Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
Appearances With Jimmy Durante
(On The Radio, Part IX)

by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Jun 28, 2017





Scope And Contents

This page is dedicated to Peggy Lee's work on The Jimmy Durante Show. She was the NBC program's featured vocalist for the duration of the entire 1947-1948 season. A brief note in the August 27, 1947 issue of the entertainment business magazine Variety reveals that, when the show was being cast, producer Phil Cohan and star Jimmy Durante were weighing between choosing a choral group or a female vocalist, ultimately picking Peggy Lee as the better option. At the start of the season, Lee had third billing in the show's cast listing. A couple of months later, she began to be billed second out of the entire cast, with only Durante himself above her. As the season progressed, she served a dual role, functioning not only as the so-called girl singer but also becoming a steady member of the comedy roster.

Below, I have provided information about Lee's musical contributions to the show, and about her involvement in the comedy routines. Due to the artist's frequent participation in such routines, I have also seen fit to transcribe sample lines from many of the episodes' scripts. (Bear in mind, however, that all the transcriptions are based not on access to the actual scripts but rather on my listening of the radio shows, as preserved on audio sources. Hence every transcription should be deemed approximate rather than exact.)

Further details about the show and about Lee's contributions can be found not only in the notes immediately below but also in the general note at the end of this page. A list of the 50 numbers that Peggy Lee performed during the 1947-1948 season of The Jimmy Durante Show can also be found in that final note. Finally, on the matter of issues, I should add that many if not all of the episodes of Durante's show were eventually edited and re-recorded on transcription discs sent out to Armed Forces Radio stations. Due to my lack of individual data for such discs, few if any of them will be listed herein. (Photos above: A close-up of Jimmy Durante's greatest physical asset, and a shot of Peggy Lee. The latter was one of various photos used to promote her appearances in The Jimmy Durante Show.)


The Show's Basic Format

Most of the season's episodes followed the same format, which consisted of four segments. Two of the segments were dedicated to Jimmy Durante's comic banter. For the first segment, announcer Howard Petrie good-naturedly exchanged barbs with him. Following a commercial promoting the show's sponsor (Rexall), the second segment co-featured Jimmy's sidekick du jour -- be it Victor Moore, Arthur Treacher or, otherwise, a special guest. Peggy Lee would generally make her official entrance as the second segment was winding down, and would participate in the banter. The third segment was reserved to a number sung by Lee. Another commercial would ensue. The final segment was a comic sketch featuring Durante with his sidekick and/or guest star. From February 1948 until the end of the season, Peggy Lee regularly participated in that final segment, too.

The 1947-1948 season of The Jimmy Durante Show firmly adhered to the above-described format, the exceptions being the first few episodes (which experienced the minor fluctuations that are the norm for starting programs) and Durante's month-long absence in January 1948 (due to surgery and its subsequent recuperation period). (Photo below: Peggy Lee and Jimmy Durante at one of LA's Brown Derby restaurants -- most likely the one on North Vine Street; otherwise the one on Wilshire Boulevard. The date attached to this photo is February 12, 1946. The year might or might not be correct; it is likelier to be 1948, instead of 1946.)







The Season's Opening Episode

The opening episode of the 1947-1948 season aired on October 1, 1947. The program kicked off with a few bars from the specialty number "We Gotta Start Off Each Day With A Song," as sung by the show's star, Jimmy Durante. Immediately after those bars, Jimmy proceeded to introduce himself, in the third person: "Yes, folks. He's back. He's here. He's on the air again. And who is it? Is it a man? Is it a bird? Is it Superman? No, it's, uh ... How do you like that?! I lost my place in the script already!" While the audience's appreciative applause was still heard, announcer Howard Petrie then took over: "Yes, from Hollywood, it's the new Jimmy Durante show, with Arthur Treacher, Peggy Lee, Candy Candido, Roy Bargy And His Orchestra, our Rexall sportscast of Tommy Harmon, yours truly Howard Petrie, and as our special guest tonight, MGM great star Greer Garson. Brought to you by ten thousand Rexall drugstores who carry the complete line of top quality Rexall drug products. Well, folks, keeping up in the wings right now I see the best-known nose in the world, and attached to the other end, of course, the one and only Jimmy Durante, in person!" The orchestra then received the command to "stop the music! stop the music!" from Durante, as the comedian moved on to cracking jokes in the company of Petrie, who assumed the role of straight sidekick. (For the entire season, the introduction to the show would actually be the same one described above, though not without a few modifications. For instance, "Inka Dinka Doo" would soon alternate with "We Gotta Start Off Each Day With A Song" as Durante's regular specialty number for the season.) (Photo below: Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, and Tommy Harmon enjoy the antics of Candy Candido, who is physically enacting the "mighty low" vocalization for which he became famous.)





The Show's Main Cast

The above-mentioned cast remained the same for the remainder of 1947 (not counting the episode's guest star, of course). There was just one noteworthy re-ordering of the stars' billing. Starting with the first week of December -- which was Peggy Lee's return from a month-and-a-half-long absence -- announcer Howard Petrie's on-the-air listing of the cast would consistently place Lee's name first -- not second, as it had been heard before. Conversely, Arthur Treacher was 'demoted' to third place. He did not stay for much longer. Presumably the holder of a contract that expired at year's end, Treacher's last episode was broadcast on December 24, 1947.

Here's an exact transcription of Petrie's opening announcement at the top of one of the December 1947 episodes: "Yes, ten thousand Rexall drugstores who carry the complete line of top quality Rexall products bring to you The Jimmy Durante Show, with Peggy Lee, Arthur Treacher, Candy Candido, Roy Bargy And his Orchestra, our Rexall sportscast of Tommy Harmon, yours truly Howard Petrie, and our special guest tonight, __. And here it is, ladies and gentleman, the one and only Jimmy Durante. In person!"

In early 1948, Victor Moore would come to the show as a special guest, making his appearance for various consecutive weeks. He would eventually ascend to Treacher's former position of Durante's main sidekick, becoming a permanent member of the cast. For Howard Petrie's aforementioned announcement at the start of the show, Victor Moore would actually be billed last (Lee still first), and a different alliterative epithet would be tagged to his name (e.g., "that bashful little butterball, Victor Moore"; "our cuddlesome casanova, Victor Moore"; "that dashing don juan, Victor Moore"). For the closing credits, on the other hand, Petrie would mention Moore first, and Peggy Lee second ("Well that's all for tonight, from Victor Moore, Peggy Lee," etc.)

The rest of the season's cast remained stable, with various unbilled actors joining comedian Candy Candido to create some of the show's most memorable comic characters, such as Hotbreath Houlihan (voiced by Florence Halop) and Mr. Ripple, U.S. Commissioner of Rivers and Waterways (voiced by Dave Barry). Meanwhile, Lee's participation in the routines (substantial in the opening episode but very limited in subsequent 1947 episodes) heavily increased in 1948. Essentially, she fulfilled duties as both the show's lead vocalist and as Durante's second sidekick -- Victor Moore becoming his first. (Photo below: Peggy Lee and Victor Moore at the piano, in a shot probably taken at the studio from which the radio show was broadcast.)





Date: October 1, 1947
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) It's A Good Day(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
unissued


Numbers Sung By Peggy Lee

1. "It's A Good Day"
For this particular version of her hit record, Peggy Lee sings a special verse: "Good morning, sun / Rise and shine, sun / 'Cause everything you do / Will turn out right / 'Cause it's a good day / From morning till night." (Consult also the notes about patter and routines below, in which there is commentary about this performance's ties to the sketch that preceded it.) Peggy Lee would sing "It's A Good day" once again during the December 31, 1947 episode of The Jimmy Durante Show. On that second performance, the singer-songwriter did not reprise the aforementioned verse.

2. "Something To Remember You By"
As explained in more detail below (under the notes about patter and comedy routines), the very first words that Peggy Lee utters in her debut episode are not spoken but sung. They are a couple of lines from the standard "Something To Remember You By."


Personnel

1. The Episode's Guest And The Show's Singer
This season's debut episode featured Greer Garson as its guest. The episode's script called for the movie star to interact at some length with Peggy Lee; further details below.


Photos

The photos below show Peggy Lee in the company of Jimmy Durante, Greer Garson, and Arthur Treacher -- the latter seen only in the first photo. The exact origin and context of these photos is not known to me, but it stands to reason that the first one would have been taken during the dress rehearsal for the October 1, 1947 episode under discussion, or otherwise at the broadcast itself. Similarly, the second photo could have been taken before or after the actual show took place; alternatively, it could be from an event attended by all three artists.





Peggy Lee's Participation In This Episode's Banter And Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
As previously explained, the first segment of The Jimmy Durante Show typically consisted of comic banter between Durante and Howard Petrie. In most episodes, Peggy Lee does not appear until the final minutes of the second segment. In this season opener, however, Lee makes her earliest appearance during this first segment. (The second episode, detailed in the next session, is another exception, since it features another early Lee entrance.)

The following query, uttered by Howard Petrie, sets up Peggy Lee's entrance: "I understand you have some wonderful people in the cast this season. Peggy Lee, Arthur Treacher ... Tell me, Jim, how did you get them?" In reply, Jimmy proceeds to reminisce about the events that supposedly led to the hiring of both cast members. Jimmy tells Howard and the audience that he was seating at the beach in San Juan Capistrano when he heard someone singing. At that point in the show's script, an unidentified female voice is indeed heard, singing a few bars of the standard Something To Remember You By. The female voice prompts Jimmy to exclaim "what a mellow, soothing voice ..." The voice is Peggy Lee's, of course. One or two jokes further into Jimmy's reminiscence, we hear knocks on a cabaña's door.

Peggy: Come in.
Jimmy: Parmi, but I was ... [uttered with surprise at the sight] Peggy Lee!
[The audience applauds and whistles.]
Peggy: Jimmy Durante, am I glad to see you! Wow, this place is dull. I've spent every night spinning in my room ... and now you are here. Ahh, Jimmy you are the handsomest man I've ever seen!
Jimmy [aside]: This kid's been in a room too long!
Peggy: Gosh. This is boring. This beach grove is so dull that even the tide refuses to come in. I was about to go for a walk.
Jimmy: Forget the walk. I've got an important matter for discussion. Take off your hat, take off your coat, take off your ...
Peggy: Wait a minute! What Lee am I? Peggy or Gypsy Rose?

Jimmy then makes a proposition to Peggy: he asks her if she would be willing to sing in his radio program. After a few more comical lines (one of them delivered by Peggy in an imitation of Jimmy's voice), the singer leaves to discuss the matter with her agent, and promises to meet Jimmy later, right outside her cabaña.

2. Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
Still at the beach, Jimmy Durante meets Arthur Treacher, who inserts himself into Jimmy's everyday life by taking on the self-appointed roles of Jimmy's housemate and instructor (in social graces). Arthur also brings in Candy Candido, to work for them as their valet. Furthermore, he talks movie star Greer Garson into coming to see Jimmy, and then leaves them alone for a while. After Jimmy and Greer exchange a few jokes, Arthur comes back in:

Arthur: Okay, dear boy, here's Peggy Lee.
Jimmy: Glad you dropped in, Peggy. Miss Garson, here is Peggy Lee, she's a vocal star on our show.
Greer: Oh how do you do, Miss Lee. You know, I'm a fan of yours. I made a collection of all your records.
Jimmy: Well, I've made a few records myse ... [Jimmy is abruptly interrupted by Peggy, who addresses Greer.]
Peggy: Oh, that's awfully wonderful. Well, I'm awfully glad. I'm a fan of yours, too, Miss Garson. I've seen all your pictures.
Jimmy: Well, I've made a few pictures too ... [Jimmy is again abruptly interrupted, this time by Greer.]
Greer: My favorite record of yours is "[It's A] Good Day." I sing it every morning in the shower. I understand you wrote it yourself.
Jimmy: I've written a few tunes in my day ... [Jimmy is once more interrupted --and ignored -- by Peggy.]
Peggy; Well, I especially like your last picture, Miss Garson.
Jimmy: Attention, orange growers, put out your smudge pot tonight!
Greer: But Jimmy, what was that for?
Jimmy: I had nothing else to do. So I thought I'd throw in a frost warning!
Audience laughter ensues.
Greer: But Peggy [?dear], you better sing something.
Jimmy: [?]Do, Peggy.

Peggy Lee is next heard singing "It's A Good Day." After the vocal, she does not participate in the show any further. The remainder of the program is dedicated to a comedy skit featuring Jimmy, Greer, and Arthur.


Critical Reception

This opening episode received a mixed review in the trade periodical Variety. Durante was unequivocally praised, Howard Petrie was said to have done his "usually effective job," and no positive or negative remarks were made about Greer Garson's performance. Peggy Lee and Arthur Treacher were not as lucky. The reviewer deemed Lee's rendition of Its A Good Day "a standout" but, as for the distribution of comedy lines, he felt that the show would be better off bypass her. Treacher was unavoidably compared to Durante's former sidekick Garry Moore, whose decision to go on his own had left to a lot of ink from the radio press. "The latter doesn't fill Moore's shoes by a longshot," bemoaned the reviewer, adding that "the limited range of Treacher's contribution ... may permanently handicap him on the show." The most thoroughly negative criticism was directed toward the script, however: it was dismissed as "sorry scripting" and repeatedly pointed as the possible cause of the episode's underpar performance. (In my estimation, the scripts from the first half of the season are, indeed, nothing to write about. However, Durante invariably manages to keep this listener interested and in an amused disposition. Perhaps Treacher's character -- the stereotypically haughty butler -- would have been more acceptable for a guest appearance than as the weekly sidekick, but the actor certainly pulls it off with the greatest expertise. Peggy Lee's feel for the show's brand of comedy does not become manifest until the second half of the season, when the scripts improve considerably.)


Availability

I know of no commercial issues of this episode -- nor do I know, for that matter, of any commercial issues of the above-listed version of "It's A Good Day." Fortunately, the episode is available for listening online, through the courtesy of fans and collectors of old-time radio.


Date: October 8, 1947
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Candy Candido, The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Arthur Treacher (v), Howard Petrie (spk)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) All Of Me - 2:45(Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons)
USA Government's Veterans Administration 16" Transcription DiscProgram No. 84 — Here's To Veterans   (1947)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) [Musical Commercial] Rexall's One-Cent Sale Jingle(possibly Jackie Barnett, possibly Jimmy Durante)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 151 — [Jimmy Durante] Durante, Patron Of The Arts   (1994)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 190 / Ra 690 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 1   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 359 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
Peggy Lee joins Jimmy Durante and Arthur Treacher half way through the opening dialogue. "Hello everybody!," exclaims Peggy, in a cooing voice. "Oh, there you are. I've been looking all over for you, gorgeous, handsome man." Jimmy assumes that the compliments are directed at him, and enthusiastically greets her. "Oh, hello, Jimmy," she responds, "I didn't see you ..." The ensuing patter includes mention of two items: a tweed jacket that Peggy received from Arthur as a present for her brother (and which was actually stolen from Jimmy), and a pair of Peggy slacks that Jimmy is inadvertently wearing.

2. Second Segment
Once again, Peggy Lee joins her fellow cast members (Jimmy, Arthur, and Candy Candido) halfway through the segment, whose script centers on the changes that Arthur has made to Jimmy's household. She gets involved in the banter. At one point, Peggy asks Jimmy for a lock of his hair, which he misinterprets as a touching gesture on her part. It turns out that she intends to place the lock on the back of her brother's motorcycle, as a decorative stand-in for a racoon tail. We further learn that Jimmy has written a song for Peggy, but he can't think of a title for it. He has tried "Peg On My Eye," "Peg Of My Ear," "Peg Of My Neck" ...

3. Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
After listening to Jimmy's comment about the song that he's written for her, Peggy tells him that she has brought the perfect tune for him. "How would you like All of Me?," asks Peggy. Jimmy retorts: "Peggy, a comment that at this point is superfludious [sic]. Sing, Peggy, sing."


Personnel

1. "Rexall Jingle" Members
The show's "Rexall Jingle" is sung by the cast. The Crew Chiefs start and conclude it. The other cast members successively heard are announcer Howard Petrie (singing), Peggy Lee, Candy Candido, Arthur Treacher (the last two not so much singing as speaking in rhythm), Jimmy Durante, and, once again, The Crew Chiefs. Because this particular jingle advertised a temporary sale (Rexall's one-cent sale), it was heard only in a few of this season's episodes. (Please notice that none of these male performers participate in "All Of Me," the other number listed above; that one is a Peggy Lee solo number.)

2. Episode's Guest
After Jimmy has finally gotten rid of Treacher and Candido, thereby having his home all to himself, guest star Eddie Cantor visits Jimmy at home. The visit quickly devolves into a reminiscence and re-enactment of a musical audition by Jimmy and Eddie for impresario Ziegfield, which took place right at the start of Cantor's and Durante's careers. This audition scenario serves as a pretext for the two acts to sing bits of their popular hits, to the audience's appreciative applause. Cantor participates only in this closing comedy skit, and does not interact with Peggy Lee.






The October 15 - November 26, 1947 Broadcasts

(Above: A photo of Jimmy Durante -- with a November 13, 1947 date penciled on its back.)

After her appearance in the initial episodes of the season, Peggy Lee would be absent from The Jimmy Durante Show for about a month and a half. Her first absence happened on either October 15 or October 22, 1947. Because no copy of the October 15 episode is available to me, I cannot pinpoint more precisely the exact week on which Lee took this leave of absence. I am aware that Margaret O'Brien served as guest of the October 15 episode, but I do not know if Lee was present as well.

Mostly from Variety, the data currently available to me points toward October the 22nd as the first week of absence, which would mean that at least one song by Peggy Lee can be found in the yet-to-be-audited October 15 episode. The October 22, 1947 issue of the periodical claimed that she was "spending this week in hospital getting checkup on kidney ailment." The October 29 issue further tells readers that "Peggy Lee, who entered hospital last week for kidney ailment checkup, [was] told by medicos to lay off for a month," and points out that she would indeed be absent from Durante's show for a month.

In the episode broadcast on October 22, Jimmy states that "our regular chanteuse Peggy Lee is in the hospital and who do you think is helping us out?: our good neighbor, the star of the Chesterfield Supper Club, Jo Stafford." Jo then introduces herself as follows: "Hello. Hello and thanks. I'm awfully glad I was able to come over and pitch in for Peggy tonight." Jo was thus presented as a star and, for that one week, as a substitute for the program's girl singer. (Victor Moore was, meanwhile, billed as the episode's guest. He was a recurrent visitor to the show in 1947 and early 1948. Eventually graduating to the position of regular cast member, he would take over the role of Durante's comic foil that Arthur Treacher had previously occupied.)

Jo Stafford's substitute appearance is circumscribed to one song and just a few lines. In addition to the words quoted above, she utters commentary that facilitates a clever Victor Moore joke about her attractiveness. After Victor's joke, we listen to Jo's rendition of "Feudin And Fightin'." (Although not identified as such, this version of "Feudin' And Fightin'" might have been taken from Jo's own show. The fact that The Starlighters accompany her is telling. Durante's Rexall show counted with its own vocal group, The Crew Chiefs; The Starlighters were regulars on Stafford's Chesterfield program. Had this performance of "Feudin And Fightin'" been a fresh one performed expressly for The Jimmy Durante Show, it stands to reason that Stafford would have been accompanied by The Crew Chiefs, not The Starlighters.)

During the ensuing weeks, the guest stars were Lucille Ball (October 29), Bing Crosby (November 5), Dorothy Lamour (November 12), Carmen Miranda (November 19) and Victor Moore (November 26). I have listened to the episodes that feature Ball, Crosby, Lamour, and Moore. Peggy Lee is not present in any of them. At the end of the November 26 episode, we hear Jimmy conclude with these words: "Good night, Peggy Lee. See you next week. And good night, Mrs. Calabash."





(Above: A photo of Jimmy Durante with Carmen Miranda, hand-dated December 1947. As mentioned in the previous paragraph, Carmen was Jimmy's guest star for the November 12, 1947 broadcast of his show. In her autobiography, Peggy Lee remembered Carmen as a "dear lady" who "was often a guest with Durante." Lee adds that she hired Carmen's band of musicians for a recording session because Carmen had called and recommended them. The band had just been hired by Carmen herself, in October 1947, but they might not begun working regularly with Carmen until her 1948 concert season -- or perhaps around Christmas 1947. Peggy hired them for the November 25, 1947 session that produced her hits "Mañana" and "Caramba, It's The Samba." Further details about the musicians can be found in the notes for that session, located in this page.)

Peggy Lee returned to the Durante household on the December 3, 1947 episode. Her re-entrance was preceded by the following words from Jimmy: "Welcome back, Peggy. Believe me, we are happy that you are well again." From then onwards (until the very last episode of the season), Lee is there to stay.

In the December 1947 issue of Capitol News, it was summarily reported that "Peggy Lee [was now] up and at ’em again, after taking four weeks off for a hospital checkup and rest. She’s heard every Wednesday, on NBC, with Schnoz Durante." References to a "recent illness of several weeks" are also made in the next issue of the record company's promotional magazine.

Since Lee did various sessions for Capitol during the month of November, I am not entirely convinced that she was hospitalized for the entire period of her absence, as the comments in print would seem to suggest. Perhaps, in addition to illness and hospitalization, certain demands from her record company factored into the lengthy absence as well. (At that precise time, the label was overworking its roster, in preparation for an upcoming music union strike.) Or perhaps husband Dave Barbour was experiencing health problems. (He is known to have gone through a serious operation some time in the late 1940s.) A hiatus due to contract negotiations is also among the conceivable motivations for the absence. (As previously mentioned, the show originally billed Lee after Treacher, but beginning with her return episode on December 3 she is billed before him.)

Ironically, a full month had not elapsed before Durante was the one to make himself absent for a month, due to surgery and hospitalization as well. His illness led to the cancellation of a tour that he and Lee were planning in January of 1948. Made on behalf of The March Of Dimes, the tour would have taken Durante and Lee (along with his show's cast and her husband, guitarist Dave Barbour) though Chicago, Kansas City, Milwaukee, St. Louis, indianapolis, Louisville, New York, and Atlanta. After this January tour, further plans had been made for a stay in New York in February, for which Durante was already scheduled to perform at the Copacabana and the Barbours intended to book themselves into a nightclub gig. All such plans ended up being postponed. The radio show did go on without interruption, though.





Date: December 3, 1947
Location: , Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v), Jimmy Durante (spk), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) I'll Dance At Your Wedding - 2:29(Herb Magidson, Ben Oakland)
Radiola/Sandy Hook Collectors' Label LPMr 1080 — [Jimmy Durante] The Schnozz ... In Person! (Comedy Series No. 27)   (1977)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)


Personnel And Songs

1. "I'll Dance At Your Wedding"
2. Jimmy Durante
3. Victor Moore?
In this episode's rendition of "I'll Dance At Your Wedding," Peggy Lee receives some vocal assistance from Jimmy Durante and The Roy Bargy Orchestra. Jimmy and the musicians take over one of the choruses, engaging in a back-and-forth, call-and-response routine. To be more specific, the musicians sing the lines "We'll drink to your father / We'll drink to your mother / We will have another / Maybe two, maybe three, maybe four, maybe more." Jimmy responds to the first three lines by echoing them in his high-pitched speaking voice: "Drink to your father / We'll drink to your mother / We'll drink to your brother." There's is also another male who can be faintly heard, rhythmically speaking the words "maybe four, maybe more" in unison with the singing musicians. It sounds like Victor Moore, yet Victor is not listed among the participants of this episode. In a subsequent episode (January 7, 1948), Peggy Lee would sing a second version of "I'll Dance At Your Wedding" all alone -- no male voices in the mix.

Peggy Lee would sing a second version of this hit of hers during an episode broadcast on January 7, 1948.

4. The Episode's Guest And The Show's Singer
The presence of guest star Charles Boyer leads to a couple of theatrical skits, one a theatrical version of Cyrano de Bergerac (with Durante in the title role, of course) and the other an audition for a female role in a movie. Peggy Lee does not participate in those particular skits, but she does interact with Boyer, right before her performance of "I'll Dance At Your Wedding." Further details can be found below.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
Right after Jimmy finishes singing his opening song (and as a preface to the conversation between Jimmy and Howard, which will center on holiday shopping), we are treated to a brief catfight at a clothing store. Peggy is briefly heard as one of two women embroiled in a physical fight for a petticoat.

2. Episode's Second Segment
Peggy Lee joins the conversation between Jimmy Durante and Charles Boyer as it is winding down. The guest, a matinee movie idol, explains that the secret of his success with women is that he ignores them. "Oh, Mr. Boyer," a voice playfully calls. "Yes, Miss Lee?" asks Boyer in his accented husk. Responds Peggy, swooningly, "ignore me!"

"Well, it's Peggy Lee!," clarifies Jimmy as the audience applauds. "Welcome back. Peggy. Believe me, we are happy that you are well again." "Oh, thanks, Jimmy," she replies. Charles and Peggy then exchange lines in French, which prompts Jimmy to ask as follows

Jimmy: "Peggy, why don't you talk like that to me?"
Peggy: "Alright, Jimmy. Parlez moi d'amour. Embrasse moi!"
Jimmy: " Well, it's better than cutting your finger with a knife and bleeding to death!"
The audience laughs.
Charles: "Will you favor us with a song, Miss Lee, while Mister Durante and I rehearse our parts for Cyrano de Bergerac?"
"I'd be happy to," replies an amenable Peggy.


Photo

Shown below are Peggy Lee and Charles Boyer, in a photo probably taken on December 3, 1947, before or after the broadcast under discussion.




Date: December 10, 1947
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) There'll Be Some Changes Made - 2:37(Billy Higgins, William Benton Overstreet)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 190 / Ra 690 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 1   (2011)
RadioSpirits Licensed CD50003 — [Jimmy Durante] Radio Spirits Presents The Jimmy Durante Show   
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 187 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel And Peggy Lee's Participation In The Show's Patter

1. The Episode's Guest And The Show's Singer
The presence of guest Boris Karloff naturally leads to a horror house skit. Framed as a nightmare experienced by a sleeping Jimmy, the skit has the dreamer visiting a guest house in which Boris lords over murderous ghouls. Peggy Lee does not participate in the skit. Boris and Peggy do interact, however, during one of the earlier segments, which consists of a conversation between Jimmy and the episode's guest. Peggy tells Boris that she adored him in various pictures, whose titles she mentions. (Those titles seem to be made up, part of the ongoing comic banter.) The interaction ends up with Peggy uttering some mock-hip patter.


Songs

1. "There'll Be Some Changes Made"
A trumpet solo is heard in the middle of this performance. Also, appreciative whistling for Peggy Lee is heard amidst the applause that follows her interpretation.


Photo

To honor the horror-movie orientation of this episode, I have conjured up so frightening a photo of the lovable Jimmy Durante that he could pass for a sibling of Freddiy Krueger, the scary ghoul of the Nightmare On Elm Street flick series. Date unknown.





Date: December 17, 1947
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Golden Earrings - 3:01(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston, Victor Popular Young)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 190 / Ra 690 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 1   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 188 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guest
Victor Moore served as guest.


Songs

1. "Golden Earrings"
This is the first of the two renditions of Golden Earrings that Peggy Lee performed in Jimmy Durante's show. For the second, see episode broadcast on January 21, 1948.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
In the first skit, Peggy Lee is briefly heard in the role of the elusive Chloe. Jimmy had been hopelessly searching and calling her name aloud for a long while, but this time she shows up at his first call. "Yes, Jimmy honey!," we hear her respond, right away. The reason for her exceptionally ready appearance, according to Jimmy: "You see folks? You can always get a girl to answer around Christmastime!"

2. Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
"And now," says Jimmy, "our charming chanteuse Miss Peggy Lee is going to sing her latest Capitol recording, the very popular Golden Earrings." Peggy replies: "Well, thanks for the kind words, Jimmy. I hope you like this haunting gypsy melody." Retorts Jimmy: "Yes, I do. And while you're singing, I'll go into the tent and have my palm read."

3. Comedy Skit
As in the first segment, in the fourth Peggy plays a character who is heard briefly. In the skit, Jimmy is about to give a speech at Congress, when he notices a young woman nearby.

Jimmy: "Before I start, I see a young lady who seems to have a question. What is it that you'd like to say, miss?"
Miss: "Hmmm, Mr. Durante, I think you are just wonderful. And after the rally, why don't you come up to my apartment and we can sit in front of the fire and hold hands, hmmm?"
Jimmy: "Well, General Marshall may have a plan but I think she's got a better one!"

Playing the miss, Peggy adopts a suggestive intonation and reads the lines in a Mae West style. (Notice that Peggy was essentially playing Hotbreath Houlihan -- one of the show's best-known recurrent characters -- months before Hotbreath would be introduced.)


Jimmy Durante's Vice Presidential Campaign

This episode emphasizes a developing storyline that (to my knowledge) had previously been mentioned only in passing. In the first segment of the episode broadcast on November 26, 1947, we hear Howard Petrie say to Jimmy: "I hope you haven't neglected your work here at home. We all know you are running for vice president next year. But have you decided on a campaign issue?" "Yes, Howard," answers Jimmy. "That's why I'm conducting my nation-wide poll of the new look. I'm going wholeheartedly for the women's vote."

In this December 17 episode, the story is developed a bit further. Once again, Howard Petrie mentions the campaign during the first segment: "In all the hussle and buzzle of the holidays, I hope you haven't neglected your campaign for the vice presidency." "To answer you in the affirmatively, no," remarks Jimmy. He adds that, on the previous week, he had conducted a poll, whose results showed that "the democrats don't like my nose, the republicans don't like my chin, and the socialists don't like my hair, and there's the communists." "What don't the communists like?," asks Howard. Jimmy's answer: "The democrats, the republicans, and thr socialists."

During the second segment, Arthur Treacher drives Jimmy to a park where the town's political mastermind is said to sit regularly in a bench. The mastermind turns out to be Victor Moore, who agrees to be Jimmy's political advisor. For the episode's final skit, Victor and Jimmy take a (fictional) trip to Washington, DC, where they walk on Pennsylvania Avenue and end up at Congress. Therein, Jimmy gives a campaign speech and Victor debuts the slogan-song "Durante Is The Choice Of The People," sung by Victor in the company of The Crew Chiefs.

Jimmy's campaign traveling would be developed a lot further during the episodes airing in 1948 (an elections year), eventually becoming the defining routine of the season.


Photos

Jimmy ran his fictional campaign for the (vice)presidency in 1948 and, again, in 1952. Below is the November 1952 issue of The National Police Gazette tabloid magazine, from which we learn that his campaign promises include hiring beautiful women as letter carries, whose mail service will include kisses. Marilyn Monroe would be his secretary of the interior, a position that Peggy Lee had held in his 1948 campaign.





Date: December 24, 1947
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p, spk), The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee (v), Candy Candido, Tom Harmon, Margaret O'Brien, Howard Petrie, Arthur Treacher (spk)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) The Christmas Song - 2:33(Mel Torme, Robert Wells)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Jimmy Duranta Claus(possibly Jackie Barnett, possibly Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 190 / Ra 690 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 1   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 188 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2504 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show; Christmas Programs   


Personnel

1. The Episode's Guest And The Show's Singer
Film child star Margaret O'Brien guested on this episode. The portions of the show in which she interacts with Peggy Lee are described in some detail below.

2. "Jimmy Duranta Claus" Cast
The show's main cast participates in this episode's number about the titular "partner of Santa Claus." Toward the end of the novelty number, each cast member wishes the audience a merry Christmas. Specifically, and in approximate order of appearance, the voices heard through the song are those of Jimmy, Peggy, guest Margaret O'Brien (not singing but speaking), Howard Petrie (speaking), Roy Bargie, The Crew Chiefs, Arthur Treacher, Candy Candido (speaking), and sports announcer Tony Harmon (speaking, though barely audible). "Jimmy Duranta Claus" was probably a staple of Jimmy's Christmas shows; I know that it was sung in the December 24, 1948 show, and assume that it was also heard in other years.

3. Arthur Treacher
This is Treacher's last episode as a cast member of The Jimmy Durante Show.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
Showing up, as was often the case, toward the end of the segment, Peggy greets everybody with a "merry Christmas and hello everybody." The episode's guest greets her ("Hello, Miss Lee") and then points out to Jimmy that Peggy is standing under the mistletoe. Jimmy proceeds to turn off the light and to try to kiss her ("pucker up, Peggy!"), but ends up kissing male cast member Candy Candido instead.

2. Segueway To Peggy's Solo
Shortly after Jimmy's misdirected kiss, Peggy points out that Margaret has fallen asleep. We then become privy to the child's dream. Margaret dreams of having a conversation with Santa Claus, who gives her a Peggy Lee doll. "A real Peggy Lee doll!," exclaims Margaret, "Isn't she beautiful! I'll wind it up and see if she can really talk." Voiced by Peggy, the doll indeed talks, in a typically robotic, designed-for-children voice: "Thank you, Margaret. This song is for you and Santa."


Photo

Shown below are Peggy Lee, Jimmy Durante, and Arthur Treacher in the 1947 Santa Claus Lane Parade, also known as the Hollywood Christmas Parade. Since the parade is usually held on the first Sunday after Thanksgiving, the photo might have been taken on Sunday, November 30, 1947. This video shows Durante riding on the parade (click around 1:08). Despite the very blurry picture, it seems to me that Lee's silhouette can be seen at 1:09, sitting opposite to Jimmy.





Date: December 31, 1947
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) It's A Good Day(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Mañana(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 190 / Ra 690 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 1   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 189 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Jimmy Durante
This is the first of four consecutive weeks in which Jimmy Durante is absent from the show, due to surgery and hospitalization. The host's absence partially explains the increment of solos performed by Peggy Lee (two instead of the customary one).

2. The Episode's Guests And The Show's Singer
Garry Moore serves as master of ceremonies, Red Skelton as guest. Their interactions with Peggy Lee are described below.


Songs

1. "It's A Good Day"
This is Peggy Lee second performance of her self-penned hit It's A Good Day in Jimmy Durante's show. She had rendered her first version on her very first episode, broadcast on October 1, 1947.

2. "Mañana"
This was the first of three Peggy Lee performances of her self-penned hit Mañana in Jimmy Durante's show. As shown in the patter below, the performance is identified as a preview; Lee's Capitol recording had not yet officially hit record stores. In 1948, after the song had become a hit, Lee would sing it again in the show, during the February 11 and March 31 episodes.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Segueway To "It's A Good Day"
"But now, Howard, what's next on our agenda?," Garry Moore asks Howard Petrie, as their segment together is winding down. "A little melodic relief from all this tomfoolery, Gary. It's time for a song from our Rexall chantoosie, Miss Peggy Lee," Howard responds. Then Garry interacts with Peggy.

Garry: "Oh, this is where I shine. Good evening, Peggy. What did -- what did you cook for us tonight?"
Peggy: "Well, Garry, I'm cooking a little private project. You see, Garry, I am a girl."
Garry: "Yes. Yes! I don't want to be risqué, but I have noticed. So?"
Peggy: "Well, Jimmy kind of likes girls, so I thought I'd sing my first number just for him."

2. Segueway To Mañana
The second segment consists of a dialogue between Garry Moore and Red Skelton. As their topics of conversation seem to be coming to a close, Peggy steps in.

Peggy: "Hey, fellows, you mind if I squeeze in here?"
Garry: "No, just step in. We'll do the squeezing. You know Peggy Lee, don't you?"
Red: "Oh, sure. Hello, Peggy. Are you going to be at Garry's party later?"
Peggy: "Well, I don't know. Whenever I go to Garry's parties all he wants to do is play post office."
Garry: "Heee hee hee."
Peggy: "And when we do play all he does is kiss me in the forehead."
Red: "Why post-office worry, he doesn't even know the right zone."
Garry: "Peg, while I get back in the deadletter office, I understand you are going to give us a preview of your latest recording."
Peggy: "That's right, Garrison. I'd like to sing Mañana."
Garry: "I can't wait for mañana, Norma. Sing it now."

3. Musical Comedy Skit
Peggy Lee is one of the lead participants in the show's main skit, which centers around the rivalry between the wealthy gentleman "John D. Skelton" and the broken-down bum "Sad Sack Moore" for the hand of "Little Peg," who in turns wants one of them to marry her sister, the ugly "Little Candy." For the most part, this skit is delivered in rhythm (i.e., neither spoken nor sung but rapped, as it were) by all four players (Candy Candido, Peggy Lee, Garry Moore, Red Skelton).


Photos

Sheet music for the two self-penned hits that Peggy Lee sings in this episode.




Date: January 7, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) I'll Dance At Your Wedding(Herb Magidson, Ben Oakland)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) The Gentleman Is A Dope(Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 190 / Ra 690 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 1   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 189 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guests And The Shows' Singer
While Jimmy Durante remains unavailable to be on the air, Bob Hope serves as master of ceremonies and Victor Moore returns as guest. Their exchanges with Lee are described below.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Segueway To Peggy Lee's First Solo
Peggy Lee makes her first entrance shortly after Bob Hope makes a comment that alludes to her.

Bob: "Well, Howard, it was nice meeting you and Mr. Ripple, but I've listened to this program many times and the person I'm particularly anxious to meet is Peggy Lee. I understand she's a girl."
Peggy: "Hello, Bob."
Bob: "That proves it. Peggy Lee!"
Applause ensues.
Bob: "Oh, Peggy, you are a vision of feminine pulchritudiness ness ness ness. [Aside, to the audience] The writers forgot Durante wasn't in the program this week!"
Peggy: "Well, thanks for the pretty words, hey. You're looking pretty good yourself. In fact, I don't remember when I've seen you looking so good."
Bob: "Yes, I am looking good; when I've seen enough I'll stop looking!"

Their banter continues. Bob and Peggy go for a variation on a musically oriented joke that various radio shows used during the late 1940s.

Bob: "Peggy, I have a collection of your records at home and I think they're wonderful."
Peggy: "Well, thank you, Bob. But wouldn't it be great if we had a record with you on one side and me on the other?"
Bob: "Yes, then maybe I can crawl through the little hole in the record and get over to your side."
The audience laughs.
Bob: "How about a sample of what I'd find over on your side, Peggy?"
Peggy: "Well, I've got a little arrangement here of I'll Dance At Your Wedding."
Bob: "Sing, Peggy, and sing it pretty. Jimmy is listening."

2. Patter And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Second Solo
Peggy Lee reenters as a conversation about Bob Hope's Road movies is winding down.

Peggy: "Hi, fellows. What's cooking?"
Bob: "Peggy, we were talking about Victor being in the next road picture in place of [Bing] Crosby."
Peggy: "Hmm, sounds exciting. I've got just the lookout for you: The Road to Scotland."

The patter continues; eventually, Bob makes the suggestion that will lead to Peggy's solo.

Bob: "Well, Peggy, while Victor and I figure out the [theme] for our next picture, why don't you sing something?"
Peggy: "Well, as long as you ask, I'll sing that great tune from Allegro, The Gentleman Is A Dope."


Songs

1. "The Gentleman Is A Dope"
Peggy Lee's performance of "The Gentleman Is A Dope" includes a chorus (or so) which I have not heard in any of the other versions with which I am familiar. I do not know if the chorus is part of the original lyric or if it was newly created for this version.

2. "I'll Dance At Your Wedding"
This is Peggy Lee's second performance of her hit I'll Dance At Your Wedding in Jimmy Durante's show. The first performance had been heard during an episode broadcast on December 3, 1947.


Photo

Peggy Lee and Bob Hope graced the cover of the August 12, 1952 issue of Downbeat magazine.




Date: January 14, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee, Victor Moore, Frank Morgan (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart(Fred Patrick, Claude Reese, Jack Val)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee (Yah! Yah! Yah!)(Jimmy Durante, Harry Crane, Harry Harris)
c. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Dance, Ballerina, Dance(Bob Russell, Carl Sigman)
All titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 190 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel And Songs

1. Episode's Guests And The Show's Singer
While Jimmy Durante continues to recuperate from surgery, Frank Morgan takes on duties as master of ceremonies and Victor Moore is back in the guest role for another week. The episode's script calls for both men to interact with Peggy Lee, as detailed below.

2. "Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee (Yah! Yah! Yah!)"
3. Frank Morgan
4. Victor Moore
Victor Moore and Frank Morgan participate on "Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee" only. (The other two numbers listed above are Peggy Lee solos.) Peggy Lee takes the lead in this number, singing the bulk of the solo lines. Morgan & Moore contribute to the chorus, which features Lee, too.




Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Segueway to "All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart"
Frank Morgan: "Well, Howard, it was nice being here with you, but I really must be leaving. I have a very pressing engagement."
At this point, Peggy Lee comes in.
Peggy: "Hi, Howard."
Frank: "I got a ... I had a ... I was going to .... I had a press ... Well, perhaps there's something in here that needs pressing."
Peggy: "Heh heh! So this is Frank Morgan."
Howard Petrie: "Yeah. Mr. Morgan, this is Peggy Lee."
Frank: "Oh, Peggy Lee?! I'm a follower of yours. Heh heh; you were discovered as I walked here tonight."
Peggy: "Heh heh. Mr. Morgan, I knew that you were a ladies' man but I never imagined you were anything like this!"
Frank: "Oh, please, please, I'm being sincere, Miss Lee. I've heard you sing many times. And in my opinion your chromatic arpeggios are deliciously smooth, exquisitely mellow, and finely blended."
Peggy: "Oh, what lovely words. Where did you get them?"
Frank: "Off the label of a bottle."
Peggy: "Heh heh."
Frank: "Seriously, my dear, I do a little [?moitch scorching] and I don't mind going on record and saying that you and I could make beautiful music together."
Unknown voice [reprovingly]: "Uh uh ahh."
Peggy: "Who is that?"
Unknown voice: "Petrillo. I'm afraid you'll have to sing alone for the present, my dear."
Frank: "What shall it be?"
Peggy: "All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart."
Frank: Oh, good. I'll sit right here and wait ... I mean, I'll listen to you."

2. Segueway to "Dance, Ballerina, Dance"
Toward the end of the second segment (a dialogue between Frank Morgan and Victor Moore), Peggy Lee comes back.
Peggy: "Is this a private conversation or can anybody break in?"
Frank: "Peggy, we were just discussing Victor's biceps. Would you care to feel the muscle in his arm?"
Peggy: "Oh, I'd love to. Victor, take your coat off."
Victor; "I can't. That's where I keep my muscle."
The banter continues with commentary about the conversation's main topic -- Victor's fight with Joe Lewis, which has been arranged by Frank.
Eventually Frank asks: "Why don't you sing, Peggy?"
She replies: "Anything for you, Frankie boy."

3. Segueway To "Chidabee, Chidabee"
The following exchange happens well into the final segment of the episode.
Frank: "Well, Victor, I guess you and I have taken care of everything here; let's go home."
Interjects Peggy: "Wait a minute, not so fast, you two lotharios. You are not getting out until you join me in singing Jimmy's own song Chidabee."
Frank: "Well, now, it's only fair to tell you, Peggy, I'm not vey good at handling vocals; my specialty is vocalists. Well, let's try it. How about it, Victor?"
Victor: "I can't sing; I haven't got my bathtub with me."
Peggy: "Ha, ha. Let's give it a rough treatment anyway, boys. Here's the way it goes."


Photos

Displayed below are singer Peggy Lee and actor Frank Morgan (of The Wizard Of Oz fame), in photos probably taken at the dress rehearsal for the January 14, 1948 broadcast under discussion, or during the broadcast itself. Victor Moore is in the second photo, too. As for the picture found a few paragraphs above, it shows sheet music for "Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee," with Peggy Lee on its front cover. The sheet incorrectly states that she recorded this Jimmy Durante specialty. Perhaps Peggy's performance of the song in this episode explains how her name became attached to the catchy novelty ("yah, yah, yah").





Date: January 21, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Golden Earrings(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston, Victor Popular Young)
Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 190 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guests And The Show's Singer
During the last week of Jimmy Durante's recuperation from surgery, Al Jolson serves as master of ceremonies, and Victor Moore is billed as the episode's guest. Due to Jolson's presence, and unlike the previous three weeks, this time Peggy Lee sings only one number. Jolson sings two songs and, as the episode's master of ceremonies, is naturally involved in all the scripted segments.


Songs

1. "Golden Earrings"
This is the second of the two renditions of Golden Earrings that Peggy Lee performed in Jimmy Durante's show. For the first, see episode broadcast on December 17, 1947.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment
The second segment is well under way before Peggy Lee is not heard of. One of the topics that Al Jolson and Victor Moore discuss during this segment is the possibility of starring together in a show.

Victor: "I think that's a great idea. I can see us now, waiting for the Robert E. Lee."
Al: "Well, you go on waiting for the Robert E. Lee. The Lee I'm waiting for is coming over here right now. Hi ya, Peggy."
Peggy: "Hi, fellows. You've got room around this mike for another character?"
Al: "Indeed we have, child. Step right in. Well, this here is Peggy Lee. Hmmm ... Hmm Um hmm."
Peggy: "Ha."
Al [making drooling sounds]: "Hmm."
Victor: "Yeah, me too!
The audience erupts in laughter.
Victor: "Al, how come you and Peggy never made a record together?"
Peggy: "Well, it isn't too late. Is it, Al?"
Al: "What, make a record now? A fine record that would be. Peggy on one side, Jolie on the other, and Petrillo crawling back and forth with a little hole picketing."
The patter continues as Al shows Peggy pictures of his recently born son, and Victor makes another joke.

2. Segueway To "Golden Earrings"
Al: "Well, Peggy honey, I'm one of your biggest fans. I really am. And I've heard your recording of Golden Earrings. And I can understand why it's tops in the country today. So if you'll sing it real pretty as only you can, you'll give us all a treat."


Photo

Peggy Lee with Al Jolson, in a photo taken around 1950.




Date: January 28, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) I Can't Give You Anything But Love - 2:19(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 360 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guest
In this episode, the previously convalescing Jimmy Durante returns to the show. From now onwards, the show features no more guests in the role of master of ceremonies.

2. Victor Moore
Victor Moore is again billed as a guest. Incidentally, the episode's patter includes a pointed joke about the fact that Victor has now been a guest for four weeks.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
Peggy Lee is one of various unidentified voices briefly heard near the beginning of the show, while Jimmy is singing "We Gotta Start Off Each Day With A Song." All the voices express how much they have missed Jimmy.

Jimmy [singing]: "You gotta start each day with a song ..."
One voice: "Welcome home, son!"
Jimmy singing a few more lines.
Female voice [Peggy's]: "Boy, are we glad you're back!"
Jimmy sings more lines.
Another voice: "Jimmy, the whole bunch of us is happy that you are back on the radio again. Why, for four weeks we couldn't eat."
Female voice [Peggy's]: "Yeah, we couldn't sleep!"
Yet another voice: "We couldn't think!"
Howard Petrie: "Who are these people, Jimmy? Fans of yours?"
Jimmy: "No, relatives."
The segment then continues with dialogue between Jimmy and Howard, without any further involvement from Peggy.

2. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
Toward the end of the routine, Jimmy utters the words transcribed below.

Jimmy: "But let's forget about boys and come back to girls. Here comes one of my favorites: Peggy Lee!"
Peggy: "Hi ya, fellows! Ah, Jimsy boy, but it's good to see you. Welcome back."
Jimmy: "Ah, you make me feel real good to be back, Peggy. I'll lift up my nose and give you a homecoming kiss."
After a 'mwah' sound is heard and Peggy declares the kiss "wonderful," Jimmy explains that this was his Columbus kiss: it "takes a long time to get around the horn but when you discover it, it's worth it."
Meanwhile, Victor exclaims that Peggy does something to him, too; she makes him feel like giving his "wolf call;" he then proceeds to howl.
Peggy declares Victor "a really gay dog," and the typically meek Victor laments that he used to be half wolf but now is all setter.
Jimmy: "Well, Peggy, have you got a song for us tonight?"
Peggy: "I sure have one especially for you and Victor. It's called I Can't Give You Anything But Love."
Jimmy: "Oh, Victor, we are lucky boys. Henry Wallace should have a third party like Peggy!"

Photo

Advertisement for the previous episode (January 21, 1948), which featured Al Jolson and Victor Moore, but not Durante.




Date: February 4, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Candy Candido, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Lone Star Moon - 2:37(Dave Franklin, Cliff Friend)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
United Audio Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Uae 30712 — Peggy Lee ("Mystic Music" Series)   (1997)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle - 2:09(Charles Newman, Allie Wrubel)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 169 — [Jimmy Durante] I Say It With Music   (1995)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 360 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel And Songs

1. Episode's Guest
Victor Moore is the episode's so-called "special guest." During the episode's patter, it is pointed out that this is his fifth consecutive guest appearance.

2. "I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle"
3. Jimmy Durante
4. Victor Moore
Jimmy Durante and Victor Moore sing along with Peggy Lee in "I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle" only. ("Lone Star Moon" is a Lee solo.) "I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle" is part of this episode's comedy routine. What's more, the song seems to have been the inspiration for the routine. See further details below.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
Following the same pattern as in the previous episode, Peggy Lee is one of various voices briefly heard near the beginning of the show. This time, the voices are all female. Peggy's line is "Mr. Durante, you promised us." The other female voices utter similarly cryptic demands. Jimmy, who had recently undergone surgery, explains : "they can't wait to see my operation since they heard it's handstiched."

2. Episode's Second Segment
Once again, Peggy makes her entrance as the patter between Jimmy and Victor Moore is well on its way. Says Victor: "As long as you are passing out awards, I think you should give one on your own show. Here comes Peggy Lee; she gets my vote for the biggest singer of the year." Responds Peggy: "Why thank you, but you better be careful saying such nice things to me, cuddle. Remember this is leap year." The patter continues for a few more lines, until Jimmy asks the logical, expected question that is transcribed below.

3. Segueway To Peggy Lee's Vocal (And More Patter)
Jimmy: "Why don't you sing something nice for Victor, Peggy?"
Victor: "Yeah, Peggy, go ahead and sing. I'll seee you later."
Peggy then asks Jimmy where is Victor going.
Jimmy: "Oh he'll be back. He likes to go over the YMCA and smile through the window at the girls."
Peggy: "But the YMCA only has men!"
Jimmy': "I know, but he's nearsighted and I haven't got the heart to tell him."
Jimmy continues: "Well, Peg, whats new on the musical agenda for tonight?"
Peggy: "A new tune, Jim, about the lone star state, called Lone Star Moon."
Jimmy: "Good. I'll go to the bunkhouse, lay down on my enchilada and listen."

3. Main Comedy Routine (Otherwise Known As The Show's Fourth Segment)
This episode's sketch is built around the song "I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle." The script leads the audience to understand that "I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle" is an air from days of yore, although in reality the song dated back to just 1926. In the skit, Jimmy and Victor are rivals vying for the affection of Corabelle, played by Peggy. They want to join her in connubial bliss (or in in cannibal bliss, according to malapropric Jimmy), but her father will give her out only to whomever of them wins a fight with the town circus' bear. The episode ends with the full singing of the song by the three protagonists.


Photo

Shown below is the sheet music for "I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle," the song that inspired this episode's skit, with Peggy Lee in the role of Corabelle. The sheet music promotes a 1947 recording by The Korn Kobblers (the group seen in the photo insert).





Date: February 11, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Mañana - 2:27(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 151 — [Jimmy Durante] Durante, Patron Of The Arts   (1994)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)


Personnel

1. Episode's Guest
2. Victor Moore
There are no guests in this episode, nor will there be any guests in the three episodes that follow. Furthermore, Victor Moore is now listed as part of the main cast.


Songs

1. "Mañana"
This is Peggy Lee second performance of her self-penned hit Mañana in Jimmy Durante's show. She had first sung it on an episode that was broadcast on December 31, 1947, and would reprise once more on the March 31, 1948 episode.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
This episode aired on February 11, and Jimmy's birthday was on the 10th. Hence births, storks, childhood and presents are among the words bandied between Jimmy and Victor during their conversation together.
Jimmy: "Well, Victor, here's someone every [young] man should know about. And she wouldn't do their fathers any harm either. I'm talking about that chantoosie of great song, Peggy Lee. Hello, Peggy."
Peggy: "Buenas noches, muchachos. ¿Cómo están ustedes? ¿Están bien?"
A couple of voices (probably the musicians): "Muy bien." "Mucho [sic] bien ."
Victor: "Peggy, where did you learn so much Spanish?"
Peggy: "I go to all of Xavier Cugat's fights!,"
Jimmy [aside, to the audience, probably half-jokingly]: "She didn't want to say that."
Jimmy: "Ever since she wrote the voice of the song Mañana, she speaks Portuguese like a native from Portland."
Jimmy's joke generates minimal laughter. He then throws in another aside.
Jimmy; "If the writer of this joke came in a superchief, what's holding him?"
The audience then laughs heartily.
Jimmy: "But have you ever been to Mexico, Peggy?"
Peggy: "Oh, I lived there for quite a while, Jimmy, and I loved it. Whenever I come back I feel as if I left a part of me there."
Victor: "I don't know what you left there, but I bet they miss what you brought back!"
Laughter erupts, and an elated Victor says, imitating Jimmy's voice (and using one of his catchphrases): "I've got a million of them, a million of them!"
Peggy: "You better keep an eye on this kid, Jimmy," says Peggy.
Then its Peggy's turn to imitate Jimmy's voice (using another of his catchphrases): "Your job is in jeopardy!"
Jimmy: "Everybody wants to get into the act!"
Jimmy adds that he can't take Victor to his birthday party because he is taking Peggy Lee. "Wait a minute," answers Victor, "I'm taking Peggy Lee!" "Sorry, boys, but I already have an escort." "You have? Who is it?," asks Jimmy. It turns out to be Mr. Ripples (one of the show's regular characters).
[n.b; Peggy Lee's assertion that she lived in Mexico "for quite a while" is actually a fictional story, concocted by the show's scriptwriters.]

3. Segueway To Peggy Lee's Vocal
The patter continues. Jimmy is having is birthday party at his home that night. He wants both Victor and Peggy there. There should be "plenty of women, wine and song," declares Jimmy. Victor begins to promise that he will bring the women, but realizing that he has no connection with any, opts to bring wine instead.
Peggy: "Well, Jimmy, I can furnish the song. How about Mañana?"
Jimmy: "Not mañana, Peggy; sing it right now!"


Photo

A ca. 1950 postcard showing Jimmy Durante's long-term house in Hollywood Hills, which he had bought in 1944, and where he lived with his first wife. In this episode's fictional story, Jimmy is having a birthday party at his house, where women, wine, and music are all promised.


Date: February 18, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v), The Crew Chiefs (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) But Beautiful - 2:35(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 169 — [Jimmy Durante] I Say It With Music   (1995)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Long Time, No See - 2:32(possibly Jackie Barnett, possibly Jimmy Durante)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 151 — [Jimmy Durante] Durante, Patron Of The Arts   (1994)
Prism Leisure Platinum Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) 430 — [Jimmy Durante] Jimmy Durante ("The Ultimate Collection" Series)   (1999)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 191 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel And Songs

1. Episode's Guest
This episode featured no guests.

2. The Crew Chiefs
During Peggy Lee's rendition of "But Beautiful," the show's in-house vocal group hums a background harmony. They are not heard in the other performance listed above.

3. Jimmy Durante
4. Victor Moore
Both men are heard in "Long Time, No See" only.

5. "But Beautiful"
This is the first of the two renditions of But Beautiful that Peggy Lee performed in Jimmy Durante's show. For the second, see episode broadcast on April 7, 1948.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment
During the second segment of this episode, Jimmy and Victor have been talking about singing. Victor complains that Jimmy, Peggy, and even Candy Candido often sing each week, yet he hasn't.

Jimmy: "But Victor, I think you better leave the singing of this show to a gal that really knows her business. Here she comes, our own Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "Hi, Victor. Hi, Jimmy."
Jimmy: "Ah, Peggy, it's good to see you. Let me be the first to felicitate you on your opening at Ciro's last night."
Peggy: "Well, thank you, Jameson, but I expected to see you there. And how come you didn't show up, Victor?"
Victor: "I wanted to, but it was the night of my boy scout meeting."
Peggy: "Oh. What's your excuse, Jimmy?"
Jimmy: "Girl scout meeting, too. [Jimmy, in an aside] I love that kind of carrying on."
Peggy: "Well, opening at Ciro's is really a thrill, Jimmy. When I listened to the bandstand I tripped and I fell right in Sydney Greenstreet's lap."
Jimmy: "Oh Peggy, that must have been awful."
Peggy: "I'll say it was: I was aiming for Cary Grant!"
Victor: "Well, Peggy, Jimmy and I are going to do the town tonight. We'll drop in at Ciro's and see you."

2. Segueway To Peggy's Vocal
The patter goes on, leading to other jokes. Finally, Jimmy says: "Now, relax, Victor, while Peggy gives us a sample of what we can expect tonight."

3. Comedy Sketch
Intent on seeing Peggy Lee's act, Jimmy and Victor decide to spend their night to Ciro's. Therein, they meet an assortment of nightlife characters and go through a series of misadventures.

They do talk to Peggy, who has saved a table for them. Their dialogue includes remarks about the nightgown that Peggy is wearing. She calls it a favorite of hers, because it brings out her eyes. "It brings mine too!," says a salacious Victor, as the noise of popping corks is heard. Peggy then bids goodbye, leaving them at the table, while she prepares for her show.

A bit later, fanfare is heard, and the master of ceremonies makes the following announcement: "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. The management of Ciro's is proud to present the star of our show, Miss Peggy Lee!" Peggy thanks the audience and says that, before she starts performing her repertoire, she has a special treat tonight: "Those two sophisticated singers of song, Jimmy Durante and Victor Moore!" Jimmy and Victor join Peggy onstage, and the three of them do a vaudeville-style, revue number entitled "Long Time, No See." Ciro's manager eventually stops the trio, unhappy with the intrusion of the two "lowlives," who are ordered out of the establishment. They end up having to wash dishes -- to their relief, since they are hard on money.


Songs, Issues, And Dating

1. "Long Time, No See"
2. Durante, Patron Of The Arts [CD]
As described above, the song "Long Time, No See" is part of the episode's comedy sketch. This number can be found in the CD Durante, Patron Of The Arts by itself, separated from its original sketch. Actually, the Viper Nest track does not include the full number, either. Viper Nest leaves out a part that is mostly spoken, and that pertains more to the skit than to the song itself. (To wit: the manager stops the performance, Peggy tells Jimmy and Victor she's sorry, Jimmy closes with a joke about the situation, and the three acts sing a few more lines as a reprise. Also missing is a bit of spoken patter from Victor, uttered right before the manager comes in.)

3. "But Beautiful"
4. Why Don't You Do Right? [CD]
Viper's Nest CD Why Don't You Do Right? gives an April 7, 1948 date to Lee's performance of "But Beautiful." All other sources date it February 18, 1948. Confusion stems from the fact that Peggy Lee sang this song twice on the show, once on each of the dates in contention. Fortunately, the CD's track includes part of the patter that preceded Peggy's singing; the references to Peggy's opening at Ciro's make it clear that this is the February 18, 1948 performance. (The aforementioned patter and sketch were, therefore, based on a real fact: Peggy had truly opened at Ciro's in February.)


Photo

In this episode's skit, Jimmy Durante attends a Peggy Lee concert at Ciro's. The photo seen below was taken just after Jimmy actually attended a Peggy Lee concert, in 1961. They were shot backstage at the Basin Street Club in New York, where Peggy Lee was having a highly successful engagement. During this show, Peggy Lee was well aware that Jimmy Durante was in the audience, and she had fun singing a number while staring at him. Since the number of her choice was a standard from the musical Jumbo (in which Durante had starred in 1935, and which would be released as a film in 1962, with Durante again the cast), Lee's intention was both to tease and to honor him. In response, Jimmy finally jumped off from his seat and regaled the audience with a preview of his act at the Copa, while Lee stayed happily in the wings.





Date: February 25, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) You Don't Have To Know The Language - 2:30(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 192 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guest
This episode featured no guests.


Songs

1. "You Don't Have To Know The Language"
This performance includes what I believe to be a coda especially created by Peggy and company, for this particular version. (I have not heard it in any of the other versions of which I am aware.) The coda uses greetings and song titles in other languages: "Don't have to know parlez vous de amour / Don't have to know Bei Mir Bist Du Schon / Don't have to know Ochi Chornia / Don't have to know ¿cómo está, bien?"


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment
During the second segment of the episode, Jimmy and Victor spend some time exchanging jokes about the former's insomnia.

Jimmy: "But Victor, let's ignore me and my dilemmius [sic]. I might not be abe to sleep but if I could, here comes the girl I'd dream about. It's Peggy Lee. Greeting. Peggy, might I say that you are looking tres chic tonight?"
Peggy: "Ha ha. Well, so are you, Jimmy? As a matter of fact, I don't know which one of you is prettier tonight: you or Victor."
Victor: "Well, I got dimples."
Jimmy: "Victor may have dimples but I got ... uh ... well, I got ... I must have something,"
Victor: "He's got insomnia."
Peggy: "Ah, you poor thing. Jimmy, what you need is some fresh air and relaxation. I went to the race tracks yesterday and I feel terrific."
Jimmy: "Say, that sounds like a good idea. Did you win any money?"
Peggy: "Well, I was wearing a dress with a new look. So I only bet to win and play."
Jimmy; "Did you win and play?"
Peggy: "Oh, with a new-look dress nothing ever show." [Peggy, in an aside, imitating Jimmy's voice] Ah, Peggy, you blonde bombshell, you."
Jimmy: "Everybody wants to get into the act."
Victor: "Say, that's funny, that you were at the race track, Peggy. Just this afternoon I found a free pass to the club house. Jimmy, we can go out and spend the whole afternoon ...[...]... without spending a dime."
Jimmy: "A tempting proposition. But won't you sing, Peggy, while Victor and I go into my mauling room and maul it over."
Peggy: "Glad to, Jimmy, glad to."

2. Comedy Routine
As proposed in the episode's second segment, Jimmy and Victor go to the race tracks. Among the characters that they find there is Peggy herself, who is not sure how to make a good bet on one of the horses. Jimmy and Victor help her out. Peggy's participation in this routine is relatively brief.


Photo

The photo below shows Peggy Lee and Jimmy Durante reading from a script. Handwritten on the back of the photo is the date March 1, 1948. (This date might be the one in which the photograph was taken, of course. However, we do not have verification that such is the case, and there are certainly other possibilities. I am more inclined to think that it was taken on February 25. If so, the date on the back of the picture could have been the one in which it was received by a magazine considering to use it.) Life magazine actually published this photo in its March 29, 1948 issue. A caption under it reads as follows: "With Jimmy Durante on his radio show, Peggy Lee sings a torchy ballad. Remarks Jimmy, If I'm going to sleep, here is the girl I'll dream about." In addition to being printed in that publication, Jimmy's words were also heard in the show about a month earlier, in the present episode. See photos under session dated March 31, 1948, too.





Date: March 3, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Peggy Lee (v), The Crew Chiefs (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) How Lucky You Are - 2:42(Edward Kassner aka Eddie Cassen, Desmond O'Connor)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 192 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guest
This episode featured no guests. Announcer Howard Petrie let us know that Victor Moore will be on vacation the following week, and that Van Johnson will be the guest.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment
Jimmy's presidential campaign is one of the topics covered during Victor's banter with Jimmy. They also exchange stories about flying, including some pertaining to relatives.

Jimmy: "Well, Victor, your granny wasn't the only high flyer. Here's something that I can get up in the air about: it's Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In person!"
Jimmy: "Peggy, you've got in on a precarious moment. I'm going to conduct my political campaign flying my own airplane."
Peggy: "Well good for you, Jimmy. You know, I've got a boyfriend who is the head instructor down at the flying school. And hey, are those pilots tricky!"
Jimmy: "What do you mean?"
Peggy: "Well, they all start out kissing your hand and then try for altitude!"
[Her line does not generate much laughter.]
Jimmy [in an aside]: "He he, ah, that's my goil who said that. But if I'd know she wasn't going to get a laugh I'd have taken that line."
Peggy: "Ha ha ha!"
The audience laughs as well.
Peggy: "But Victor, you're being awfully quiet. Are you going to do a little flying with Jimmy?"
Victor: "Oh, me. I get dizzy just looking at an air mail stamp."
Jimmy: "Now Victor, Victor, we're in this thing together. Peggy, we're going over to your friend the flying instructor. When you get through singing your song, I want you to join us at the airfield."

2. Comedy Sketch
Jimmy and Victor indeed go to take flight instructions. Among those with whom Jimmy exchange words at the flight school is Peggy.

Peggy: "Hey, Jimmy, you're all set for your first flight?"
Jimmy: "Yeah, Peggy, but before I get into your boyfriend's plane, tell me if he's a safe instructor."
Peggy: "Well, he oughtta be. I met him when he was a pilot in one of those United airliners."
Jimmy: "Fast mail?"
Peggy: "He was, but I slowed him down!"
The audience laughs.
Peggy herself [in an aside, imitating Jimmy's voice]: "Peggy, you delectable dish, you!"
Jimmy [in his own aside]: "I really love women, especially if they are female!"
Peggy: "There's my boyfriend's place over there. I think he's sitting in the front seat. Happy landing, Jimmy!"
With those words, Peggy's contribution to the ongoing sketch ends.


Photo

In a commercial ad for the no-longer-made product Briten, both the toothpaste and the depicted singer are ranked among the nation's "preferred." The ad also informs 1948 listeners that they can "hear popular Peggy Lee on the Jimmy Durante Radio Show, Wednesdays, NBC."





Date: March 10, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv), Jimmy Durante, Van Johnson, Peggy Lee (v), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) The Secretary Song (Bidibi Bot Bot) - 2:38(Jackie Barnett, Sammy Fain)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
United Audio Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Uae 30712 — Peggy Lee ("Mystic Music" Series)   (1997)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
Bianco Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Bia 4014 — The Lady Is A Tramp [Version #1]   (2000)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: Should Jimmy Run For Vicepresident?(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrunknown — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel And Songs

1. Episode's Guest
Van Johnson was this episode's guest. His exchanges with Peggy Lee are described below.

2. Victor Moore
Victor Moore is absent this week. He is said to be vacationing.

3. "The Secretary Song"
4. Session Musicians
During Peggy Lee's rendition of this then-popular novelty (co-written by Jimmy's songwriting partner, Jackie Barnett), a chorus of male voices is heard two or three times, singing short lines. Although I am more inclined to think that the voices belong to the orchestra's musicians, they could alternatively belong to the male members of The Crew Chiefs.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment
Shortly after introducing his guest, vice presidential candidate Jimmy Durante hires Van Johnson as his campaign manager. Naturally, part of their banter is about their campaign plans. Among other issues, Van needs to prove himself effective as a campaign manager.

Jimmy: "But Van, here's a chance to question charm. Here comes one of the most feminine-type females I know. It's Peggy Lee."
Peggy Lee: "In person."
Jimmy: "Go ahead, Van. See if you can help Durante in this campaign."
Van: "Okay. Uh, Miss Lee, I'm Van Johnson. Tell me, would you ..."
Peggy [interrupting Van]: "Oh! Would, would I! Oh, Van, I'd do anything for you, anything! And every other woman in the country feels the same way."
Jimmy [in an aside]: "How do you like that. He's supposed to ... [at this point audience behavior or some crew noise causes Jimmy to break away from the script, to make jokes about the interruption]."
Jimmy [back to his scripted aside]: "How do you like that. He's supposed to be campaigning for me and he's practically in office."
Van: "Wait a minute. I'm working for you, Jimmy. Peggy, what do you say we meet after the show tonight and go for a nice ride in my new convertible?"
Jimmy: "Please, Van, I'll take her for a ride in my convertible."
Van: "But I'll buy her orchids."
Jimmy: "I'll buy her orchids."
Van: "I'll take her to Ciro's."
Jimmy: "I'll take her to Ciro's."
Van: "I'll take her inside!"
[Moment of silence.]
Jimmy: "Sneak."
Peggy: "This is a switch. It's the first time I've heard of anybody fighting before they get to Ciro's!"
Jimmy: "Ah, Van and I would never fight, Peggy. But won't you sing something while we map out our campaign?"
Peggy: "Okay, Jimmy. Let me hit you with a little song that is sweeping the country. It's about the girls behind the typewriters and it's Jackie Barnett's Secretary Song."

2. Format Of The "Any State In The 48th Is Great" Comedy Skits
This episode marked the introduction of what would become the regular weekly skit of The Jimmy Durante Rexall Show for the rest of the season. For this routine, Jimmy would typically hop on his magic carpet along with Peggy Lee and Victor Moore (or a guest, on those occasions in which Moore was absent from the episode). The magic carpet trio would take the trio to three different areas of the United States. The purpose of the trip was always political, and the visits would usually center around a survey question, part of Jimmy Durante's (fictional) campaign to become the nation's vice president in the upcoming elections. When they arrived at their destinations, Peggy would encourage the others two to jump out of the carpet, and she would remain in the carpet, waiting for their return.

The routine combined song with dialogue. The singing happened while the three actors were in the carpet. Once down, Jimmy and company would have conversations with the character(s) living in the area.

The sung number invariably was "Any State In The 48th Is Great," which apparently had been written for this skit. To the choruses that were the same from week to week, new ones would be added each week, dealing with the locations being visited.

3. This Episode's "Any State In The 48th Is Great" Comedy Skit
As mentioned above (in the comments about the second segment of this episode), guest Van Johnson had agreed to become Jimmy's campaign manager, and Jimmy had asked Peggy to sing while the two men mapped out their political campaign. Following Peggy's solo (as well as a Rexall commercial and an additional joke -- this one at Frank Sinatra's expense), we hear Jimmy address Van and Peggy.

Jimmy: "Come on, Van; come on, Peggy. Let's start our campaign through and check up on the state of the union."
Van: "But where are we gonna start on our tour, Jimmy?"
Proclaims Jimmy: "Van, in this country it doesn't make any difference where we start; "I'll show you what I mean."

Then The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy, Peggy, and Van break into song, one after the other. (The Crew Chiefs would always be an integral part of the sketch's vocals, but they would not credited as participants in the sketch.)

The sung lyrics let us know the three destinations as they arrive at them. First up is "New York, including Brooklyn and The Bronx," where you can see and hear "the clatter of the subways underground" (the quoted words sung by Peggy), "the patter of people running around" (as sung by Van), "The Brooklyn Dodgers and The Mets" (as sung by Jimmy), and "Park Avenue, the upper set" (also according to Van). The carpet actually lands in an upper class lady's Manhattan penthouse. New Orleans is the second location visited. Therein, they talk to a southern belle. The final location is Beavertown, Arkansas. While singing about that last location, Peggy herself adopts a hillbilly accent. Jimmy and Van spend this last visit talking to a hillbilly resident.


Photo

Taken on the day of the broadcast, the playful photo below let us know that, when it came to Peggy Lee's affection (and this episode's script notwithstanding), there was no real contest between Jimmy Durante and Van Johnson.





March 17, 1948: No Broadcast

A comment made by Jimmy Durante during the next episode (March 24, 1948) reveals that there was no broadcast of the show this week. Jimmy says to Victor Moore: "You know we were separated last week when president Truman spoke and you were off the show the week before that." It is thus clear that, on March 17, 1948, The Jimmy Durante Show was pre-empted on behalf of president Harry Truman's speech about "The Threat To The Freedom of Europe."


Date: March 24, 1948; also July 11, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv), Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Laroo Laroo Lilli Bolero - 2:06(Sylvia Dee, Sidney Lippman, Elizabeth Moore)
USA Government's Treasury Department Service 16" Transcription DiscPrograms No. 67 & No. 68 — Guest Star [Kay Kyser & Ish Kabibble / Jimmy Durante & Peggy Lee]   (1948)
Biac Collectors' Label LP(Belgium) Brad 10 530-531 — At Their Rarest Of All Rare Performances {Al Jolson, Peggy Lee}    (1976)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2240 — Guest Star Starring Peggy Lee, Progs. #68, #82, #234, #434 434   
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: Resorts For The Campaign's One-Year Vacation Promise(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 205 / Ra 705 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 2   (2011)


Personnel And Songs

1. Episode's Guest
This episode featured no guests.

2. "Laroo Laroo Lilli Bolero"
3. The Crew Chiefs
During parts of "Laroo Laroo Lilli Bolero," the vocal group The Crew Chiefs just doodles behind Peggy Lee (no words on their part).


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy's Vocal
Jimmy and Victor have been talking about the days that the latter spent away from the show, on vacation. As part of this conversation, Jimmy makes mention of the star that served as guest while Victor was away, Van Johnson, at the time starring in the MGM picture The Bride Goes Wild.

Jimmy: "Don't laugh, folks, but they're saying MGM is sending me a free bride that goes wild. But here's someone who drives me wild every week. It's Peggy Lee!"
Peggy; "In person!"
Jimmy: "Ah, Peggy, just like always, it's good to see you."
Peggy: "Ah, thanks, Jimmy. Oh, hi Victor. I missed my little pookie pie."
Victor: "I missed you too, Peggypoo."
Peggy: "He, heh. Ah, Victor, you are a regular little lambyskins."
Victor: "And you are a cuddlebunny."
Peggy: "Ah, but you are a sugarbun."
Peggy; "And you are a dollywotsit."
Jimmy: "If you two miss me I'm playing gin rummy with a little lady in the front row!
Jimmy [in an aside, to himself]: "Ah, Durante ... you look good but nobody wants you."
Peggy: "Ah, you know how I feel about you, Schnoozz. It's just that, I don't know, since Victor's vacation he looks like such a rugged, outdoor type."
Jimmy: "I'm the outdoor type too, Peggy. Partly because I like fresh air and partly because nobody invites me in."
The banter proceeds with yet another joke, before the segueway to Lee's vocal.
Jimmy: "But enough of this idle bandiage, Peggy. How about a song? Would you sing one?"
Peggy: "I'd be glad to, Jimsy. Bolero, Mr. Bargy."
Jimmy: "Bolero!"

2. Comedy Routine
After deciding that the promise of an one-year vacation for everybody will be a keystone of his political platform, Jimmy decides to travel across the nation to survey vacation spots, and "give a report to the nation." Thus begins this episode's installment of "Any State In The 48th Is Great." Jimmy, Victor, and Peggy first stop in a vacationing countrytown (Cold Green Bay, Wisconsin). Then they go Las Vegas, Nevada, where "it doesn't matter if you are rich or broke" (according to Peggy's singing). Their last stop is Wiggleworm [sp?], a fishing spot.

Peggy sends the two men off to each of these places while she stays in the carpet and awaits for their comeback. In this particular sketch, the script gives her three musically inspired send offs: "I'll pick you up on the next cadenza" / "I'll be waiting on the downbeat. But watch it now, no gambling." / "I'll meet you at the intermezzo." The skit also ends up with a lesson of sorts, uttered by Jimmy (and a variation of a comment that he had made in the previous episode): "no matter where you go in this country you can have a good time."


Photo

Supposedly authored by Jimmy Durante, the curious book seen in the photo below was instead prepared and given as a gift to him. Should you open What I Know About Gin Rummy, you will discover that all its pages are blank. The basic joke behind the Christmas gift may have been Jimmy's mentions of gin rummy in his routines. One such mention takes place in this episode's conversation between Durante and Lee.






Sources And Issues

1. Guest Star, Starring Peggy Lee [CD] (Episode #68)
Seen in one of the images below, this compact disc contains four episodes of the Government-sponsored radio show Guest Star. Each episode identifies itself as a transcribed program produced to promote citizens' investment in savings bonds. Peggy Lee is featured in all four installments, but only #68 bears a direct connection to this discographical page.

The episode is clearly a mini-edition of the The Jimmy Durante [Rexall] Show. Howard Petrie serves as announcer and master of ceremonies, Jimmy Durante as the lead guest. Right from the program's start, Petrie’s interjections resemble his own announcements for Durante’s program. For instance: "Our guest tonight is Jimmy Durante, with the glamorous singing star Peggy Lee and Roy Bargy And His Orchestra. And coming up now is the nose that looks like a man. Here he is, the one and only Jimmy Durante. In person!” The jokes seem to have been recycled from various episodes of the comedian's regular program -- or perhaps not even recycled, but re-recorded straight from the original, regular episodes. Indeed, I believe that episode #68’s “Laroo Lilli Bolero” vocal is not a freshly sung performance, but a transcription from the March 24, 1948 broadcast under scrutiny.

Episode #68’s format is very similar to that of the Rexall series, too. Being a half-an-hour program, The Jimmy Durante Show usually consisted of four segments; the fifteen-minute Guest Star packs three, letting go of the customary situational sketch. During the first of 68’s three segments, Jimmy and Howard engage in a conversation that the former prefaces with one of his trademark tunes ("You Gotta Start Off Each Day With A Song"). Just as in The Jimmy Durante Show, the rest of that conversation is intermittently peppered with more singing from Jimmy ("Ciribirin"). The episode's two other segments would have also been familiar to listeners of comedian's show: a second bantering conversation from Durante (with Victor Moore in the network programs; with Peggy here), and a vocal by a female artist (Lee's).

As for the conversation between Jimmy and Peggy (i.e., the second segment), it takes place shortly after he sings parts from one of his staples, "Ciribirin." Here is an approximate transcription of their dialogue:

Peggy: "Ah, bravo, bravo. Ah, Jim, you sang it with mucho gusto."
Jimmy: "Ah, Peggy and mucho gusto to you, too. I hope you know, folks, that I speak Portuguese as a native from Portland."
Peggy: "You know Jimmy, your singing really thrilled me. Your high tones are comparable to Dennis Day's, your low tones are like Bing Crosby's and your intonation reminds me of Perry Como."
Jimmy: "Oh, I wouldn't say that."
Peggy: "Then why do you make me say it? .... I'm only kidding, Jimmy. You've been my idol ever since I was a little girl. Why, your face is always in front of me. When I see a moving picture, the hero has your face, the villain has your face, in fact everybody in the picture has your face!"
Jimmy: "Egad, what a cast!"
Peggy: "You know, Jimmy, I was interested in hearing you tell about your Mexican experiences. [Peggy is referring to Jimmy's preceding conversation with announcer Howard Petrie.] I'll bet you even made romance with the señoritas, I think. ["I think" is uttered with a hispanic accent and a teasing, sing-along intonation.]
Jimmy: "You think. I know! Me and a beautiful señorita used to sit down in the moonlight every night. The four of us."
Peggy: "Four of you?"
Jimmy: "Yeah, me and her and my two hot water pottles. You know it gets cold, nights in Acapulco! But enough of this gay falderal, Peggy. What are you going to sing?"
Peggy: Well, Jimmy, it's an intriguing item called Laroo Lilli Bolero.
Jimmy: "Ask a foolish question, you get a foolish answer!"

3. At Their Rarest Of All Rare Performances {Al Jolson, Peggy Lee} [LP]
4. "Laroo Lilli Bolero"
The identification of this session's version of "Laroo Lilli Bolero" as the one heard in the 1976 Belgian album is tentative. The album gives the performance's date as July 7, 1948, which does not correspond to any of the versions that I have tracked down. Of those, the present version is chronologically the closest to the album's version, particularly in its AFRS form (July 11, 1948). Hence, hoping that perhaps the Biac album has a slight dating error, I have tentatively identified the set's "Laroo Lilli Bolero" as the one heard on the AFRS disc. Given the tentativeness of my decision about this track, readers should bear in mind that additional commentary, correction or confirmation might be provided in the future, if more data is forthcoming.


Photo

One of the photos below shows the front cover of the CD that contains the 1947 U.S. Saving Bonds show whose contents are described above. The last photo show an ad featuring Jimmy Durante, still promoting U.S. Savings Bonds twenty years later (1967).




Date: March 31, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Mañana(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: Will The Youth Support Jimmy?(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 361 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Special Guest
During Jimmy's opening segment of the show -- which in most other weeks consisted of a conversation between him and announcer Howard Petrie -- Rose Marie makes a previously unannounced and rather lengthy appearance. Rose Marie spends most of her time impersonating Jimmy.


Songs

1. "Mañana"
This is Peggy Lee's third performance of her self-penned hit Mañana in Jimmy Durante's show. The first performance had been heard during an episode broadcast three months earlier, on December 31, 1947. The second version had been performed on the February 11, 1948 episode.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy's Solo
Jimmy and Victor have been talking about the movies.

Jimmy: "And speaking of pictures, here comes one that I'd stay to see twice. It's Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In person,."
Jimmy: "Meddle in, Peggy."
Peggy: "Hi, Jimmy. [To Victor] And how are you, Loverlip?"
Victor [in an aside]: "It gets around, it gets around."
Peggy: "Hey, Jimmy, what's happening to our boy tonight? He looks so ... spic and span."
Jimmy: "He'd even look more spic if he didn't have so much spam. But let us congratulate you, Peggy. I saw your picture in Life magazine this week."
Peggy: "Oh, thanks, Jimmy. And I noticed that your picture was in there, too."
Jimmy: "Yes, I stayed home all night opening and closing the pages."
Peggy: "Why did you do that?"
Jimmy: "You're on page 16 and I'm on page 17. Everytime I close the magazine our lips meet!"
Peggy: "Oh, Victor, have you ever been in Life?"
Victor: "No, they claim there isn't enough life in Victor."
Jimmy: "Well, Peggy, the magazine says that your record of Mañana was the top seller in the country. Why don't you sing it for us right now?"
Peggy [in her mañana voice]: "Alright, Jimmy, I'll sing it for you now."
Jimmy [in Peggy's mañana voice]: "I think."

2. Comedy Routine
Jimmy: "You know, Victor, Peggy's popularity with the youth of the country has filled me with isolation [sic]."
Victor: "What are you driving at?"
Jimmy: "Who's the backbone of the country? The youth. And who can make Durante vice president? The youth. And where do you find the youth of the country? In the colleges."

Soon after the above-quoted dialogue, Jimmy and Victor embark in a tour of the nation's colleges, to see how well Jimmy's campaign is standing with the youth. Peggy of course accompanies them, as the three of them make their customary magic carpet tour. They visit Texas ANM, Cambridge MA's Harvard, and NY's Vassar. In each college, the characters are asked their opinion of Jimmy's candidacy.


Photos

During their banter for this episode, Jimmy and Peggy mention the publication of a Life magazine issue that contains photos of the two of them. Although the mention of the magazine serves as a setup for a joke, the information itself was accurate: the front cover of the magazine in question can be seen below. Bearing a March 29, 1948 date, this issue includes a spread dedicated to Peggy Lee, entitled "Busy Singer" The spread was published under the magazine's Radio column and includes various photographs. One of the them shows the singer next to Durante, both of them apparently reading from one of his show's scripts. That photo can be seen above, under the session dated February 25, 1948. Two other photos, from the same source but unpublished at the time, can be seen here.





Date: April 7, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p, v), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv), Jimmy Durante, Dorothy Lamour, Peggy Lee, Howard Petrie (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) But Beautiful(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: Should Jimmy Support A Woman For President? - 9:13(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 151 — [Jimmy Durante] Durante, Patron Of The Arts   (1994)
c. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) [Musical Commercial] Rexall's One-Cent Sale Jingle(possibly Jackie Barnett, possibly Jimmy Durante)
All titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 361 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. "Rexall Jingle" Members
2. The Crew Chiefs
This version of the show's "Rexall Jingle" is sung by the entire cast. The Crew Chiefs start and conclude it. The other members of the cast have a solo part each, in this order: Howard Petrie, Peggy Lee, Roy Bargy, and Jimmy Durante. For an earlier all-cast version of this jingle, consult notes under the April 8, 1947 date. The men are heard in the jingle only. The other number listed above, "But Beautiful," is a Peggy Lee vocal, with some background vocalizing from The Crew Chiefs.

2. Victor Moore
3. Episode's Guest
Victor Moore is not present in this episode; he is scheduled to be returning on the next episode. In Victor's absence, Dorothy Lamour performs duties as the show's guest and also as Jimmy's sidekick.


Songs

1. "But Beautiful"
This is the second of the two renditions of But Beautiful that Peggy Lee performed in Jimmy Durante's show. For the first, see episode broadcast on February 18, 1948.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Patter
Continuing his campaign for vice president, Jimmy asks Dorothy if she would consider being the first woman president of the United States. Dorothy protests that she is no politician and that "in most of my pictures the only thing they let me do is sing and dance the hula. After making a joke about Dorothy's feminine qualifications, Jimmy adds: "Wait a minute. Don't take my word for it. Let's get the opinion of one of the fairest of the fair sex: Peggy Lee!" "In person!," responds Peggy. A conversation between Dorothy and Peggy ensues, with Jimmy being ignored and interrupted every time that he tries to sneak in.

Dorothy: "Hiya, Peggy."
Peggy; "Hi Dory. Hey, what's the big discussion about? What was it that you kids wanted my opinion on?"
Jimmy: "Well I think that ..."
Dorothy: "Jimmy wants me to run for president of the United States."
Jimmy: "Sure, in my opinion ..."
Peggy: "Well, I think a woman president would be wonderful. [?Tear up] those curtains in president Truman's new balcony."
Jimmy: "Well, uh ..."
Dorothy: "Yes, and I'd have the inside of the White House done in gold and black and the outside painted chartreuse."
Peggy: "Oh how wonderful. It'd just match that new dress you got!"
Jimmy" "How about the taxes?"
Peggy: "Please, Jimmy!"
Dorothy: "Yes, will you stop interrupting?"
Jimmy: "How do you like that. She isn't even elected yet and already free speech [has been put on] on a pause! Besides, Dorothy, you haven't told me yet if you'd accept the presidency as my Roman mate."
Dorothy: "I'd do anything for you, Loverlips."
Jimmy [in an aside]: It gets around, it gets around! When you get back next week, Victor Moore, it will be your turn to use that line."

2. Segueway To Peggy Lee's Vocal
Jimmy: "But Peggy, will you give us a little vocal interlude while continuing this discussion tout de suite?"
Peggy: "Alright, Jimmy. I'd lke to do But Beautiful. And I'm thinking of you!"
Jimmy: "Lather up!'

3. Comedy Sketch
Continuing his campaign travels on his ever-reliable magic carpet, this time Jimmy takes Dorothy and Peggy to Atlantic City, to Palm Beach, and to Washington DC. (As usual, the comedy routine consists of sketches preceded and followed by singing from the three acts. Among the purposes of the sung lyrics is the identification of the locations where the magic carpet is landing. Peggy remains on the carpet all along, while the aspiring president and vice-president come down and campaign.) In this particular sketch, Jimmy and Dorothy ask the locals their opinion on Dorothy's possible candidacy.


Photo

In this photo (whose source and context are unknown to me), we see what looks like a campaign rally. Durante is near a couple of campaign signs ("Jimmy for president"), not to say anything of various comely women -- seemingly models or starlets.





Date: April 14, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv), Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) You Turned The Tables On Me - 2:34(Louis Alter, Sidney Mitchell)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) [Musical Commercial] Rexall's One-Cent Sale Jingle(possibly Jackie Barnett, possibly Jimmy Durante)
c. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: How Is The Housing Situation?(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
All titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 362 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Songs

1. "You Turned The Tables On Me"
The episode's interpretation of "You Turned The Tables On Me" includes a coda, presumably created by Peggy and company for this particular rendition: "The tables are turned / And oh, how I've learned / You turned the tables on me!"

2. "Rexall Jingle"
In this edition of the one-cent sale "Rexall Jingle," the cast sings in the following order: The Crew Chiefs, Howard Petrie, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore, Jimmy Durante, and The Crew Chiefs again. The other number listed above, "You Turned The Tables On Me," is a Peggy Lee vocal, in which Durante, Moore, and Petrie do not participate.


Personnel

1. Victor Moore
2. Episode's Guest
"Back with us tonight, our Victor Moore," announces Howard Petrie at the start of the show. With Victor Moore back from his one-week absence, no guests are added to this episode.

3. Harry S. Truman
The first five minutes of this episode were preempted for a pre-taped message from President Truman on behalf of US Savings Bonds.

4. The Crew Chiefs
During Peggy Lee's performance of "You Turned The Tables On Me," The Crew Chiefs doodle a bit here and sing a few words there, all of it in a call-and-response to Peggy's lines. The following lines are a sample of the group's responses to Peggy: "Yes, you were the top" / "Ah, you let me die" / "All alone, all alone."


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
After having a long conversation with Victor, Jimmy says: "But enough of this conversation ... I've got more pressing matters at hand. And here comes one of the matters that I'd like to press: Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In person!"
Jimmy: "Hi ya, Peggy. Look who's back with us tonight. My only rival for your affections, Victor Moore."
Peggy: "Well, hello, Vicki baby."
Victor: "Hello, darling."
Peggy: "Hey, don't tell J.i.m.m.y. but I think you are awful c.u.t.e."
Victor: "Oh, thanks, Peggy. Say, how about a d.a.t.e.?"
Peggy: "Okay, I'll be home at h [At this point, Peggy catches herself, realizing that the script called for her to spell the word "home," which she had already uttered. A laughing Peggy starts over, much to the audience's relish and enjoyment.] I'll be h.o.m.e. at s.e.v.e.n."
Jimmy: "What a sneaky way to keep me out of the conversation."
Peggy: "Ah, you know I love you, Jimmy boy. You can do me a big favor. Either one goes north and find an apartment?"
Victor: "Well, to tell you the truth I'm looking for a place myself, Peggy. We are going to need more room come the first tonight."
Jimmy: "Victor!. You mean!?"
Victor: "Yeah, my police dog is expecting rookies."
Peggy: "Gosh, it seems everybody is looking for a place to live. Jimmy, you are a political candidate. Why don't you do something about the housing problem?
Jimmy: "Peggy, that a great idea you are putting in my head, and it's a neat trick; I have my hat on. But Peggy, while Victor and I confront the housing shortage, would you mind singing something pretty as only you can?" Peggy: "Anything for you, Jimmyboy, anything."

2. Comedy Skit
This week, Jimmy surveys the housing situation across the nation. He and his two regular companions travel to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ("city of brotherly love," sings Peggy, a point that Jimmy reiterates during the ensuing dialogue), Detroit, Michigan ("full of action, full of industry," sings Peggy; "they work day and night to keep the nation supplied with oldsmobiles that they can ride," adds Jimmy) and finally, for a change of nation, to Fairyland, where they meet old Mother Hubbard.


Photos

Reality and fiction ran parallel wavelengths during this 30-minute broadcast of The Jimmy Durante Show. The five minutes of this broadcast were pre-empted for an address from then-president Harry S. Truman, and most of the last ten minutes were dedicated to Durante's fictional candidacy for the vice presidency. Below, the tables are turned: Harry S. Truman partakes in the musical world of Durante, and another president, Lyndon B. Johnson, declares the pianist victorious.





Date: April 21, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Lucille Ball, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv), Session Musicians (bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) I May Be Wrong (But I Think You're Wonderful) - 2:21(Harry Ruskin, Henry Sullivan)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
United Audio Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Uae 30712 — Peggy Lee ("Mystic Music" Series)   (1997)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: In Search Of Endorsement From Show Business People(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)


Personnel And Songs

1. "I May Be Wrong"
In this rendition of "I May Be Wrong," Peggy Lee sings the female variation of the song's chorus ("All of my clothes are unsightly / All of my hats are a crime"), rather than the male ("shirts/ties") variation. Notice that she also keeps the first pronoun, which she would not do in a later version, made for Snaders telescriptions. (For the Snaders performance, she sings "all of your clothes are unsightly," etc.)

This episode's version of "I May Be Wrong" includes a call-and-response exchange between Peggy Lee, the male musicians, and The Crew Chiefs:

The Musicians: "You may be wrong, dear"
Peggy: "But I think you are wonderful"
The Musicians: "But then you may be wrong"
Peggy: "I think you are swell"
Doodling from The Crew Chiefs ensues."
The Musicians: "Do you like our style, say?"
Peggy: "I think it's marvelous"
The Musicians: "But then you are always wrong"
Peggy: "So how can I tell?"
The Crew Chiefs: "Deuces to me are all aces"
Peggy: "Seems though as I'll never win"
The Crew Chiefs: "And faces are all open spaces"
Peggy: "You might as well be Errol Flyn!"

The performance continues with Peggy singing one final chorus, while the musicians stick to playing, and The Crew Chiefs do some more doodling behind her.

2. Episode's Guests
Clayton and Layton, Jimmy's erstwhile showbiz partners from his vaudeville days, were the guests for this episode. Consigned to the first segment of the show, their participation is rather brief and short on words. They do a song-and-dance number.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment
During the second segment, some of the banter between Victor and Jimmy centers on a lady who was supposed to go on a date with Jimmy but had secretly gone out with Victor instead, leaving Jimmy standing in the rain, in wait.

Jimmy: "But here comes someone I'd gladly walk eleven miles in the rain for: the darling of the record club and the queen of the jukebox, Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In person! Hello, Victor. Hello, Jimmyboy."
Jimmy: "Hiya, Peggy. Say, there's something I want to ask you. I read in the papers that your record of Mañana sold over a million copies. I have a little number called Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee and I thought we might put it in the other side."
Peggy: "Ha. Well, I'm sorry Jimmy, but that record already has a number on the other side."
Jimmy: "Well, mine is a very short number. Is there any room left around the edges?"
Peggy: "Oh, stop kidding, Jimmy. I was on a music store the other day and they told me that your records are selling like hotcakes."
Jimmy: "They oughta sell like hotcakes: when you pour syrup on them, I sound like Sinatra."
Victor: "Honeypeg 1380 6 90 and 240. Candybar page 740 and 4 90 ..."
Jimmy: "Wait a minute, Victor. What are you doing?"
Victor: "I don't have any lines here, so I thought I might as well get the race tracks out."
Jimmy: "You know, this boy is another Stassin. He's running away with himself."

2. Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
Peggy: "You know, I've been thinking about your political campaign, Jimmy. If you could get all the people you know in show business behind you, you'd be a cinch to get in."
Jimmy: "Why, Peggy, the same thought just came to me. It's mental telecracy [sic]. But Peggy, while Victor and me plan a tour to contact our show business friends, would you inspire us with an aria in the Peggy Lee manner?"
Peggy: "Happy to oblige, Jimmyboy."
Jimmy and Peggy, in unison: "Happy to oblige."

3. Comedy Skit
"Well, let's hop in Peggy's lap and we'll be sitting pretty, Victor. Let's go!" So says Jimmy as they embark on their latest campaign-driven sojourn of the nation. This time they are after the endorsement of the film industry. First, they interview a director on location, in The Grand Canyon ("here's a wonder of the world unfurled," sings Peggy). Then they interview newly-christened cinema sensation Hotbreath Houlihan, who is staying in the so-called 'great show town' Chicago ("a town that's tough yet sentimental," adds Peggy during her vocal contribution). Finally, Jimmy and Victor talk to Lassie's owner while at the famous dog's residence in Hollywood. (This person was not really Frank Weatherwax, the real fog owner, but a member of Durante's cast, impersonating Weatherwax for this skit.) "If you make good in Hollywood," Peggy and The Crew Chiefs end up teaching us in song, "you'll be the toast of late night parties, cocktail parties, ?women pool, dramatic school, Warner, Metro, RKO; see how quick they spend their dough in Hollywood."


Photos

During this episode's comedy skit, reference is made to radio, television, and film star Lassie. A professionally trained collie, Lassie remained a media presence from the 1940s to the end of the twentieth century (mostly on TV). Below, three pictures bearing a connection to Lassie can be seen. First, Lassie and Jimmy Durante pose side by side, for a photo taken in 1946. In another photo, taken around 1948, Peggy Lee takes her turn, posing not with Lassie but with Banjo, a collie that the Barbours adopted that year, after the dog turned by their home, looking in poor shape. The third photo captures Peggy Lee and her husband Dave Barbour in an idyllic scenario. The Barbours are at their home's garden, with Banjo by their side. When that last photo was published in Life magazine, Lassie's owner (animal trainer and actor Frank Weatherwax) took a look at it and promptly went up in arms: he recognized Banjo as a lost offspring of Lassie's. Subsequently, the Barbours had to put up with unfair accusations of theft, made by a few members of the yellow press. Eventually, the young dog's Dickensian past came out: Banjo had had a rough childhood. After the collie's birth, Weatherwax had given Banjo to another trainer. Suffering repeated abuse from the second trainer, the dog had escaped and gone off on his own in the streets. The last photo shows Peggy Lee and Banjo still together seven years later, months before the premiere of Walt Disney's animated film Lady And The Tramp, for which she did four voices, including one dog.





Date: April 28, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), Lucille Ball, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee (v), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) It's The Sentimental Thing To Do - 2:51(Roy Alfred, Marvin Fisher)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
United Audio Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Uae 30712 — Peggy Lee ("Mystic Music" Series)   (1997)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: Should Women Be Allowed To Work In Industries? - 9:28(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 169 — [Jimmy Durante] I Say It With Music   (1995)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 362 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Victor Moore
2. Episode's Guest
In a pattern which suggests that at this point he had been hired to appear in the show every other week only, Victor Moore is once again absent from the show. Serving as guest this time is Lucille Ball, making her second guest appearance of the season.

2. The Crew Chiefs
During the second half of Peggy Lee's rendition of "It's The Sentimental Thing To Do," The Crew Chiefs contribute to the vocal. Their contribution falls under the categories of doodling and humming the melody. Their humming is intermittent and always in the background. They do sing actual words just for one line, when they echo Peggy in the line "I love you."


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
Guest Lucille Ball says that she has come to the show to ask candidate Jimmy Durante for his support on the issue of working women. She predicts that eventually women will work and men will stay at home. A sketch, enacting such a scenario, follows. The traditional roles of the sketch's married couple have been reversed: Lucille plays an industry businesswoman, and Jimmy is her whiny, jealous househusband. After the sketch ends, Jimmy gives the somewhat patriarchal verdict quoted below.

Jimmy: "You see, Lucille, it just wouldn't work out."
Lucille: "Oh, Jimmy, I thought you made a wonderful housewife."
Jimmy: "You can't get away from it, Lucille. Females belong in the home and here's a female I wish I had a home for: the gal at the top of the record list, Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In person!"
Jimmy: "Peggy, you know Lucille, don't you?"
Peggy: "Sure! Hi, Lucille. Oh, where did you get that adorable dress you are wearing?"
Lucille: "Oh, just a little thing I had created for me by Schiaparelli"
Jimmy: "You should see my new ..."
Lucille (interrupting Jimmy): "But Peggy, your outfit is lovely. Where did you get it?"
Peggy: "Well, it's a new design by Hattie Carnegie."
Jimmy: "Well, when it comes to clothes I've got to ..."
Peggy (interrupting Jimmy): "But Lucille, where did you get those astonishing accessories?"
Lucille: "Well, the shoes are by Capezio, the handbag is an Evans creation and the hat by John-Frederics."
Jimmy: "Notice they didn't mention Adrian. He's spending every minute whipping up my new spring halter. But we'll carry on our industrial disapersion [sic] later .... Meanwhile, Peggy, will you smooth my jangle and sing something pretty for me?"
Peggy: "We've got the music, Jimmy, and the next voice you'll hear will be mine." [She pronounces this last word with an emphatic, funny intonation. By this point on the season, offbeat pronunciation was par for the course from Peggy, in her last script line before the beginning of the vocal solo.]

2. Comedy Skit
Jimmy: "Well, Lucille and Peggy, have I convinced you that women don't belong in the industry?"
Peggy: "Well, I don't know about that, Jimmy. I mean look at history. Behind every man there was a woman."
Lucille: "That's right. George Washington had Martha. Abraham Lincoln had Nancy Hanks and Artie Shaw had - well, we don't have time to go into that."
Jimmy: "Well, to prove to you that you are wrong, girls, I've arranged a tour of the big industries to find out how they feel about women in business. Is the gang ready, Peggy?"
Peggy: "All set, Jimmy. You carry the ball."
Jimmy: "If it's Lucille Ball, I'll be happy to."

After the above-transcribed dialogue, the music of "Any Place In The Forty-Eighth Is Great" is heard and off the gang go. In Milwaukee, they visit the pickle industry -- specifically, Schwartz Pickle Boy. In Paris, Illinois, they check "the second largest perfume industry in the country. " In Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, they talk to a steel tycoon. A line from "Any Place In The Forty-Eighth Is Great," sung by Peggy, should give an indication of which gender comes out the (otherwise unacknowledged) winner: "the women in the industry have passed the test."


Photo

This episode's script calls for Peggy Lee and Lucille Ball to voice their enthusiasm for the top fashion designers of the day. In the 1949 photo seen below, Peggy Lee is dressed like a fashionista. Original caption: "Dramatic black accessories lend the proper glamorous touch to warbler Peggy Lee's dinner ensemble. To a sheer, strapless gown, Peggy adds a wide-brimmed Milan hat and suede gloves with intricately-cut gauntlets. Choker pearls with rhinestone pendant complete the sophisticated costume."





Date: May 5, 1948
Location: , Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv), Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) I Went Down To Virginia - 2:27(Redd Evans, Dave Mann)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
United Audio Public Domain CD(Netherlands) Uae 30712 — Peggy Lee ("Mystic Music" Series)   (1997)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: A Poll On The Nation's Transportation(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)


Personnel

1. Victor Moore
2. Episode's Guest
Victor Moore is back on the show, and there are no guests in this episode.

3. The Crew Chiefs
In "I Went Down To Virginia," Peggy Lee naturally sings the bulk of the lyrics, while The Crew Chiefs alternate between responding to her and singing along with her.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
During the second segment of this episode, Jimmy and Victor talk about a variety of subjects, including previous guest Lucille Ball, Victor's plans to go to the beach, and the pros of taking girls to the tunnel of love.

Jimmy: "And if you are taking a girl, here is a girl that wouldn't be hard to take. The record queen of the country, Peggy Lee!"
Peggy: "In person!"
Jimmy: "Everybody wants to get into the act."
Peggy: "Hi, Jimmy. And how are you, little Vickyboy?"
Victor: "Ah, hello, Peggypoo."
Peggy: "You know, Victor, the more I look at you, the more you remind me of Charles Boyer."
Victor: "Well, now that you mention it, there is a resemblance."
Jimmy: "Yeah, especially around the 'casbah'! You might've not noticed, Peggy, but Victor tried for Boyer's part in the Arch Of Triumph."
Victor: "Yeah, but they turned me down. They took one look at my stomach and said, too much arch and not enough triumph."
Peggy: "Ha, ha. Aah, don't you worry, poofie. I love a boy with ?aber ?doughboy."
Jimmy: "Peggy, it's becoming more and more obvious that your attention is centered more on Victor than it is on me."
Peggy: "Oh why, Jimmy, how can you say that!? I waited for you down at the station when you came back from Salt Lake but the train was six hours late. Was there a bridge washed out?"
Jimmy: "More serious than that. The engineer we got sent us on a shoe and he stopped at Boulder Dam to rinse out his socks."
Peggy: "Gosh, Jimmy, the transport situation has sure gone down nowadays."
Jimmy: "That's right, and I'm going to do something about it. Why don't you sing something, Peggy, while Victor and I plan a tour of the country to figure out a solution of the transportation problem."
Peggy: "Okay. And meanwhile I'm going to make a small detour myself, to the apple festival down Virginia way."

Peggy then proceeds to sing "I Went Down To Virginia."

2. Comedy Skit
In their survey of "the transportation situation" across the nation, Jimmy and company take trips east (to Nantucket), west (to Kansas City), and south (to Albuquerque). As part of the special lyrics for "Any State In The 48th Is Great," Peggy actually sings a full chorus about the last of the three locations. She also gives the following exhortation to Jimmy and Victor: "Go down, boys, and try to take some turkey in Albuquerque!"


Photo

This episode's banter between Jimmy and Victor includes talk about going to the beach. Below is seen a 1947 ad for Eveready batteries that features an illustration of Victor Moore and Jimmy Durante at the beach.





Date: May 12, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Nature Boy - 2:36(Eden Ahbez)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
BD Music Licensed CD(France) Bdjz 127 Bd 100 (Also 978 2 84907 127 4) — Peggy Lee (Éditions BD Music, BD Jazz Series, Volume 125)   (2011)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: Should The Vicepresidential Candidate Get Married?(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrunknown — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guest
This episode featured no guests.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
Victor tells Jimmy that he should have a wife in order to improve his chances as a political candidate. People likes to vote for family men, Victor adds. After a few additional comments on the matter, Jimmy prepares the audience for Lee's entrance.

Jimmy: "But speaking of matrimony, here comes a little girl I'd go on the bride-and-groom program any day. It's that record-breaking record maker Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In person! Thank you, boys. Hi ya, Vicki. And Jimmy, I sure want to thank you for the nice things you said about my record."
Jimmy: "Well, deserved, Peggy, and when I get elected I'll appoint you to any position you want."
Peggy: "Oh! Well, do you think I'd make a good secretary of the interior?"
Victor: "Yeah. Your exterior ain't bad either."
Peggy: "Ha, ha, ha. Thank you, Victor. Spoken like a gentleman, you little doll."
Jimmy: "Well, Peggy, Victor thinks that since I'm a political candidate I should have a wife to take her to the White House."
Peggy: "I think that is a wonderful idea. What's wrong with getting married?"
Jimmy: "Being joined in cannibal bliss [sic] is alright but it's too dangerous. These days, before a woman goes to bed, she uses an electric curler, an electric vibrator, an electric reducer and curls in under an electric blanket."
Peggy: "He, he. What so dangerous about that?"
Jimmy: "How can a guy kiss his wife goodnight when any minute he might get electrocuted?"
Victor: "Well, Jimmy, I think a question of this importance should be put up to the voters. Why don't you and I start out on another one of our surveys?"
Jimmy: "Okay, Victor, I'll do it for you. While we plan our itinerary, why don't you sing something in the interim, Peggy?"
Peggy: "I'd love to, Jimmy. I'm going to sing a song with a simple and tender message, called Nature Boy.

2. Comedy Skit
For this installment of "Any Place In The 48th Is Great," Jimmy, Victor, and Peggy conduct a survey to determine whether Jimmy should get married for the benefit of his political campaign. First they visit visit a location "where the honeymoon shines," according to the special lyrics that the three of them and The Crew Chiefs sing." (It's Niagara Falls.) Then they go to a town that they describe as "ritzy" (Newport, Rhode Island). As their final destination, they travel to a city "where there are ten men to every woman" (Oklahoma ).


Photo

Pinback button, part of Jimmy Durante's fictional campaign for the vice presidency.




Date: May 19, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Why Don't You Do Right? - 2:30(Joe McCoy)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Master Tone Razamataz Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Rz 4031 — ... Just One Of Those Things   (1996)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: Surveying The Nation's Small Businesses(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 598 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Episode's Guest
No guests were present for this episode.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
Jimmy: "But before we start on our tour, Victor, let's have a chat with that lovely little chanteuse who stops by at this time every Wednesday. It's Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "Arriving on track 5! ... Hello, Victor. And how are you, Jimmyboy?"
Jimmy: "Ah, Peggy, it's a delight to see you. And I hope you got that little gift I left in your dressing room."
Peggy: "Yes, I got it, Jimmy, thanks. But I haven't had time to open it yet. What is it?"
Jimmy: "Oh, just a little seasonal token of my esteem: a strapless-backless-seamless-sightless-and-a-sixteen-label-that say-Carolina swimsuit."
Peggy: "Swimsuit!? Why does it got 16 labels on it?"
Jimmy: "Without the labels you got no suit! It'd just be a yard and a half of very troily zipper."
Victor: "My name is Victor Moore. I live at 8559 Roxbury Drive and my last job was ..."
Jimmy [interrupting Victor]: "Victor, Victor, what are you doing?"
Victor: "Well, I didn't have any lines here, so I thought I might as well apply for my unemployment insurance."
Peggy: "Ah, Victorboy, I'd love to put my arms all the way around you ... But it's only a half hour program."
Jimmy: "Hee, hee. In that case, sing Peggy. I'll pucker up my ears and listen."

2. Comedy Sketch
For this weekly edition of Jimmy's, Victor's, and Peggy's tour across the nation, the campaigning men set their sights on small businesses. Soon after they take off on their magic carpet, they spot a couple on the land below, and decide to fly low to listen in on their conversation. It's a lovelorn pair. The male longingly asks for a kiss, but the female, named Ann, protests that she's too shy. In this brief vignette, the role of Shy Ann is actually played by Peggy herself. Afterwards, the magic carpet takes Jimmy, Victor, and Peggy to St. Louis (identified by Peggy as "Mr. Missouri's favorite son ... the seventh largest of American towns"), Portland (about which Peggy clarifies that, while is is true that "there are many Portlands ... we are going to the one in Oregon") and Cincinnati, Ohio (" 'cross the river from Bingo").


Photo

On display below is a pinback button promoting the 1932 comic film The Phantom President, in which Jimmy played the role of best friend to a man who becomes president of the nation. Jimmy does his own version of political campaigning for his friend -- chiefly, singing and playing the piano -- becoming the president's chief advisor and/or the vice president. It can be surmised that The Phantom President was the seed that gestated into Durante's "Any State In the 48th Is Great" routines.




Date: May 26, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me - 2:22(Mack David, Ticker Freeman)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 158 — Why Don't You Do Right?; 1947-1948   (1995)
Platinum/Start Entertainments Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Pc 617 — Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series)   (1997)
Snapper/Recall Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Smdcd 304 — Linger   (2000)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: In Search Of The Nation's Champions(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles on: Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 598 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show   


Personnel

1. Peggy Lee
Notice that this episode was broadcast on Peggy Lee's birthday; she turned 28 on this date. See also the comments about comedy skit, whose script incorporates a brief homage to her.

2. Episode's Guest
No guests were featured.


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's First Segment
During the opening segment, Peggy Lee participates in a very brief, two-or-three-lines-long vignette. She plays Chloe, a character that she had impersonated once before (December 17, 1947). Chloe utters just one line: "(I said) no; your mustache tickles."

2. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy Lee's Solo
Jimmy and Victor have been talking about the latter's penchant for the outdoors. After Victor mentions that in his youth he was a champion huntsman, Jimmy has the idea of using the moniker Durante the choice of the champions as his campaign slogan.

Jimmy: "But speaking of champions, Victor, here is one right now coming out of the corner. The holder of the jukebox crown and a little lady I'd like to go around with anytime, Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In one twelve and a half! Hello, Vickiboy."
Victor: "Hello Peggypoo."
Jimmy: "And how are you, Jimmy? Let me look at your little pixie face."
Jimmy: "Ah, Peggy, I know I'm not good looking but what's my opinion against thousands of others?"
Peggy: "Ha, ha, ha!"
Victor: "You haven't said anything nice about me yet, Peggy."
Peggy: "Oh, you know how I feel about you. You are made for me, Victor, just made for me!"
Victor: "Well, maybe so, but I think the guy who poured my foundation forgot to say when."
After a couple of additional lines of banter, Jimmy adds: "But Victor, I want to talk to you some more about my slogan, Durante, the choice of the champions. And while we're conversing, Peggy, would you favor us with some vocal, uh, calisthenics?
Peggy: "Gladly, Jimmy, I'll lift up a couple of bars if you'll lend an ear."
Jimmy: "I will."

3. Comedy Skit
In this installment of Jimmy's campaign travails, the candidate and his companions go around the nation in search of advice from "champions," or people who have been successful in the pursuit of their careers -- particularly in the field of sports. The carpet's first stop is Pompton Lakes, New Jersey ("see that turnpike below, we all oughtta know," Peggy points out, as part of the lines that she sings during the team's rendition of "Any State In The 48th Is Great"). Therein, Jimmy and Victor go to a boxing ring. Joe Luis, Jimmy Braddock, Carnera, and Maxi Baer are mentioned in the dialogue. The third and last stop is the speedway in Indianapolis ("the home of the legion," sings Peggy). In between Pompton Lakes and Indianapolis, the following exchange takes place:

Peggy (spoken): "Pull out the next stop, James."
Victor (spoken, addressing Jimmy): "Go ahead, tell her the secret."
Jimmy: "Well, Peggy, we are going to the town that crowned you sweetheart of Sigma Chi today."
Peggy (sung): "Well, now I know."
The Crew Chiefs (sung): "Fargo."
Peggy (sung): "Fargo, North Dakota."
The Crew Chiefs (sung): "Northwest of Minnesota."
Peggy (sung): "It's the largest city in the state of N.D."
The Crew Chiefs (sung): "Among other things it's famous for Peggy Lee." [Jimmy joins The Crew Chiefs during the words "Peggy Lee."]
Peggy (sung): "It did me many a good turn."
The Crew Chiefs (sung): "Fargo, North Dakota."
Peggy (sung): "And I'm glad to return."
The Crew Chiefs (sung): "To Fargo, North Dakota."
Jimmy (sung): "They gave us a champ. What are we waiting for? Let's go down and look around, there must be more."
The Crew Chiefs (sung): "In Fargo."
Peggy (spoken): "Come on down, Jimmy, and see how far you go, in Fargo."

Once Jimmy and Victor come down, they are met by Hotbreath Houilhan (one of the show's staple characters) on a galloping horse, at the rodeo in Fargo. As we hear the sounds of the horse running and , Jimmy asks, "What is this coming? Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Is it Superman?" "No, it's Hotbreath Houlihan," says she, before she lets them know that she just won the cow-branding contest in town. (The fiery-breathed female brands them with a kiss, which instantly turns the cows into barbecue.)


Photo

In this episode's skit, Jimmy is met by the sensual character Hotbreath Houlihan on a galloping horse, and in the illustration below we see a collusion of femaleness, "horsiness," and of course, "schnoozness." A fan of horse racing (California's Del Mar Thoroughbred Club is actually located in a boulevard named after him), Jimmy Durante is herein seen at the Del Mar beach, carrying out an activity that he seemingly reserved for females with whom he was very good friends: nose kissing. (See pictures with Carmen Miranda and Peggy Lee elsewhere in this page.) On this occasion, however, the female happens to be a horse. The illustration, by horse cartoonist Pierre "Peb Bellocq, comes from the booklet of the 1974 Del Mar National Horse Show. (See Peb's justly celebrated illustrations at his site.)





The June 2 And 9, 1948 Broadcasts

I have found no clear traces of Jimmy Durante Show broadcasts from the first two weeks of June 1948. Of the sources that I consulted, the most helpful was David Bakish's book Jimmy Durante: His Show Business Career, which lists a June 2 episode but not a June 9 episode.

The absence of a June 9 date from Bakish's listing leads me to assume that The Jimmy Durante Show was preempted on that day. The cause for the pre-empting remains unknown to me. Presumably an event of some general significance (a presidential address, a sports game) aired on that night.

The June 2 episode is, in essence, the only broadcast from the 1947-1948 season for which I lack details about Lee's involvement. I do not have even proof of its preservation. Any information about the episode in question would be appreciated.

(Photo below: a publicity shot, used to promote Peggy Lee's appearances in The Jimmy Durante Show.)




Date: June 16, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs (v, bkv), Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) It's Magic(Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn)
b. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: A Poll On The Law Against Men In Beauty Parlors(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Both titles unissued.


Availability

I know of no commercial release of the above-listed performances. Though commercially unavailable, thankfully the entire episode is online-accessible for listening, through the courtesy of fans and collectors of old-time radio.


Personnel

1. Guests
This episode featured no guests.

2. The Crew Chiefs
The show's vocal group doodle behind Peggy Lee during one of the last choruses of "It's Magic." (They doodle only; they do not sing words.)


Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Episode's Second Segment And Segueway To Peggy's Solo
Victor has been trying to buy a ticket to Pismo Beach. Jimmy tricks him into buying a free ticket for a certain "tour" that does end in Pismo Beach but which, on its way, first takes "passengers" through San Diego, Singapore, Calcutta, Madagascar, and other countries: Jimmy has signed Victor to join the Navy, much to Victor's consternation.

Jimmy: "Victor, don't be upset, that whole thing was just a gag. But I wish I was a sailor 'cause here comes a girl to have ?on arm and every ?thought: Peggy Lee."
Peggy: "In person! Hi, Jimmy. How are you tonight, Vickyboy?"
Victor: "Well, I'm a little tired. I've been reading all day."
Jimmy: "Ah, Peggy, you look so lovely that right after the program I'm going to take you to see Victor's new picture, On Our Merry Way. We'll sit in the balcony."
Peggy: "Oh, but you took me there last night and we sat in the balcony."
Jimmy: "I know. But tonight we'll watch the picture."
Victor: "Say, can I come along, too?"
Peggy: "Of course, Victor, we'll need you."
jimmy: "Yeah, while I'm kissing Peggy, you can grapple up popcorn."
Victor: "That's the way I always wind up -- holding the bag."
Jimmy: "Well, Peggy, while Victor pops the butter off his fingers, will you favor us with a little vocal selection?"
Peggy: "Gladly, Jimmy, I'd like to sing a new ballad that is making the rounds, called It's Magic."

2. Comedy Sketch
Peggy: "Hey, fellows, did you hear the New York State is trying to pass a law making it illegal for men to be into a beauty parlor?"
Victor: "Ay, that's ridiculous."
Jimmy: "Yeah, it could be a catatastroke [sic]. A beautician once talked me into putting mud packs in my head."
Victor: "Did it grow hair?"
Jimmy; "No, grass! These ain't wrinkles in my head; they are mow lawn tracks."
Peggy: "Well, there's only one way to find out how the rest of the country feels about men in beauty parlors. Let's make a tour and take a survey."
Jimmy: "That's a good idea. We'll leave with a hop, skip and a jump."
Victor: "You two can leave with a hop, skip and jump. I can make better time if I lay down and roll."
Jimmy: "Let's go!"

The gang then proceeds to hop on Jimmy's magic carpet, traveling to New Haven, Connecticut (where they interview a 'beauty operator'), Memphis, Tennessee ("see the magnolia blossoms in the air," says Peggy, who also tells Jimmy and Victor to lose the blues there), and Douglas, Arizona ("the land of the sun," Peggy informs us).


Photo

Shown below is a (gag) photographic book published by Simon & Schuster in 1952. The book is based on the conceit that the comedian was running for the vicepresidency in real life.




Date: June 23, 1948
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Jimmy Durante Show (Sponsored By Rexall Drugstores)

Roy Bargy's Orchestra (acc), Roy Bargy (p), The Crew Chiefs, Jimmy Durante, Peggy Lee, Victor Moore (v)

a. ExtantJimmyDurante Show (NBC) It's Not His Mind, It's His Music - 3:54(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 169 — [Jimmy Durante] I Say It With Music   (1995)
Radio Archives Collectors' Label MP3/CDRa 230 / Ra 730 — [Jimmy Durante] The Jimmy Durante Show, Volume 3   (2011)
b. Not Extant?JimmyDurante Show (NBC) Any State In The 48 Is Great: A Night At The Old Palace And The Copacabana(Jackie Barnett, Jimmy Durante)
unissued


Availability

1. "Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: A Night At The Old Palace And The Copacabana"
This episode's installment of "Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great" has not been commercially released. I have not been albe to locate it online, either. The rest of the episode is available for listening online, through the courtesy of fans and collectors of old-time radio. A copy of the episode is also kept at the Library of Congress, but I do not know if the library's copy includes the entire episode.


Songs

1. "It's Not His Mind, It's His Music"
This song is actually special material, and runs as part of one of the comedy routines. The song starts with a verse, sung by Peggy:

I don't claim that he's a Paderewski
But you must admit he's got his point
He never played the president's ball
Or a concert over at Carnegie Hall

Then the number goes back and forth between Jimmy and Peggy.

Jimmy: But I've been cheered at some of the Barrys' better joints
Peggy: I know that I'm a fool to ever fall
Jimmy: You couldn't help yourself
Peggy: If you are his type, I want to warn you off
Jimmy: I'll play modestly
Peggy: It's not his mind, nor is his music / That makes me mad for that man / He makes me melt / He's got magic / And his piano is part of his plan

The vaudevillian number (with Durante's piano sounding like those featured in the canteens of cowboy flicks) continues with singing from both Jimmy and Peggy, in a back-and-forth format.

The above-listed Viper Nest's CD contains an abbreviated version of this rendition. A middle chorus and part of the final chorus have been left out.

The number was reprised by Jimmy in an episode of The Jimmy Durante Show With Alan Young that aired on December 24, 1948. Peggy Lee was not a cast member by that time. The Christmas episode featured another unbilled guest appearance by singing comedienne Rose Marie, who served as Jimmy's duet partner in the reprise of "It's Not His Mind, It's His Music."


Photos

Shown below are advertisements for Jimmy Durante's appearances at the Old Palace (1936) and at his regular haunt for many years, the Copacabana (1951). Those are also the two venues that he re-visits in this season-ending installment of "Any State In The48th Is Great;" see further details in the notes that follow the pictures.





Peggy Lee's Participation In The Banter And The Comedy Routines

1. Alterations Of The Show's Format And Sequence
For this last show of the season, the customary order of the program was slightly altered. In a switch, the segment featuring banter between Jimmy Durante and Victor Moore is heard not second, but third in the episode's sequence. Conversely, the Peggy Lee segment is moved to second place. Her segment does not consist of a solo vocal from her, not is hers solely, however. Instead, the segment offers extended banter between Peggy and Jimmy, as well as a duet from the pair.

2. Second Segment
During the first segment, Jimmy has been talking with Howard about the then-ongoing Republican delegates' convention in Philadelphia, whose first day he supposedly attended. We move to the second segment when Jimmy utters the words transcribed immediately below.

Jimmy: "But speaking of conventions, Howard, here comes a little lady I'd like to get in convention with at any time. It's Peggy Lee."

Peggy: "In person! Ah, Jimmyboy, it sure is good to see you back from Philadelphia."
Jimmy: "Thanks, and it is a pleasure to be back here in the west again where men are men and women are women -- an arrangement which is rapidly catching on in Cucamonga."
Peggy: "Uh, Jimmy."
Jimmy: "Yes, my petite?"
Peggy: "I was wondering if you'd sit down at the piano just once and play something for me. Will you?"
Jimmy: "Well, I'd love to, Peggy. Just sit next to me here on the piano bench and let the set of my kaboom take its toll."
Jimmy plays a few notes.
Peggy: "Ah, Jimmy, what a lovely arpeggio. Where did you ever get such a haunting phrase?"
Jimmy: "Oh, it's just a little thing that occurred to me this morning while plucking a goose."
Peggy: "Ah, Jimmy, when you play like that, it does something to me. It's just as though you are playing on my heartstrings."
Jimmy: "Please, Peggy, my glowing watch is blushing. It's holding its hands in front of its pace."
Peggy: "Hmm. I love that man."

Then Peggy begins singing.

2. Comedy Routine
Most circulating copies of the episode under discussion miss the episode's fourth segment. Only the routine's final lines have been preserved. The included lines reveal that Clayton and Jackson (whose guest appearance had been announced at the end of the previous episode) took part in the sketch. Peggy Lee was definitely part of the sketch; hers is among the voices that are heard in the extant, concluding lines of this edition of "Any State In The 48th Is Great."

In his book Jimmy Durante: His Show Business Career David Bakish includes a summary of the skit: "On the June 23, 1948, show, the Magic Carpet trip is to the Old Palace Theatre and to the Copacabana. Jimmy speaks to Pierre, the French doorman at the Copa, using a phony French accent. Inside the Copa are Clayton and Jackson. The three sing There'll Be Some Changes Made. Lou Clayton dances, Eddie Jackson sings. Durante thanks them and adds thanks to drummer Jack Roth."

3. Season Goodbye
Jimmy: "Well, Peggy, Victor, this is our last show of the season. What are you gonna do this summer?"
Peggy: "Well, Jimmy, I'm taking a motor trip to Chicago and New York where I'm going to be playing at the Chicago and Paramount Theaters."
Jimmy: "That's great. How about you, Victor?"
Victor: "I've got a terrible ?_ to do. I'm taking a bicycle tour. I've got a bicycle built for two and I'm sitting in the front seat."
Jimmy: "Who's gonna sit on the back seat?"
Victor: "The rest of me."
Jimmy: "Ah folks, it's been a wonderful three years working for Rexall and I've enjoyed every minute of it. And I wanna offer ten thousand thanks, one for each of the Rexall drugstores throughout the country. I'll be back in the fall, folks, at a new time, and I'll be looking to see you. I wanna thank the entire cast and the crew I work with and I want to give credit to my writers: Lester White, Stanley Davis, Bud Pearson, Elon Packard, Harry Crane, and my special song material writer Jackie Barnett. Happy birthday, Mrs Calabash, wherever you are."




The Fall 1948 Appearance(s)

After the closing of his show 1947-1948 season (on Wednesday, June 23, 1948), Jimmy Durante naturally took a short vacation from radio hosting. He returned on either October 1 or October 8, 1948, for a new season under the same network, but with a new sponsor and on a different day (Fridays).

At the closing of the 1947-1948 season, Peggy Lee's return to the show was presented to the public was presented as a possibility that had yet to be ratified. By August, it had become clear that Lee would not be returning, because she had instead to be one of the hosts of another radio show (The Chesterfeld Supper Club).

Not surprisingly, Peggy Lee is not part of any of the subsequent episodes of Durante's show that I have been able to track down. Unfortunately, I have not been able to track all of them. I have become familiar with logs for all installments from 1949 to 1950, when the show ended. I have also located details for the episodes that aired in December of 1948, but not from the preceding months (i.e., October and November). They do not seem to be available online, and I know of no sources detailing their contents.

In other words, we have no factual knowledge about Durante's broadcasts from October and November of 1948. Since we know that she had been serving as the new hostess of The Chesterfield Supper Club since September 30, 1948, we can confidently ascertain that Lee was not Durante's girl Friday during those two months. Lee hosted the Thursday installments of the Supper Club; her Capitol labelmate Jo Stafford did the Tuesday installments.

The above-seen photo and caption give notice that Lee and Stafford did make a joint appearance in the October 1, 1948 episode of The Jimmy Durante Show. I do not have further details on the matter. It is indeed possible that this episode was the opener of Durante's fall season. Alternatively, the caption's phrasing could be deceptive; perhaps Lee and Stafford were heard on a special that featured only them, but which aired on the prospective slot of The Jimmy Durante Show. If the latter was the case, then the debut of Durante's fall season would have been on October 8, which is indeed the date given by his discographer.

Be that as it may, Lee's and Stafford's joint appearance would have obviously served as promotion for the Hollywood installments of The Chesterfield Supper Club.

(Photo above: found in the pages of a magazine published in the fall of 1948. The caption reads: "Stafford-Lee .... Jo Stafford, popular Chesterfield Supper Club vocalist, and Peggy Lee, transcribed singer-composer, blend their voices for pal Jimmy Durante on his NBC, Friday night show at 8:30 P.M.")


FINAL NOTES

Jimmy Durante's Radio Hosting Career



Jimmy Durante's earliest forays into the world of radio hosting took place in the mid-1930s. He first served as pal Eddie Cantor's replacement in NBC's The Chase and Sanborn Hour (late 1933; also summer of 1934). Then he graduated to his own show in the same network, Jimmy Durante: The Jumbo Fire Chief Program (1935-1936), a Texaco-sponsored show that was also a promotional tool for Billy's Rose's Broadway musical Jumbo.

During subsequent years, Durante made some guest appearances on radio, but otherwise spent much of his time traveling Europe, filming in Hollywood, and playing on Broadway. After various successful guest appearances in the Old Gold-sponsored NBC Blue show Melody And Madness, he did have a short stint as that show's host (for 7 episodes, late 1939). There were no other hosting gigs between 1936 and 1942, however.

Durante's subsequent return to radio hosting happened in 1943. He was returning as, once again, a substitute, and temporarily. This time, the show was NBC's The Abbott And Costello Show, which was facing the dilemma of having one of its stars (Costello) indisposed due to illness. Costello had had Abbott, and Durante was not scheduled to host alone, either. At the initiative of Phil Cohan, a director and producer, Durante took over the show in the company of emerging comedian Garry Moore. Their successful partnership on this temporary gig resulted in their hire as the regular hosts of a show in another network, CBS' Camel Comedy Caravan (1943-1944).

Durante & Moore successfully hosted the Camel show for various years. They continued hosting it when Camel's sponsorship ended and Rexall's began (1945). From then onwards renamed The Jimmy Durante - Gary Moore Show (1945), the program continued unabated until two years later, when Moore decided to leave it in order to strike on his own. The 1946-1947 season was his last one with Durante.

Simply re-titled The Jimmy Durante Show, the next season of the Rexall-sponsored program began on October 1, 1947 on a different network (NBC), a different day (Wednesdays instead of Fridays), and one hour later (10:30 p.m. instead of 9:30 p.m.). The full season consisted of 37 episodes. The last episode was broadcast on June 23, 1948. (The 37-week run was sequential, except for two weeks on which the program seems to have been preempted. One of the two exceptions happened on March 18, and its cause was a presidential address. I have no data about the reasons behind the other exception, which took place on June 9.) Throughout this season, Phil Cohan remained as the producer. Cast holdovers from the previous season were Roy Bargy and His Orchestra, character comedian Candy Candido, and announcer Howard Petrie. The main newcomers were Peggy Lee, Arthur Treacher, and Tom Harmon.

Two of the newcomers lasted less than half a season. Treach, whose role was to serve as Durante's sidekick, left in December of 1947. (Frequent guest Victor Moore eventually took over the role.) The other short-lived newcomer was sports caster Tom Harmon for whom the last minutes of each episode were reserved. A former player for The Los Angeles Rams (and, in 1951, the father of a baby who would grow out to be TV actor Mark Harmon), Tom Harmon was in charge of telling Durante's audiences about recent or ongoing sports games, particularly in the fields of football and baseball. Heard regularly during the first months of the show, Harmon's segment would be completely dropped once the year 1947 had run its course.

The other newcomer was kept for the entire duration of the 1947-1948 season. As shown throughout this page (and as mentioned previously), Peggy Lee was not only the program's female vocalist but also a regular participant in the banter and comedy routines. Also, the show's credits ranked Lee as the most important cast member, after Durante himself. From December 1947 through June 1948, she was invariably billed first (i.e., after the show's host) in the weekly announcement of the cast, at the star of the program. She was present in every single episode, except for a month and a half absence (which the show's script attributed to illness) early in the season.

This discographical page covers 29 of the 30 episodes of The Jimmy Durante Show in which Peggy Lee appeared. The episode broadcast on June 2, 1948 could not be covered because I have not found any audiocopies of it -- nor details about Lee's involvement in its singing and comedy. (The same obstacle applies to an episode broadcast on October 15, 1947, which could have featured Lee. Although currently I am presuming that it was the start of Lee's month-and-a-half-long absence, lack of conclusive evidence raises the possibility that she might have still been present on this date, thus beginning its absence on the following week. If Lee did appear on that October 15 installment, then the total count of episodes in which she participated would be 31. Or 32: she seems to have guested at least once, early during the 1948-1949 season.)

Moore's departure from the show had led to predictions that this 1947-48 season would prove Durante's undoing as a host, and the program's cancellation. Instead, the season rated three points higher than its predecessor.

After the season closer in June 1948, Durante's show returned in early October of 1948, still at 10:30 p.m. and still on NBC. But there were changes and retreads to earlier seasons. The program moved back to Fridays, switched back to its previous sponsor (Camel), and hired both a new announcer (Verne Smith) and a young bantering partner for Durante (obviously in an attempt to recreate Schnozzola's rapport with Garry Moore). The Jimmy Durante Show With Alan Young remained in place until April 1949, when it became The Jimmy Durante Show With Don Ameche, until it bade adieu in 1950.

Peggy Lee was a cast member of Durante's show during the 1947-1948 season only. She is believed to have made a guest appearance for the opening of the next season (October1, 1948). Lee's friendship with Jimmy Durante (born 1893, died 1980) was a life-long one, however. Her 1983 autobiographical Broadway play Peg included a song done in honor of the man about whom (after all those years, and not long before his passing), she still referred as "my beloved Jimmy Durante."





A List Of Songs Performed By Peggy Lee In The Jimmy Durante Show

The total numbers of Peggy Lee vocals listed in this page is 50. Of those, 19 titles are comedy specialties and/or special material, performed in the company of Jimmy Durante and other cast numbers.

The remaining 31 titles are solo spots. Among those solos, there are 4 numbers that were performed twice and 1 number that was performed thrice during the season.

The 50 vocals that Peggy Lee sang in Durante's show can thus be divided into 25 solo titles, 6 repeats of those solos, and 19 specialty numbers with Durante and/or the cast. An itemization can be found below.


A. Solo Vocals

1. All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart (January 14, 1948)
2. All Of Me (October 8, 1947)
3. Baby, Don't Be Mad At Me (May 26, 1948)
4+. But Beautiful (February 18, 1948; April 7, 1948)
5. Christmas Song, The (December 24, 1947)
6. Dance, Ballerina, Dance (January 14, 1948)
7. Gentleman Is A Dope, The (January 7, 1948)
8+. Golden Earrings (December 17, 1947; January 21, 1948)
9. How Lucky You Are (March 3, 1948)
10. I Can't Give You Anything But Love (January 28, 1948)
11. I May Be Wrong (But I Think You're Wonderful) (April 21, 1948)
12. I Went Down To Virginia (May 5, 1948)
13+. I'll Dance At Your Wedding (December 3, 1947; January 7, 1948)
14+. It's A Good Day (October 1, 1947; December 31, 1947)
15. It's Magic (June 16, 1948)
16. It's The Sentimental Thing To Do (April 28, 1948)
17. Laroo Laroo Lilli Bolero (March 24, 1948)
18. Lone Star Moon (February 4, 1948)
19+. Mañana (December 31, 1947; February 11, 1948; March 31, 1948)
20. Nature Boy (May 12, 1948)
21. Secretary Song, The (March 10, 1948)
22. There'll Be Some Changes Made (December 10, 1947)
23. You Don't Have To Know The Language (February 25, 1948)
24. You Turned The Tables On Me (April 14, 1948)
25. Why Don't You Do Right? (May 19, 1948)

(A plus sign, found next to some of the above-listed numbers, indicates that the given title was sung more than once in the show.)


B. Comedy Numbers And Special Material

1. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: A Night At The Old Palace And The Copacabana (June 23, 1948)
2. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: A Poll On The Law Against Men In Beauty Parlors (June 16, 1948)
3. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: A Poll On The Nation's Transportation (May 5, 1948)
4. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: How Is The Housing Situation? (April 14, 1948)
5. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: In Search Of Endorsement From Show Business People (April 21, 1948)
6. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: In Search Of The Nation's Champions (May 26, 1948)
7. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: Resorts For The Campaign's One-Year Vacation Promise (March 10, 1948)
8. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: Should Jimmy Run For Vicepresident? (March 10, 1948)
9. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: Should Jimmy Support A Woman For President? (April 7, 1948)
10 Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: Should The Vicepresidential Candidate Get Married? (May 12, 1948)
11. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: Should Women Be Allowed To Work In Industries? (April 28, 1948)
12. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: Surveying The Nation's Small Businesses (May 19, 1948)
13. Any State In The Forty-Eight Is Great: Will The Youth Support Jimmy? (March 31, 1948)
14. Chidabee, Chidabee, Chidabee (Yah! Yah! Yah!) (January 14, 1948)
15. I'm Comin' A-Courtin' Corabelle (February 4, 1948)
16. It's Not His Mind, It's His Music (June 23, 1948)
17. Long Time, No See (February 18, 1948)
18. Jimmy Duranta Claus (December 24, 1947)
19. Rexall's One-Cent Sale Jingle (October 8, 1947; April 7, 1948; April 14, 1948)





Sessions Reported: 29

Performances Reported: 52

Unique Songs Reported: 44

Unique Issues Reported: 33