its original CBS broadcast version, bearing the above-shown date. There is no evidence of an AFRS re-broadcast.


Guest




Though fated to subsist under the large shadow cast by his legendary brother Bing, Bob Crosby enjoyed a long and fairly successful music career on his own, faring well on multiple media -- radio, film, television, and records. His success was strongest in the music charts, where he placed 41 hits from 1935 to 1951, including two chart toppers ("Whispers In The Dark," "In A Little Gypsy Tea Room). Peggy Lee had first worked with Bob Crosby during her very first year as a nationally known solo artist (1944), when she guested on his radio show. At that time, the small record label Ara also issued a single by The Bob Crosby Orchestra featuring Peggy Lee. Four years later, George Robert Crosby and Norma Deloris Egstrom would again cross paths on the airwaves: a 1948 episode of The Bing Crosby Show spotlighted Bob as the guest and Peggy as the girl singer. It took four more years for Bob Crosby and Peggy Lee to actually become radio siblings, as it were: in 1952, the CBS radio network filled its 9:30 p.m. slot with Bob Crosby's Club 15 on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; and with Peggy Lee's Club 88 on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Club 15 had actually been on the air since 1947 (though at different time slots), and would continue to air until 1953. Aside from the 1949-1950 season, when Dick Haymes temporarily took over, Bob Crosby remained the show's host for all such years.


Date: ca. September 4, 1952 (Mock Date; For Indexing Purposes)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Most Unusual Day - 1:12(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Something Wonderful - 3:08(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) After All, It's Spring - 2:30(Kim Gannon, Walter Kent)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Bermuda - 2:22(Cynthia Strother, Eugene Strother)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 64 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




For his third and final guest appearance in Peggy Lee's show, Larry Douglas did a solo version of "Mr. And Mississippi." This time around, he did not duet with Lee. Details about the Broadway actor's career can be found in the notes under the other two episodes which featured his singing (episodes dated July 29, 1951 and March 18, 1952).


Episode

The contents listed herein are from a 1953 AFRS episode. Based on chronological calculations used to date the CBS episodes listed in this page, I would have expected September 4, 1952 to be the date of this AFRS program’s original airing (on CBS). However, there is already a CBS episode with that date. I suspect that the songs listed in this AFRS program were just culled from various CBS episodes. (The fact that Douglas did not duet with Lee is particularly thought-provoking. It leads me to wonder if AFRS just took Douglas’ solo from the episode dated July 29, 1951, whose song list is unknown to me.) In any case, this problematic situation puts into relief how tentative my dating for this material is, and how limited the sources at my reach can be sometimes.


Date: September 9, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Alfred Apaka, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Old Black Magic - 1:42(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart - 2:17(John Sexton, Eberhard Storch, John Turner)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Be Anything (But Be Mine) - 2:26(Irving Gordon)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I've Got You Under My Skin - 1:29(Cole Porter)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Sweet Leilani - 2:04(Harry Owens)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 66" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 65 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




As the above-seen LP jackets should make apparent, Hawaiian-born singer Alfred Apaka favored a repertoire that combined American pop standards with the sounds and styles of his native islands. Born Alfred Aholo Afat, Jr. in 1919, Apaka enjoyed his first professional job of note at the age of 19, when he was hired to perform with the Royal Hawaiian Hotel house band on Waikiki Beach. By 1940, New Yorkers could come to hear him at the Hotel Lexington’s Hawaiian Room, where he was serving as vocalist for a band led by another Hawaiian-born singer, Ray Kinney. Apaka went on to form his own band, with which he toured nationally from 1946 to 1949. His music career also received a considerable boost from frequent visits to the nationally syndicated, long-running radio show Hawaii Calls.

But Apaka did not truly reach mainstream status until 1952, when Bob Hope caught the 33-year-old singer in concert. Shortly thereafter, the man who would eventually be nicknamed “the Bing Crosby of Hawaii" started to appear in radio and TV shows hosted by Hope.

The year 1952 also found Apaka guesting in Peggy Lee's program. The two artists were Decca recording stars at the time; later on, they would also share Capitol as their recording home. (He had been making appearances on record since his days with Kinney. Singles and albums under his group’s or his own name can be found on Bell, Hula, and ABC-Paramount.) During this episode, the North Dakotan and the Hawaiian joined forces to sing the praises of "Sweet Leilani.” (Incidentally, this number was composed by the leader of Hawaii Calls’ orchestra, Harry Owens.) "The Moon of Manakoora" was Apaka's choice for a solo.

Just eight years after this broadcast, a 40-year-old Apaka died prematurely and unexpectedly, when he suffered a heart attack while playing handball. In his native land, the date of his death would come to be remembered as “the day that Hawaii cried.”


Date: September 11, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Andy Russell (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World - 1:29(John Rox)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You Belong To Me - 2:18(Pee Wee King, Chilton Price, Redd Stewart)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I'll See You In My Dreams - 1:58(Gus Kahn, Isham Jones)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Getting To Know You - 2:27(Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 67" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 66 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Andy Russell's second visit to Club 88 found him in full balladeer mood, crooning "What Is There To Say" by himself and softly singing "I'll See You In My Dreams" while in Lee's company. His first appearance, undertaken in conjunction his first wife Della, had been broadcast a few weeks earlier (episode dated ca. July 10, 1952). For biographical comments about the married pair, see notes under that episode.


Date: September 16, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Zing A Little Zong - 1:11(Leo Robin, Harry Warren)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You Belong To Me - 2:24(Pee Wee King, Chilton Price, Redd Stewart)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Everything Happens To Me - 2:27(Matt Dennis, Tom Adair)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Jeepers Creepers: Johnny Mercer Medley(Johnny Mercer, Harry Warren)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Too Marvelous For Words: Johnny Mercer Medley(Johnny Mercer, Richard Whiting)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Blues In The Night - 2:16(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 69" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 68 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




For the duration of this broadcast, Peggy Lee's guest is the freckle-faced redhead Champ Butler, whom she compliments for his "lovely" suntan (presumably the result of some time spent in the main topic of their subsequent chitchat, the Hawaiian Islands). The interaction between guest and hostess also involves a three-song Johnny Mercer medley. She does the opener ("Jeepers Creepers") and the closer ("Too Marvelous For Words"), while he takes care of the middle number ("One For My Baby") only. After the medley is over, Butler asks Lee if she can do another tune, a request that leads into her interpretation of "Blues In The Night." As for the number that he chooses to sing during his solo spot, it is titled "You Intrigue Me."

Sadly, Champ Butler is an artist who nowadays falls within the ranks of utterly forgotten singers of the 1950s -- so much so that scarcely any information about him is available in print or online. A quote attributed to his agent suggests that Butler's birth name might have been Morris Schwartz. A St. Louis native, he was born on December 21, 1928, and passed away on March 12, 1992, at age 64. According to the back cover notes from one of his LPs, he "came to Hollywood [and] got a job parking cars at the Mocambo, [where he] was called in by managers as a last second substitute for an ailing star, bec[oming] an overnight sensation."

Nearly all other known aspects of his career are circumscribed to the decade of the 1950s. He was a Columbia recording artist from 1950 to 1954, enjoying three or four hits in Billboard's charts, the highest one ("Down Yonder") peaking at #17 and staying for an impressive 15-week run. (Cash Box gave it a #8 peak.) Both Butler and Lee had hits with the tune "Be Anything (But Be Mine)." Butler's version on Columbia peaked at #26 (besting the #27 peak of Helen O'Connell's Capitol version), whereas Peggy Lee's single (her very first on Decca) reached #21. All three versions climbed to their respective peaks during May of 1952. On Mercury, the version by Eddy Howard And His Orchestra (with vocal backing supplied by the Jack Holloran Choir) had the upper hand, having been released first; by the end of March, it had reached its #7 peak.

After the Columbia contract, Butler signed with the following labels: Coral (ca. 1956), Keen (ca. 1958 - ca. 1959; this label lasted just three years), Viscount (ca. 1959; seemingly the very first single on an even more short-lived label), Five-Ten (1960; a brand new label on which Butler was the first artist signed, and which seems to have gone nowhere) and Magnum (ca. 1966; another label set up by Frank Russell, the same man behind Five-Ten, and seemingly lasting three or four years). He made at least two LPs, one of them for a Hollywood-based label called Gillette (Heartaches By The Dozen, date unknown) and the other on Golden Tone (Cowboy Songs For Little Buckaroos, ca. 1959; reissued on Tops).


Dating

The above-shown broadcast date (September 16, 1952) is for the original CBS episode, not for its 1953 re-broadcast on AFRS stations. Generally, AFRS seems to have re-aired the episodes in the same order in which CBS originally aired them. The present and the next episodes are among the exceptions: AFRS inverted CBS’s broadcasting order.


Date: September 18, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Danny Thomas (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? - 1:24(Traditional)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Half As Much - 2:08(Curley Williams)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard - 2:42(Henry W. Petrie, Henry Sawyer, Philip Wingate)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) My Small Señor (With The Sonriente Eyes) - 1:57(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Two Sleepy People - 1:55(Frank Loesser, Hoagy Carmichael)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 68" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 67 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




On this occasion, Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee welcomed the songstress' co-star in Michael Curtiz' 1952 film remake of The Jazz Singer: Danny Thomas. During the broadcast, audiences heard the guest sing "The Birth Of The Blues" as a solo and "Two Sleepy People" as a duet with the hostess. According to the hostess' own comments, merely six hours had elapsed since she and Thomas had seen one another. The movie, which would have its Hollywood premiere on December 30, 1952, was being shot during those September days. The above-seen photos give us a view of the co-stars at the Warner Brothers set, probably while in-between takes.

Forty years old at the time of this guest appearance, Amos Muzyad Yakhoob Kairouz's exposure to the world of entertainment dated back to his childhood and early teens, when he had been able to infiltrate the realms of burlesque (just to sell ice cream and candy on the aisles) and vaudeville (while performing routines with his brother). In his freshman year, the Ohio-raised boy had dropped from high school in order to pursue his aspirations of a career in showbusiness -- preferably as a character actor. Some ups and many downs had ensued, not to say anything of numerous menial jobs and various moves from one state to another, in seemingly vain hopes of having better luck. Biographical reports vaguely suggest that the Lebanese-American youngster quit altogether at one point in time.

Around 1940, the nearly thirty-years-old dreamer decided to give a renewed try to a career as a comedian. It was at this point that he adopted the stage name Danny Thomas, primarily out of a desire to hide his new attempt from his family (lest the attempt didn't pan out). Luckily, Thomas' career began to flourish in the mid-1940s, especially on the radio. Previously, he had only managed to score a few appearances in amateur and nowadays obscure programs (radio debut: The Happy Hour Club, 1932). From 1944 to 1949, he was given his own show, as well as second-rank billing in the popular series The Bickersons. (He had also appeared in The Bickersons' prequel, Drene Time.)

But it was on television that Thomas made his biggest impact. He became widely known as the protagonist of the long-running sitcom Make Room For Daddy (1953-1965) and its short-lived sequel, Make Room For Granddaddy (1970-1971). Cast as a (grand)father who worked as a nightclub entertainer, the series allowed him to do a sizable share of singing. In addition, he held a very successful backstage career as a TV producer (The Dick VanDyke Show, Mob Squad, The Real McCoys, etc.).

Danny Thomas' philanthropic work is worth noting as well. Devotedly Catholic, he had promised a shrine to the patron saint of lost causes in 1937, in exchange for not only the means to provide for his family but also a successful future as an actor. Means and success did come forth, as already exemplified. In 1962, Thomas became one of the co-founders of the St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital.


Performances

1. "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard"
Unlike her better-known studio recording on Decca, Peggy Lee's radio versions of "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard" included the song's fairly long verse. There is a total of three radio versions. All three are from Club 88 (AFRS episodes #50, #57, and #67).


Dating

The above-shown broadcast date (September 18, 1952) belong to the original CBS episode, not to the 1953 re-broadcast on AFRS stations. Generally, AFRS seems to have re-aired the episodes in the same order in which CBS originally aired them. The present and the preceding episodes are among the exceptions: AFRS inverted CBS’s broadcasting order.


Date: September 23, 1952 ( Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Johnny Dugan, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Good Day - 1:08(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) When I Fall In Love - 2:10(Edward Heyman, Victor Popular Young)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) These Foolish Things - 2:16(Harry Link, Eric Maschwitz aka Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Oh! Look At Me Now - 2:03(Joe Bushkin, John De Vries)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 1:25(Cole Porter)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 69 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Peggy Lee's showcasing of up-and-coming artists of the early 1950s continued with this episode, for which she invited Johnny Dugan to guest. Yet another name nearly forgotten nowadays, the Massachusetts native had begun his professional career in 1933, at the age of 11, as a vocalist on the radio. By age 18, he was singing in Broadway (at the Roxy Theatre). Post-war, he appeared at nightclubs and hotels, too. His big break came in 1952. A few months before he appeared in Lee's show, he scored his own summer replacement TV program, The Johnny Dugan Show, which ran from May to September in the afternoons (3:30-4:00). The above-seen black & white photos are publicity shots from the program, which was described in the press as featuring "audience-participation stunts and light-hearted music." (The lady in one of the photos is the show's girl singer, Barbara Logan, a 19 year old said to have worked as a lion tamer at age 14.) Dugan's good luck continued in 1953. Presumably a female-audience draw, he was hired as the master of ceremonies for Ladies' Choice, another program telecast on NBC in the afternoons (4:30-5:00). I have found no traces of his whereabouts after 1953.

While attending Lee's radio show in 1952, the future Ladies' Choice man sang about "Something Bigger Than You And Me." With Lee, he interpreted "Oh! Look At Me Now."


Date: September 25, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Jeff Chandler, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Botch-a-me - 1:32(Luigi Astore, Riccardo Morbelli, Eddie Y. Stanley)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Half As Much - 1:52(Curley Williams)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Lady Is A Tramp - 2:14(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Takes Two To Tango - 1:36(Al Hoffman, Dick Manning)
Real Gone Music CDRgm 0341 — AT LAST; THE LOST RADIO RECORDINGS   (2015)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Slumming On Park Avenue - 1:47(Irving Berlin)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 70 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Showing up for the last of his three guest appearances, Jeff Chandler reprised the numbers that he had sung during the second appearance: "That Old Black Magic" (solo) and "Let's Go Slumming" (with Lee). For details about this singer and actor's career, consult the notes under program dated ca. May 27, 1952.


Date: September 30, 1952 (Approximate Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Woody Herman, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) When You're Smiling - 1:06(Larry Shay, Joe Goodwin, Marvin Fisher)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Wish You Were Here - 2:06(Harold Rome)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night - 2:20(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That's What The Man Said - 2:36(Willard Robison)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Takes Two To Tango - 1:24(Al Hoffman, Dick Manning)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 71 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




An old Peggy Lee friend joined her as this episode's guest: Woody Herman, with whom she had co-hosted a radio show called The Summer Electric Hour, back in 1947. An instrumentalist who also sang and led his own successful bands/combos, clarinetist Woodrow Charles Herman (1913-1987) is too well-known to merit extensive biographical commentary here. Suffice it to say that, having started his professional career when he was a child (as a singer and tap dancer in the vaudeville circuit), he continued to perform, in his roles of bandleader and clarinetist, all the way to the mid-1980s. Besides his extensive discography of instrumental recordings, he also released a few vocal albums, including the deanmartinian Songs For Hip Lovers, whose front cover is pictured above. For this Club 88 broadcast, Herman chose to sing a standard with which he was closely identified, "Early Autumn." Then the former tap dancer and the former farm girl tackled "Takes Two To Tango" as a duet.


Date: October 2, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You - 1:19(Harold Adamson, Walter Donaldson)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart - 2:12(John Sexton, Eberhard Storch, John Turner)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Summertime - 2:17(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Dubose Heyward)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Swing Low, Sweet Chariot - 1:12(Traditional)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Sans Souci - 3:00(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Peggy Lee)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 73" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 72 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During the sixth of their 11 guest appearances in Peggy Lee's show, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires backed the hostess as she sang "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." They also performed "On The Alamo" by themselves. Viewers interested in learning more about this group and its connections to Lee should consult the notes under program dated ca. May 20, 1952.

Gloria Wood, one of the quintet's two female members, had a solo career that resulted in one 12" LP for Columbia and one EP for Capitol, both of them pictured above. The Columbia LP found her singing standards. The Capitol EP, released around 1954, was named after her 1953 million seller, recorded in the company of trumpeter Pete Candoli. In 1961, she rejoined Candoli to record enough material for a 10" LP, if not a full LP, but most of it has been left unissued.

As a professional singer, her earlier jobs were with Horace Heidt and Kay Kyser. The latter's #2 hit from 1948, "On A Slow Boat To China," was sung by Wood in duet with boy vocalist Harry Babbitt. Her voice was also heard in numerous TV commercials (e.g. the Peter Pan peanut butter ads, for which she was the voice of Tinker Bell), cartoon TV series (The Bugs 'n' Daffy Show, The Woody Woodpecker Show, etc.) and, even more frequently, in various Disney movies, usually within s choral group (So Dear To My Heart, The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad, Alice In Wonderland, Peter Pan, etc.). Like the other female member of The Rhythmaires (Louilie Jean Norman), Gloria also dubbed a few famous actresses and personalities, including Marilyn Monroe in River Of No Return and Vera-Ellen in Irving Berlin's White Christmas.


Date: October 7, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Gordon MacRae (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) What Does It Take (To Make You Take To Me)? - 1:15(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) When I Fall In Love - 2:10(Edward Heyman, Victor Popular Young)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Here In My Heart - 2:12(Bill Borelli, Pat Genaro, Lou Levinson)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It Never Happen' To Me - 1:49(Joe Elly)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Tea For Two - 1:26(Vincent Youmans, Irving Caesar)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 74" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 73 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During the last of his two appearances in Peggy Lee's radio show, Gordon MacRae sang Willard Robison's "Kinda Peculiar Brown," a number that Lee herself had interpreted on the radio, in earlier years. The pair also reprised the duet that they had sung in the previous appearance, "Tea For Two." If interested in some additional comments about MacRae's career, consult the notes under his earlier appearance (program dated ca. June 19, 1952).


Date: October 9, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee, Gene Nelson (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Somebody Loves Me - 2:06(Buddy G. DeSylva, George Gershwin, Ballard MacDonald)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) A Guy Is A Guy - 2:46(Oscar Brand)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Zing A Little Zong - 1:11(Leo Robin, Harry Warren)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Let's Call The Whole Thing Off - 1:44(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) The Lady Is A Tramp - 2:10(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 77" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 76 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




Having showcased Gordon MacRae in two episodes, including one that aired about a week before the present broadcast, Peggy Lee now proceeded to feature MacRae's nemesis in the world of Hollywood movies, Gene Nelson. The two men co-starred in at least three celluloid musicals (Tea For Two, Oklahoma!, Three Sailors And A Girl). In all of them, Nelson had to settle for second lead and resign himself to the fact that MacRae was bound to get the girl who was the object of their affection. Finally freed of male competition while appearing in Peggy Lee's show, Nelson had the girl all to himself on this occasion, even if their choice for a duet was the rather worrisome "Let's Call The Whole Thing Off." When his time to work solo came, the actor chose to make a tentative declaration in song: "I May Be Wrong."

Dancing, not acting, had been Nelson's original trade. From ice skating and gymnastics in high school, he proceeded to perform as a member of the Sonja Henie Hollywood Ice Revue while he was still seventeen year old (1937) and to tour with Irving Berlin's This Is The Army during wartime. Postwar, his movie career quickly took off. Two years before his visit to Club 88, the athletic actor had had the lead next to Doris Day in Lullaby Of Broadway (with no MacRae in tow).

To his Hollywood acting, singing and dancing resume, Nelson would subsequently add a teaching post (Drama at San Francisco State University, late 1980s), two Broadway appearances (lead roles in 1971's Follies and 1975's Good News, the former resulting in a Tony nomination for Best Actor In A Musical), and many directing gigs. Comprising over 50 credits, his second career as director was actually significant, particularly in the world of television (Mob Squad, The Donna Reed Show, I Dream of Jeannie Gunsmoke, Star Trek, etc.).


Dating

The above-shown broadcast date (October 9, 1952) is for the original CBS episode, not for its 1953 re-broadcast on AFRS stations. Generally, AFRS seems to have re-aired the episodes in the same order in which CBS originally broadcast them. Among the exceptions are this episode and the next two below; out of the threesome, this particular one was re-aired last by AFRS.


Date: October 14, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Dan Dailey, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) From This Moment On - 1:21(Cole Porter)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Wish You Were Here - 2:33(Harold Rome)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Somewhere Along The Way - 2:19(Sammy Gallop, Jimmy Van Heusen aka Kurt Adams)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Watermelon Weather - 1:22(Paul Francis Webster, Hoagy Carmichael)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Oh! Look At Me Now - 2:06(Joe Bushkin, John De Vries)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 75" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 74 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During the third and final Dan Dailey appearance in Club 88, the two numbers that he had sung in his previous appearance were reprised: "This Can't Be Love" (a solo) and "Walkin' My Baby Back Home" (with Lee). For general comments about this song-and-dance man's career, see notes under his first appearance (program dated ca. June 12, 1952).


Dating

The above-shown broadcast date (October 14, 1952) is for the original CBS episode, not for its 1953 re-broadcast on AFRS stations. Generally, AFRS seems to have re-aired the episodes in the same order in which CBS originally broadcast them. Among the exceptions are this episode, along with the one that precedes and the one that follows it; out of the threesome, this particular episode was re-aired first by AFRS.


Date: October 16, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) That Great Come-And-Get-It Day - 1:33(Burton Lane, Erwin 'Yip' Harburg)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Once In A While - 2:22(Michael Edwards, Bud Green)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Danny Boy - 2:33(Traditional, Fred E. Weatherly)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little David, Play On Your Harp - 1:42(Traditional)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? - 1:01(Traditional)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 76" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 75 — Peggy Lee   (1953)

Guest




During the seventh of their 11 guest appearances in The Peggy Lee Show, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires backed the hostess while she sang all of her numbers. When performing by themselves, the quintet's tune of choice was "Liza." Viewers interested in learning more about this group and its connections to Lee should consult the notes under an earlier episode, bearing the date ca. May 20, 1952.

Seen above is one of the group's members, Charlie Parlato. In addition to his work as group vocalist, Parlato also had an extensive career as an instrumentalist. An academically trained trumpeter, he played with the big bands of Kay Kyser and David Rose but is best remembered for his work with Lawrence Welk, whose orchestra he joined in 1962. Parlato stayed with Welk for 20 years, not only playing trumpet but also singing in the choral numbers that were part of Welk's TV show. This instrumentalist also did a significant amount of work that was not connected to The Rhythmaires or to Welk. He was, for instance, the trumpet man in Tennessee Ernie Ford's top seller "Sixteen Tons," and one of the backup singers in Sam Cooke's top hit "You Send Me." The above-shown photos are from Parlato's years with Welk.


Episode And Dating

The above-shown song listings are those given in logs of this CBS's show's re-airing, on the American Forces Radio network. I have relied mainly on such logs while entering data about the great majority of this show's episodes,. There are a few episodes, however, for which I have counted with other listeners' transcriptions of the original CBS broadcasts. This broadcast is among those few.

All five songs listed above were heard on both the CBS original broadcast and the AFRS re-airing. The original broadcast is extant in two lacquer discs -- i.e., it is duplicated. One disc bears the date October 6, 1952 (a Monday) and the other October 18, 1952 (a Saturday). Since this show aired regularly on Tuesdays and Thursdays, neither date seems to refer to the actual day of the broadcast. I believe the first dating to miss a digit: October 16 is the date that I have assigned to this broadcast.


Songs

1. Samuel Taylor Coleridge
2. T. S. Eliot
3. Peggy Lee's Introduction To "Once In A While"
Announcer Bob LeMond notice a certain demeanor on Lee, which prompts him to ask her if she is feeling nostalgic. “Kind of, Bob," the poetically inclined vocalist replies. "A crescent moon over a balmy eve mixes with memory and desire.” These lines are reminiscent of both T.S. Elliot's The Wasteland ("... lilacs out of the dead land, mixing memory and desire ...") and Samuel Taylor Coleridge's 1802 "Dejection: An Ode" (".... all this long eve, so balmy and serene ........ yon crescent Moon, as fixed as if it grew In its own cloudless, starless lake of blue ... ").


Date: October 21, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Slumming On Park Avenue - 1:43(Irving Berlin)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You Belong To Me - 2:21(Pee Wee King, Chilton Price, Redd Stewart)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Goody Goody - 1:01(Matt Malneck, Johnny Mercer)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Takes Two To Tango - 1:54(Al Hoffman, Dick Manning)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho - 1:42(Traditional)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 78" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 77 — Peggy Lee   (1953)




Images

Sheet music for "Takes Two To Tango," one of the numbers sung by Peggy Lee in this 1952 broadcast, and a hit for both Louis Armstrong and Pearl Bailey that year. His version peaked at #19, while hers climbed all the way to #7.


Guest

During the eighth of their 11 guest appearances in Club 88, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires backed the hostess as she sang "Slumming on Park Avenue" and "Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho." When performing by themselves, the quintet's tune of choice was "I Think Of You." Peggy Lee's roundabout way of introducing them involves football. She says that in football all the attention is granted on the quarterback, yet without blockers there would be no quarterback, and without interference the sport would lose much of its punch. She then calls for “the five greatest interferers I know,” aka The Rhythmaires, Viewers interested in learning more about this group and its connections to Lee should consult the notes under program bearing the date ca. May 20, 1952.


Songs

1. Robert Browning
2. "You Belong To Me"
Peggy Lee often preambled that ballad with a poetic, proverbial, or philosophical introduction, and she did not make an exception in the present episode. "How good," she recites, "How good is man's life, the mere living! How fit to employ all the heart and the soul and the senses forever in joy!" This couplet is from Robert Browning's long poem Saul, first published as part of his Men And Women (1855). The lines are from one of the tunes that the character of David (a shepherd and a skilled harpist) recites to the sound of his harp, in an attempt at inspiring his troubled king, Saul. (The incident and its characters are of biblical origin, but the tunes are of Browning's creation.)

3. "Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho"
This episode's rendition of that number is introduced with the following words from Peggy Lee: "Music has a tremendous amount of emotional impact, and songs have been written and sung about love, crusades, love, war, love, country, love, religion, love and, oh, just about everything. Here is a spiritual that has left an emotional impact on all of us for a great number of years."


Date: October 23, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Good Day - 1:08(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) River, River - 2:40(Ben Oakland, Bob Russell)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little David, Play On Your Harp - 2:28(Traditional)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Somewhere Along The Way - 2:22(Sammy Gallop, Jimmy Van Heusen aka Kurt Adams)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Lover - 3:06(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 79" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 78 — Peggy Lee   (1953)




Images

Sheet music for "Somewhere Along The Way," one of the numbers sung by Peggy Lee in this 1952 broadcast, and a #8 hit for Nat King Cole on that year. Tony Bennett recorded it as well, but his version did not chart.


Guest

During the ninth of their 11 Club 88 guest appearances, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires backed the hostess as she sang "Little David, Play On Your Harp" and "Lover." The Rhythmaires sing "Election Day," a number co-written by the show's conductor, Sonny Burke (with Sylvia Fine). Viewers interested in learning more about the quintet and its connections to Peggy Lee should consult the notes under program dated ca. May 20, 1952.


Songs

1. AFRS Versus CBS
2. "Little David, Play On Your Harp"
Heard only in the AFRS re-airing of the show, this song was not part of the original CBS broadcast. It is thus likely that AFRS re-used a version of "Little David, Play On Your Harp" from an earlier broadcast. I have no confirmation on the matter, however. Hence, for the time being, the tune is being included under this entry even if it might be a duplicate.

Be that as it may, AFR had a clear motivation for the insertion of a fifth tune into the episode. Halfway through the original CBS broadcast, Lee talks about the then-upcoming presidential elections, urging listeners to go out and vote for the candidate of their choice. Then we listen to The Rhythmaires' song pick, a tune called "Election Day," which provides further encouragement to get out and vote. AFR dropped the entire politically charged segment from its re-airing, substituting it with the aforementioned spiritual.

3. Peggy Lee's Introduction To "River, River"
Asked by announcer Bob LeMond about the reason for the faraway look that she has at the moment, Peggy Lee answers: “Space, Bob. Space. The endless expanse of it. Mountains, rivers, never-ending skies of blue and endless and timeless as a true love."

4. Peggy Lee's Introduction To "Somewhere Along The Way"
"Sometimes it seems that life is not for real, and we think we’re alone, wandering and searching for someone we can’t find. Faces have only hazy traces until the search is over ...”

5. Peggy Lee's Remark About "Lover"
The singer says that, back when she was recording what turn out to be a smash hit mambo version of "Lover" for Decca, a foremost hope of hers was that its songwriters would not mind or object to "the way I feel about their tender waltz."


Date: October 28, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) You - 1:50(Harold Adamson, Walter Donaldson)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Wish You Were Here - 2:34(Harold Rome)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) My Small Señor (With The Sonriente Eyes) - 1:57(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Sans Souci - 3:02(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Peggy Lee)
All titles on: non-commercial (for-network-use-only) CBS Lacquer Disc"No. 80" — "Club 88"   (1952)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 79 — Peggy Lee   (1953)




Images

Mementoes from Wish You Were Here, a Broadway musical that successfully ran from June to November of 1952. Its title song, a #1 hit for Eddie Fisher, was sung by Peggy Lee in this episode. (The mementoes: RCA original cast recording, poster.)


Guest

The Rhythmaires continued to keep Peggy Lee company, scoring with this broadcast the tenth of their 11 guest appearances. However, they did not accompany Lee during the episode, but instead sang by themselves -- thus reversing, from the prbious episode to this one, their modus operandi . "Just You, Just Me" was their only selection. Viewers interested in learning more about this act and its connections to Lee may want to consult the notes under program dated ca. May 20, 1952.


Issues

1. “Club 88” [Lacquer Disc]
2. The Peggy Lee Show [Transcription Disc]
I have verified the inclusion of all the above-listed songs in one of the two discs that are also listed above: all four songs are in the AFRS disc of The Peggy Lee Show. As for the CBS “Club 88” lacquer disc, I have verification only for “My Small Señor” and “Sans Souci.”


Episode

The above-given broadcast date corresponds to a 1952 CBS installment of the show, while the listed songs have been taken from a log of 1953 AFRS re-broadcasts. That state of affairs (i.e., use of information from two different though related sets of broadcasts) is par for the course throughout this page, and necessary because of the scarcity of available data. To clarify: Club 88 was originally broadcast by CBS in 1952, then re-broadcast by AFRS in 1953. Fortunately, we have song listings for almost all the AFRS episodes. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said for the original CBS episodes: we know the songs heard in about half of them. Comparisons between early episodes from the two series demonstrate that AFRS generally followed the original CBS sequence, playing the same songs in the same order in each successive installment. For mid- and late AFRS episodes, however, no evidence of a pattern is clear. In the case of the very last AFRS episodes (those featuring The Rhythmaires), I suspect that AFRS incorporated quite a few songs from earlier programs.

For the episode at hand, my current suspicion is that the first two songs are "duplicates" from earlier broadcasts, whereas the last two songs were newly sung for this broadcast. For the time being, I can only voice these suspicions, however; I have no corroboration for them.


Performances

1. Thomas Haynes Bayly
2. "Wish You Were Here"
Before her interpretation of one of the songs from this CBS broadcast, Peggy Lee is asked by announcer Bob LeMond what the ballad for the night is. Her response: About 1820 a man by the name of Thomas Haynes Bayly said " absence makes the heart grow fonder.” It’s been said in a lot of different ways, but this way, I think, is one of the prettiest. This commentary and the ensuing poetical recitation are heard only on the original CBS broadcast. (The AFRS re-airing cut all poetical commentary.)

Unfortunately, the part of this CBS broadcast which have been preserved do not include the song that follows Lee’s recitation. However, given the tenor of the commentary that was just quoted, “Wish You Were Here" is a strong candidate to follow up the poetical lines.

Although he did not originate it, Bayly indeed used the phrase absence makes the heart grow fonder in his ballad poem Isle Of Beauty, Fare Thee Well, which was published as part of the poet's two-volume set Songs, Ballads, And Other Poems (1844). The phrase is found in the poem's last stanza:

When the waves are round me breaking,
As I pace the deck alone,
And my eye in vain is seeking
Some green leaf to rest upon;
What would I not give to ponder
Where my old companions dwell?
Absence makes the heart grow fonder,
Isle of beauty fare thee well!



Date: October 30, 1952 (Broadcast Date)

Sonny Burke And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) It's A Good Day - 1:08(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Forgive Me - 1:58(Milton Ager, Jack Yellen)
c. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Swing Low, Sweet Chariot - 1:13(Traditional)
d. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Danny Boy - 2:33(Traditional, Fred E. Weatherly)
e. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? - 1:01(Traditional)
f. ExtantPeggy Lee Shows (CBS) Little David, Play On Your Harp - 1:42(Traditional)
All titles on: Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" TranscriptionProgram No. 80 — Peggy Lee   (1953)




Images

Sheet music for one of the numbers that Peggy Lee sang during this 1952 broadcast. In addition to Peggy Lee, "Forgive Me" was recorded that same year by both Eddie Fisher and Julius LaRosa, but only Fisher had a hit with it (#7). All three versions qualified as revivals; the song is estimated to have been a #1 hit back in 1927, as recorded by Gene Austin. "Forgive Me" would enjoy yet a third chart round in 1965, when an Al Martino version peaked at #61.


Guest

With their 11th visit to Club 88 (at least as shown in the AFRS edition of the program), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires ended their reign as the guest act with the most Club 88 appearances, by far. (They could be more accurately called semi-regulars. However, announcer and hostess usually refer to them as guests.) On this occasion, the LA-based group backed their pal Lee as she sang "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," "O Dear, What Can The Matter Be?" and "Little David, Play On Your Harp." When performing by themselves, the Rhythmaires' tune of choice was "On The Alamo." Viewers interested in learning more about this quintet and its connections to Lee should consult the notes under program dated ca. May 20, 1952.


Club 88: The Peggy Lee Show





Basics

The above-seen publicity photos were used to promote Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee, a music series that generated over 80 episodes and featured nearly 50 guests. Also known by the simple moniker of The Peggy Lee Show, it aired on the CBS radio network each Tuesday and Thursday from 9:30 p.m. to 9:45 p.m., running almost uninterrupted from the beginning of 1952 until late October or early November of that year. (On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, this 9:30 p.m. slot was occupied by Bob Crosby's Club 15, a much longer-running series whose sponsors included Campbell's Soup -- especially during the 1940s -- and, in the early 1950s, Ford Dealers and Lincoln-Mercury Dealers of America.) Peggy Lee's recruitment for the show was announced on the December 12, 1951 issue of Variety, in which it was also pointed out that Campbell Soups, the previous sponsor of this 9:30 p.m. slot, had abandoned it after re-signing for the sponsorship of Club 15.

As will be discussed below, the sponsorship history of Club 88 has proven difficult to pinpoint -- and the same point will have to be made, unfortunately, about various other topics of relevance. This researcher's difficulties partially stem from the fact that only about a third of the original CBS broadcasts are known to be extant.  To make matters worse, only a small fraction of that third has ever been available to me.  The lack of enough episodes to audition poses a serious obstacle not only for the determination of matters such as the program's sponsorship history but also for the fulfillment of my overall goal:  to provide a comprehensive description of this radio show.  

Even with such obstacles and information gaps, I hope that readers will be appreciative of the amount of research that has been conducted, and the minutia that has been retrieved. I also hope that assistance (corrections, additions, suggestions) will be forthcoming.





Locations And Personnel

Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee (1952) was the direct successor of The Peggy Lee Rexall Show (1951).  Both shows aired on CBS radio in New York City, the earlier program for one summer and the one under the discussion all year round (although, as will be further discussed below, it eventually relocated to another city).  In addition to Lee herself, two key members of the personnel worked on both programs:  Louis Melamed and Russ Case.  Melamed served as producer for the 1951 summer show, and Case as its conductor.  In 1952, they continued to provide their respective services through the duration of Club 88's stay in New York. 

On the fifth month of its broadcasting history, Club 88 went through a change of location.  The change was precipitated by Peggy Lee's decision to move back to her main home in Los Angeles.  A nominal split is thus evident between the batch of episodes that runs from January to May the second, all of them broadcast from WCBS in New York, and subsequent installments, broadcast from CBS's flagship station, LA's KNX-CBS.   

The specific NY and LA locations used for the show can be identified through publicity material, including the blurbs that accompany pictures from the CBS Photo Archive.  Such blurbs mention that the show was "broadcast from CBS Studios, New York."  The Big Apple episodes were thus probably taped at the CBS Studio Building on 49 East 52nd Street, which WCBS Radio (880 AM) occupied during the 1940s and 1950s.  Thanks to some of the archival photos that are seen above (Peggy Lee with Jeff Chandler, Frankie Laine, etc.), it is further clear that the station in LA was KNX (1070 AM), located in CBS headquarters, at 6121 Sunset Boulevard at Columbia Square. Of further help is a particular photo in which Chandler is seen opening the door for an exiting Lee.  If this publicity shot is to be trusted, the show was taped and/or rehearsed at Studio C.

Naturally, the relocation to LA led to personnel modifications, too.  Sonny Burke And His Orchestra took over the music, Larry Berns over the production.  In New York, Bruno Zirato, Jr. had directed, from scripts written by Charles S. Monroe, while Olen Tice had taken care of announcements and promotions.  In Los Angeles, Lucien Davis [sp?] took over the direction.  Also lending his expertise to the LA edition of the show was Bob LeMond, whose long career as announcer for the CBS network (in both its radio and TV branches) found him working on I Love Lucy, Ozzie and Harriet, The Red Skelton Hour, and Leave It To Beaver, among many other programs.  (Incidentally, this announcer' last name is often found misspelled as Lamond in both print and online sources.  Similarly, Larry Berns' last name is sometimes misprinted as Burns.)

As for the musicians who played in either the NY or the LA episodes, the only names given by my sources are those of the orchestras' leaders.  There are only two exceptions.  Thanks to his own testimony, we know that  percussionist Mike Pacheco played in the series -- most likely, in the LA edition of the show, although he did not reveal any such specifics.   And, thanks to singer David Allyn, we also know that vibraphonist Terry Gibbs played in the NY edition of the show.

The writer of the show's music and arranger of the songs is not specified in my sources, but,  be it the NY or the LA edition, logical assumptions can be made.  Russ Case is presumed to have written most of the arrangements for the New York edition, aside from those being re-used, from Lee's concerts and studio work.  (Such arrangements would have only needed slight modifications, to fit Case's style and the make-up of his orchestra).  In LA, Sonny Burke would have similarly written all the needed arrangements.  Both Case and Burke are likely to have received input from Peggy Lee -- more heavily so in Burke's case, because he and Lee were assiduously writing songs together at that time. 
 
(Photos. Above: seen first are two modern-day photos of the CBS Studio Building in New York.  The seven-story structure was essentially an annex to the main corporate building that stood nearby, on 485 Madison Avenue, at this point in time.  The last two shots are period photos of CBS Columbia Square in Los Angeles.  Below:  Russ Case and Sonny Burke, the show's orchestra leaders. Their respective orchestras were active beyond the confines of the radio show under discussion: two of these shots are actually front covers of albums featuring early 1950s material from said bands.)  





Dating

During my preparation of this page for the radio show Club 88 Starring 88, one of the most challenging tasks has been (and continues to be) the handling of broadcast dates.  Only in some instances do my main sources supply the date on which the episodes aired.  Further complicating matters is the fact that much of the available information about Club 88 pertains not to the original CBS episodes (1952) but to their 1953 versions, which were edited and re-broadcast by the Armed Forces Radio.  

Here is a basic exposition of this complicated state of affairs.  I am fortunate to know the exact order in which the AFRS versions were broadcast, but unfortunate to not have the equivalent information for the original CBS episodes.  I am similarly fortunate to have broadcast dates for some of the CBS episodes, but unfortunate to lack dates for any of their AFRS counterparts.  At the heart of the matter is the fact that the AFRS versions were not always broadcast in the same exact order as the original CBS items.  

Due to the complications just explained, I have thought it prudent to specify which episodes count with evidence or support for the dates that I assigned to them.  A list, divided according to the source of support, is provided below.  

A. Source:  Transcription Discs.
January 31.  February 5, 7, 12, and 14.  March 13, 20, 25, and 27.  April 1, 3, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, and 29.  May 6.  September 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, and 23.   October 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, and 28.  These dates belong to CBS broadcasts that have been preserved in the form of transcription discs.  The dates are the ones found written on the physical labels of these discs.  (I should mention in passing that I did not inspect the discs myself.  Instead, I received the information from a reliable party who owns them.)

B. Source: Variety Issues.
May 6. May 8. June 5. July 3. October 9. These dates were obtained by perusing issues of Variety magazine. In most cases, the magazine's entries were alerts to a guest who would be appearing in Lee's show.

C. Source:  Goldin's Index.
January 15.  March 6.  May 6.  I found these three dates by consulting the GoldIndex, a log that tallies all the radio shows in the collection of radio engineer David Goldin.  The log features brief descriptions of each episode in the collection, with a date sometimes included as part of the information offered.  (Many of the broadcasts owned by Goldin were preserved in the form of transcription discs.  In some cases, the preserved discs were the ones originally sent out to radio stations for airplay, and in other cases the preserved discs were reference copies made mostly for the parties involved in the show.  Goldin presumably found the dates for these three particular broadcasts in the physical labels of the respective CBS discs.)  

D. Source: Stock And Press Photos
May 6. June 26. August 5. These dates are attached to photographs of Lee and artists on location with guests who appeared in her show. The degree of reliability of these dates is moderate. Sometimes the dates that photo agencies ascribe to stock photos are clearly wrong, pertain to an event that took place sometime after the picture was taken, or simply turn to be approximate rather than exact dating.

As for the many other CBS episodes not listed above, the dates which I have assigned to them should be deemed estimates for which I have no direct support or evidence.  Generally, I believe such estimated dates to be either correct (especially those with dating previous to May 6) or off by a relatively small margin (an one- or two-episode margin; namely, a couple of days or a week).





Format

Among the most consistent features of the radio series under discussion was its presentation and highlighting of a guest. The emphasis given to such a feature is evident from the fact that the guest segment was often identified by name (Guest Time) and blissfully introduced with harp playing. As a matter of fact, every single episode of the show had a guest act, without any exception.

Not as consistent but certainly recurrent was the use of poetry as an introduction to songs. Clearly part and parcel of Peggy Lee's modus operandi as a radio hostess, she had made similar use of poems and proverbs in the two other series that she had hosted on her own, The Peggy Lee Rexall Show (1951) and The Chesterfield Supper Club (1948-1949). Naturally, the songs chosen for poetic treatment were usually ballads, and the choice was restricted to one number per episode. (Exceptions can be found in the very last episodes, which do not feature sponsored commercials, and allow lee to talk more than previously.) Readers wishing to read transcribed samplings of poetic recitations from Club 88 should consult the notes under the episodes with the following dates: ca. June 3, June 5, ca. June 24, August 12, August 14, August 21, August 26, September 2, October 18, and October 21, 1952. (It is of course possible that Lee recited poetry in early episodes, before the ones broadcast in June, but so far no evidence has been forthcoming.)

The New York installments of Club 88 usually started off with Olen Tice announcing that you’ve got a date with Peggy Lee! His words were followed by Russ Case's interpretation of a few bars from the instrumental "Peg Of My Heart." Then Tice would jump right back into the proceedings, with a full intro: Welcome to The Peggy Lee Show, an easy, breezy Tuesday and Thursday session starring one of America’s favorite singers, lovely Peggy Lee, and Russ Case And His Orchestra, and music with a heartbeat. Tonight Peggy’s guest is __. And here is the star of our show, Peggy Lee! The vocalist would then sing her first number of the evening, and only afterwards would she greet audiences, typically with the phrases Hello there, you! And you. And you, too. For the rest of the program, she would continue to make brief comments, each one usually preceding a song (including any selections sung by the guests). Sometimes, the brief comments pertained to the song (e.g., identification of songwriter; origination in a Hollywood film or Broadway show; general description of the number, personal feelings about the selection). Other times, the comment involved the guest or, less frequently, Lee herself (e.g., announcement that she had been invited to be Yale Junior Class' Prom Date).

The closing segment of the New York shows would typically start with the reprise of a few bars from "Peg Of My Heart," after which Peggy Lee would bid adieu. As an example, here are the words with which she closed episode #25: Well, time’s almost up for the night. Thanks, Jackie Paris. You were pretty grand. And now this is Peggy Lee saying so long until Thursday, when I’ll be back at the same time, same place, same Russ Case and his fine orchestra and with Bob Carroll paying a return visit as our guest. Tomorrow night be listening for Bob Crosby and the gang at Club 15, right here at this time on most of the same stations. Until then ... She would next be heard singing a couple of lines from her hit "It's A Good Day." The final seconds of the New York installments would be spent on personnel credits, enunciated by announcer Olen Tice over the orchestra's continued playing of "It's A Good Day." (Though the two songs already mentioned in this paragraph seem to have been the commonplace picks to open and close the episodes, there appears to have been a bit of flexibility as to the choice of instrumental music. Instead of "Peg Of My Heart" and/or "It's A Good Day," some of the New York episodes are listed as having used Case's playing of "Begin The Beguine.")

When Club 88 moved to LA, "It's A Good Day" became the show's sole theme, at least for a while. It was heard both vocally and instrumentally, with neither "Peg Of My Heart" nor "Begin The Beguine" as regular parts of the equation anymore. Initial episodes from LA seem to have kept much of the above-quoted introductory and closing words, as well as taglines or catchphrases like "you've got a date with Peggy Lee." One additional line, "here's lovely Peggy Lee," was regularly uttered by the LA announcer (LeMond).

After Oldsmobile became the show's sponsor (from mid-May onwards, as will be further detailed below), that company's jingle opened and closed the shows sometimes. At other times, the jingle was heard in the middle of the episode, and there was no opening or closing theme from Lee. (Following the announcer's opening, she would jump right into her first number.) Tellingly, these episodes of the series start off with announcer Bob LeMond's identification of the program as The Oldsmobile Show: Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee.

The last episodes of the show reverted to old themes. They start off with semi-regulars The Rhythmaires singing a few bars of the oldest of the show's themes, "Peg Of My Heart." The episodes close with The Rhythmaires singing a few more bars of "Peg Of My Heart," most times followed by Peggy Lee singing, for her part, a few bars of another old theme, "It's A Good Day."

(Photos above: sheet music for the numbers that Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee used as song themes at one time or another of its nearly-year-long existence. Some of these themes were heard as instrumentals, others as vocals. "In My Merry Oldsmobile" was sung with updated lyrics that served as promotion for the show's steadiest sponsor, Oldsmobile.)


Critical Reception

The May 21, 1952 of Variety enthuses that "CBS'Peggy Lee Show ... continues as one of the neatest song sessions on the airlanes. Nothing pretentious about this stanza, but the music is excellent." The November 22, 1952 issue of Billboard includes a tabulation called Top 5 Radio Shows Each Day Of The Week In Boston, where the Tuesday edition of The Peggy Lee Show ranks at #3, with a 5.5 rating that ties it with The Jack Smith Show and People Are Funny. (A baseball extravaganza ranks at the top with a 6.5, followed by Edward R. Murrow with a 6.0 share.)





Sponsorship

After researching the vaults of the periodicals Variety and Billboard, the fuzzy story of this show's sponsorship has become relatively clearer to me.  Also helpful in my exploration was the GoldIndex, a database that lists hundreds of broadcasts in the possession of radio engineer J. David Goldin.  The series went through three phases.  

During its first phase (January 2 to May 8), Peggy Lee's show was a sustained series, although there is proof that it sometimes succeeded at finding sponsors on a week-by-week basis. The GoldIndex indicates that the January 15, 1952 broadcast was sponsored by Buick and, locally, American Airlines. A couple of weeks earlier, in its December 29, 1951 issue, Billboard had revealed Buick's actual purchase of not one but two Peggy Lee episodes. In doing so, and again according to Billboard, Buick was taking advantage of CBS' "single shot sponsorship." (CBS was apparently trying for a sponsorship model that not been commonplace in the past. Contract with one exclusive sponsor had tended to be the norm for radio shows during previous decades, but such was no longer the general case in the 1950s. Sponsorship appears to have become a more 'fluid' concept at this late point in the history of variety radio programming. Given such state of affairs, Buick could have been just the first of various national sponsors of Lee's show. Or the show could have remained on a sustained, non-nationally-sponsored basis in the successive weeks.)

I have also been told that a a Mercury jingle is heard in one of the show's broadcasts (January 31, 1952) and an ad for Collier's in another (April 29, 1952). However, these advertisements for Mercury and Collier's were inserted right after the end of the respective broadcasts, thereby leaving me to doubt that either one falls within the Club 88 slot.

Attempts to woo a permanent sponsor were definitely made during this period. The March 5, 1952 issue of Variety informs its readers that the program's publishing agent was pursuing a deal with Wrigley's, and that there was "a good chance the gum outfit, which reportedly is looking for a show with more exposure for its mass consumption product, will pick it up."  (Wrigley's was in the process of dropping one of the two radio shows that it had been regularly sponsoring, Life With Luigi. The company went on to sponsor 36 half hours of summer shows -- in a block deal with CBS -- and may have also agreed to sponsor the just-debuting TV edition of Life With Luigi. But I have found no indication that the company ever sponsored the Peggy Lee's show, too.)

The Goldindex includes pertinent data about the May 6, 1952 broadcast: it was sustained. (Goldin itemizes five additional episodes of the show, but all five of those were available to him only in their AFRS versions, from which references to sponsorship are always edited out.)  As will be discussed in other sections below, that May 6 episode was the first one to be broadcast after the show changed location, having moved from Manhattan to Los Angeles.

The second phase of the show began on May 15, which was the fourth broadcast after the program's relocation to California. From that date onwards, Oldsmobile sponsored the series. Naturally, the process had been set in motion weeks earlier: on April 30, Variety commented that "Oldsmobile may enter radio sponsorship for the first time in several years" and identified Lee's show as the object of Oldsmobile's sponsoring affection. A deal was struck for six and a half weeks (according to Variety; or six weeks, according to Billboard). Oldsmobile then renewed it for 13 more weeks (Variety, June 24, 1952). Yet another renewal was reported on the August 21st issue of Variety. On its August 27 issue, the peridiocal declared that the show "has had several renewals and Olds is now considering continuing it indefinitely."

During its third and final phase, the show became a sustained series again.  Consisting of at least five weeks, the full length of this period is unknown to me. The phase might have been part and parcel of the show's transitioning (to its old location, with a new host). Variety (October 22nd, 1952) phrased the news in the following way: "Peggy Lee stays on CBS for five sustainers until Mindy Carson takes over her time in N.Y."

Photos above: Memorabilia related to the two known sponsors of the show's New York edition. The first of the picture is from a 1950 brochure, the second from an unknown source and year.





Oldsmobile's Rocket 88 Sponsorship

Oldsmobile was a highly successful and long-lasting car brand (1897-2004) produced by General Motors. According to various online sources, including the one source (Wikipedia) about to be quoted at length, the Oldsmobile 88 car was

produced from 1949 until 1999. From 1950 to 1974, the 88 was actually the division's top-selling line, particularly the entry-level models such as the 88 and Dynamic 88. The 88 series was also an image leader for Oldsmobile, particularly in the early years (1949–51) when it was one of the best performing automobiles thanks to its relatively small size, light weight and advanced overhead-valve high-compression V8 engine ... A large number of variations in nomenclature were seen over this long model run— [the] Futuramic, Super, Golden Rocket, [etc.] were [all] used at various times with the 88 badge ... For 1951, the 88 was now the entry-level Olds[mobile line, superseding the 76 line] ... New this year was the more upscale Super 88 line ...

Over the years, GM would of course continue to make additional improvements to its Oldsmobile line(s).

General Motors had also come up with a successful advertising campaign for the Oldsmobile 88. The campaign compared the 88's engine to a space rocket. The comparisons were memorable enough to even inspire the writing of a song that became a hit for Jackie Brenston in 1951. (Called "Rocket 88," the tune was not directly connected to the company or the campaign, but its lyrics clearly draw from the campaign's ads: "V-8 motor and this modern design / black convertible top /..." Nowadays, "Rocket 88" is one among a select few recordings from the late 1940s and early 1950s vying for the title of earliest rock 'n' roll record -- even though this 1951 hit number still sounds too immersed in the boogie woogie tradition to be confidently called a piece of rock music.)





The year 1952 found Oldsmobile premiering its upscale Super 88 line and sponsoring sophisticated trush Peggy Lee on CBS radio. Lee and the sponsor actually had a background story: according to the May 1951 issue of Capitol News,, both Peggy Lee and Vivian Blaine had been "signed to make a series of television commercials for Oldsmobile" at that time. One year later, Lee's show was being casually referred to as Club 88 in some magazine articles and its opening line (You've a got date with Peggy Lee) mirrored the slogan used for Oldsmobile's aforementioned campaign (Make a Date with a Rocket 88). Metaphorically, Peggy Lee was being equated to the Super 88 rocket.

As previously mentioned, the episodes in question identify themselves as The Oldsmobile Show: Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee. At both the opening and closing of each episode, Lee is heard singing the Oldsmobile 88 jingle. In 1951 and 1952, the most commonly used lyrics for that jingle were as follows: What a thrill to take the wheel / of a rocket Oldsmobile; / in performance it's a star, / it's a rocket engine car; / hydramatic drive is new / futuramic styling, too; / yes, the going's great in an 88; / it's a driver's dream come true. It is possible that this version of the jingle was sung in some of the episodes. However, the one jingle-including episode from which I have full information (September 2, 1952) features Lee singing the following, different version: You’ve gotta get behind the wheel / of the newest Oldsmobile; / take the key and get inside; / got to try that rocket ride; / there's a super power thrill / on each highway, curve and hill; / got to make a date with an 88; / got to drive an Oldsmobile.

Besides the rendition of the jingle (as sung by hostess Lee) and the promotional comments (made by announcer Bob LeMond), the Oldsmobile episodes also counted with the contributions of Johnny & Lucille, the designated faces of the campaign. A fictional couple first mentioned in the 1905 hit song "In My Merry Oldsmobile,” Johnny & Lucille were played by actors with which the public became familiar through television and print campaigns. Typically, the campaigns featured them riding a space rocket that stood for Oldsmobile's 88 engine. Readers curious to see the couple's routine should look at this 1953 TV commercial, which captures Johnny & Lucille in rocketing action, and guest Mel Tormé along for the ride — or rather, along to praise the ride. (Incidentally, the couple seems to have been played by different individuals as time went by, but in 1952 Johnny was personified by Bill Lechner, who would serve as Lee's guest in one of the episodes (the one dated ca. July 1, 1952). Rather than Lechner, the "Johnny" seen in the linked video is likely to be the actor who succeeded him in the role.)

(Photos above and below: various campaign ads on behalf of the Oldsmobile 88 line and its 1952 brand, the Super 88. The campaign's space rocket is prominently featured, of course. Johnny & Lucille can also be seen in a variety of propaganda, including a publicity shot, a still from a TV commercial, a poster, and a drawing from a newspaper ad. In the ad, consumers are being told that Oldsmobile's singing sweethearts, invite you to try that thrilling rocket ride. Bill Lechner is the smiling man in the publicity shot. Below: Another campaign poster, and two photos of the actual cars. The second photo presents one of the variations of the 88, the Oldsmobile Futurama car, also in vogue during the very early 1950s.)





Taping

Yet another question mark about Peggy Lee's show is whether it aired live or was pre-taped.  Once again, researching of the archives of Variety has proven helpful in the clarification of this matter. As suspected -- given the program's relatively late date of creation, which falls well within the tape era -- the evidenceat hand point in the direction of a pre-taped show.  One such piece of evidence was found in the July 16, 1952 issue of Variety: we are told that "Peggy Lee taped two CBS airers last night."

The photos shown directly below (from the CBS Photo Archive) can also be cited as evidence. They are available at GettyImages, where most of them bear a June 26, 1952 date.  The second photo is especially telling: Lee is seen amidst guests from different shows (i.e., Jeff Chandler and Frankie Laine, the latter accompanied by his pianist Carl Fischer).  According to this page's episode log, an episode featuring Chandler and another featuring Laine were broadcast back to back.  The presence of both men in the same photo suggests that, at the very least, one of these episodes was pre-taped.  (The photos under scrutiny are the first and, especially, the second. The other photos are believed to be from another of Chandler's guest appearances in this series -- not from the appearance or broadcast that preceded Laine's.)

(Of course, valid objections could be raised to my assumption that both men appear with Lee because in the photo because they were reporting for guest duty on her show.  We could certainly imagine any number of casual scenarios leading to their presence, including the casual stepping of one of both men into the Peggy Lee Show studio while they working in a studio nearby. But the setup, including the presence of sheet music and script pages, suggests otherwise.)

It must be granted that these pieces of evidence (photos, Variety notices) do not allow for the conclusion that the entire series was pre-taped. They provide support only for the episodes to which they are linked. Still, they add to the various arguments to be made below, all of which point in the direction of a pre-taped show.

The show's standard practice of featuring a guest in every single episode must have played an influential role in its schedule, makeup and format.  The hostess and her crew needed to accommodate a large parade of guests, many of whom probably had tight schedules.  The option of pre-taping would have eased the process considerably. Pre-taping would have particularly simplified the timeline for guests slated to make more than one guest appearance,  theoretically, they might have been able to tape performances for two, three, or more episodes in just one visit.   (I should stress that the last sentence's scenario is entirely theoretical; I have no proof of its having actually happened.  If it did, Louis Prima could have been its greatest beneficiary, due to his appearances in four episodes, all of them broadcast between March 25 and April 24, 1952.)

We should also pay heed to the hectic schedule that Peggy Lee herself was keeping in the early 1950s.  During this period, she was not only hosting her own radio show but also acting in (and writing for) the movies, performing regularly on various TV shows, and holding concert engagements.  The hostess and her crew would have clearly benefitted from a policy of non-live programming:  they would have had more time to put together their twice-a-week episode workload together.  Besides -- given the ready availability of pre-taping as an alternate option at this point in time -- most artists and crews of the 1950s probably found live broadcasts too much of an unnecessary hassle. 

As heard on audio, the show's atmosphere suggests a fairly quiet environment.   In the episodes I have auditioned, there is no applause, nor any other overt indication of an audience's presence. The absence of a public would have made the task of pre-taping quicker and easier for everyone involved.  

Based on the admittedly vague picture at hand, I am inclined to believe that Lee's and the LA crew operated on an once-per-week basis. In my hypothetical scenario, they would have come to do the two broadcasts from the given week on the sam day. At least one of those broadcasts, if not both, would have been pre-taped. This scenario would explain the combined presence of Chandler and Laine in the second of the photos above: they were on call on the same day, presumably for both rehearsal and taping or broadcasting. This two-guest pattern is also apparent from an April 16, 1952 Variety entry, which tells us that Dick Haymes and Liberace will be the first guest stars to be heard in the broadcasts from Los Angeles.

(Photos below: dated June 26, 1952, the first two shots have been discussed in some of the paragraphs that precede this one. Though also dated June 26, 1952, the other two shots are, in my estimation, from an earlier date. In one of them, Chandler is holding both a copy of the episode's script and the sheet music for "You Made Me Love You," the number that he sang during the first of his guest appearances, broadcast ca. May 27, 1952. Empty chairs are visible in the background -- no audience in sight.  It is also worth noting that some lines of dialogue have been marked or highlighted, and other lines have been crossed out.  The last photo reveals that Marjorie Hoshelle was also present at this rehearsal and/or taping.  An actress primarily active during the 1940s and the first half of the 1950s, Hoshelle had married Chandler in 1946.)  






The AFRS Edition Of The Peggy Lee Show

Some sources claim that the Peggy Lee radio show under scrutiny was broadcast in 1953. Such late dating is incorrect, though not entirely unfounded. Confusion stems from the fact that, in 1953, this program was re-aired by the Armed Forces Radio Service in its participating stations. AFRS announcers would simply identify the program as The Peggy Lee Show.

Due to editing, the re-aired episodes were not identical to the originals that had been heard at least a year earlier in the CBS network. One of the policies that AFRadio had always strictly enforced was the excision of promotional material from any of the network shows that it re-aired. No exception was made in the case of CBS' Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee. This policy had a particularly adverse effect on the announcer of the original CBS show: being the main exponent of promotional material, AFRS would either edit major portions of his commentary or completely erase his contributions to the program. What's more, AFRS incorporated its own announcer on the program; he was in charge of identifying the reconfigured show as an AFRS production. The AFRS announcer could also be tasked with rephrasing comments that had been originally made by the network announcer. The end result: two different announcer voices can be sometimes heard during the same AFRS episode, and at least one of them might not be identified by name.

Another general AFRS practice involved the dropping of one or two songs per episode. Sometimes, AFRS’ procedure would involve just deletion but other times there was also substitution: one or two songs from a different episode would replace the numbers and the patter that had been skipped. The main reasons for such substitutions and deletions was naturally, time limitations in some cases, time extensions in other cases. Other reasons, unknown to me, are likely to have been at play as well.

Fortunately, the AFRS editors of CBS's Club 88 do not seem to have assiduously resorted to the practice of dropping and substituting songs -- "seem" and "assiduously" being the operative words in the present sentence. Far less fortunately, the editors did tend to eliminate one of Club 88's distinctive features: Peggy Lee's poetic introductions to songs.


Original Audio Sources: Extant AFRS And CBS Discs

Under the simple name of Peggy Lee (or, alternatively, and depending on the episode's conductor, Russ Case With Peggy Lee / Sonny Burke With Peggy Lee), the American Federation Radio Service released to its radio stations a total of 82 transcription discs, each one containing a 15-minute-long episode hosted by the singer. All but one of these 82 AFRS transcription discs are extant at the Library of Congress. The one AFRS disc seemingly missing from LOC is program #3.

Each of the 81 extant AFRS transcription discs play at 33.3 rpm and measure 16 inches in diameter. (I should clarify that I have not seen the discs myself, but I believe that my information about them is correct. The only matter about which I remain uncertain is whether these transcription discs are one sided or double sided. If the latter, then the total number of discs would be 41 instead of 82. However, the information entered in the LOC database has led me to assume that they are one-sided.)

All the episodes found in those discs are edited versions of shows that Lee had hosted for the CBS radio network in 1952 and 1953. To be more precise, 80 of the AFRS transcription discs are estimated to contain edited versions of the show that is being discussed in this page, CBS' Club 88, broadcast in 1952. (I am including the missing disc, containing program #3, in this 80-disc total.)

The remaining two AFRS discs at the Library of Congress contain edited versions of a related show: CBS' 1951 The Peggy Lee Rexall Show, discussed in a separate page. Because the 1951 CBS show was half an hour long whereas the AFRS show had a 15-minute duration, the two Rexall installments underwent a larger amount of editing at the hands of AFRS.)

In addition to the 81 AFRS discs, 33 of the original CBS broadcasts are also extant. I am not absolutely certain of the format in which such CBS broadcasts have been preserved; throughout this page, I have assumed it to be lacquer disc. Similarly unclear to me is what sort of identification -- if any -- can be found in such discs. Hence I have provisionally given them the name "Club 88,." (Being part of this provisional measure, the quotation marks are meant to indicate that this name is of my own making.)

The history behind the preservation of the "Club 88" episodes can be only loosely traced. Some of the extant discs were reference copies that remained in the possession of Peggy Lee. Other might have been remnants of the CBS library which AFRS used to create its edited versions of the show. The second batch mentioned is now owned by the Library of Congress. A few more, including those listed in the aforementioned Goldindex, are probably the copies originally sent out to radio stations, and fortunately kept by some employees at such stations.

Of the 33 CBS episodes extant, three qualify as very special cases: they have no AFRS equivalent. One of them is a broadcast featuring Bob Crosby as guest. It has been preserved in full. Another, with guest Red Norvo, exists only in fragmentary form. Ditto for the third and less interesting of the three items, featuring The Rhythmaires and two Lee vocals that might or might have not been edited by AFRS into the last few episodes of the Service’s Peggy Lee Show edition. I do not know why AFRS skipped these particular installments. Whichever the reason might have been, their physical existence raises the possibility that AFRS might have also left out a few others. (Such hypothetically 'missing' CBS installments would have been broadcast during the only apparent gap in the known sequence of extant episodes: from July 15 to July 31, 1952. It is a six-episode gap. Bear in mind, however, that this six-episode loss is a highly speculative matter, to which I am not fully subscribing. On the contrary, I’m leaning more toward the theory that there never were any such six episodes: in July, Peggy Lee might have just taken a three-week vacation from the show, and prepare for the filming of her starring role in the movie The Jazz Singer. In any case, I am hoping for definitive answers on this matter to materialize in the near future.)

Given the low number of extant CBS-radio originals, comparisons between that network’s broadcasts and their AFRS counterparts should be deemed tentative. Although my own comments throughout this page have tried to chiefly rely on the network broadcasts, in many cases doing so has proven impossible. In such cases, the AFRS counterparts have been the only source from which information could be drawn.


The Closure OF Peggy Lee's Show

The broadcasting of Club 88 Starring Peggy Lee began in January of 1952 and ran continuously (or almost continuously, given a yet-to-be-corroborated three-week gap) until either October 30 or November 4, 1952. An additional order of 16 or 17 episodes would have fittingly kept the series running until the end of the year, but no such "fit' took place.

CBS' and Peggy Lee's reason(s) for ending her show are unknown. Judging from Oldsmobile's continued renewals as the series' sponsor, and from the company's aforementioned intention to continue it "indefinitely," lack of sponsorship does not seem to have been a problem. Perhaps the motive was simple: a total number of episodes might have been specified in the original contract, and the quota might have been finally met around late October of 1952. And perhaps there were other specific circumstances at play. For instance, Lee's need to cultivate her budding movie career could have been weighed against the preparation of any further episodes. She might have needed to spend more time filming and promoting The Jazz Singer, which would premiere on the very last day of the year.

How did Lee end the show? Which were her final picks to sing, and which comments were made by her? Regrettably, I do not know which episode was the final one. None of the episodes to which I have listened contain a goodbye or any other indications of a full closure.

Most of the last episodes of the series are extant in both their CBS and AFRS versions. The CBS edition of the episode that aired on Tuesday, October 28 has been auditioned. At its end, Bob LeMond announces that there will be a special broadcast next Thursday evening. After a silent pause, he continues: Starting Thursday, November 6th at this time, CBS Radio invites you to join us for The Mindy Carson Show. [Add it to] your evening time list of listening favorites, at the star’s address. You’ll adore Mindy Carson, America’s New Singing Sweetheart… LeMond then offers a few more details about Carson, obviously as part of a pitch to entice and keep the regular Club 88 audience syntonized to the 9:30 p.m. CBS slot. (Carson's NY edition of the show began as a sustained program, but was promptly picked up by Buick, one of the sponsors that had also backed Lee when the broadcasts were being beamed from New York.)

From LeMond's above-quoted comments, we can surmise that the last episode of Lee's CBS show aired on either Thursday October 30 or Tuesday, November 4, 1952. It is not clear if by "special broadcast" on October 30, he means a final episode of Lee's show. In any case, and most unfortunately, the CBS edition of the October 30 episode does not seem to be extant, and I have yet to find traces of the program that was heard on November 4.

Pinpointing or identifying the final episode of this show is just one out of many Club 88 pursuits that remain on hold, due to the absence or vagueness of the available information. Too few of the extant episodes have been auditioned, too. Future listening of the non-auditioned installments should correct or solve matters that remain nebulous at the time of this writing.


Indexes






I. Songs

This index lists all the numbers that Peggy Lee is known to have sung in the CBS radio show Club 88 (1952) and its prequel The Peggy Lee Rexall Show (1951). (The former is the subject of discussion throughout this page; the latter receives attention in another page.) A grand total of 400 performances has been listed. Peggy Lee definitely sang more numbers, especially on The Peggy Rexall Show, but I have no knowledge or record of which numbers they were. (Readers intent of gathering fully data on this and another show-related matters should also be reminded of the caveats that were expressed near the top of this page -- caveats about sources, multiplicity of song versions, and dating.)

Below, all performances have been kept under one list, independently of whether they are Peggy Lee solos or duets with guests.  As for the guests' own solos, those are excluded from the present index, and also from all other song tallies in this page.  (However, the guests’ solos have still received attention and identification: their titles can be found in the notes under each session.  See also the guest index below, and the note that follows it.)


1. Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive (January 17, 1952)
2. Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive (April 15, 1952)
3. Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive: Johnny Mercer Medley (ca. May 22, 1952)
4. Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive (ca. June 24, 1952)
5. Ac-cent-tchu-ate The Positive ("ca. September 2, 1952")
6. After All, It's Spring (June 17, 1951)
7. After All, It's Spring ("ca. September 4, 1952")
8. All Of Me (June 17, 1951)
9. Alone Together (ca. June 19, 1952)
10. Alone Together (ca. August 26, 1952)
11. And So To Sleep Again (January 17, 1952)
12. Angel Eyes: Matt Dennis Medley (ca. August 12, 1952)
13. At Last (April 17, 1952)
14. At Last (ca. June 10, 1952)
15. At Last (ca. June 26, 1952)
16. Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart (ca. August 14, 1952)
17. Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart (ca. August 28, 1952)
18. Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart (September 9, 1952)
19. Auf Wiedersehen, Sweetheart (October 2, 1952 )
20. Baby, It's Cold Outside: Frank Loesser Medley (ca. August 21, 1952)
21. Baia (March 11, 1952)
22. Basin Street Blues (March 25, 1952)
23. Be Anything (April 8, 1952)
24. Be Anything (April 24, 1952)
25. Be Anything (April 29, 1952)
26. Be Anything (ca. May 29, 1952)
27. Be Anything (July 1, 1952)
28. Be Anything (September 9, 1952)
29. Be My Life's Companion (March 11, 1952)
30. Bermuda (February 12, 1952)
31. Bermuda (March 6, 1952)
32. Bermuda (March 27, 1952)
33. Bermuda (ca. June 24, 1952)
34. Bermuda ("ca. September 4, 1952")
35. Blacksmith Blues, The (March 18, 1952)
36. Blacksmith Blues, The (April 3, 1952)
37. Blacksmith Blues, The (April 15, 1952)
38. Blacksmith Blues, The (May 8, 1952)
39. Blues In The Night: Johnny Mercer Medley (ca. May 22, 1952)
40. Blues In The Night (September 16, 1952)
41. Botch-a-me (ca. July 8, 1952)
42. Botch-a-me (ca. August 19, 1952)
43. Botch-a-me (September 4, 1952)
44. Botch-a-me (ca. September 25, 1952)
45. Bushel And A Peck, A: Frank Loesser Medley (ca. August 21, 1952)
46. Button Up Your Overcoat (January 22, 19526)
47. Button Up Your Overcoat (February 19, 1952)
48. Come On-A My House ("ca. September 2, 1952")
49. Come Rain Or Come Shine (ca. May 22, 1952)
50. Come What May (February 28, 1952)
51. Come What May (March 20, 1952)
52. Cry (March 11, 1952)
53. Danny Boy (ca. May 27, 1952)
54. Danny Boy (ca. August 19, 1952)
55. Danny Boy (September 2, 1952)
56. Danny Boy (October 16, 1952)
57. Danny Boy (October 30, 1952)
58. Did Anyone Call? (March 4, 1952)
59. Did Anyone Call? (April 3, 1952)
60. Did Anyone Call? (ca. August 21, 1952)
61. Domino (January 17, 1952)
62. Everything Happens To Me (ca. August 12, 1952)
63. Everything Happens To Me (September 16, 1952)
64. Ev'ry Time (April 10, 1952)
65. Ev'ry Time (ca. June 12, 1952)
66. Fine And Dandy (January 3, 1952)
67. For Me And My Gal (ca. August 26, 1952)
68. For You (ca. June 17, 1952)
69. Forgive Me (April 17, 1952)
70. Forgive Me (May 8, 1952)
71. Forgive Me (ca. May 20, 1952)
72. Forgive Me (October 30, 1952)
73. Frenesí (ca. June 24, 1952)
74. From This Moment On (March 4, 1952)
75. From This Moment On (March 20, 1952)
76. From This Moment On (April 17, 1952)
77. From This Moment On (ca. June 19, 1952)
78. From This Moment On (October 14, 1952)
79. Georgia On My Mind: Hoagy Carmichael Medley (ca. May 15, 1952)
80. Getting To Know You (September 11, 1952)
81. Go, Go, Go ("ca. September 2, 1952")
82. Goin' On A Hayride (April 22, 1952)
83. Goin' On A Hayride (April 29, 1952)
84. Goody Goody (May 13, 1952)
85. Goody Goody (ca. June 17, 1952)
86. Goody Goody (October 21, 1952)
87. Guy Is A Guy, A (April 1, 1952)
88. Guy Is A Guy, A (April 22, 1952)
89. Guy Is A Guy, A (May 6, 1952)
90. Guy Is A Guy, A (ca. May 20, 1952)
91. Guy Is A Guy, A (June 5, 1952)
92. Guy Is A Guy, A (July 3, 1952)
93. Guy Is A Guy, A (ca. August 7, 1952)
94. Guy Is A Guy, A (October 9, 1952)
95. Half As Much (ca. August 26, 1952)
96. Half As Much (September 18, 1952)
97. Half As Much (ca. September 25, 1952)
98. Heigh-Ho (March 18, 1952)
99. Here In My Heart (ca. June 19, 1952)
100. Here In My Heart (July 3, 1952)
101. Here In My Heart (August 5, 1952)
102. Here In My Heart (ca. August 19, 1952)
103. Here In My Heart (October 7, 1952)
104. Hoop Dee Hoo (ca. August 21, 1952)
105. I Could Write A Book (February 5, 1952)
106. I Could Write A Book (March 13, 1952)
107. I Could Write A Book (ca. June 10, 1952)
108. I Don't Know Enough About You (January 29, 1952)
109. I Don't Know Enough About You (September 4, 1952)
110. I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard (ca. June 26, 1952)
111. I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard (ca. August 12, 1952)
112. I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard (September 18, 1952)
113. I Get Along Without You Very Well: Hoagy Carmichael Medley (ca. May 15, 1952)
114. I Got Rhythm (February 14, 1952)
115. I Got Rhythm (April 17, 1952)
116. I Got Rhythm (ca. May 29, 1952)
117. I'll Never Smile Again: Sinatra-Dorsey Medley (June 5, 1952)
118. I'll See You In My Dreams (January 24, 1952)
119. I'll See You In My Dreams (September 11, 1952)
120. I'm Confessin' (July 3, 1952)
121. I'm Gonna Live Till I Die (January 15, 1952)
122. I'm Gonna Live Till I Die (February 12, 1952)
123. I'm Gonna Live Till I Die (March 11, 1952)
124. I'm Gonna Live Till I Die (May 1, 1952)
125. I'm Gonna Live Till I Die (May 13, 1952)
126. I'm Gonna Live Till I Die (ca. August 28, 1952)
127. I've Got My Love To Keep Me Warm (January 3, 1952)
128. I've Got You Under My Skin (July 1, 1952)
129. I've Got You Under My Skin (September 9, 1952)
130. If I Could Be With You One Hour Tonight (July 15, 1951)
131. If I Were A Bell: Frank Loesser Medley (ca. August 21, 1952)
132. In The Good Old Summertime (August 5, 1952)
133. Insomnia (Is A Lack Of Attitude) (January 3, 1952)
134. It Never Happen' To Me (June 17, 1951)
135. It Never Happen' To Me (July 15, 1951)
136. It Never Happen' To Me (ca. August 26, 1952)
137. It Never Happen' To Me (October 7, 1952)
138. It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World (February 5, 1952)
139. It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World (March 13, 1952)
140. It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World (April 1, 1952)
141. It's A Big, Wide, Wonderful World (September 11, 1952)
142. It's A Good Day (February 19, 1952)
143. It's A Good Day (ca. May 20, 1952)
144. It's A Good Day (unknown; listed under session dated ca. June 24, 1952)
145. It's A Good Day (ca. August 14, 1952)
146. It's A Good Day (September 23, 1952)
147. It's A Good Day (October 23, 1952)
148. It's A Good Day (October 30, 1952)
149. It's A Most Unusual Day (January 24, 1952)
150. It's A Most Unusual Day (March 27, 1952)
151. It's A Most Unusual Day ("ca. September 4, 1952")
152. Jeepers Creepers: Johnny Mercer Medley (ca. May 22, 1952)
153. Jeepers Creepers: Johnny Mercer Medley (September 16, 1952)
154. Johnny One Note (March 11, 1952)
155. Johnny One Note (ca. May 29, 1952)
156. Johnny One Note (ca. July 10, 1952 )
157. Johnny One Note (ca. August 14, 1952)
158. Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho (February 19, 1952)
159. Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho (ca. June 10, 1952)
160. Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho (September 2, 1952)
161. Joshua Fit The Battle Of Jericho (October 21, 1952)
162. Jump Through The Ring (April 15, 1952)
163. Jump Through The Ring (May 1, 1952)
164. Jump Through The Ring (ca. May 15, 1952)
165. Jump Through The Ring (ca. June 3, 1952)
166. Just One More Chance (January 3, 1952)
167. Just One More Chance (January 15, 1952)
168. Just One More Chance (February 5, 1952)
169. Just One More Chance (June 5, 1952)
170. Just One Of Those Things (January 31, 1952)
171. Just One Of Those Things (March 25, 1952)
172. Just One Of Those Things (March 27, 1952)
173. Just One Of Those Things (April 15, 1952)
174. Just One Of Those Things (ca. June 3, 1952)
175. Just One Of Those Things (ca. July 10, 1952 )
176. Just One Of Those Things (ca. August 14, 1952)
177. Just One Of Those Things (September 23, 1952)
178. Kiss To Build A Dream On, A (January 8, 1952)
179. Kiss To Build A Dream On, A (January 24, 1952)
180. Kiss To Build A Dream On, A (February 21, 1952)
181. Lady Is A Tramp, The (February 7, 1952)
182. Lady Is A Tramp, The (March 4, 1952)
183. Lady Is A Tramp, The (April 8, 1952)
184. Lady Is A Tramp, The (May 8, 1952)
185. Lady Is A Tramp, The (June 5, 1952)
186. Lady Is A Tramp, The (ca. September 25, 1952)
187. Lady Is A Tramp, The (October 9, 1952)
188. Let's Call The Whole Thing Off (March 18, 1952)
189. Let's Call The Whole Thing Off (April 29, 1952)
190. Let's Call The Whole Thing Off (October 9, 1952)
191. Let's Get Away From It All (January 31, 1952)
192. Let's Get Away From It All (May 1, 1952)
193. Let's Get Away From It All (August 5, 1952)
194. Let's Get Away From It All: Matt Dennis Medley (ca. August 12, 1952)
195. Life Is A Beautiful Thing (February 7, 1952)
196. Life Is A Beautiful Thing (February 28, 1952)
197. Life Is A Beautiful Thing (April 3, 1952)
198. Life Is A Beautiful Thing (April 8, 1952)
199. Little David, Play On Your Harp (January 15, 1952)
200. Little David, Play On Your Harp (February 21, 1952)
201. Little David, Play On Your Harp (ca. May 20, 1952)
202. Little David, Play On Your Harp (ca. August 7, 1952)
203. Little David, Play On Your Harp (October 16, 1952)
204. Little David, Play On Your Harp (October 23, 1952)
205. Little David, Play On Your Harp (October 30, 1952)
206. Little Old Lady: Hoagy Carmichael Medley (ca. May 15, 1952)
207. Little White Cloud That Cried, The (February 19, 1952)
208. Louisville Lou (May 1, 1952)
209. Louisville Lou (July 1, 1952)
210. Love Me Or Leave Me (February 28, 1952)
211. Lover (March 27, 1952)
212. Lover (April 24, 1952)
213. Lover (ca. June 10, 1952)
214. Lover (ca. August 7, 1952)
215. Lover (October 23, 1952)
216. Lullaby Of Broadway (February 26, 1952)
217. Make The Man Love Me (July 15, 1951)
218. Mañana (June 17, 1951)
219. Mañana (January 22, 1952)
220. Mañana (March 25, 1952)
221. Mañana (ca. June 3, 1952)
222. Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night, The (ca. June 17, 1952)
223. Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night, The (ca. August 14, 1952)
224. Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night, The (ca. September 30, 1952)
225. Mountain Greenery (March 4, 1952)
226. Mountain Greenery (August 5, 1952)
227. My Baby Just Cares For Me (April 10, 1952)
228. My Darling, My Darling (ca. August 21, 1952)
229. My Funny Valentine (February 14, 1952)
230. My Small Señor (September 18, 1952)
231. My Small Señor (October 28, 1952)
232. Night And Day (February 26, 1952)
233. Night And Day (April 1, 1952)
234. Night And Day (April 10, 1952)
235. O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? (January 31, 1952)
236. O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? (May 8, 1952)
237. O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? (ca. August 7, 1952)
238. O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? (September 18, 1952)
239. O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? (October 16, 1952)
240. O Dear, What Can The Matter Be? (October 30, 1952)
241. Oh! Look At Me Now (April 1, 1952)
242. Oh! Look At Me Now (April 22, 1952)
243. Oh! Look At Me Now (ca. June 12, 1952)
244. Oh! Look At Me Now (ca. August 12, 1952)
245. Oh! Look At Me Now (September 23, 1952)
246. Oh! Look At Me Now (October 14, 1952)
247. [Commercial] Behind The Wheel Of The Newest Oldsmobile (September 2, 1952)
248. Ole Buttermilk Sky (ca. May 15, 1952)
249. Ole Buttermilk Sky (July 3, 1952)
250. On A Slow Boat To China: Frank Loesser Medley (ca. August 21, 1952)
251. Once In A While (ca. August 7, 1952)
252. Once In A While (October 16, 1952)
253. Perfidia (ca. June 3, 1952)
254. Please, Mr. Sun (January 31, 1952)
255. Please, Mr. Sun (February 12, 1952)
256. Please, Mr. Sun (March 6, 1952)
257. Please, Mr. Sun (April 10, 1952)
258. Please, Mr. Sun (May 13, 1952)
259. Please, Mr. Sun (ca. May 27, 1952)
260. Please, Mr. Sun (ca. June 17, 1952)
261. Please, Mr. Sun (ca. August 28, 1952)
262. Pretty-Eyed Baby (March 13, 1952)
263. River, River (October 23, 1952)
264. Rockin' Chair: Hoagy Carmichael Medley (ca. May 15, 1952)
265. Sans Souci (ca. June 17, 1952)
266. Sans Souci (October 2, 1952 )
267. Sans Souci (October 28, 1952)
268. Shadrack (February 5, 1952)
269. Shanghai (July 1, 1951)
270. Shanghai (July 15, 1951)
271. Show Me The Way Out Of This World (ca. August 12, 1952)
272. Since My Love Has Gone (January 29, 1952)
273. Since My Love Has Gone (February 26, 1952)
274. Since My Love Has Gone (ca. May 22, 1952)
275. Since My Love Has Gone (ca. June 19, 1952)
276. Singing In The Rain (January 29, 1952)
277. Singing In The Rain (July 3, 1952)
278. Skylark (ca. May 15, 1952)
279. Skylark (ca. July 10, 1952 )
280. Slumming On Park Avenue (January 8, 1952)
281. Slumming On Park Avenue (February 12, 1952)
282. Slumming On Park Avenue (ca. June 24, 1952)
283. Slumming On Park Avenue (September 2, 1952)
284. Slumming On Park Avenue (ca. September 25, 1952)
285. Slumming On Park Avenue (October 21, 1952)
286. Small Fry: Hoagy Carmichael Medley (ca. May 15, 1952)
287. Solitaire (January 15, 1952)
288. Solitaire (ca. May 29, 1952)
289. Somebody Loves Me (October 9, 1952)
290. Something Sort Of Grandish (February 7, 1952)
291. Something Sort Of Grandish (April 3, 1952)
292. Something Sort Of Grandish (July 1, 1952)
293. Something Sort Of Grandish (ca. August 19, 1952)
294. Something Wonderful (July 1, 1951)
295. Something Wonderful ("ca. September 4, 1952")
296. Somewhere Along The Way (ca. June 26, 1952)
297. Somewhere Along The Way (ca. July 10, 1952 )
298. Somewhere Along The Way (October 14, 1952)
298. Somewhere Along The Way (October 23, 1952)
300. Summertime (ca. June 12, 1952)
301. Summertime (July 1, 1952)
302. Summertime (ca. July 8, 1952)
303. Summertime (October 2, 1952 )
304. Sweet Leilani (September 9, 1952)
305. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot (March 20, 1952)
306. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot (October 2, 1952 )
307. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot (October 30, 1952)
308. Takes Two To Tango (ca. September 25, 1952)
309. Takes Two To Tango (ca. September 30, 1952)
310. Takes Two To Tango (October 21, 1952)
311. Tea For Two (ca. June 19, 1952)
312. Tea For Two (ca. June 26, 1952)
313. Tea For Two (October 7, 1952)
314. That Great Come-And-Get-It Day (March 6, 1952)
315. That Great Come-And-Get-It Day (ca. June 10, 1952)
316. That Great Come-And-Get-It Day (ca. August 19, 1952)
317. That Great Come-And-Get-It Day (October 16, 1952)
318. That Old Black Magic (July 1, 1951)
319. That Old Black Magic (January 17, 1952)
320. That Old Black Magic (April 8, 1952)
321. That Old Black Magic (May 6, 1952)
322. That Old Black Magic (ca. May 22, 1952)
323. That Old Black Magic (September 9, 1952)
324. That's What The Man Said (ca. September 30, 1952)
325. These Foolish Things (June 5, 1952)
326. These Foolish Things (August 5, 1952)
327. These Foolish Things ("ca. September 2, 1952")
328. These Foolish Things (September 23, 1952)
329. This Can't Be Love (February 21, 1952)
330. This Can't Be Love (April 3, 1952)
331. This Can't Be Love (April 29, 1952)
332. This Love Of Mine: Sinatra-Dorsey Medley (June 5, 1952)
333. To Be Loved By You (May 8, 1952)
334. To Be Loved By You (ca. May 27, 1952)
335. Too Marvelous For Words: Johnny Mercer Medley (ca. May 22, 1952)
336. Too Marvelous For Words: Johnny Mercer Medley (September 16, 1952)
337. Too Young (July 15, 1951)
338. Toodle-Ee-Yoo-Doo (July 15, 1951)
339. Trust In Me (February 7, 1952)
340. Trust In Me (March 25, 1952)
341. Trust In Me (ca. June 12, 1952)
342. Try A Little Tenderness (July 1, 1951)
343. Two Sleepy People: Hoagy Carmichael Medley (ca. May 15, 1952)
344. Two Sleepy People (September 18, 1952)
345. Undecided (January 8, 1952)
346. Undecided (ca. May 20, 1952)
347. Unforgettable (January 22, 1952)
348. Unforgettable (March 13, 1952)
349. Unforgettable (March 18, 1952)
350. Unforgettable (May 6, 1952)
351. Wait Till The Sun Shines, Nellie (ca. June 17, 1952)
352. Walkin' My Baby Back Home (April 8, 1952)
353. Walkin' My Baby Back Home (May 6, 1952)
354. Walkin' My Baby Back Home (ca. May 27, 1952)
355. Walkin' My Baby Back Home (ca. July 8, 1952)
356. Walkin' My Baby Back Home (ca. August 28, 1952)
357. Watermelon Weather (ca. May 29, 1952)
358. Watermelon Weather (ca. July 8, 1952)
359. Watermelon Weather (October 14, 1952)
360. We Belong Together: Matt Dennis Medley (ca. August 12, 1952)
361. We're One (ca. June 24, 1952)
362. We're One (ca. August 28, 1952)
363. What Does It Take To Make You Take To Me (ca. May 27, 1952)
364. What Does It Take To Make You Take To Me? (ca. June 12, 1952)
365. What Does It Take To Make You Take To Me? (ca. June 26, 1952)
366. What Does It Take To Make You Take To Me? (October 7, 1952)
367. What Is This Thing Called Love? (January 17, 1952)
368. What Is This Thing Called Love? (January 29, 1952)
369. What Is This Thing Called Love? (April 24, 1952)
370. Whee, Baby (February 26, 1952)
371. Wheel Of Fortune, The (February 19, 1952)
372. Wheel Of Fortune, The (March 18, 1952)
373. Wheel Of Fortune, The (April 1, 1952)
374. Wheel Of Fortune, The (April 22, 1952)
375. When I Fall In Love (September 23, 1952)
376. When I Fall In Love (October 7, 1952)
377. When The World Was Young (February 21, 1952)
378. When The World Was Young (May 13, 1952)
379. When You're Smiling (January 8, 1952)
380. When You're Smiling (March 6, 1952)
381. When You're Smiling (ca. September 30, 1952)
382. Why Don't You Do Right? (March 20, 1952)
383. Wish You Were Here (ca. September 30, 1952)
384. Wish You Were Here (October 14, 1952)
385. Wish You Were Here (October 28, 1952)
386. Yes, Lord (February 28, 1952)
387. You (January 29, 1952)
388. You (October 2, 1952)
389. You (October 28, 1952)
390. You Belong To Me (September 2, 1952)
391. You Belong To Me (September 11, 1952)
392. You Belong To Me (September 16, 1952)
393. You Belong To Me (October 21, 1952)
394. You Go To My Head (ca. July 8, 1952)
395. You Will Never Grow Old (April 10, 1952)
396. You're Mine, You (September 4, 1952)
397. Zing A Little Zong (ca. August 26, 1952)
398. Zing A Little Zong (September 4, 1952)
399. Zing A Little Zong (September 16, 1952)
400. Zing A Little Zong (October 9, 1952)






II. Guests

1. Apaka, Alfred (September 9, 1952)
2. Arnaz, Desi (ca. June 3, 1952)
3. Belafonte, Harry (January 24, 1952 / March 11, 1952)
4. Butler, Champ (September 16, 1952)
5. Bygraves, Max (May 13, 1952)
6. Carey, MacDonald (August 5, 1952)
7. Carmichael, Hoagy (ca. May 15, 1952)
8. Carroll, Barbara (February 26, 1952)
9. Carroll, Bob (February 7, 1952 / April 3, 1952)
10. Chandler, Jeff (ca. May 27, 1952 / ca. June 24, 1952 / ca. September 25, 1952)
11. Cole, Nat King (ca. August 14, 1952)
12. Cornell, Don (July 1, 1951)
13. Crosby, Bob (September 4, 1952)
14. Dailey, Dan (ca. June 12, 1952 / ca. July 8, 1952 / October 14, 1952)
15. Dale, Alan (April 29, 1952)
16. Dennis, Matt (ca. August 12, 1952)
17. Desmond, Johnny (May 1, 1952 / ca. August 26, 1952)
18. Dorsey, Tommy (June 5, 1952)
19. Douglas, Larry (July 29, 1951 / March 18, 1952 / "ca. September 4, 1952")
20. Dugan, Johnny (September 23, 1952)
21. Edwards, Tommy (January 22, 1952)
22. Golden Gate Quartet, The (January 15, 1952 / February 5, 1952 / February 19, 1952 / February 21, 1952 / February 28, 1952 / March 20, 1952)
23. Goodman, Benny (July 15, 1951)
24. Griffin, Merv (February 12, 1952)
25. Haskell, Jack (January 31, 1952 / March 4, 1952)
26. Hayes, Richard (January 3, 1952)
27. Haymes, Dick (May 6, 1952)
28. Herman, Woody (ca. September 30, 1952)
29. Jessel, George (ca. June 17, 1952)
30. Kent, Walter (June 17, 1951)
31. Laine, Frankie (ca. June 26, 1952)
32. Lechner, Bill (July 1, 1952)
33. Lewis, Robert Q. (January 17, 1952)
34. Liberace (May 8, 1952)
35. Loesser, Frank (ca. August 21, 1952)
36. Lund, Art (June 24, 1951)
37. MacRae, Gordon (ca. June 19, 1952 / October 7, 1952)
38. Mariners, The (March 6, 1952 / April 15, 1952)
39. Mercer, Johnny (July 22, 1951 / ca. May 22, 1952 / "ca. September 2, 1952")
40. Merry Macs, The (July 3, 1952)
41. Nelson, Charles (ca. August 28, 1952)
42. Nelson, Gene (October 9, 1952)
43. Norvo, Red (February 14, 1952 / ca. May 29, 1952)
44. Paris, Jackie (April 1, 1952)
45. Powell, Mel (July 29, 1951)
46. Prima, Louis (July 8, 1951 / March 25, 1952 / March 27, 1952 / April 10, 1952 / April 24, 1952)
47. Ray, Johnnie (January 8, 1952 / April 8, 1952 / April 22, 1952)
48. Rhythmaires, The (ca. May 20, 1952 / ca. June 10, 1952 / ca. August 7, 1952 / ca. August 19, 1952 / September 2, 1952 / October 2, 1952 / October 16, 1952 / October 21, 1952 / October 23, 1952 / October 28, 1952 / October 30, 1952)
49. Russell, Andy & Della (ca. July 10, 1952 )
49a. Russell, Andy (ca. July 10, 1952 / September 11, 1952)
50. Scholl, Danny (January 29, 1952)
51. Thomas, Danny (September 18, 1952)
52. Tormé, Mel (June 17, 1951)
53. Wayne, David (ca. August 19, 1952)
54. Williams, Mary Lou (March 13, 1952 / April 17, 1952)

To find out which tunes were sung by the above-listed guests, consult the notes under the program in which each guest appeared. Take, for instance, guest Alfred Apaka, who made his guest appearance in a program dated September 9, 1952. If you read the notes under that program, you will learn that he sang "The Moon of Manakoora" as a solo and "Sweet Leilani" as a duet with Lee. 





III. Inventory

1. Most Reprised Songs
As the song index above should make amply clear, many of the numbers featured in Club 88 were heard over multiple episodes. Being one of the show's vocal themes, "It's A Good Day" was probably repeated far more than any other number. Nevertheless, only a few times was it played in its entirety; we were generally exposed to just a few bars at the opening and/or closing of the episodes. Leaving "It's A Good Day" aside, then, the most reprised titles were "Just One Of Those Things," "A Guy Is A Guy," and "Please, Mr. Sun." Each was heard a total of 8 times. Holding second place: "Little David, Play On Your Harp" and "The Lady Is A Tramp," each with 7 entries. Tied for third place, with 6 showings, are the following titles: "Oh! Look At Me Now," "Oh Dear, What Can The Matter Be?," "Be Anything (But Be Mine)," "I'm Gonna Live Till I Die," "That Old Black Magic," and "Slumming On Park Avenue." (At the present time, I do not know if each reprise was a brand new performance, or if the reprises were instead re-broadcastings of the earliest version performed.)

2. Most Frequent Guests
The Rhythmaires, a LA-based quintet, was the show's most frequent guest act, accompanying Peggy Lee for a total of 11 appearances. Second place belongs to The Golden Gate Quartet, a group which had served a similar function when the show was broadcast from NY. The quartet appeared in six episodes. Among solo acts, Louis Prima's five appearances easily earns him the title of The Peggy Lee Show's most frequent guest.


Gallery Of Photos

The present Index has been decorated with selected images of acts who guested in The Peggy Lee Show. The first row of images show Desi Arnaz (twice), Jackie Paris, and Frankie Laine (also twice; with pianist Carl Fischer in the last photo). The second row starts off with a head shot of Andy Russell in his later years and continues with images of Johnny Desmond, Gene Nelson, Liberace (piano and candelabra in sight), and George Jessel. Bob Carroll and Jeff Chandler are among those who share the spotlight in the third row, the former dressed for his Fiorello! role as Mayor La Guardia, the latter showing up in his capacity as a singer under contract with Decca Records. The third row also includes a publicity shot of married couple Andy and Della Russell. Moreover, there is a photo of a nightclub setting in which Jackie Paris can be only partially seen (half-hidden by Charles Mingus and his voluminous bass). Still further, three singers who separately guested in Lee's program are caught in the act of recording a single together: Alan Dale, Don Cornell, and Johnny Desmond. Finally, the row of photos directly below this paragraph makes room for Harry Belafonte (twice), Max Bygraves, Dick Haymes, and two of this gallery's 'repeat offenders,' Jeff Chandler and Johnny Desmond.






Sessions Reported: 82

Performances Reported: 386

Unique Songs Reported: 155

Unique Issues Reported: 170