Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
The A&M Contract (1975)
by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on Dec 18, 2016


Date: May 27, 1975
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles
Label: A&M

Peggy Lee (ldr), Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller (pdr), Other Individuals Unknown (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. take-7Alternate Take (A&M) Daddy Wah Dah Do (The Climb / Squatty Watty Do) - 3:16(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
b. take-8Master Take (A&M) Daddy Wah Dah Do (The Climb / Squatty Watty Do) - 3:16(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
c. take-14Alternate Take (A&M) I Ain't Here - 4:02(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
d. take-15Alternate Take (A&M) I Ain't Here - 3:48(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
All titles unissued.


Masters, Dating And Cross-references

1. Preservation
2. Dating
Most of Peggy Lee's A&M performances are currently preserved in various reel tapes at Universal's tape library. Not preserved in the library are this session's performances, which are believed to be her earliest at A&M Records.

The performances have been preserved instead in reference tapes (reel and cassette) originally made for the benefit of the session's participants, and dated May 27, 1975. Some of those reference tapes have ended up in the hands of fans, who have made transfers to other audio configurations.

Given the absence of a master tape at the Universal library, a commercial release of these performances is, though not impossible, unlikely.

3. "I Ain't Here"
For the commercially released version of "I Ain't Here," see session dated May 30, 1975.

4. "Daddy Wah Dah Do"
My designation of #8 as the master take of "Daddy Wah Dah Do" should be deemed arbitrary, and intended strictly for this discography's internal (indexing) purposes. No master take designation was ever made for this particular title, which remains unreleased.


Songs

1. "Daddy Wah Dah Do"
2. "Squatty Watty Do"
3. "The Climb"
4. "The Slime"
The song "Daddy Wah Dah Do" has been known by various names. Leiber & Stoller originally entitled it "The Slime." Under that name, it was first recorded by The Coasters, a r&b group under the songwriters' tutelage. However, that initial recording could not be issued due to the objections of Atlantic honchos Jerry Wexler and Ahmet Ertegun, for whom the title had unpleasant connotations. Hence Leiber & Stoller did a slight rewriting of the lyrics, changed the song's name to "The Climb,", and asked The Coasters to record the number again. Atco released the resulting version in 1962. A parody of dance crazes, the number went on to become briefly popular in France, where a handful of orchestras recorded it, and audiences took "Le Climb" for a real dance craze. (As for "The Slime," it was finally issued during the CD era.) While working with Peggy Lee, Leiber & Stoller reworked the lyrics once more, this time using the phrase "Squatty Watty Do" as the song's title and main line. The events that transpired when Lee saw the lyrics are known only to those present, but it is reasonable to assume that she strongly objected to the potential crassness of the word "squatty." The surviving takes make it evident that the singer and the songwriting-producing team settled, at least momentarily, for having her sing the phrase as "Daddy Wah Dah Do." Ultimately, the number was left unissued.


Arrangements

1. Perry Botkin, Jr.
Preserved in Peggy Lee's sheet music library is an arrangement for "I Ain't Here" that is credited to Perry Botkin, Jr.


Date: May 29, 1975
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles
Label: A&M

Peggy Lee (ldr), Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller (pdr), Pete Romano (eng), Other Individuals Unknown (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. take-unknMaster Take (A&M) Don Juan - 3:04(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)
b. take-17Alternate Take (A&M) Don Juan - 3:49(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
unissued
c. take-6Master Take (A&M) Crazy Life - 3:00(Gino Vannelli) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
unissued
d. take-11Alternate Take (A&M) Crazy Life - 2:59(Gino Vannelli) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
unissued
e. take-8Master Take (A&M) The Best Thing - 3:33(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller, Ralph F. Palladino, John Sembello) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
unissued


Masters And Dating

1. Preservation
2. Dating
The tapes on which these performances were originally recorded have not been preserved. Fortunately, a safety tape is extant at the Universal tape library. It is dated June 9, 1975. In addition to the safety tape, the performances are also preserved in reference tapes that were made for some of the sessions' participants, and which are dated May 29, 1975. (See also notes under session dated May 27, 1975.)

3. "Crazy Life"
4. "The Best Thing"
My designation of take #6 as the master of "Crazy Life" is arbitrary, and intended strictly for this discography's internal (indexing) purposes. No master take designation seems to have taken place for this particular title.

The same intention is behind amy designation of "The Best Thing" as a master. In truth, this performance is a breakdown: it is incomplete. However, it is her only A&M take of the song, as far as I am aware. And, as intimated by the timing, the artist does sing the entire song. The performance is basically interrupted by the producer right before its instrumental finish.


Songs And Songwriters

1. "Don Juan"
My identification of the first take of "Don Juan" as the same one released on the Hip-o CD is tentative. I am relying on my own listening of two audio sources (the Hip-o track and a copy of the aforementioned reference tape). I do detect some minor differences, but those could have resulted from the mixing process.

2. "The Best Thing"
3. Ralph Palladino
The original version of "The Best Thing" was recorded for the album Dino & Sembello, which was produced by Leiber & Stoller in 1974. The song was a collaboration between the two teams. In sites such as ASCAP, Ralph Palladino can be found listed under the alternate name Ralph Dino.

4. "Crazy Life"
5. Gino Vannelli
Singer-songwriter Gino Vannelli was signed with A&M at the time of this session. Presumably, his "Crazy Life" was part of an A&M-approved list from which Leiber & Stoller asked Lee to pick any numbers which she favored. There is good indication that the song was to her liking; see below, under Arrangements.


Arrangements

1. Perry Botkin, Jr.
Preserved in Peggy Lee's sheet music library are the arrangements for the three above-entered numbers. In all of them, Perry Botkin, Jr. is identified as the arranger.

2. "Crazy Life"
Peggy Lee's music library contains two arrangements of "Crazy Life," one by Perry Botkin, Jr. and the other by Mickey Ingalls. The existence of the Ingalls arrangement is strong indication that Lee liked the song a lot -- enough to commission the score, presumably with the intention of performing it in concert.


Date: May 30, 1975
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles
Label: A&M

Peggy Lee (ldr), Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller (pdr), Hank Cicalo, Pete Romano, Carmen aka Carmine Rubino (eng), Meco Monardo (s-a), Other Individuals Unknown (acc), George Young (f), Ray Brown (b), Unknown (str), {Head Arrangement}, Peggy Lee (v)

a. 0000Master Take (A&M) Love Me Or Leave Me(Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn)
unissued
b. 0000Alternate Take (A&M) I Ain't Here(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
unissued
c. 0000Master Take (A&M) I Ain't Here - 4:14(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)
d. 0000Master Take (A&M) Some Cats Know - 4:22(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
A&M 451771 — {Some Cats Know / I Remember}   (1975)
A&M 451771 S — {Some Cats Know (full version) / Some Cats Know (edited version)}   (1975)
A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)


Masters

1. "Some Cats Know"
2. Overdub
Just like the other masters entered under this date, "Some Cats Know" was originally recorded with a rhythm section. Unlike those other masters, however, "Some Cats Know" was eventually picked for inclusion in the album Mirrors. In order to make it fit with the rest of the album's tracks, the number was transformed from a piece backed just by rhythm section to an orchestral performance: various additional instruments (strings, flute) were separately recorded, and then dubbed over. Those overdubs took place at The Record Plant (New York), date unknown -- most likely July or August 1975.

In addition to the completed master, various false starts of "Some Cats Know" are extant in Universal's vaults, too.


Dating

1. A General Note About The Dating Of The A&M Sessions
The recording dates that I have entered for the majority of this discography's A&M performances were found in the master boxes that contain them. The possibility remains that, instead of the actual recording day, the dating on those boxes refers to any other part of the production process. Some cutting and removal of performances from one box to another could have also happened.

2. "Some Cats Know"
The inclusion of "Some Cats Know" under this date is tentative: I do not know on which exact session this master was recorded. Of the various possibilities, this date strikes me as the likeliest, mainly because the session tapes contain various false starts of "Some Cats Know." As for the reason why the completed master is not in those tapes, I assume that the decision to do a strings overdub led to the master's removal to another tape.

I should also mention that a safety tape dated June 9, 1975 contains a complete performance of "Some Cats Know." Unfortunately, the original date of the performance is not indicated on the tape's label.


Arrangements

1. Head Arrangements
2. Overdubs
As already explained, all numbers from this session were originally recorded by the vocalist with just a rhythm section, using head arrangements. At a later date, strings and other instruments were dubbed over the original performance of "Some Cats Know," and a commissioned arrangement was used to conduct those instruments.

3. "Love Me Or Leave Me"
This session's unreleased performance of "Love Me Or Leave Me" features the same upbeat, reggae arrangement heard in Lee's television and concert performances of the song from around this time. (Once it opens for viewing, see this discography's page for Guest TV Appearances, 1975.) The "reggae arrangement" is extant in Lee's music sheet library, but it does not identify its author. Given Perry Botkin, Jr.'s involvement in one of the other masters listed in this session, he is the leading suspect.


Personnel

1. Meco Monardo
Meco Monardo is the arranger and conductor of the strings which are heard in "Some Cats Know." He was not part of the original, rhythm section recording of "Some Cats Know."

2. Ray Brown
I have added Ray Brown's name to this session because, in Leiber & Stoller's autobiography, he is credited as playing bass in "Some Cats Know."

3. Pete Romano
4. Carmine Rubino
5. Hank Cicalo
6. Brian Blackburn
The engineer on "I Ain't Here" and "Love Me Or Leave Me" was either Pete Romano or Hank Cicalo.

All the engineers listed in this session worked on the making of "Some Cats Know." Pete Romano was the engineer of the original, non-orchestral performance. Carmine Rubino engineered the overdub instrumental session. Hank Cicalo was the remix engineer of "Some Cats Know" as it is heard in the original Mirrors album.

The "Some Cats Know" master would be remixed once more, this time for inclusion in the CD Peggy Lee Sings Leiber & Stoller. The remix engineer for all tracks on that excellent CD release was Brian Blackburn.


Issues

1. A&M #1771-S [45]
1. A&M #1771-S [45]
A&M single #1771 exists in two versions. One is the commercially issued 45-rpm disc, which features "Some Cats Know" on the A side, "I Remember" on the B side. The other version is a promo that A&M sent out to disc jockeys and radio stations and which spotlights only "Some Cats Know," presenting it in full on one side, in an edit on the other side. ("I Remember" is not included). The promo's catalogue number is the same as the commercial issue, except for the addition of a suffix letter -- an s.


Date: Between Monday, June 2 and Thursday, June 5, 1975
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles
Label: A&M

Peggy Lee (ldr), Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller (pdr), Hank Cicalo (eng), Johnny Mandel (con), Georgia Alwan, Norman Benno, Gene Cipriano, Harry Klee, Ronald Langinger, Abe Most, John Neufield, Jack Nimitz, Bill Perkins, Jerome Richardson, Thomas W. "Tom" Scott, Bud Shank, George Young (r), Joe Burnett, Marion "Buddy" Childers, Charles "Chuck" Findley, Paul Hubinon, Malcolm McNab, Anthony Terran (t), Charles C. "Charlie" Loper, Richard T. "Dick" Nash, Kenny Shroyer, Phillip Tule, Mike Vlatkovich, Chauncey Welsch (tb), Vincent DeRosa, Alan Robinson, Marilyn Robinson (hrn), John T. Johnson, Bill Masonheimer (tu), Dennis Budimir, John Pisano, Tommy Tedesco (g, bj), Ray Brown, Joe Mondragon (b), Fred Seykora (b, vc), Clare Fischer, Dave Grusin, Artie Kane, Michael Lang, Mike Melvoin, Varda Ullman (key), Stephen Paietta (pac), Corky Hale (hrp), Larry Bunker, Gene Estes, John Guerin, Ken Park, Joe Porcaro, Emil Radocchia, aka Richards, Jack Ranelli, Mark Stevens, Alvin Stoller, Kenneth Watson (d, per), Victor Feldman (per), Arnold Belnick, Blanche Belnick, Harry Bluestone aka Blostein, Norman Carr, Harold Dicterow, Assa Drori, Irving Geller, William "Bill" Kurasch, Betty Lamagna, Carl Lamagna, Guy Lumia, Erno Neufeld, Wilbert Nuttycombe, John Pintavalle, Tony Posk, Elliot Rosoff, Bob Sanov, Paul Shure, Richard Sortomme, Mari Tsumura, Gerald Vinci, Shari Zippert (vn), Julien Barber, Allan Harshman, Virginia Majewski, Barbara Thomason (vl), Anne Goodman, Dennis Karmazyn, Jess Levy, Edgar Lustgarten, Jackie Lustgarten (vc), Peggy Lee (v, spk)

a. 0000Master Take (A&M) Saved(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
unissued
b. 0000Master Take (A&M) The Case Of M. J. - 3:04(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)
A&M CS/CD75021 5268 4/2 — Mirrors   (1989)
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)
c. 0000 [Edit]Alternate Take (A&M) The Case Of M. J.(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
A&M©Universal CD(Japan) Uciy 3333 — Mirrors   (2001)
d. 0000Master Take (A&M) I Remember - 2:50(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
A&M 451771 — {Some Cats Know / I Remember}   (1975)
A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" TranscriptionP 15767 - P 15768 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Mirrors]   (1975)
A&M CS/CD75021 5268 4/2 — Mirrors   (1989)
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)


Masters & Issues

1. "The Case of M. J."
2. Mirrors [CD; Universal]
Universal's CD #3333 contains an edited version of "The Case of M. J." that is not found in any other commercial release. This edit was originally produced by Leiber & Stoller around 1978; it was one of their seminal steps for a prospective reissue of the album Mirrors. (See note titled The Aborted "Mirrors" Projects, under session dated August 1, 1975.)

Most noticeable in this edit is the absence of the line that Lee murmurs throughout the song -- how old were you when your father went away?" For many listeners who are familiar with the non-edited version, the edit naturally comes off as truncated and disappointing. The original's strings are missing, too.

Although I myself have not listened to Universal CD #3333, other listeners have kindly informed me about its pros and cons. Aside from the edit in "The Case Of M. J. ," they have not noticed any significant differences from the original LP version. Listeners have complained, however, about the CD's sub-par audio quality, deploring its "heavy digital ambience" and audible "tape edits." In short, this Japanese CD cannot be recommended.


Arrangements

1. "Saved"
2. Perry Botkin, Jr.
The arrangement for this session's performance of "Saved" is extant in Peggy Lee's sheet music library. The sheet credits Perry Botkin, Jr. as the arranger.

3. "I Remember"
4. "The Case Of M.J."
The arrangement for this session's "I Remember" is also extant in Lee's library, but it does not identify its author. Since Leiber & Stoller and Lee have credited Johnny Mandel with writing the arrangements for the album Mirrors, and since the album itself credits him with all but one of the arrangements, I have followed suit.


Personnel And Cross-references

1. Collective Personnel
For this session, I have entered the collective personnel found in the back cover of the LP Mirrors. Some (many?) of the above-listed musicians could have thus been present at any of the other sessions but absent from this one.


Dating

This session's performances are preserved in an undated (and unnumbered) master box. Here is my reasoning for the tentative dating that I have assigned to them:

a) Lee's previous session is dated Friday, May 30. Since a date held over the weekend would have been highly unlikely, the earliest date on which this ensuing session could have happened is on the following Monday (June 2).

b) Lee's A&M masters follow a pattern that separate them into two groups, depending on the machine used to record them. The first group consists of masters taped on a 16-track recorder. The second group comprises masters taped on a 24-track machine. The first group is found in boxes bearing May and June dates, whereas the second group is found in boxes bearing dates ranging from June 6 to August 1975. Since the masters under discussion are all 16-track recordings, 'June 5 or before' is the most logical date for them.


Sources

In their autobiography, Leiber and Stoller suggest that, previous to the first of the Mirrors sessions with orchestra, only one rhythm section date had taken place. As can be seen above, this discography claims otherwise. My source is the data written in the master tapes themselves -- or rather, in the master boxes that contain them. Perhaps the producers (or their writer, David Ritz) chose to refer to just one date in order to simplify what was a minor, inconsequential point within their narrative.


Date: June 6, 1975
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles
Label: A&M

Peggy Lee (ldr), Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller (pdr), Hank Cicalo (eng), Perry Botkin, Sr., Johnny Mandel (con), Georgia Alwan, Norman Benno, Gene Cipriano, Harry Klee, Ronald Langinger, Abe Most, John Neufield, Jack Nimitz, Bill Perkins, Jerome Richardson, Thomas W. "Tom" Scott, Bud Shank, George Young (r), Joe Burnett, Marion "Buddy" Childers, Charles "Chuck" Findley, Paul Hubinon, Malcolm McNab, Anthony Terran (t), Charles C. "Charlie" Loper, Richard T. "Dick" Nash, Kenny Shroyer, Phillip Tule, Mike Vlatkovich, Chauncey Welsch (tb), Vincent DeRosa, Alan Robinson, Marilyn Robinson (hrn), John T. Johnson, Bill Masonheimer (tu), Dennis Budimir, John Pisano, Tommy Tedesco (g, bj), Ray Brown, Joe Mondragon (b), Fred Seykora (b, vc), Clare Fischer, Dave Grusin, Artie Kane, Michael Lang, Mike Melvoin, Varda Ullman (key), Stephen Paietta (pac), Corky Hale (hrp), Larry Bunker, Gene Estes, John Guerin, Ken Park, Joe Porcaro, Emil Radocchia, aka Richards, Jack Ranelli, Mark Stevens, Alvin Stoller, Kenneth Watson (d, per), Victor Feldman (per), Arnold Belnick, Blanche Belnick, Harry Bluestone aka Blostein, Norman Carr, Harold Dicterow, Assa Drori, Irving Geller, William "Bill" Kurasch, Betty Lamagna, Carl Lamagna, Guy Lumia, Erno Neufeld, Wilbert Nuttycombe, John Pintavalle, Tony Posk, Elliot Rosoff, Bob Sanov, Paul Shure, Richard Sortomme, Mari Tsumura, Gerald Vinci, Shari Zippert (vn), Julien Barber, Allan Harshman, Virginia Majewski, Barbara Thomason (vl), Anne Goodman, Dennis Karmazyn, Jess Levy, Edgar Lustgarten, Jackie Lustgarten (vc), Peggy Lee (v, spk)

a. 0000Master Take (A&M) Ready To Begin Again (Manya's Song) - 3:20(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Perry Botkin, Sr.
b. 0000Master Take (A&M) Tango - 5:44(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
c. 0000Master Take (A&M) Longings For A Simpler Time - 3:54(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" TranscriptionP 15767 - P 15768 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Mirrors]   (1975)
All titles on: A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)
A&M CS/CD75021 5268 4/2 — Mirrors   (1989)
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)


Songs

1. "Tango"
Leiber & Stoller's "Tango" consists of three parts: an instrumental intro, a recitative by Peggy Lee, and Lee's sung vocal. Only the sung vocal and the recitative were recorded during this session.

For the instrumental intro, not recorded on this date, see comments under session dated August 1, 1975.

Furthermore, the recitative seems to be a composite of various takes, including those recorded laster, during the session dated August 1, 1975.


Musicians And Arrangements

1. Perry Botkin, Jr.
2. Johnny Mandel
Perry Botkin, Jr. conducted and arranged "Ready To Begin Again (Manya's Song)" only. Johnny Mandel arranged and conducted the session's other performances. Both sets of credits are given in the back cover of the album Mirrors and corroborated by the scores, extant at Lee's sheet music library.


Masters (And Recording Technology)

1. 24-Track Recordings
Of Peggy Lee's various A&M sessions, these are the earliest performances recorded on a 24-track machine -- or at least, the earliest that are extant. The previous ones had been taped on a 16-track recorder. Most likely, the A&M Studios had only recently acquired the 24-track machine, and it was made available to Leiber & Stoller on this date.


Date: August 1, 1975
Location: A&M Studios, 1416 N. La Brea Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles
Label: A&M

Peggy Lee (ldr), Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller (pdr), Hank Cicalo (eng), Johnny Mandel (con), Georgia Alwan, Norman Benno, Gene Cipriano, Harry Klee, Ronald Langinger, Abe Most, John Neufield, Jack Nimitz, Bill Perkins, Jerome Richardson, Thomas W. "Tom" Scott, Bud Shank, George Young (r), Joe Burnett, Marion "Buddy" Childers, Charles "Chuck" Findley, Paul Hubinon, Malcolm McNab, Anthony Terran (t), Charles C. "Charlie" Loper, Richard T. "Dick" Nash, Kenny Shroyer, Phillip Tule, Mike Vlatkovich, Chauncey Welsch (tb), Vincent DeRosa, Alan Robinson, Marilyn Robinson (hrn), John T. Johnson, Bill Masonheimer (tu), Dennis Budimir, John Pisano, Tommy Tedesco (g, bj), Ray Brown, Joe Mondragon (b), Fred Seykora (b, vc), Clare Fischer, Dave Grusin, Artie Kane, Michael Lang, Mike Melvoin, Varda Ullman (key), Stephen Paietta (pac), Corky Hale (hrp), Larry Bunker, Gene Estes, John Guerin, Ken Park, Joe Porcaro, Emil Radocchia, aka Richards, Jack Ranelli, Mark Stevens, Alvin Stoller, Kenneth Watson (d, per), Victor Feldman (per), Arnold Belnick, Blanche Belnick, Harry Bluestone aka Blostein, Norman Carr, Harold Dicterow, Assa Drori, Irving Geller, William "Bill" Kurasch, Betty Lamagna, Carl Lamagna, Guy Lumia, Erno Neufeld, Wilbert Nuttycombe, John Pintavalle, Tony Posk, Elliot Rosoff, Bob Sanov, Paul Shure, Richard Sortomme, Mari Tsumura, Gerald Vinci, Shari Zippert (vn), Julien Barber, Allan Harshman, Virginia Majewski, Barbara Thomason (vl), Anne Goodman, Dennis Karmazyn, Jess Levy, Edgar Lustgarten, Jackie Lustgarten (vc), Peggy Lee (v, spk)

a. 0000Master Take (A&M) Say It - 4:03(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" TranscriptionP 15767 - P 15768 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Mirrors]   (1975)
USA Government's Treasury Department Service LP76 143-144 — The Grammy Treasure Chest [Various Artists; 1 Peggy Lee Vocal]   (1976)
A&M CS/CD75021 5268 4/2 — Mirrors   (1989)
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)
b. 0000Master Take (A&M) Professor Hauptmann's Performing Dogs - 5:58(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)
A&M CS/CD75021 5268 4/2 — Mirrors   (1989)
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)
c. 0000Master Take (A&M) A Little White Ship - 3:04(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 12" TranscriptionP 15767 - P 15768 — Basic Music Library [5 songs from LP Mirrors]   (1975)
A&M 45(United Kingdom) Ams 7225 — {I've Got Them Feelin' Too-Good-Today Blues / A Little White Ship} [single never released in the USA]   (1976)
A&M CS/CD75021 5268 4/2 — Mirrors   (1989)
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)
d. 0000Master Take (A&M) I've Got Them Feelin' Too-Good-Today Blues - 2:20(Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) / arr: Johnny Mandel
A&M 8-track/CS/LP8t/Ca/Sp 4547 — Mirrors   (1975)
A&M 45(United Kingdom) Ams 7225 — {I've Got Them Feelin' Too-Good-Today Blues / A Little White Ship} [single never released in the USA]   (1976)
A&M CS/CD75021 5268 4/2 — Mirrors   (1989)
Universal's Hip-O Select Licensed CDB 0004169 02 — PEGGY LEE SINGS LEIBER & STOLLER   (2005)
e. 0000Alternate Take (A&M) Tango [Recitative](Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
unissued
f. 0000Alternate Take (A&M) Tango [Recitative](Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
unissued


Songs & Masters

1. "Professor Hauptmann's Performing Dogs"
Mike Stoller has composed two numbers that bear the title "Professor Hauptmann's Performing Dogs." The first was an instrumental piece originally issued on the B-side of the 1968 single "Silver Sea Horse," recorded by Mike Stoller & The Stoller System on Amy Records #11027.

The second number is, of course, the one recorded at this session. It began life as a lyric by Jerry Leiber, to which Stoller then wrote music.

The two numbers are entirely different from one another, sharing only the title. (The title is actually Leiber's device. Leiber was the one who suggested it for Stoller's 1968 instrumental, and who re-used it for his own 1975 lyric.) ASCAP lists the title only once, and places both Peggy Lee and Mike Stoller under it, as performers.

2. "Tango" [Recitative]
This session's performances of "Tango" consisted of the song's spoken part only; the sung segment was recorded earlier. (See session dated June 6, 1975.)

The recitative had also been attempted at that earlier date. Although I have classified this session's recitatives as unissued, in reality they are not entirely so: in their pursuit of a perfect take, Leiber & Stoller are believed to have spliced some of their lines into the June 6 master.

3. "Little Tango"
Also recorded during this session was Tango's instrumental intro, known as "Little Tango" or, alternatively, as "Tango Del Fuego." (This instrumental has had a separate life of its own; director Paul Mazursky used it in his film The Tempest.) Since Lee was not an active participant in its recording, I have not entered "Little Tango" in this discography's database.


Dating

1. A General Note About The Dating Of The A&M Sessions
2. April To August 1975: Full Recording Period For The Album Mirrors
The recording dates that I have entered for the majority of this discography's A&M performances were found in the master boxes that contain them. The possibility remains that, instead of the actual recording day, the dating on those boxes could refer to any other part of the production process. Some cutting and removal of performances from one box to another could have also happened.

Notice that, if this and the previous session's dates are correct, almost a month elapsed between them. During an interview for the December 27, 1975 issue of Record World, Lee told David McGee that "we did set keys [for the album Mirrors] in April and then I went away and when I returned we recorded for a while and I went away again and came back and finished it ..... I had to go to Japan, so we set the keys on the things they did have and when I returned they had written new things. By then it had become a concept album."


Arrangements

1. Johnny Mandel
In the back cover of the album Mirrors, the arrangements for this session's numbers are credited to Johnny Mandel. All the arrangements but the one for "Professor Hauptmann's Performing Dogs" are also extant in Lee's sheet music library, but "Tango" is the only one which names as arranger -- Mandel, indeed.


The Aborted Mirrors Projects


Peggy Lee Sings The Cabaret Songs Of Leiber & Stoller
The Unreleased LP


Listed in A&M's log files is an album titled Peggy Lee Sings The Cabaret Songs Of Leiber & Stoller. Producers Leiber & Stoller conceived the album around 1978. They planned it to be both a reissue and an expansion of their earlier LP with Peggy Lee, Mirrors (A&M Records #4547). As part of the plan, the record label proceeded to assemble a complete LP master. A catalogue number (A&M Records #4734) was assigned to the prospective album, and the cover art was designed, too. But the project was eventually shelved.

Had it come to fruition, Peggy Lee Sings The Cabaret Songs Of Leiber & Stoller would have contained new remixes of various songs from Mirrors as well as songs newly recorded by Peggy Lee. Leiber & Stoller did go on to remix at least one or two numbers, but there's no evidence of new recording activity from Lee.

The 2005 CD Peggy Lee Sings Leiber & Stoller (A&M B0004169) is a modern-day incarnation of the abandoned 1978 project. A far more advanced reincarnation. Among the CD's significant advantages are its superior remix and its inclusion of previously unreleased numbers from these 1975 sessions.


Mirrors / Is That All There Is?
The Unreleased CD


In 2004, word of mouth began to spread about an upcoming Peggy Lee CD. Then in progress, the planned disc was to be a twofer which would combine the albums Mirrors and Is That All There Is?. The Australian label Raven Records was preparing it. By 2005, additional word came about the completion of the liner notes and of some remixes, too.

But in 2005, when Raven found out about the upcoming release of Peggy Lee Sings Leiber & Stoller, the record label graciously held off releasing its twofer. Afterwards, plans to release the project seem to have been fully abandoned, perhaps due to two competing CDs in the market (Hip-o Select's Peggy Lee Sings Leiber & Stoller and EMI's A Natural Woman / Is That All There Is?).



Peggy Lee With Leiber & Stoller At A&M Records


Producers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller were responsible for bringing Peggy Lee to A&M, a label with which they had established a partnership at the time of these 1975 sessions. After having worked twice with her in the 1960s (see Capitol sessions dated November 14, 1962 and January 24, 1969), the independent producers had again approached Lee in the early 1970s, while she was still under contract with Capitol Records. The team's desire was to produce an album titled Is That All There Is? for Capitol and Lee. The prospective album would have started off with that hit single, and would have then moved on to other songs in the same vein, all of them co-written by the pair. Unfortunately, there was no expression of interest from Lee for the duration of her Capitol contract, nor during the couple of years that followed.

Any misgivings on her part would have been understandable. After the ordeal that she had undergone while trying to convince Capitol that the song "Is That All There Is?" was worth recording and releasing, she must have been wary of pitching the idea of a full album containing similar material. An even greater source of concern must have been the reaction of her audiences. She had already faced negative criticism from conservatively minded listeners who had deemed "Is That All There Is?" morally reprehensible. As someone who was striving to keep a positive outlook in her own personal life, such reactions had grieved Lee. She had responded with a strenuous defense of the lyrics, declaring them open to positive interpretation.

In 1975, Lee finally expressed interest in doing an album with Leiber & Stoller. By then she was no longer tied to Capitol, and Leiber & Stoller have presumed that she accepted because there were no other record contract prospects in her horizon, either. Such a presumption is erroneous. Since 1974, British producer Ken Barnes had been trying to persuade Lee to record under his tutelage. (She would do so later on; see this page's 1977 sessions.) And there could have been other offers of which I am not aware; I do know that she recorded for another team of independent producers at an unknown date between 1973 and 1977, although that project failed to generate a commercial release.

With Lee on board, Leiber & Stoller next had to convince Jerry Moss, the record producer and businessman who, along with Herb Alpert, owned A&M. Moss was wary of signing Lee due to word of mouth, presumably from other executives, which portrayed Lee as difficult. "We'll sign Peggy for one LP if you guys guarantee that you'll produce it," said Moss, according to Leiber & Stoller in their autobiography Hound Dog. Leiber believes that main reason why Moss struck the deal was his gratitude for the international success of "Stuck In The Middle With You," a single that Leiber & Stoller had produced in 1972 for the British group Stealers Wheel, an A&M act.

The initial sessions seem to have been highly experimental. No conceptual focus is apparent in the choice of repertoire, which included one plug tune (written by an A&M act), one standard (updated to a reggae beat) and an assortment of Leiber & Stoller numbers from various genres (rock 'n' roll, r&b, proto-disco, theatre). Those numbers were recorded with a rhythm section. According to Peter Stoller, remix producer of the CD Peggy Lee Sings Leiber & Stoller, most of those songs were recorded "as a sort of back up proposal in case A&M didn't go for the Mirrors concept. When Mirrors got the green light, those ... recordings were abandoned."

Also recorded during the earlier sessions were two pieces which showed a literary bent ("The Case Of M. J.," "I Remember"). Both received lavish orchestral treatments from Johnny Mandel. Either at this point or a little later, Lee nixed another couple of worthy compositions ("Let's Bring Back World War One" and, most notably, "Humphrey Bogart") on account of their lyrics.

Soon thereafter, Leiber & Stoller met with Jerry Moss, Gil Friesen and other executives, for a discussion of the progress that they were making with the ongoing sessions. The producers played for them a demo that contained the songs which had been recorded so far. The rhythm section numbers were deemed "fine" and "typical Peggy" but the superlative "brilliant" was reserved for the two orchestral performances. "Do the rest of the album like that," Friessen said to the producers. (The autobiography identifies the two orchestral numbers as "The Case Of M. J." and "A Little White Ship" but the data supplied below suggests that the second number might have been "I Remember," not "A Little White Ship.") Later on, after the producers had finished (re-)writing the full series of songs that they had been planning, the full concept of Mirrors took shape.

Even though it was alternatively ignored or panned at the time of its release, Mirrors went on to reach cult status in subsequent decades, eliciting admiration from younger fans and from music critics who no longer evaluated it with the biased lens of the earlier critics' r&b and rock 'n' roll roots.


Sessions Reported: 6

Performances Reported: 26

Unique Songs Reported: 18

Unique Issues Reported: 10