Peggy Lee's Bio-Discography:
The Benny Goodman Years (1941-1943)
by Iván Santiago-Mercado

Page generated on May 15, 2017


PRELIMINARY NOTES



Photos

A young Peggy Lee is visually showcased above. The first photograph captures Lee's looks during her late teens. Undated, the image is believed to fall within the four years that preceded the momentous hiring of the singer for a canary position with The Benny Goodman Orchestra. The other two photos were shot at Goodman recording sessions dating from early 1942, when Lee was 21 years old. Since both belong to the period to be discussed throughout this page, these two last shots will receive further attention below.

Contents

Peggy Lee joined The Benny Goodman Orchestra in mid-1941 and left it in mid-1943.  This discographical page covers the 18 sessions on which she participated during that time, all of them while serving as the band's official, permanent canary. For most of the sessions, I have provided not only standard discographical detail (e.g., personnel, masters, issues) but also an extensive annotation.  All session notes aim at bringing attention to topics connected to the given date, including anything from an unsolved matter to worthwhile minutia (e.g., uncertainties about the personnel listed, mistakes found in the liner notes of relevant LP or CD releases, features through which one alternate take can be distinguished from another, and so forth).  Lighter subjects are also explored: anecdotal stories from the session dates, peak positions attained by Lee's vocals in the contemporary music charts, et cetera.  Finally, each session comes with its own photographic material. (This photographic feature fulfills both aesthetic and didactic purposes.  In a page filled with extensive blocks of text, photos serve as visual markers.  Because each session contains just one row of pictures, viewers scanning the page will hopefully be able to recognize more quickly the text's shift from one record date to the next.)

Additional Information

The notes at the bottom of this page offer general information about Peggy Lee's working period with Benny Goodman.  Topics covered therein include (1) The 34 Masters And Their Alternate Takes, (2) Peggy's Popularity In The [Music] Polls, and (3) the main Sources from which I gathered the information supplied.  Such is by not, however, the full extent of Lee-Goodman data to be found in this bio-discography. A relatively lengthy overview of Lee's year and a half as Goodman's canary is part of the discography's miscellaneous pages, too.  Therein, subjects up for discussion range from (1) Benny Goodman's Hiring Of Peggy Lee and (2) Lee's Departure From The Benny Goodman Orchestra to (3) The Frank Sinatra Event At The Paramount and (4) The AFM Recording Ban. Readers wanting to explore the Lee-Goodman topic even further are also welcome to check three supplementary pages.  The first covers her extant concerts and radio broadcasts with the bandleader.  The other two pages display mostly photos of their LPs and CDs, one of them being circumscribed to the aforementioned airchecks and their commercial releases.  (If curious about the singer's career before she began recording with Benny Goodman and became nationally famous, you may want to consult this discography's Pre-recording Period as well.)

Recommendations & Technicalities

For elucidation of the various codes that I have used while listing musicians and instruments in the sessions below, check the Abbreviations And Symbols page. If looking for CD recommendations, pay attention to releases whose titles are in boldface and uppercase. (As examples, take a look at the second, third and fourth items listed immediately below, under the first take of "Elmer's Tune." Recommendations are based on sound quality and/or rarity of the tracks included.) Note also that, under each song or master, the listing of issues (LPs, CDs, etc.) has been arranged chronologically, by year of release. As for the blue arrowheads periodically found throughout (next to some album titles), click on them if you want to see a longer, nearly complete list of Goodman-Lee albums containing any given Peggy Lee performance. Finally, this page's bottom notes include an explanation of certain discographical matters in need of clarification, including my idiosyncratic designation of some takes as "secondary masters" and my occasional use of take letters instead of take numbers.


Date: August 15, 1941
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), John Hammond (pdr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Skip Martin, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Billy Butterfield, Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Cootie Williams (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), John Simmons (b), Mel Powell (p), Sid Catlett (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CCO 3950-1Alternate Take (Columbia) Elmer's Tune - 2:50(Elmer Albrecht, Sammy Gallop, Dick Jurgens)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7616 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume V; The Earl   (1980)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDCk 53422 [reissued 2011] — BENNY GOODMAN, FEATURING PEGGY LEE ("Best Of Big Bands" Series)    (1993)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8822 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME II, 1 & 2   (1994)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Acrobat Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Addcd 3047 — Where Or When   (2008)
b. CCO 3950-2Master Take (Columbia) Elmer's Tune - 2:51(Elmer Albrecht, Sammy Gallop, Dick Jurgens)
COLUMBIA 78Co 36359 — {Elmer's Tune / The Birth Of The Blues [instrumental]}   (1941)
COLUMBIA EPB 1636 — Benny Goodman Presents Peggy Lee    (1953)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)




Photo

Publicity shots of Peggy Lee, all of them taken in 1941.


At The Recording Session

The events known to have transpired at this recording date are covered in an overview of Peggy Lee's tenure with The Benny Goodman Orchestra, which I have incorporated to this discography's miscellaneous pages.


Songs

1. "Elmer's Tune" And The Music Charts
"Elmer's Tune" was not fondly remembered by Peggy Lee. In 1983, an interviewer described Lee as involuntarily shuddering at the mention of the tune: "Oh, that. First, I hated Elmer's Tune, and second, it was in Helen Forrest's key ..."

Leaving aside the unpleasant memories of a difficult recording session (and the unsavory challenge of singing in somebody else's key), there were other plausible reasons for Lee's dislike of the number. "Elmer's Tune" was a far cry from the sophisticated repertoire of swing and standards that she had come to associate with The Benny Goodman Orchestra. The novelty tune features lyrics which, while cute and catchy, evoke a backwoods atmosphere: "What makes a lady of eighty / Go out on the loose / Why does the gander / Meander in search of a goose / What put a kick in a chicken / The magic in June / It's just Elmer's tune ..." Better suited for a vocal group (or a hillbilly act), such tongue-twisting lyrics must have failed to meet the high expectations of the young Lee: they were not the most ideal of choices for her debut with the top band that she had hugely admired for years.

In the estimation of many of the era's big band fans, this ditty was, on the other hand, a winner: playfully humorous and, most importantly, eminently danceable. A version by The Glenn Miller Orchestra became the nation's top hit in early October 1941. It featured Ray Eberle and The Modernaires on vocals. Competing versions included not only Goodman's but also recordings by Bob Crosby And His Orchestra, The Andrews Sisters, and Lawrence Welk And His Orchestra. Then there was the original rendition, an instrumental by Dick Jurgens and His Orchestra that reached the top 10 as well. (After Mller asked Jurgens if the instrumental had been set to words at all, Sammy Gallop was enlisted to write lyrics to the tune. Jurgens' songwriting credit might be entirely based on his suggestion of a title for the song.) Both hit versions counted with the advantage of being sold at competitive prices. Miller's was issued by RCA on its budget subsidiary Bluebird, and Jurgens' on Columbia own budget line, Okeh.

Though released in the pricier Columbia label, Goodman's version enjoyed some measure of popularity, at least in the Chicago area. Reports of its success come from contemporaneous newspapers, which are vague as to specifics. The Goodman-Lee version is also listed in Edward Foote Gardner's Popular Songs Of The Twentieth Century: A Charted History as one of four that received airplay and which made a dent in Billboard's music charts. (The fourth version was the one by The Andrews Sisters, on Decca. Foote Gardner's book does not include charting positions or any other details.)

Thanks to airplay not only on radio but also on film, "Elmer's Tune" remained current for about two years after the charting versions had run their course. Movie audiences who went to see Universal's Strictly In The Groove (premiering in November 1942, running nationwide in 1943) were treated to yet one more interpretation of the melody. (For another number featured in Strictly In The Groove that Lee happened to record, see her #1 hit "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place," which she and Goodman recorded on November 13, 1941.) Moreover, the popular radio show Hit Parade named "Elmer's Tune" one of the top songs of 1943; the ditty had spent 15 weeks in the show's countdown. Not surprisingly, the song's original author made a further attempt at extending the tune's lasting popularity: Elmer Albrecht (a Chicago citizen who worked as both a pianist and an undertaker) wrote a follow-up which he of course titled "Elmer Done It Again," and which, unfortunately, did not make for profitable business.


Masters And Issues

1. Columbia Co #36359 [single]
This 78-rpm disc, containing "Elmer's Tune" on one side and the instrumental "The Birth Of The Blues" on its flip side, was Peggy Lee's debut on record. The disc's label, seen here, does credit her by name ("vocal chorus by Peggy Lee").

2. "Elmer's Tune" [Song] And Benny Goodman, Featuring Peggy Lee [CD]
The 1993 Columbia/Sony CD Benny Goodman, Featuring Peggy Lee identifies its version of Elmer's Tune as a "previously unissued master." For multiple reasons, such a wording is equivocal, if not plain wrong. First of all, the version included in the CD is not the master, but an alternate take (#1). Second, the master take (#2) had been issued many times before 1993 (going back all the way to 1941, when it debuted on Columbia's subsidiary label Okeh).

Third, any claim that CCO 3950-1 was "previously unissued" would also be inaccurate. Back in 1980, the alternate take had been released for the first time by the collectors' label Phontastic, probably with the blessing of Benny Goodman himself. (Phontastic had close ties to Goodman's friend, bio-discographer, and archivist, Donald Russell Connor -- aka Russ Connor. Goodman's own music library was of the likely sources from which Phontastic was able to make many alternate takes commercially available.) Columbia's likeliest reason for considering CCO 3950-1 unissued would be the fact that the company itself had not released it before 1993. As explained by Russell Connor, who wrote the notes for the aforementioned Phontastic album: "[i]n company with other major label producers, Sony refuses to acknowledge prior releases on unauthorized labels."

3. "Elmer's Tune" [Song] And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
Minute mistakes plague the discographical annotation of the otherwise definitive Columbia/Sony 1999 CD set Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947. Those mistakes will be pointed out one by one through this page, in the suitable session notes. (The errors are also collectively listed within one single entry, as part of the notes specifically about the set itself, viewable in this discography's page for CDs. That huge page is chronologically arranged; scroll down to the 1999 issues.) The first of the CD set's errors pertains to the take of "Elmer's Tune" that it contains. Contrary to the claim made in the notes, it is not #2 (the master) but #1 (the alternate).

4. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this session was the instrumental "The Birth Of The Blues" (master #3951).

5. Breakdowns
There are no extant breakdowns from this date.


Arrangements

1. "Elmer's Tune"
The arranger of "Elmer's Tune" was either Mel Powell or Eddie Sauter. As discussed in the next paragraphs, my main sources disagree on this matter. Powell's own comments about this date, quoted in Lee's autobiography, vaguely point to Sauter as the arranger, and at the present time I am inclined to believe that such was the case.

In the track listing of various Columbia Legacy CDs (#53422, #65686), Mel Powell is listed as pianist/arranger of "Elmer's Tune." And yet, the liner annotator of one of those CDs (#53422) alludes instead to Eddie Sauter as the arranger. Perhaps one or both of the track list annotators wrongly inferred that, because Powell was the session's pianist, he had to have been the arranger, too.

For his part, Goodman bio-discographer Russ Connor lists Mel Powell not only as this session's pianist but also as the arranger of its other performance (the instrumental "The Birth of The Blues"). However, Connor does not list any arranger for "Elmer's Tune," thereby suggesting that he, too, is uncertain as to the man's identity.


Location

None of the consulted sources identifies the exact location of Benny Goodman's Chicago sessions. In one instance, Russell Connor does refer to "Chicago's Columbia Studios," but he does not provide any further specifics.


Date: August 20, 1941
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), John Hammond (pdr), Bill Savory (eng), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Skip Martin, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Billy Butterfield, Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Cootie Williams (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), John Simmons (b), Mel Powell (p), Sid Catlett (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CCO 3981-3Alternate Take (Columbia) My Old Flame(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
b. CCO 3981-2Alternate Take (Columbia) My Old Flame(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
c. CCO 3981-1Master Take (Columbia) My Old Flame - 3:16(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7616 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume V; The Earl   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8822 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME II, 1 & 2   (1994)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1271 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1941, VOLUME 3   (2002)
Acrobat Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Addcd 3047 — Where Or When   (2008)
d. CCO 3982-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) I See A Million People(Una Mae Carlisle, Robert Sour) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
e. CCO 3982-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) I See A Million People(Una Mae Carlisle, Robert Sour) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
f. CCO 3982-2Alternate Take (Columbia) I See A Million People(Una Mae Carlisle, Robert Sour) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
g. CCO 3982-1Master Take (Columbia) I See A Million People - 2:42(Una Mae Carlisle, Robert Sour) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA 78Co 36379 — {I See A Million People / The Count [instrumental]}   (1941)
COLUMBIA 78/7" 33.3 rpm singleCo 39034 / 1 865 — {I See A Million People [Benny Goodman instrumental] / I See A Million People [Cab Calloway instrumental]}   (1950)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 1971 - P 1972 — Basic Music Library [6 Benny Goodman numbers, 2 of them with Peggy Lee]   (1951)



Photo

A picture of Benny Goodman in 1941 (probably taken in March or April of that year) and an autographed, undated picture of Peggy Lee, possibly from 1941 as well.


At The Recording Session

The events known to have transpired at this recording date are covered in an overview of Peggy Lee's tenure with The Benny Goodman Orchestra, which I have incorporated to this discography's miscellaneous pages.


Dating

In his book Benny Goodman: A Supplemental Discography, David Jessup point out a minor discrepancy found in Columbia's lacquer logs. One of this session's lacquer discs is listed not under August 20 but under August 21, 1941. Jessup considers the matter "most likely a misdating," although he does not fully discard the "possibility of a midnight session." The disc in question contains take #1 of "I See A Million People" and two takes of the instrumental "The Birth of The Blues."


Personnel

1. John Hammond
John Hammond was the producer of Goodman's 1941 Chicago sessions. (The identity of the man who produced all subsequent dates -- which were held in New York -- remains unknown to me. The Japanese LP Elmer's Tune gives credit to Hammond for the production of all 32 master takes in the album (i.e., the recordings from both the Chicago and the New York sessions, 1941-1942), but I am wary of collective credits, since they often turn out to be inaccurate. Besides, this collective credit to Hammond is not found in other official issues, nor is it acknowledged in Benny Goodman's official bio-discography, compiled by Donald Russell Connor. What's more, Goodman expert Ross Firestone states in his book Swing, Swing, Swing: The Life & Times of Benny Goodman that, at the end of 1941, Hammond "took what was described as an indefinite leave of absence from Columbia Records.")


Cross-references

1. "My Old Flame"
According to Peggy Lee, "My Old Flame" was the number -- or one of the numbers -- that she sang during her very first concert with The Benny Goodman Orchestra. (That onstage appearance seems to have taken place just one or two days before her August 15 debut session -- or, if not just one or two, at most three or four days earlier.) "My Old Flame" is, therefore, a very important song in Peggy Lee's canon. After she became a solo artist, Lee re-recorded it twice, once for Decca (on June 7, 1956) and once for Capitol (on February 28, 1969). It is the only composition that Lee recorded in each of the three main decades of her discographical career, and for each of the three majors who contracted her for extended periods of time. (Below, see also session dated October 2, 1941, which lists a Goodman-and-Lee remake of "My Old Flame.")


Songs

1. "I See A Million People" In The Music Charts
In his book Popular Songs Of The Twentieth Century: A Charted History, Edward Foote Gardner lists the three artists whose versions of this song enjoyed airplay in 1941 -- according to his research methodology. One of them is the original version sung by the co-songwriter, Una Mae Carlisle, and another was the above-listed Benny Goodman-Peggy Lee version, issued on Columbia. The third is also listed in Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954: Cab Calloway's, whose vocal was released by Columbia's budget line Okeh. (Whitburn lists neither the Una Mae Carlisle nor the Goodman-Lee version.)


Masters

1. World Transcription Recordings
2. Mysterious, Unknown 1941 Peggy Lee Recordings?
Discographer Donald Russell Connor makes reference to some mysterious Goodman & Lee sides whose existence still remains in doubt: "music press reports at this time [i.e., in late August 1941] claimed Benny recorded some sides with vocals by Peggy for World Transcriptions. Benny has no recollection of such a session, cannot imagine under what circumstances it would have occurred."

I have not come across any other mentions of such transcriptions. (Lee did record for the World transcription service, but she did so in the 1950s, by which time she was an established solo artist, no longer tied to the Goodman orchestra.) The aforementioned music press reports from 1941 may thus be erroneous. Misinterpretation could have stemmed from the fact that, between 1939 and 1941, Columbia Records occasionally made use of the World Broadcasting System's studios in New York. Perhaps Goodman and his orchestra went to World's recording facilities not to wax transcriptions, but to participate in a radio broadcast, or even to record a studio date. (Were the possibility of such a recording session to be entertained, it should be noted that the location at which the Goodman-Lee studio dates took place is not known in every single case. But any session in New York's World's studios would have to have happened later than August, since during that month the participants were still in Chicago.)

Another possible explanation for the claim of a World transcription session: many studio recordings of the 1940s were re-pressed on transcription discs by the Armed Forces Radio Service. For instance, Goodman-and-Lee's Columbia recordings of "I See A Million People," "On The Sunny Side Of The Street," and "Why Don't You Do Right?" made appearances on AFRS transcription discs. Confusion could have resulted from reports that such discs were being made. (This is a less likely possibility, however, especially if said reports were circulating as early as August 1941.)

In conclusion, there is no factual evidence of 1941 World transcription recordings by Lee with Goodman. Still, the lack of evidence does not automatically discard the possibility that such recordings were made. (As for Goodman's incredulous reaction, his memory is known to have been faulty in other occasions.)

3. "I See A Million People"
This session's three unissued takes of "I See A Million People" were not kept in Columbia's vaults. For that reason, most of the official paperwork at Columbia makes no mention of them. Goodman bio-discographer Donald Russell Connor explains that they were found in the possession of audio engineer Bill Savory, who kept them as souvenirs of the date, after they were discarded. (As previously mentioned, Savory was not a regular member of Columbia's staff in Chicago. He became involved in the present session at Goodman's request. According to Russ Connor, the bandleader felt "unhappy with the engineering in Columbia's Chicago studios." (Addendum, 2014: these alternate takes are also mentioned in David Jessup's 2010 book Benny Goodman: A Discographical Supplement. The author consulted Columbia's lacquer logs, and found out that one of the takes, previously reported by Connor as numberless, was identified as #2 in the logs.)

4. "My Old Flame" (Master Designation)
"My Old Flame" was first recorded on this session, then re-recorded on October 2, 1941. When tunes were re-recorded at different dates, Columbia usually assigned the same matrix number to the resulting takes from both dates. "My Old Flame" is an exception. Perhaps the fact that each date took place in a different city led to the exceptional treatment.

5. "My Old Flame" ("Missing" Takes)
Takes #2 and #3 of "My Old Flame" are not listed in Donald Russell Connor's bio-discographical works. They were discovered during a more recent inspection of Columbia's lacquer logs. David Jessup, author of the aforementioned Benny Goodman: A Supplemental Discography (2010), was the first to reveal, in print, the existence of both takes.

6. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this session were the instrumentals "The Birth Of The Blues" (master #3951; a remake) and "Clarinet A La King" (master #3980).

7. Breakdowns
There are no extant breakdowns from this date.

8. An August 21, 1941 Follow-up Session?
According to Benny Goodman discographer David Jessup, "the [Columbia] lacquer logs cite a date of 21 August 1941 for the disc containing -1 of My Old Flame and -3, -2 of Birth Of The Blues (in that order). It's most likely a misdating ... {clip} ... but there's a possibility of a past-midnight session."


Issues

1. "My Old Flame" [Song] And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
The notes of the otherwise definitive 2CD Columbia/Sony 1999 CD set Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 are plagued with discographical mistakes and what can be best described as "conditional" truths. Among them is the claim that CCO 3981-1 ("My Old Flame") had never been issued before. While it is true that the Columbia family of labels had not released previously released it, the take had appeared, with Goodman's approval, in two issues from the collectors' label Phontastic.


Discographical Clarifications

1. Take #3982-"A"
2. Take #3982-"B"
For an explanation of my use of letters as suffixes in the above-listed takes, see note at the very bottom of this page.


Date: September 25, 1941; 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Skip Martin, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Billy Butterfield, Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Cootie Williams (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Morty Stuhlmaker (b), Mel Powell (p), Jo Jones (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 31363-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) How Deep Is The Ocean? - 3:20(Irving Berlin) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1015 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 8; 1936-1955   (1986)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1271 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1941, VOLUME 3   (2002)
b. CO 31363-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) How Deep Is The Ocean?(Irving Berlin) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
c. CO 31363-2Alternate Take (Columbia) How Deep Is The Ocean? - 3:19(Irving Berlin) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7616 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume V; The Earl   (1980)
COLUMBIA LP/CS/CDCs/Cj/Ck 40834 — [Benny Goodman] Clarinet A La King ("Columbia Jazz Masterpieces" Series; Benny Goodman, Volume II)   (1987)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8822 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME II, 1 & 2   (1994)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Acrobat Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Addcd 3047 — Where Or When   (2008)
d. CO 31363-1Alternate Take (Columbia) How Deep Is The Ocean? - 3:13(Irving Berlin) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Nostalgia Book Club Licensed LPNost 1004 (also: Co Alb P3 13618) — [Various Artists] Rare Big Band Gems 1932-1947   (1976)
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1014 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 7; 1941-1942   (1985)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1271 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1941, VOLUME 3   (2002)
e. CO 31366-1Alternate Take (Columbia) That's The Way It Goes - 3:05(Sid Robin, Alec Wilder) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
f. CO 31366-2Master Take (Columbia) That's The Way It Goes - 3:09(Sid Robin, Alec Wilder) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA EP/LPG 4 19 [7 1500-1502]; also B 356 [5 1667-1669]/ GL 523; reissues CL 523 & Jgl 523 [rel. 1975 by CBS] — [Benny Goodman] Benny Goodman Presents Arrangements By Eddie Sauter    (1953)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)
Hallmark Licensed LP(United Kingdom) Hm 503 — We'll Meet Again [Reissue Of Columbia's Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman]   (1967)
g. CO 31367-1Alternate Take (Columbia) Let's Do It - 2:00(Cole Porter) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
h. CO 31367-2"Alt. Master" (Columbia) Let's Do It - 2:01(Cole Porter) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6474 — {Let's Do It [take 4 pressing]/ The Earl [instrumental]}   (1941)
COLUMBIA's Epic LPEe 22025 [reissue: Columbia Sp Prods P 18711] — [Benny Goodman] Clarinet A La King ("Encore" Series)   (1968)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)



Photos

Pictures of pianist Mel Powell, the prodigy who helped Peggy Lee so much during her early days with The Benny Goodman Orchestra, and who went on to become a life-long friend of hers. Powell joined Goodman's orchestra when he was 18 years old. Nearly 50 years later (1990), he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music.


Dating

1. Appointment Hours
The three-hour period entered above (1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.) is the official time amount for which Liederkranz Hall was booked on behalf of Benny Goodman. In practice, the leader and his band might have left earlier or later than 4:00 p.m. In the same manner, the official booking time has been entered for all other sessions in this page, except where otherwise indicated.


Location

1. Liederkranz Hall
2. Other NY Columbia Studios
See notes at the bottom of this page.


Songs (And Cross-references)

1. "Let's Do It"
According to Goodman bio-discographer Donald Russell Connor, "Let's Do It" was Peggy Lee's "first big hit" with The Benny Goodman Orchestra and "a must in her repertoire for years. He adds that "Peggy's sexy treatment of those clever lyrics was a looked-for highlight of Benny's dance and radio dates of wartime '40's." Russ Connor seems to be referring to audience demand at Goodman's concerts, which were sometimes broadcast over the radio airwaves.

Despite his allusion to "Let's Do It" as a highlight at Goodman's concert and radio dates, Connor's bio-discography lists only two radio remotes in which Lee is heard singing the number -- that is to say, just two extant broadcast performances, out of nearly six dozens. Perhaps the number was indeed sung often by Lee, as Russell Connor claims, but the radio networks chose to close their lines during most of her performances, due to the objectionable lyrics. (Ever since its original publication in 1928, the song's suggestive lyrics had kept it out of the airwaves, and thereby away from a significant chunk of the record-buying public.) Then again, perhaps the vague claims of radio censorship that are I've heard at inaccurate. At any rate, Russell Connor's comment suggests that "Let's Do It" was Lee's unofficial first hit.

Peggy Lee herself told radio broadcaster Fred Hall that the Cole Porter standard was among the numbers that she had sung during her pre-Goodman days at the Buttery Room of Chicago's Ambassador West Hotel. Hence "Let's Do It" may have been Lee's first active contribution (or suggestion) to the band's repertoire, and as such, an indication that she was gaining a footing amidst Goodman's ensemble. In her autobiography, the singer further clarified how she became acquainted with the tune. "Rather late at night after I sang," explained Lee, "I would go to Rush Street and hear Laura Ricker [sic; Rucker] and Baby Dodds [brother of Johnny Dodds] -- two of the truly old-time greats. Laura played the piano and sang, Baby sang and played the drums ...... she taught me how to sing songs like Let's Do It ... They both had quite an effect on me, and, without reservation, I loved them very much."

The Benny Goodman Orchestra re-recorded "Let's Do It" on October 21. That saucier-sounding version (not this one) is the Peggy Lee vocal that has become best-known through continued issuing, although this version also displays a fine reading of the lyrics.

2. "How Deep Is The Ocean?"
For comments about Lee's rendition(s) of this song, see notes under session dated October 8, 1941.


Masters And Cross-references

1. Non-Lee Masters
2. Non-Lee Vocals: Tommy Taylor
Also recorded during this session were "The Earl" (master #31364; an instrumental) and " 'Tis Autumn," which features a vocal by Tommy Taylor (master #3136).

3. Sequence Of Masters And Takes
During this session, the band actually recorded numerous takes of both "The Earl" and "How Deep Is The Ocean?". Word of mouth suggests that Goodman was dissatisfied with the session's drummer, who was not the band's regular drummer at the time (Sid Cattlett) but Jo Jones. Extant in reference copies, the recording sequence begins with two completed takes of "How Deep Is The Ocean?," which are followed by various takes of "The Earl," some of them also completed, some aborted. Yet more takes of both songs ensue, but without drums. When queried decades later, a hesitant Goodman remarked that the sometimes problematic acoustics at Liederkranz Hall had probably led him and his engineer to get rid of the drums. He did not think that there had been any difficulties with the session's personnel -- other session witnesses have suggested otherwise -- or at least he had no recollection of any.

4. "How Deep Is The Ocean?" (Takes' Order And Availability)
Before the CD era, Columbia kept this session's takes of "How Deep Is The Ocean?" unissued. If interested in the take that Columbia did originally issue on a 78-rpm single, see remake session dated October 8, 1941.

The presence or absence of one instrument differentiates the takes of "How Deep Is The Ocean?" that I have named A and B from the ones that were numbered 1 and 2. Drums are present in A and B, absent in 1 and 2.

Furthermore, Columbia's database lists only take #1 and take #2. The other two takes of "How Deep Is The Ocean?" were belatedly found -- presumably in the possession of Goodman or one of the other main participants. Their designation as "A" and "B" is exclusive to this discography; elsewhere, both tend to be listed simply as master 31363, with no additional number (or letter) to differentiate between them.

These four takes are herein listed in the order in which they were performed (ditto for all other masters and takes).

5. Breakdowns
Two "How Deep Is The Ocean?" breakdowns are extant, both from the drumless segment of the date. Also extant are three consecutive "Let's Do It" breakdowns, all of them following the first completed take. There are no extant "That's The Way It Goes" breakdowns.


Personnel

1. Jo Jones
Jo Jones plays on takes A and B of "How Deep Is The Ocean?" only. Jones is out on all other above-listed takes and masters.


Arrangements And Cross-references

1. "Let's Do It"
"Let's Do It" began as a head arrangement, later polished by Mel Powell. For more details, see notes under session dated October 21, 1941.


Issues, Alternate Takes And Cross-references

1. "Let's Do It" And Okeh #6474 [78]
"Let's Do It" first came out in a 78-rpm single from Columbia's budget subsidiary Okeh, rather than on Columbia's self-titled, main label. Discographer Russ Connor deems Columbia's decision "a strategical move to counter RCA's low-priced Bluebird releases." It was the first of various Goodman singles issued on Okeh Records.

Okeh #6474 has a couple of peculiarities. For starters, not all of this disc's pressings feature the same take of "Let's Do It." One pressing contains take #2, another take #4. (You can see both pressings of the single in this discography's 78 index.)

The pressing that contains take #2 was withdrawn and replaced with the other pressing. The presumed motivation for the withdrawal was the lack of an audible drummer in that take. Goodman and/or Columbia might have objected to the company's initial issuing of the drumless take. (As for the tune on the other side of the single -- "The Earl" -- the same take was issued on both pressings of Okeh #6474.)

Notice also that, although Columbia's cataloguing system identifies those two performances of "Let's Do It" as takes from the same matrix (31367), the performances were actually recorded at different dates.

For other peculiarities pertaining to both "Let's Do It" and Okeh #6474, and for additional takes of "Let's Do It," see session dated October 21, 1941, including note entitled "Let's Do It": Comparison Of Takes.

2. "Let's Do It" [Song] And Elmer's Tune [LP]
In a 1996 update to his 1988 Benny Goodman bio-discography, D. Russell Connor tried to correct an error that he had allegedly made in an earlier edition of the text. In the 1988 edition, he had supposedly misidentified the take of "Let's Do It" which is included in the LP Elmer's Tune as #2, when it was #4 instead. My inspection of the actual LP reveals that Connor was paradoxically wrong in thinking that he was wrong: the LP in fact contains both takes of the song (#2 and #4). I have thus disregarded Russ Connor's self-correction. (Take #2 is part of this date. For take #4, see session dated on October 21, 1941.)

3. "Let's Do It" [Song] And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
Columbia Legacy's 1999 CD set includes two takes of "Let's Do It," the one recorded during this date (#2) and another one (#4), recorded on October 21. The CD's discographical annotator has made a transpositional error in the identification of those two takes:

Track #8 (in the first of the set's two CDs) is misidentified by the annotator as take #4 from October 21. It is actually take #2 from this September 25 date .

Track #19 (also in the first of the two CDs) is misidentified by the annotator as take #2 from September 25. It is actually take #4 from October 21.

My thanks to the ever-vigilant Bill "Mr. Alternate Take" Brooks for noticing and pointing out the annotator's error to me.

4. "How Deep Is The Ocean?" And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
Columbia Legacy's 1999 CD set also contains two takes of the song "How Deep Is The Ocean?". One of the two takes dates from October 8.

The other take, dated September 25, 1941, shall be the focus of the present paragraph. It is track #18 of the CD set's first disc. The CD's annotator identifies it as alternate take #1. However, record collector Bill Brooks has a dissenting opinion on this identification. He convincingly argues that the take in question cannot be #1, because drums are featured. (Take #1 is known to be drumless -- ditto for take #2. The takes known to feature drums are the ones herein identified as "A" and "B.") Brooks feels certain that it is take "A" because he has listened to the issue in which that take was originally issued -- i.e., Blu-Disc's 1986 LP The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 8. Not having been able to listen to that LP, I cannot fully corroborate or deny Bill's claim, but I am willing to tentatively endorse it. (As for take "B," it is not known to have ever been issued.)

To read about yet another discographical error in the same 2CD set, pertaining to the other take of "How Deep Is The Ocean?," see notes about issues under session dated October 8, 1941.

5. "Let's Do It" And Public Domain Issues
Most Public Domain issues contain not this session's take of "Let's Do It" (#2) but the master take of the same song (#4) which was recorded later, on October 21, 1941. Readers must bear in mind, however, that I have not been able to listen to every single Goodman-Lee Public Domain issue to ever appear on the market. In some instances, I have simply made the tentative assumption that the included take is #4, not #2. Any corrections from those who own any of the PD issues listed under either take would be appreciated.

In passing, it is worth noting that the once uncommonly found take #2 is now more easily available to bootleggers and Public Domain companies, due to its inclusion in the two above-bolded, widely distributed CD issues from the 1990s. Case in point: Where Or When, a compact disc on the Public Domain label Acrobat, which showed no compunction in grabbing the entire contents of the Columbia Legacy CD set, alternate takes included.


Discographical Clarifications

1. Secondary Masters (3981-1)
For an explanation of my parenthetical use of the term "secondary master" next to alternate take CO 31367-2, see note at the very bottom of this page.


Date: October 2, 1941; 2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Skip Martin, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Billy Butterfield, Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Cootie Williams (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Morty Stuhlmaker (b), Mel Powell (p), Sid Catlett (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 31391-1Master Take (Columbia) I Got It Bad And That Ain't Good - 3:14(Duke Ellington, Paul Francis Webster) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA 78Co 36421 — {I Got It Bad / Pound Ridge [instrumental]}   (1941)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LPHl 7148 — [Various Artists] The Girl Friends   (1958)
COLUMBIA's Epic LPEe 22025 [reissue: Columbia Sp Prods P 18711] — [Benny Goodman] Clarinet A La King ("Encore" Series)   (1968)
b. CO 31392-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) My Old Flame(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1014 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 7; 1941-1942   (1985)
c. CO 31392-1Master Take (Columbia) My Old Flame - 3:08(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA 78Co 36754 — {My Old Flame / How Deep Is The Ocean?}   (1945)
COLUMBIA EPB 1636 — Benny Goodman Presents Peggy Lee    (1953)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)




Photo

An undated picture of Benny Goodman in action. The combined presence of drummer Sid Catlett and saxophonist Vido Musso (both visible in the background) allows us to circumscribe the date to somewhere between early June and mid-October of 1941.


Songs

1. Peggy Lee's Billboard Hits
Peggy Lee's string of 70 Billboard entries began with a Columbia master from this 1941 session. The string lasted 33 years, ending with the 1974 master "Let's Love," on Atlantic Records.

2. "I Got It Bad" In The Music Charts
According to Joel Whitburn's calculations in his book Pop Memories, 1890-1954, Peggy Lee's first Billboard hit appeared in the charts during the week of November 15, 1941 and peaked at #25. (Duke Ellington's own version of "I Got It Bad," with a vocal by his canary Ivie Anderson, had entered the charts a month earlier. It is estimated to have peaked at #13.)

"I Got It Bad" was also the first of Lee's 10 chart hits as vocalist with The Benny Goodman Orchestra. During her stay with the band, vocals actually accounted for the majority of the hits that the orchestra placed in the charts. The orchestra had only two instrumental hits within the period in question. (Besides Lee's entries, there were also a couple of vocal hits sung by Dick Haymes, who was the orchestra's male singer for a few weeks.)

(Nota bene: In making the previous commentary about the ratio of vocal to instrumental hits, my chief intention has been to show that Lee contributed to the band's success during the early 1940s. My commentary should not be misconstrued as an indication that Lee or any other Goodman vocalist deserves primary credit for the band's overall success. Before Lee and Haymes joined the band, Goodman had had well over a hundred radio hits -- about half of which were instrumentals, with the other half or so being vocals by his previous singers. The bandleader would go on to have about thirty more hits after Haymes and Lee left his orchestra.)


Masters

1. Master Designation
4. "My Old Flame" (Master Designation)
"My Old Flame" was first recorded on the above-shown August 20 session, then re-recorded on this October 2. When tunes were re-recorded at different dates, Columbia usually assigned the same matrix number to the resulting takes from both dates. "My Old Flame" is an exception. Perhaps the fact that each date took place in a different city led to the exceptional treatment.


2. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this October 2, 1941 session were the instrumentals "Caprice XXIV Paganini" (master #31390), "Clarinet A La King" (master #31393) and "I'm Here" (master #31402).

3. Breakdowns
Two consecutive breakdowns of "My Old Flame" have been preserved. There are no extant breakdowns of "I Got It Bad."


Issues

1. "My Old Flame" And Columbia Co #36754 [78]
As noted by Russ Connor in his texts, Columbia's 78-rpm single Co #36754 omits credit to Peggy Lee for her vocal on "My Old Flame."


Collectors' Corner

1. Vocalists ("70 Oz." Series) [CD]
Generally, various-artists compilations are not included in this discography's session pages. Instead, I have listed such compilations in a separate, miscellaneous discographical page. However, I have made exceptions for a few compilations that might be of interest to Peggy Lee fans and collectors. Case in point: the 1995 CD Vocalists ("70 Oz." Series) is a Sony-licensed product which includes Lee's version of "I Got It Bad." So do many another compilation. But the front cover of this particular release is of potential interest to fans of Peggy Lee. It features a drawing of a brass section and a female, singing into a microphone. Though the woman is unidentified, her face is clearly Peggy Lee's (minus mole, and with a neo-swing attire which is unlike anything that Lee was ever known to have worn in concert).


Date: October 8, 1941; 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Skip Martin, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Billy Butterfield, Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Cootie Williams (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Sid Catlett (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 31363-3Master Take (Columbia) How Deep Is The Ocean? - 3:04(Irving Berlin) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA 78Co 36754 — {My Old Flame / How Deep Is The Ocean?}   (1945)
COLUMBIA's Epic LPEe 22025 [reissue: Columbia Sp Prods P 18711] — [Benny Goodman] Clarinet A La King ("Encore" Series)   (1968)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)
b. CO 31426-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
c. CO 31426-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
d. CO 31426-"C"Alternate Take (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
e. CO 31426-1"Alt. Master" (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird - 2:45(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA 78Co 36429 ("bulky" typeface) — {Shady Lady Bird / Buckle Down Winsocki [vocal by Tommy Dix & Chorus]}   (1941)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1271 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1941, VOLUME 3   (2002)



Photo

Saxophonist Vido Musso, described by Goodman bio-discographer Russ Connor as Peggy Lee's "unofficial bodyguard" during her tenure with The Benny Goodman Orchestra. Three years her senior, he was 28 years old when she joined the orchestra.


Songs

1. "How Deep Is The Ocean?"
Critical Praise. In the book The Swing Era, Eddie Sauter's arrangements of How Deep Is The Ocean? and My Old Flame are singled out for praise. Author Gunther Schuller also writes approvingly of Peggy Lee's interpretative talents. In the case of How Deep Is The Ocean?, he hears a suitably "unemotional, virtually passive" voice that "drifts across the song like a slow-moving distant cloud in the sky." According to a commentator on the net, the virtues of Lee's low-key approach to this tune have also been extolled elsewhere through an apt simile: "as still as a full moon gliding silently across a cloudless sky." Peggy Lee herself would have been pleased by this correlation of her work with pictorial poetry.

Lyric Order. As noted by Richard Sudhalter in his essay for the Columbia Legacy CD Benny Goodman, Featuring Peggy Lee, the singer reverses the first four-bar lines of "How Deep Is The Ocean?". Instead of

How much do I love you?
I'll tell you no lie
How deep is the ocean?
How high is the sky?

the lines are sung as follows:

How deep is the ocean?
How high is the sky?
How much do I love you?
I'll tell you no lie

Since the same pattern is present in all takes that I've heard, the reversal seems to have been intentional. If so, perhaps this reversal was requested by the bandleader or by the session's producer. (On the web, I have read comments from listeners who assert that Goodman demanded the alteration. The presumable motivation for the change would have been a desire to start the vocal with its title. The same listeners also claim that Lee originally sang the song in the correct order, after which Goodman requested the reversal. That's certainly a logical scenario, and therefore it could have happened. Nevertheless, the reliable sources at my reach offer no confirmation, nor are there, as already mentioned, any extant takes which feature the official line order.)

2. "How Deep Is The Ocean?" In The Charts
Curiously, "How Deep Is The Ocean?" remained unissued for four years. Columbia's decision to finally release it in 1945 might have had something to do with the inclusion of this song in the film Blue Skies, which premiered in 1946. The film version was sung by Bing Crosby. As a result of the film's high profile, various record companies issued competing singles by artists such as Margaret Whiting (Capitol) and Dick Haymes (Decca). Columbia might have also wanted to reap benefits from Peggy Lee's then-incipient success as a solo artist at Capitol. The movie's titular song was also newly recorded by Goodman, with a vocal by Art Lund.

According to Joel Whitburn's tabulations in his book Pop Memories, 1890-1954, the Goodman-Lee version of "How Deep Is The Ocean?" appeared in the charts during the week of October 6, 1945 and peaked at #19. It belatedly became Lee's 10th chart success as Goodman's canary. (Margaret Whiting's Capitol version is not listed as charting in Whitburn's book, but, according to Edward Foote Gardner's Popular Songs Of The Twentieth Century: A Charted History, it also received airplay, making a smaller dent in the charts.)


Masters

1. A Session Of 'Makes' And Remakes
This was one of three consecutive Goodman sessions that were partially or completely dedicated to remaking previously recorded songs. (Peggy Lee did not participate in the third one, dated October 23.)

"How Deep Is The Ocean?" had been first recorded during the orchestra's September 25 session. Columbia had assigned the numbers 1 and 2 to a couple of completed takes from that earlier date. When "How Deep Is The Ocean?" was re-recorded at the present October 8 session, the resulting takes received the same master number (31363) that had been previously used, with a 3 suitably assigned to the take that was picked for commercial release.

Two other songs from this October 8 date would be remade in Goodman's next session, dated October 21: the above-listed "Shady Lady Bird" and also "Buckle Down, Winsocki," which does not feature Lee.

2. "Shady Lady Bird"
Only the master take of "Shady Lady Bird" (#1) is listed in Columbia's master logs. Three other takes, herein labeled A, B and C, were belatedly found.

3. Non-Lee Masters
4. Non-Lee Vocals (Tommy Taylor)
Also recorded during this date were the instrumentals "Roll 'Em, Part 1" and "Roll 'Em, Part 2," to which Columbia did not assign a master number. A fifth recording from this session was "Buckle Down, Winsocki" (master #31427), whose vocal was sung by the orchestra's then-new, recently hired male vocalist Tommy Taylor, and which also featured a backing vocal by the musicians, singing in chorus. (During the ensuing October 21 session, this particular song was tried again, both by Goodman himself on vocals and by another male vocalist -- a brand new one. Taylor's membership with The Benny Goodman Orchestra seems to have lasted a couple of weeks, at most.)

5. Breakdowns
Among the various aborted attempts from this date that are extant, one occurred during the recording of "How Deep Is The Ocean?" and three during the recording of "Shady Lady Bird." All other extant breakdowns happened during the recording of the session's instrumentals.


Dating

1. "Shady Lady Bird"
In addition to the four takes listed under this date, four more takes of "Shady Lady Bird" can be found in the next session (October 21). The dating of these eight takes is problematic. Columbia's database places those it lists in this session only. (As already mentioned, not all eight takes are listed by Columbia). Nevertheless, discographer Russ Connor does not believe that all extant takes come from a single date. Because he inspected not only the Columbia's 16" safeties but also the reference tapes originally in Goodman's possession, I am trusting his judgment on this matter. His proposed distribution is thus the one that I have followed herein -- and through most of this discographical page.


Issues And Collectors' Corner

1. "Shady Lady Bird" And The Different Pressings Of Columbia Co #36429 [78]
Columbia 78-rpm Co #36429 can be found with two sligthtly different labels. The labels' differences include the typeface used, particularly on the songs' titles: in one case, it is Columbia's standard size; in the other case, it is a smaller and bulkier typeface. Also, only the label with the smaller typeface includes the words "for perfect tone use Columbia needles."

All 78-rpm discs with the standard-typeface label contain take #3 of "Shady Lady Bird," (recorded on October 21, 1941). The same cannot be fully said of discs with the small-typeface label: take #3 appears in most, not all of them. Some small-typeface discs contain instead take #1 of "Shady Lady Bird," recorded at the present session.

Very few copies of the disc containing take #1 have been tracked down over the years. Goodman expert David Jessup logically hypothesizes that "the metal part was perhaps sent out to a West Coast pressing plant in error."

My thanks to Jessup for clarifying this matter for me. I am also thankful to music collector Mark Takasugi for setting this query in motion, by supplying an useful description of his own 78-rpm copy (small typeface, take #3).

2. "How Deep Is The Ocean?" [Song] And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
Columbia Legacy's 2CD set Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings contains two takes of the song "How Deep Is The Ocean?". One take is from September 25, 1941. The other take (track #6, first CD) is from this date (October 8). The CD's annotator states that it was "[o]riginally released in 1941." His statement is incorrect: as shown above, "How Deep Is The Ocean?" was first released in 1945. (The alternates were of course released even later.)


Personnel

1. Cootie Williams
In Columbia's logs, this session from early October is the last one to include trumpet player Cootie Williams amidst its personnel. According to discographer Russ Connor, the trumpet player actually stayed with the band for the whole month, until October 31, when his one-year contract expired, but he does not appear to have come into the studio after the date under discussion. Connor adds that Williams is present in extant broadcasts from later in October.


Arrangements

1. "Shady Lady Bird"
The identification of Mel Powell as the arranger of "Shady Lady Bird" is tentative. For an explanation, see Arrangements notes under the next session.


Date: October 21, 1941; 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Clint Neagley, Jules "Julie" Schwartz (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Billy Butterfield, Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 31426-"D"Alternate Take (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
b. CO 31426-"E"Alternate Take (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
c. CO 31426-3Master Take (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird - 2:45(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA 78Co 36429 (standard Columbia typeface) — {Shady Lady Bird / Buckle Down Winsocki [vocal by Tommy Dix & Chorus]}    (1941)
COLUMBIA's Epic LPEe 22025 [reissue: Columbia Sp Prods P 18711] — [Benny Goodman] Clarinet A La King ("Encore" Series)   (1968)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)
d. CO 31426-2Alternate Take (Columbia) Shady Lady Bird - 2:40(Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) / arr: Mel Powell
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDCk 53422 [reissued 2011] — BENNY GOODMAN, FEATURING PEGGY LEE ("Best Of Big Bands" Series)    (1993)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
e. 31367-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Let's Do It(Cole Porter) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
f. 31367-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) Let's Do It(Cole Porter) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
g. CO 31367-3Alternate Take (Columbia) Let's Do It - 2:00(Cole Porter) / arr: Mel Powell
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
Veronica Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Ve lp 1 — [Benny Goodman] title unknown   
h. CO 31367-4Master Take (Columbia) Let's Do It - 2:16(Cole Porter) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6474 — {Let's Do It [take 2 pressing] / The Earl [instrumental]}   (1941)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPC 170 (38280-38283) / B 406/ Cl 6033 [EP & LP rel. 1949] — Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee   (1948)
COLUMBIA (10") LPCol Cl 2534 — [Various Artists] The Hot Canaries ("House Party" Series)   (1955)




Photo

A very juvenile-looking Peggy Lee, photographed in 1941.


At The Recording Session. Masters, Dating And Cross-references.

1. A Session Of Remakes
This was a session entirely dedicated to remakes: "Let's Do It" had been first recorded on September 25, 1941, "Shady Lady Bird" and the instrumental "Buckle Down Winsocki" on October 8, 1941. As Goodman bio-discographer Russ Connor states, "Benny had trouble getting these two tunes [Shady Lady Bird and Buckle Down Winsocki] from the musical Best Foot Forward onto wax satisfactorily. Each tune was recorded a total of eight times, spread over three studio dates. Shady Lady Bird, a simple-enough score probably by Mel Powell, seemed jinxed; the band would ride through it without mistake almost to the coda, then someone would hit a clinker. Finally the band got it right; Peggy's vocal is split by a Goodman-Powell interlude, Vido Musso solos against a brass background, and the result is a happy blend of piquant lyrics and lighthearted melody." [n.b.: Russ Connor alludes to three recording dates because when he wrote the above-quoted note -- in the late 1960s -- he indeed believed that those two songs had been recorded over a trio of October 1941 sessions. In the 1960s, the discographer was aware of the existence of various alternate takes (though not extant in Columbia's vaults, Goodman had kept them on reference tapes), but the date on which they had been recorded was unknown. Along with the "discovery of Columbia 6-inch safeties in private hands in 1984," later research led Connor to make corrections which included the assignation of those previously undated takes to just two dates, instead of three.]

2. "Let's Do It": Comparison Of Takes
Peggy Lee sings this session's takes of "Let's Do It" in a saucy manner, particularly where the title line is concerned. What's more, one of this session's alternates (#3) finds Lee in a humorous mood, especially toward the end of the song. In additional takes from an earlier date (September 25, 1941), she generally sings the title line in a manner that comes across as more emphatic than saucy.

3. Non-Lee Masters
4. Non-Lee Vocals: Tommy Dix And Benny Goodman
The only non-Lee master recorded during this session was "Buckle Down Winsocki." Initial takes of "Buckle Down Winsocki" featured vocals by Tommy Dix; later takes had Benny Goodman himself on vocals. [The earlier versions from October 8 used yet another vocalist, Tommy Taylor.] Also singing in all takes, as a chorus: the musicians. Explains discographer Donald Russell Connor: "The difficulty with Buckle Down Winsocki wasn't orchestral, it was vocal. Before he got a take he liked, Benny tried three vocalists: Tommy Taylor, Tommy Dix, and ... Benny Goodman! One effort by Taylor was released on V-Disc; one by Dix was issued by Columbia; but th[e] take with Benny singing was unissued until [1968]."

5. Breakdowns
During the recording of "Let's Do It," there were three aborted attempts. They took place right after the second completed take. There are no other extant breakdowns from this date.

6. Dating [Take Co #31426-2 & Take Co #31426-3]
In Columbia's database, takes #2 and #3 of "Shady Lady Bird" are listed under the earlier, October 8, 1941 session, but in this sessionography, I have followed the lead of Goodman's discographer Russ Connor, who re-assigned those takes to this date. Russell Connor's alteration was based on his listening of the session tapes. (He also re-assigned various takes of "Buckle Down Winsocki" to this session.)


Arrangements

1. "Let's Do It"
"Let's Do It" began as a head arrangement which later in the process was polished by Mel Powell. In Peggy Lee's own words, this was a tune with which "we fooled around ... quite a bit. I guess you'd have to say Mel Powell was responsible for the arrangement as it was finally recorded." Benny Goodman's comments, as quoted by Russell Connor, echo Lee's take on the matter: "we first started fooling around with this cute little tune of Cole Porter's [while playing in New Jersey's Meadowbrook club]. We changed it a couple of times, and I guess you'd have to credit Mel with the finished arrangement."

2. "Shady Lady Bird"
3. Stylistics: Mel Powell Versus Eddie Sauter
Goodman bio-discographer Donald Russell Connor does not seem to have known who the arranger of "Shady Lady Bird" was. In his book Benny Goodman: Listen To His Legacy, the discographer certainly tells us who arranged this session's two other songs -- Mel Powell in the case of "Let's Do It," Cliff Jenkins in the case of "Buckle Down Winsocki" -- but remains mum about "Shady Lady Bird."

However, Connor ventures an educated guess in his aforementioned notes for the Epic LP Clarinet A La King. He writes, in passing, that the arrangement was "probably by Mel Powell." Writer and musician Richard M. Sudhalter shares the same opinion in his liner notes for Columbia Legacy CD #53422 (Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman).

One basis for the tentative assignation of ditties such as "Shady Lady Bird" to Powell is that his writing is, in Sudhalter's words, "generally clear and direct, without as much musical incident as [Eddie] Sauter's, and therefore flows better rhythmically."

In short, the identification of Mel Powell as the arranger of "Shady Lady Bird" is not definite, but its proposal counts with a fair amount of expert support.


Issues

1. "Let's Do It" And Okeh #6474 [78]
A peculiarity of 78-rpm single Okeh #6474 is its existence in two versions. One version contains take #2 of "Let's Do It," the other take #4. The pressing that contains the rarer take is deemed a valuable collectible. (I believe the rarer take to be #2, from the session dated September 25, 1941.)

2. "Shady Lady Bird" And Columbia Co #36429 [78]
Also released in two pressings was Columbia 78-rpm single #36429. Each pressing contains a different take of "Shady Lady Bird." See notes under session dated October 8, 1941.

3. "Shady Lady Bird" [Song] And Benny Goodman, Featuring Peggy Lee [CD]
Columbia Legacy's 1993 CD incorrectly identifies its take of "Shady Lady Bird" as #3. According to D. Russell Connor, the disc contains take #2 instead.

4. "Shady Lady Bird" [Song] And Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
In Columbia Legacy's 1999 CD set, the master take of "Shady Lady Bird" is inaccurately dated October 8, 1941. The correct date is October 21. (This error is attributable to the producers' use of official but outdated documentation. Columbia's old logs do list all takes of "Shady Lady Bird" under Goodman's October 8 session. But bio-discographer D. Russell Connor actually listened to the original session tapes, and found out that the takes are split between two consecutive sessions. Herein I have followed the corrected dating that the discographer established.)

5. "Let's Do It" [Song] And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
Furthermore, Columbia Legacy's 1999 CD set includes two takes of "Let's Do It," one recorded on September 25, 1941 (#2) and the other (#4) recorded at this date. The CD's discographical annotator has made a transpositional error in the identification of those two takes:

Track #8 in the first CD is misidentified by the annotator as take #4 from October 21. It is actually take #2 from September 25.

Track #19, also in the first CD, is misidentified by the annotator as take #2 from September 25. It is actually this date's take #4.

My thanks to the late Bill Brooks for pointing out the annotator's error.


Date: November 13, 1941; 2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Clint Neagley, Jules "Julie" Schwartz (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Billy Butterfield, Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 31741-2Alternate Take (Columbia) Somebody Else Is Taking My Place - 3:09(Bob Ellsworth, Dick Howard, Russ Morgan) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA (10") LPCl 6048 — [Benny Goodman] Benny Goodman, Volume 1 ("Dance Parade" Series)   (1949)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
b. CO 31741-1Master Take (Columbia) Somebody Else Is Taking My Place - 3:09(Bob Ellsworth, Dick Howard, Russ Morgan) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6497 — {Somebody Else Is Taking My Place / That Did It, Marie}   (1941)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm albumC 122 (37243-37246) — [Benny Goodman] Benny's Best {Cancelled In The USA, Released As Columbia A-52 In Canada}   (1947)
COLUMBIA 78Co 38198 — {Why Don't You Do Right? / Somebody Else Is Taking My Place}   (1948)
c. CO 31742-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Somebody Nobody Loves(Seymour Miller) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label 45(Sweden) Phon Mlp 80 — {Somebody Nobody Loves / [unknown second title]}   
d. CO 31742-1Master Take (Columbia) Somebody Nobody Loves - 3:20(Seymour Miller) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6562 — {Somebody Nobody Loves / Let's Give Love A Chance [vocal by Art London]}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPC 170 (38280-38283) / B 406/ Cl 6033 [EP & LP rel. 1949] — Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram No. 2246 — G.I. Jive [Woody Herman, Alvino Rey]   (1949)
e. CO 31742-2Alternate Take (Columbia) Somebody Nobody Loves - 3:30(Seymour Miller) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
f. CO 31743-3Alternate Take (Columbia) How Long Has This Been Going On? - 3:58(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
unissued
g. CO 31743-2Master Take (Columbia) How Long Has This Been Going On? - 3:16(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6544 — {How Long Has This Been Going On? / Clarinet A La King [instrumental]}   (1942)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 1971 - P 1972 — Basic Music Library [6 Benny Goodman numbers, 2 of them with Peggy Lee]   (1951)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDCk 53422 [reissued 2011] — BENNY GOODMAN, FEATURING PEGGY LEE ("Best Of Big Bands" Series)    (1993)
h. CO 31743-1"Alt. Master" (Columbia) How Long Has This Been Going On? - 3:21(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA (10") LPCl 6100 — [Benny Goodman] Benny Goodman, Volume 2 ("Dance Parade" Series)   (1950)
COLUMBIA EP(United Kingdom) Seg 7556 & Australia (Sego 7556) — [Benny Goodman] Benny Goodman Plays (aka Let's Dance)   (1955)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)
i. CO 31744-bkdnIncomplete Take (Columbia) That Did It, Marie - 1:06(Irene Higginbotham, Fred Meadows) / arr: Mel Powell
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
j. CO 31744-2Alternate Take (Columbia) That Did It, Marie - 3:19(Irene Higginbotham, Fred Meadows) / arr: Mel Powell
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
k. CO 31744-1Master Take (Columbia) That Did It, Marie - 2:29(Irene Higginbotham, Fred Meadows) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6497 — {Somebody Else Is Taking My Place / That Did It, Marie}   (1941)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm albumC 122 (37243-37246) — [Benny Goodman] Benny's Best {Cancelled In The USA, Released As Columbia A-52 In Canada}   (1947)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)



Photo

In the company of her pet Torchy, Peggy Lee takes a look at the sheet music of "Little Fool," the first composition of hers to ever be published. The publication was made possible by the active intervention of Benny Goodman, who sent the song to the Chicago Sunday-Herald-American, for inclusion in the newspaper's weekly spotlight of music from the big bands' libraries. According to biographer Peter Richmond, Goodman had occasionally performed the Lee original in his concerts. The back of this photo bears the penciled date November 8, 1941.)


At The Recording Session

The events known to have transpired at this recording date are covered in an overview of Peggy Lee's tenure with The Benny Goodman Orchestra, which I have incorporated to this discography's miscellaneous pages.


Songs

1. "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" In The Music Charts
According to Joel Whitburn's book Pop Memories, 1890-1954, "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" topped the Billboard charts for three consecutive weeks. Released by Columbia on its budget imprint Okeh, the smash hit entered the charts during the week of March 7, 1942. It stayed for a total of 15 weeks.

Competition came from Russ Morgan and His Morganaires, whose Decca version peaked at #5. Edward Foote Gardner's Popular Songs Of The Twentieth Century: A Charted History lists two other versions which received airplay, and which presumably turned up in some (unspecified) 1941 airplay charts. One of the versions is by The Bob Chester Orchestra, the other by Vaughn Monroe.

"Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" was the fourth Peggy Lee vocal to enter Billboard's charts. The first one had been "I Got It Bad," from the a session dated October 2, 1941. The second and third hit vocals were actually recorded after "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" but released before. (See below, under sessions dated November 27 and December 24, 1941.)

Long after its 15 aforementioned weeks in currency, "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" managed the feat of re-entering the charts. Newly pressed and re-released as Columbia 78-rpm single #38198, "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" made its return during the week of June 19, 1948. On this second round, it peaked at #30 (in Whitburn's estimation). One of the factors that probably triggered Columbia to re-release the tried-and-true hit was the success that Capitol had had, a few months earlier, with the Goodman-Lee track "For Every Man There's A Woman" (Capitol #15030, recorded on December 2, 1947).

"Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" thus holds the distinction of being not only Lee and Goodman's only #1 hit collaboration but also their #11 and final chart entry together.

2. The Canonization Of "Somebody Nobody Loves"
The CD set The Singles Collection is a definitive retrospective of Peggy Lee's career. Three tracks from her Goodman years were selected for inclusion, one of them being from this session: "Somebody Nobody Loves." Knowledgeable Lee fans have deemed the selection a bit unorthodox and surprising; a more logical choice would have been this session's top charting ballad, "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place." But the producers apparently preferred to feature this uptempo instead. Were he alive, Goodman's bio-discographer Russ Connor might have been someone who would have approved of the producers' decision. Singling out the "perky lilt in her voice," Connor deemed Somebody Nobody Loves Lee's "kind of tune." "I consider it one of her better, if little remarked efforts," he concluded.


Masters And Takes

1. Non-Lee Masters
Only numbers with vocals by Peggy Lee were recorded during this session.

2. Breakdowns
There are four extant breakdowns from this date. Two happened during the recording of "Somebody Nobody Loves," one during "How Long Has This Been Going On?," and another during "That Did It, Marie."

3. Belatedly Found Take Numbers
In Russell Connor's publications, no take numbers were given for the alternates that this discography identifies as CO 31744-2 ("That Did It, Marie") and CO 31743-3 ("How Long Has This Been Going On?"). The documentation that he consulted did not supply either take with a number. These takes' numbers were found more recently, and published in David Jessup's 2010 book Benny Goodman: A Supplemental Discography. (If eventually released, the "How Long Has This Been Going On?" take should be of particular interest to dedicated fans and collectors of Goodman music. It features a vastly different intro and, as indicated above, it is a longer performance.)

4. The Two Vocal Readings Of "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place"
The two preserved takes of "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" evince some minor but clear differences which should help collectors in the task of locating them. In the master take, Lee sings the fifth and six lines of the song in their correct, official order ("Little you know the price that I paid / Little you care for vows that you made"). In the alternate take, she reverses these two lines ("Little you care for vows that you've made / Little you know the price that I've paid"). Notice that the verbs' tense is altered from one take to the other; this alteration hints at an intentional, thought-out reversal of the lines.

5. The Correct Takes Of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" (Take #1 Versus Take #2)
Two takes of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" were officially issued during the pre-CD era. Take #2 was the original release; it came out on a 78-rpm single in 1941. Take #1 was released as part of the Benny Goodman 10" LP Dance Parade, Volume 2, in 1950. Ever since its release on that LP, Columbia has consistently picked take #1 for issue in not only its main label but also its subsidiaries and licensees (Harmony, Hallmark, etc.). One exception is the 1993 CD Benny Goodman, Featuring Peggy Lee, in which the original master take was used.

A trait that distinguishes one take from the other is Lee's periodic use of a tremulous vibrato in take #2. For instance, only on take #2 does Lee apply vibrato to the "I" of the lines "Where have I / Been all these years?," which she utters about 36 seconds into the performance.

The fact that both of these takes were issued before the compact disc era complicates the task of determining their distribution. Posing the most difficulty are the many Public Domain CDs which do not supply discographical information. Here is a list of PD CDs whose take of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" I have been able to identify:


Pearl CD: In The Beginning ... [take #2; i.e., the originally released master]
Gallerie CD: A Portrait Of Peggy Lee [take #2]
Going-For-A-Song CD: The Fever Of Peggy Lee [take #2]
Great Voices Of The Century CD: Oh La La Lee [take #2]
History CD: Everything I Love [take #2]
Music Club CD: Black Coffee; The Best Of Peggy Lee [take #2]


ASV CD: It's A Good Day [take #1, aka "secondary master"]
ASV CD: Why Don't You So Right [take #1]
Pickwick/Hallmark CD: Why Don't You So Right [take #1]
Planet CD: Let There Be Love [take #1]
Snapper CD: Linger [take #1]
Tim/Document CD: A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues [take #1]
Acrobat CD: Where Or When [probably take #1]

In the case of all other Public Domain CDs that contain Lee's Columbia performance of "How Long Has This Been Going On?," I have not listened to them, and I do not know which take they contain. Until I'm able to locate copies and give them a listen, I am forced to arbitrarily "dump" all of those PD CDs under one of the two takes. Take #1 is my choice.

6. The Identity Of The Take Of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" Issued By Phontastic
Adding to the confusion surrounding this session's performances are the allegations made about a take of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" that the label Phontastic issued on the LP The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI (1980), and also on the 1994 CD counterpart of that LP. Goodman's premier discographer Russ Connor identified it as a previously unissued take. However, in the early 2000s collectors Bill Brooks and Jarl Ingves separately gave careful listening to the take as heard on the LP, and both came to the same conclusion: this is actually the well-known, commonly found take #1, not a previously unheard alternate. During the second decade of this century, various Goodman experts have proceeded to weigh on the matter. It is now generally agreed that Connor's earlier attribution was erroneous. Accordingly, this discography lists the aforementioned Phontastic issues under take #1 of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" and, departing this one time from Connor's otherwise accurate text.

(It should me noted that Connor was dealing with a huge amount of recordings and discographical detail. As Connor gained access to yet more data and material over the years, he published supplementary texts in which he naturally included corrections and modifications. A couple of such corrections are actually mentioned below, under a session dated January 15, 1942. Writing about a number recorded at that date, Connor explains that "[a]cquisition of a test pressing of mx CO 32241-1 proved it to be the same as an unnumbered take on a CO safety recording, and a supposed take is eliminated." He also acknowledges that, in a previous book of his, a LP had been placed under the incorrect take.)


Arrangements

1. "That Did It, Marie"
Columbia's database credits Eddie Sauter with the arrangement of "That Did It, Marie." After listening to the session tapes, discographer Russ Connor determined that the credit was erroneous. Dialogue heard in the session's aborted takes proves that the arranger was Mel Powell. Further corroboration comes from the arrangement itself, currently kept in the New York Public Library, as part of the Benny Goodman Collection of Musical Arrangements: it identifies Powell as its author.

2. "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place"
Mel Powell "probably did the arrangement," writes music historian Richard Sudhalter in his notes for the Columbia Legacy CD Benny Goodman, Featuring Peggy Lee. Although I have trusted the late Mr. Sudhalter's proven expertise, more exacting readers are advised to consider the credit tentative. In his Benny Goodman bio-discography, Connor lists no arranger for this number.


Issues

1. "Somebody Nobody Loves," [Song], "Somebody Loves Me" [Song], And Benny Goodman And Peggy Lee [78-rpm Album]
Consisting of four 78-rpm discs, the album Benny Goodman And Peggy Lee exists in two versions, a70 and C-170. Each version sports a different cover but otherwise the two versions are quite alike, and have the exact same eight recordings. There is, however, an error in the cover of set a70: instead of "Somebody Nobody Loves," the cover lists "Somebody Loves Me" among its tracks. This is an error. "Somebody Loves Me" had been recorded by Goodman as an instrumental in 1936, but never as a vocal featuring Peggy Lee. More to the point, it is not heard in the album. The cover of version C-170 correctly lists the track as "Somebody Nobody Loves."

2. Columbia Co #38280, Co #38281, Co #38282, Co #38283 [78s]
Mistakenly listed as individual 78-rpm singles in some sources, these four discs are actually pieces of the 78-rpm album Benny Goodman And Peggy Lee (C 170 in the US, A70 in Canada). They were released only as part of that album, not separately. Or so has been my belief for a long time. An August 28, 1948 Cash Box review of Columbia #32281 ("Let's Do It" / "Where Or When") raises the possibility that at least this particular disc was made available as both a single and an album component. Alternatively, The Cash Box could have erred in its treatment of this platter as a single. That alternative strikes me as likelier to be correct: all the copies of 38281 that I have seen so far carry the catalogue number C 170 (or A70) on their labels, along with the numerical suffixes 3 for "Let's Do It" and 4 for "Where Or When."

3. "That Did It, Marie" [Song] And Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman [LP]
4. "That Did It, Marie" [Song] And Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings [CD]
As duly noted by Russ Connor in his Goodman bio-discography, the first chorus of "That Did It, Marie" is missing from the above-listed 1956 Harmony LP issue, and thus also from its derivates. Since Harmony was a Columbia branch, the budget label's commission of this mistake should certainly rise at least one eyebrow. Both eyebrows are definitely worth raising by the deplorable recurrence of the same mistake in the 1999 Columbia/Sony Complete 2CD set.

5. "How Long Has This Been Going On?" [Song] And Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings [CD]
6. "How Long Has This Been Going On?" [Song] And The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI [LP]
7. "How Long Has This Been Going On?" [Song] And The Different Version, Volume III, 1&2 [CD]
There is an error in the track listing of the Columbia Legacy set Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings. The set's version of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" is identified as take #2 but aural inspection reveals that the CD contains take #1 instead. My thanks to Bill Brooks, whose notes about different takes alerted me to this error. (n.b.: As already explained above, the take originally released on a 78-rpm single in 1941 was #2; from the 1950s onwards, Columbia/Sony shifted to take #1. Perhaps this situation led to the Columbia Legacy set's misidentification of take #1 as the master.)

9. A Portrait Of Peggy Lee 1941-1942 [LP & CD, from CBS Sony]
10. A Portrait Of Peggy Lee [CD, from Gallerie]
Many commercial websites give incorrect track information about a CD that they call A Portrait Of Peggy Lee 1941-1942 but whose real title is simply A Portrait Of Peggy Lee. A detailed explanation follows.

There is only one issue titled A Portrait Of Peggy Lee 1941-1942. It is a Japanese anthology that has undergone various incarnations. Originally released on LP, it has also been issued on CD twice. The original incarnations (LP, CD) contained 16 tracks. In 2002, a reissue expanded the track total to 24. This Sony anthology boasts a cover illustration of a young Peggy Lee in a red-orange gown, singing on a rooftop at dusk, with a skyline behind her.

There are, on the other hand, various CD releases whose title is A Portrait Of Peggy Lee. The one of interest to this discussion is a 47-track 2CD set, encased in a red box. It was released by the Gallerie label.

Many commercial websites wrongly list the 47 tracks of A Portrait Of Peggy Lee under the title A Portrait Of Peggy Lee 1941-1942. There are also a few commercial sites which mix numbers from the Sony and the Gallerie releases, ending up with a total of 24 tracks.

Amazon.com shows the wrong title and the wrong cover here. The right cover (the one from the Public Domain CD) can also be seen at Amazon, thanks to a customer who uploaded it here.


Date: November 27, 1941; 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Sol Kane, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Al Davis, Joe Ferrante, James "Jimmy" Maxwell (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee, Art London aka Art Lund (v)

a. CO 31811-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Winter Weather - 2:55(Ted Shapiro) / arr: Mel Powell
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7617 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VI; Clarinet A La King   (1980)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
b. CO 31811-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) Winter Weather(Ted Shapiro) / arr: Mel Powell
unissued
c. CO 31811-3Alternate Take (Columbia) Winter Weather(Ted Shapiro) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA©CBS Special Products CS/LP/CD17817 [CD rel. in 1992; re-pressed 1996] — [Various Artists] Christmas With The Big Bands    (1984)
d. CO 31811-1Master Take (Columbia) Winter Weather - 3:00(Ted Shapiro) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6516 — {Winter Weather / Ev'rything I Love)   (1941)
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6516 — {Winter Weather / I Don't Want To Walk Without You [vocal by Tommy Tucker; erroneous pressing]}   (1941)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPC 170 (38280-38283) / B 406/ Cl 6033 [EP & LP rel. 1949] — Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee   (1948)
e. CO 31812-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Ev'rything I Love - 3:05(Cole Porter) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7620 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VII; Royal Flush   (1982)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
f. CO 31812-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) Ev'rything I Love(Cole Porter) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
g. CO 31812-2Master Take (Columbia) Ev'rything I Love - 3:05(Cole Porter) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6516 — {Winter Weather / Ev'rything I Love)   (1941)
COLUMBIA's Epic LPEe 22025 [reissue: Columbia Sp Prods P 18711] — [Benny Goodman] Clarinet A La King ("Encore" Series)   (1968)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)




Photos

Art London served as Benny Goodman's crooner from mid-November 1941 to late May 1942. He sang two duets with Peggy Lee, one of them being this session's hit "Winter Weather," which was his debut with Goodman's band. The other duet, recorded on January 15, 1942, was called "If You Build A Better Mousetrap." In January 1946, after coming back from military service, London rejoined The Benny Goodman Orchestra under a new name (Art Lund), staying with the band until around September, when he went solo.


Songs

1. "Winter Weather" In The Music Charts
According to the aforementioned chart tabulator Joel Whitburn, Peggy Lee's second chart hit with The Benny Goodman Orchestra made its debut during the week of January 10, 1942. "Winter Weather" peaked at #24. Whitburn's tabulations show no other charting versions of this holiday-oriented love song.


Personnel

1. Art London
2. Art Lund
During this session, Peggy Lee shared vocal duties with the band's then-new male vocalist, Art London. They duetted on "Winter Weather." (As for "Ev'rything I Love," it has a Peggy Lee solo vocal.) Notice that in later years Art London changed his stage name to Art Lund.


Issues

1. "Ev'rything I Love" [Song] And Okeh #6516 [78]
The 78-rpm single Okeh 6516 exists in two pressings. The official pressing pairs "Winter Weather" with "Ev'rything I Love." The other issue pairs "Winter Weather" with a vocal by Tommy Tucker ("I Don't Want To Walk Without You"). The release of the latter is believed to have been an error on Columbia's part.


Masters And Takes

1. "Ev'rything I Love" (Critical Commentary)
Goodman bio-discographer Donald Russell Connor describes the first take of "Ev'rything I Love" as follows: "Mel Powell's intro seems somewhat experimental, Peggy Lee is strident, but excellent nevertheless; and Benny is quite inventive." Russ Connor's comment is partially meant as an illustration of the adage that practice makes perfect. He considers subsequent takes better than the first. (Connor is more harshly critical of the singing of Art London during the date that followed this one.)

2. Assignation Of Take Numbers
In keeping with my own practice for alternate takes, I have assigned letters to all numberless takes. (The policy is described in this page's final note.) Columbia's general policy was to assign numbers to takes when and if they were released, beginning with #1 for the master take. Hence the takes that have never been issued by the Columbia family of lables bear no number.

Occasionally, Columbia appears to have disregarded its own policy. This session's takes of "Ev'rything I Love" are a case in point. Columbia released two of them. For the master take, the company followed its usual policy: the master was given the number "1," although it had actually been recorded last. However, the policy was disregarded by the label later, when it released one of the alternate takes. Instead of numbering it 2, that alternate was assigned a 3 as its number, seemingly because it was the third one recorded at the session.

3. Belatedly Found: "Ev'rything I Love"
The alternate take that I have identified as 31812-"B" ("Ev'rything I Love") is not listed in Columbia's logs, nor was it preserved in Columbia's vaults. It was instead kept by one of the session's participants.

4. Non-Lee Masters
Only masters that featured Peggy Lee were recorded at this session.

5. Breakdowns
All four extant breakdowns from this date happened during the recording of "Winter Weather."


Date: December 10, 1941; 2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Sol Kane, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Bernie Privin (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 31945-2Master Take (Columbia) Not A Care In The World - 3:20(Vernon Duke, John Latouche) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA EP/LPG 4 19 [7 1500-1502]; also B 356 [5 1667-1669]/ GL 523; reissues CL 523 & Jgl 523 [rel. 1975 by CBS] — [Benny Goodman] Benny Goodman Presents Arrangements By Eddie Sauter    (1953)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)
COLUMBIA©CBS Nippon LP(Japan) Xm 5 C — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman   (1966)
b. CO 31944-3Alternate Take (Columbia) Not Mine - 2:59(Johnny Mercer, Victor Schertzinger) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7620 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VII; Royal Flush   (1982)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
c. CO 31944-2Alternate Take (Columbia) Not Mine(Johnny Mercer, Victor Schertzinger) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
d. CO 31944-1Master Take (Columbia) Not Mine - 3:18(Johnny Mercer, Victor Schertzinger) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA 78Co 36580 — {Not Mine / If You Build A Better Mousetrap}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPC 170 (38280-38283) / B 406/ Cl 6033 [EP & LP rel. 1949] — Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee   (1948)
COLUMBIA©CBS Nippon LP(Japan) Xm 5 C — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman   (1966)
e. CO 31945-1Alternate Take (Columbia) Not A Care In The World - 3:22(Vernon Duke, John Latouche) / arr: Eddie Sauter
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7620 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VII; Royal Flush   (1982)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7659-61 — [Benny Goodman] The Permanent Goodman; A Portrait In Music Of The King Of Swing, 1926-1945   (1986)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDCk 53422 [reissued 2011] — BENNY GOODMAN, FEATURING PEGGY LEE ("Best Of Big Bands" Series)    (1993)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)




Photo

An undated picture of Peggy Lee. Given her attire and general look, this photo could have been taken during the rehearsals for "I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean," recorded on March 12, 1942. For comparison, see photo under that date.


At The Recording Session

The events known to have transpired at this recording date are covered in an overview of Peggy Lee's tenure with The Benny Goodman Orchestra, which I have incorporated to this discography's miscellaneous pages.


Masters (And Alternate Takes)

1. "Not A Care In The World"
Though very similar, the two extant takes of "Not A Care In The World" can be easily distinguished thanks to a piano riff heard in take #2 only. The riff is heard 6 seconds into the performance, and lasts less than a second. My thanks to music collector Bill "Mr. Alternate Take" Brooks for pointing out this difference.

2. Non-Lee Masters (Art London)
This session was entirely dedicated to vocals; no instrumentals were recorded. In addition to Peggy Lee's two entries, there were three ballads sung by Art Lund: "Someone's Rocking My Boat" (master #31942), "Let's Give Love A Chance" (master #31943) and "You Don't Know What Love Is" (master #31946).

3. Breakdowns
Of this session's various extant breakdowns, only one happened during an attempt at a Lee number -- "Not A Care In The World." It occurred between the last take of "Not Mine" and the take of "Not A Care In The World" that was labeled as #1.

4. Belatedly Found Take Numbers
5. Take Order Revision
In Russell Connor's published discographical works, alternates CO 31944-3 ("Not Mine") and CO 31944-2 ("Not Mine") lack take numbers. Their numbers were found more recently, and published by David Jessup in his book Benny Goodman: A Supplemental Discography (2010). Furthermore, Russ Connor listed all the takes of "Not Mine" first, the other performance's takes last. Relying on newly incorporated information from Columbia's lacquer logs, Jessup provided the more variegated sequence seen above.


Issues

1. "Not A Care In The World" [Song] And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
This 1999 Columbia Legacy set misidentifies its take of "Not A Care In The World" as #1. Instead, the take heard in the set is the master (#2).

2. "Not A Care In The World" [Song] And Benny Goodman, Featuring Peggy Lee [CD]
This 1993 Columbia Legacy CD includes take #1 of "Not A Care In The World," which is inaccurately described by the CD's annotator as a "previously unissued alternate take." Granted that Columbia itself had not issued this alternate before, the collector's label Phontastic certainly had. (Columbia was obviously unwilling to recognize or legitimize unauthorized issues of the masters that it owned.)

3. Benny Goodman Presents Arrangements By Eddie Sauter [EP, LP]
4. "Not A Care In The World" / "That's The Way It Goes" [45]
Of all the issues included in this discography, Benny Goodman Presents Arrangements By Eddie Sauter ranks high amidst my most time-consuming research subjects. The points that needed clarification and modification are discussed in this discography's LP Index, under the entry for that particular issue.


Date: December 24, 1941; 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Sextet (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Cutty Cutshall (tb), Lou McGarity (tb, v), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p, cel), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 32052-1Master Take (Columbia) Where Or When - 3:21(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) / arr: {Head Arrangement}, Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6553 — {Blues In The Night / Where or When}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPC 170 (38280-38283) / B 406/ Cl 6033 [EP & LP rel. 1949] — Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram No. 239 — Jill's Juke Box   (1949)
b. CO 32051-1Master Take (Columbia) Blues In The Night - 3:15(Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6553 — {Blues In The Night / Where or When}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78/7" 33.3 rpm singleCo 38821 / 1 642 — {Blues In The Night / Bewitched [Benny Goodman instrumental]}   (1949)
COLUMBIA's Harmony 78Ha 1012 — {Blues In The Night / Bewitched [Benny Goodman instrumental]}   (1949)
c. CO 32052-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Where Or When - 3:18(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) / arr: {Head Arrangement}, Mel Powell
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1002 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 1; The Small Groups   (1981)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7620 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VII; Royal Flush   (1982)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
d. CO 32053-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) On The Sunny Side Of The Street - 3:15(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller) / arr: {Head Arrangement}, Mel Powell
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1002 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 1; The Small Groups   (1981)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7620 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VII; Royal Flush   (1982)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7659-61 — [Benny Goodman] The Permanent Goodman; A Portrait In Music Of The King Of Swing, 1926-1945   (1986)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 7660 — [Benny Goodman] The Permanent Goodman; A Portrait In Music Of The King of Swing; Volume 2, 1939-1945   (1997)
e. CO 32053-1Master Take (Columbia) On The Sunny Side Of The Street - 3:11(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller) / arr: {Head Arrangement}, Mel Powell
COLUMBIA 78Co 36617 — {On The Sunny Side Of The Street / All I Need Is You}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78Co 37514 — {On The Sunny Side Of The Street / Serenade In Blue [vocal by Dick Haymes]}   (1947)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm albumC 122 (37243-37246) — [Benny Goodman] Benny's Best {Cancelled In The USA, Released As Columbia A-52 In Canada}   (1947)
f. CO 32053-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) On The Sunny Side Of The Street - 3:22(Dorothy Fields, Jimmy McHugh, possibly Andy Razaf, possibly Thomas 'Fats' Waller) / arr: {Head Arrangement}, Mel Powell
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1004 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 2; The Big Band/The Small Groups   (1981)



Photos

Two tongue-in-cheek shots of Benny Goodman and Frank Sinatra, who performed on the same bill at the Paramount Theatre in New York City's Times Square, beginning on December 30, 1941. The central shot shows Goodman and Sinatra onstage, with bandmembers (including Dave Barbour) on the back. These shots are from the early 1940s, and the central one might be from the Paramount engagement, but I do not have a date for any of them. (The first appeared in a music magazine that was published in November 1943.)


At The Recording Session

In her autobiography, Peggy Lee writes: "We did some sextette numbers -- Where Or When, and The Way You Look Tonight -- at the Liederkranz Hall. Benny wanted to use one microphone for all musicians as well as the singer, which called for more gymnastics. [The microphone was hanging high, quite a few feet away from the floor.] Lou McGarity, playing trombone, would first crawl up in the air (on boxes), then we somehow managed to remain relatively silent and hold our breath in passing each other as I crawled up for my vocal and he crawled down. Those recordings may seem rather moody, and somehow they were, but it was also, after all, a little dangerous ... either of us could have crashed to the floor. But if Benny said do it, we did it."

It is also worth noting that the above-shown sequence of takes is the correct one, as heard in the session lacquers. Where Or When was thus the first performance attempted at the session. The first attempt at Blues In The Night ensued, followed by a second attempt at Where Or When, but the previous take of Where Or When was the one picked for commercial release. "Undoubtedly," bio-discographer Russ Connor declares, "Benny realized that earlier version -- there's little to choose between them -- could be released, and additional recordings were not needed."


Songs

1. "Where Or When" [And "The Way You Look Tonight"] As Part Of The Peggy Lee Canon
In a radio interview conducted by Fred Hall, Peggy Lee named both "Where Or When" (recorded during this session) and "The Way You Look Tonight" (recorded on March 10, 1942) among her personal favorites from her years of recording with Benny Goodman. She had good reason for singling them out. Lee thoroughly imbued both ballads with a personalized approach (an emotional fervor, a mellow warmth) that she had probably been discouraged from conveying in ballads featuring the full orchestra. (Such orchestral ballads were geared toward dance-oriented audiences. They were often boxed in Eddie Sauter's danceable and complex arrangements.)

"Where Or When" and "The Way You Look Tonight" probably exemplify the intimate style of singing that Lee had cultivated earlier, during her days as a solo act -- a style which she had needed to put on hold in order to adjust to the dance tempo of the big bands. Lee continued to develop this bluesy and melodic style right after leaving Goodman, through her interpretations of numbers such as "That Old Feeling" (recorded January 7, 1944), "Baby Is What He Calls Me" (December 27, 1944), and "Waitin' For The Train To Come In" (July 30, 1945).

2. "Blues In The Night" In The Music Charts
In the book Pop Memories 1890-1954,"Blues In The Night" is listed as Peggy Lee's third chart hit under the wing of The Benny Goodman Orchestra. After entering the charts during the week of February 14, 1942, it peaked at #20. Five other versions of the song are shown as also charting, including one by Woody Herman And His Orchestra, who took the standard-to-be to the top spot.


Personnel And Musical Instruments

1. Celeste
Celeste is heard on "Where Or When" only.

2. Yodeling
Lou McGarity (not Peggy Lee) does the yodeling on "Blues In The Night."

3. Cutty Cutshall
4. Lou McGarity
Cutty Cutshall and his trombone join The Benny Goodman Sextet for "Blues In The Night." The need for a second trombone player was probably due to the fact that regular trombonist Lou McGarity was busy, since he had been assigned the yodeling segment of the performance.

Russell Connor's text suggests that McGarity was the only trombonist during "On The Sunny Side Of The Street."

Somewhat oddly, Connor's text further suggests that both trombonists are heard during "Where Or When." Since this is a performance for which the use of two trombones would seem unnecessary, this suggestion is questionable. Taking into account Lee's above-quoted comment, I'd be more inclined to believe that only McGarity played. (Then again, an alternation between trombonists could have eased the motional and acoustic challenges to which Lee referred.)


Arrangements

1. Mel Powell
2. Head Arrangements
With the possible exception of "Blues In The Night," this session's sextet numbers seem to have actually used head arrangements, presumably routined by Mel Powell. Indeed, the Columbia Legacy CD set Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings lists Mel Powell as this session's "pianist/arranger."

3. Eddie Sauter
4. "Blues In The Night"
The arranger of "Blues In The Night" is not officially known. According to collector (and Benny Goodman expert) Dave Weiner, Goodman's live versions of "Blues In The Night" feature full-band charts in a style strongly reminiscent of Sauter's. This session's master of "Blues In The Night" strikes Weiner as a cut-down version of the aforementioned live versions. The credit to Eddie Sauter should thus be deemed likely, but still tentative.


Issues

1. "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" On V-Disc?
An unissued V-disc pressing of "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" is listed in Richard Sears' book V-Discs: A History And Discography. I have not seen that pressing, nor do I know of any other source that mentions it. Sears identifies Dave Barbour's Orchestra as the accompaniment. He further pinpoints the original source from which the V-disc was re-pressed: Capitol single #810.

Sears' information on this matter is confusing and, at the very least, partially erroneous. For starters, Peggy Lee did not record "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" for Capitol. The 78-rpm single to which Sears refers contains instead her Capitol versions of "Sugar" and "Save Your Sorrow For Tomorrow."

Furthermore, the Capitol single in question was actually issued in 1950, whereas the V-Disc program ceased general disc production in 1949. (It should be added, in passing, that even if this commercial single came out too late to qualify for V-Disc pressing, the two numbers found in the single had been recorded early enough to make their inclusion on V-Disc possible -- one in 1947, another in the first half of 1949.)

The main question remains, then: is "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" really the song heard in the unissued V-disc, or does the V-disc contain instead one of the songs from the 78-rpm issue ("Sugar," "Save Your Sorrow For Tomorrow")? Since I have not listened to the V-disc described by Sears, I can only offer an educated guess. My inclination is toward deeming "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" as the correct answer. (Should this guess ever be proven correct, it would then be necessary to determine whether the master or one of the alternates from the present 1941 session was used.)

There is some lateral support for the likelihood that the V-disc contains "On The Sunny Side Of The Street." The American Forces Radio Service pressed "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" on transcription disc, for use at their radio stations. If AFRS found this Benny Goodman Orchestra performance suitable and/or popular enough for radio airplay on their stations, there is a good chance that the V-Disc program felt the same way. The song's optimistic lyrics must have been deemed a potential morale booster for the troops. Further incentive for a V-disc release might have been provided by the fact that Goodman's version of this bright number was among those which made a dent on the charts.

2. Columbia #38281 [78]
3. Columbia #38821 [78]
4. Benny Goodman And Peggy Lee [aka Benny Goodman, Vocals By Peggy Lee] [78-rpm Album]
In the 1988 edition of his Benny Goodman bio-discography, D. Russell Connor partially (mis)identifies "Where Or When" and "Blues In The Night" as the two songs found in Columbia 78-rpm disc #38821. In his 1996 update of that text, Connor corrects the error: "Where Or When" is not on single #38821, but on single #38281, whose flip side features "Let's Do It."

Notice also that, although nowadays sold as single pieces by record sellers, the four Columbia 78 rpm-discs that bear the numbers 38280, 382281, 38282 and 38283 were originally parts of the album Benny Goodman And Peggy Lee (set C 170).

5. The Different Version, Volume III, 1 & 2 [CD]
6. "On The Sunny Side Of The Street"
I have conflicting reports about the take of "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" that Phontastic included in this CD, of which I do not own a copy. Since the label had issued take A on LP, it would be logical to expect to find that same take on the CD. Various online sources add to this expectation. However, online samplings of the CD suggest that the included take might be B. In short, my incorporation of this CD under either alternate take of "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" should be deemed tentative, for the time being.

7. Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee [EP]
In what seems to b an error, Goodman discographer Russ Connor lists Columbia EP B-406 under the song "Blues In The Night." The song is not on that EP.


Masters

1. The Three Takes Of "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" (Slightly Different Lyrics)
Curiously and uncharacteristically, Peggy Lee does changes one or more words in each of the three extant takes Of "On The Sunny Side Of The Street." The changes pertain to just one chorus of the song. In the master (take #1), the chorus is sung as follows:

I used to walk in the shade
With those blues on parade
But I'm not afraid
This rover crossed over.

In the alternate that I have labeled A, she changes one word (italicized below):

I used to walk in the shade
With those blues on parade
Now I'm not afraid
This rover crossed over.

The difference is far more extensive in the alternate labeled as B, where Peggy Lee seems to take a jazzier, more adventurous approach to the chorus:

I used to walk in the shade
Blues on parade
My blue day is over
Now I walk in the sun
Having my fun
- This rover crossed over.

As shown above, the worthwhile take B has been issued only once, on LP (Blu-Disc T 1004).

2. The Correct Alternate Take Numbers For "Where Or When" And "On The Sunny Side Of The Street"
A more technical commentary. As I have also explained in this page's very last note, Columbia did not assign numbers to those takes that it left unreleased. Thus, in the case of "On The Sunny Side Of The Street," Columbia's paperwork lists the released take as Co 32053-1 but the two alternates just as Co 32053, with no take number to distinguish between them. In this page, I have attempted to differentiate such alternates from one another by assigning them a letter within quotation marks: e.g., "A" or "B" or "C."

A differentiating system more obvious than mine was enforced by the Blu-Disc Record Company, which released numerous alternate takes from Benny Goodman's discography. Blu-Disc simply gave a number to each take. As a result, my discography's takes "A" of "Where Or When" and "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" are the exact same takes that are identified in Blu-Disc albums as #2 takes.

For the pros and cons of my decision to identify alternate takes by letter, see note at the bottom of this page.

3. Non-Lee Masters
There were no additional masters recorded at the present date. This sextet session was actually an all-vocals session, with Peggy Lee singing on every master (and the addition of Cutty Cutshall's trombone in some performances).

4. Breakdowns
From this date, there is only one extant breakdown. It preceded the first master take of "Where Or When."


Date: January 15, 1942; 2:00 p.m. - 6:05 p.m. (Booked 2:00 - 6:00)
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Sol Kane, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Chuck Gentry (bar), Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Bernie Privin (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee, Art London aka Art Lund (v)

a. CO 32239-3Alternate Take (Columbia) The Lamp Of Memory (Incertidumbre)(Gonzalo Curiel, Al Stillman) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
b. CO 32239-1Master Take (Columbia) The Lamp Of Memory (Incertidumbre) - 3:17(Gonzalo Curiel, Al Stillman) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6580 — {The Lamp Of Memory / When The Roses Bloom Again [vocal version by Art London, sans Peggy Lee]}   (1942)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1303 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1941-1942   (2003)
Jazum Collectors' Label LPJaz 67 — [Benny Goodman] title unknown   
Jazum Collectors' Label LPJaz 67 — [Benny Goodman] Benny Goodman And His Orchestra   
c. CO 32239-2Alternate Take (Columbia) The Lamp Of Memory (Incertidumbre) - 3:17(Gonzalo Curiel, Al Stillman) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Acrobat Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Addcd 3047 — Where Or When   (2008)
d. CO 32240-3Alternate Take (Columbia) If You Build A Better Mousetrap(Victor Schertzinger, Johnny Mercer) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
e. CO 32240-2Alternate Take (Columbia) If You Build A Better Mousetrap - 3:02(Victor Schertzinger, Johnny Mercer) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Acrobat Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Addcd 3047 — Where Or When   (2008)
f. CO 32242-4Alternate Take (Columbia) When The Roses Bloom Again(Nat Burton, Walter Kent) / arr: Eddie Sauter
unissued
g. CO 32240-1Master Take (Columbia) If You Build A Better Mousetrap - 3:04(Victor Schertzinger, Johnny Mercer) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA 78Co 36580 — {Not Mine / If You Build A Better Mousetrap}   (1942)
COLUMBIA©Sony Special Products CS/CD28427 — [Benny Goodman] Rarities, 1940-1942   (1997)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CS/CDunknown & Ccm 153 2 / A 31705 — [Art Lund] Band Singer; The Best Of Art Lund    (2000)
h. CO 32242-1Master Take (Columbia) When The Roses Bloom Again - 2:52(Nat Burton, Walter Kent) / arr: Eddie Sauter
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)
COLUMBIA©Sony Special Products CS/CD28427 — [Benny Goodman] Rarities, 1940-1942   (1997)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)




Photo

A bike ride seems to be in store for bandleader Benny Goodman and the twosome who served as his main vocalists during the 1941-1943 period (Peggy Lee, Art London). Although this picture was featured in a 1948 magazine, it was probably taken in April or May of 1942. (Lund left the band in May. Until at least mid-March, Lee regularly sported a hairdo that was very different from the one seen in this photo.). The pair of Lee and London recorded a total of three duets, the second of them ("The Lamp Of Memory") at the present session. Their third vocal coupling took place at a 1946 Benny Goodman radio show, on which Lee guested.


Personnel

1. Art London (aka Art Lund)
Art London shares vocal duties with Peggy Lee on "If You Build A Better Mousetrap" only.

2. Chuck Gentry
3. Artie Baker
Chuck Gentry's presence on baritone sax should be deemed possible, rather than certain. It could be Artie Baker instead.


Masters And Issues

1. "When The Roses Bloom Again" (Additional Take)
Columbia's database lists a second complete take of "When The Roses Bloom Again," numbered 32242, no take number indicated. Discographer Donald Russell Connor clarifies that this is not an alternate take but merely a safety copy of take #1. As usual, I have trusted his judgment, and have therefore excluded the alleged second take #32242 from this discography. See also point #7 below.

2. "When The Roses Bloom Again" (Additional Take; Non-Lee Vocal)
During a later date (January 23, 1942), Benny Goodman And His Orchestra recorded a second master of "When The Roses Bloom Again." That second master (identified as matrix #32242, take #2) features Art London on vocals -- not Peggy Lee. Lund's version was actually the one that Columbia chose for release on 78 rpm (Okeh #6580). As a result, Lee's version was left unissued until its appearance in a Japanese anthology in the 1970s.

3. "The Lamp of Memory" (Additional Take)
Take #2 of "The Lamp of Memory" made its first appearance on Columbia Legacy's CD Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947, released in 1999. Previously, its existence was not stated in any of the documents that I have consulted -- not even in Donald Russell Connor's bio-discography.

4. "If You Build A Better Mousetrap" [Song], "When The Roses Bloom Again" [Song], And Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
Columbia Legacy's 1999 CD set C2k 65686 incorrectly labels its takes of "If You Build A Better Mousetrap" and "When The Roses Bloom Again" as previously unissued. (The CD's annotator used an asterisk to signify that a given track had not been previously issued. Asterisks can be found next to both tracks.) These takes had been formerly released by Sony itself in Japan, on vinyl. Both takes had also been previously issued domestically: by Sony in the case of "When The Roses Bloom Again" and by the (non-official) collectors' label Joyce in the case of "If You Build A Better Mousetrap." Most likely, this and other errors in the CD set stem from consulting Columbia logs that have not been updated.)

5. "When The Roses Bloom" [Song] And Rarities, 1940-1942 [CD]
The 1997 CD Rarities, 1940-1942 also misidentifies "When The Roses Bloom" as a previously unissued master.

6. "If You Build A Better Mousetrap" [Song] And Art Lund ("The Big Bands' Greatest Vocalists" Series) [LP]
In his book Benny Goodman: Listen To His Legacy, Russ Connor erroneously listed the Joyce LP Art Lund ("The Big Bands' Greatest Vocalists" Series) under take #1. He acknowledged and rectified the error in the book's sequel, Wrappin' It Up, where the LP's version of "If You Build A Better Mousetrap" is correctly listed as #2.

7. Newly Found Takes
Takes #3 of both "The Lamp Of Memory" (Co 32239-3) and "If You Build A Better Mousetrap"(Co 32240-3) and take #4 of "When The Roses Bloom" (Co 32342-4 ) are not listed in Russ Connor's discographical works. Reference to the existence of these alternate takes was not discovered until after the dawn of the twenty-first century, and subsequently published in David Jessup's Benny Goodman: A Supplemental Discography. Notice that, in the case of "When The Roses Bloom Again," there is a bit of a mystery: since the only takes known to exist were numbered 1 and 4, there is a question as to whether non-extant takes received the numbers 2 and 3. Still further, reference to a deleted take entry is made in Connor's Benny Goodman: Listen To His Legacy. The author writes that "[a]cquisition of a test pressing of mx CO 32241-1 proved it to be the same as an unnumbered take on a CO safety recording, and a supposed take is eliminated."

8. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this session were the instrumentals "At The Darktown Strutters' Ball" (master #32241) and "Jersey Bounce" (alternate to master #32238; other takes, including the master, recorded on January 23, 1942).

9. Breakdowns
There are no extant breakdowns from this date.


Arrangements

1. "When The Roses Bloom Again"
Bio-discographer Russ Connor does not list an arranger for this Peggy Lee performance. However, he does list Eddie Sauter as the probable arranger of the performance of the same song that Benny Goodman recorded a little over a week later (on January 23, 1941), with a new vocal by Art Lund. Hence I have tentatively added Sauter as the arranger of this session's version of "When The Roses Bloom Again."


Date: February 5, 1942; 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. (Booked 1:30 - 5:30)
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Sol Kane, Clint Neagley (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Art Ralston (bar), Al Davis, James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Bernie Privin (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 32384-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) My Little Cousin - 3:23(Eli Basse, Sam Braverman, Cy Coben, Happy Lewis) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA LPPg 33405 — [Benny Goodman] Solid Gold Instrumental Hits   (1975)
Collectables Licensed CDCol 7859 / Sony A 702918 — [Benny Goodman] Solid Gold Instrumental Hits   (2007)
b. CO 32384-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) My Little Cousin - 3:15(Eli Basse, Sam Braverman, Cy Coben, Happy Lewis) / arr: Mel Powell
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7620 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VII; Royal Flush   (1982)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
c. CO 32384-1Master Take (Columbia) My Little Cousin - 3:17(Eli Basse, Sam Braverman, Cy Coben, Happy Lewis) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6606 — {My Little Cousin / A Zoot Suit [vocal by Art London]}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPC 170 (38280-38283) / B 406/ Cl 6033 [EP & LP rel. 1949] — Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee   (1948)
Armed Forces Radio & Television Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram No. 2245 — G.I. Jive [Connie Haines, Lionel Hampton, Woody Herman]   (1949)




Photo

Taken at the New York Public Library on January 29, 1942, this is a shot of Benny Goodman in the company of science fiction writer Lewis Gannett and Austrian actress Mady Christians.


Songs

1. "My Little Cousin" In The Music Charts
"My Little Cousin" was Peggy Lee's fifth chart hit. (For her fourth, see session dated November 13, 1941.) After making its debut during the week of April 11, 1942, it went on to peak at #14. Joel Whitburn's chart book Pop Memories 1890-1954 does not list any other charting versions of the song.


Masters

1. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this session were the instrumentals "A String Of Pearls" (master #32383) and "Ramona" (master #32385).

2. Breakdowns
Four of this date's eight extant breakdowns happened during the recording of "My Little Cousin." (The remainder happened during the recording of the instrumental "Ramona.")


Issues And Masters

1. "My Little Cousin" [Song] And Solid Gold Instrumental Hits [LP]
A double album that otherwise comprises instrumentals, Solid Gold Instrumental Hits curiously includes Peggy Lee's vocal of "My Little Cousin." A plausible explanation for the inclusion of "My Little Cousin" in an album of instrumentals is the undeniable appeal or catchiness of its melody, which was taken from a Yiddish original.


Date: March 10, 1942; 3:00 p.m. - 6:35 p.m. (Booked 3:00 - 6:00)
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Sextet (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p, cel), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 32595-1Master Take (Columbia) The Way You Look Tonight - 3:21(Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern) / arr: {Head Arrangement}, Mel Powell
COLUMBIA 78Co 36594 — {The Way You Look Tonight / The Wang Wang Blues [instrumental]}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm album/EP/(10")LPC 170 (38280-38283) / B 406/ Cl 6033 [EP & LP rel. 1949] — Benny Goodman, His Orchestra And Sextet; Vocals By Peggy Lee   (1948)
COLUMBIA EPB 2556 — The Benny Goodman Sextet With Peggy Lee ("Hall of Fame" Series)   (1958)




Photo

The way that Peggy Lee looked around early 1942.


Songs

1. "The Way You Look Tonight" [And "Where Or When"] As Part Of The Peggy Lee Canon
On the matter of this performance's relevance among Peggy Lee's earliest interpretations on record, consult the Songs notes under the session dated December 24, 1941 in this page.

2. "The Way You Look Tonight" In The Music Charts
This classic from the Great American Songbook made its first appearance in the 1936 movie Swing Time. Fred Astaire sang it in the film and also took it to the top of the 1936 charts. Other versions were recorded that year; some of them made the charts as well.

Six years later, Peggy Lee and The Benny Goodman Sextet were responsible for the return of the tune to the charts. Their version made its debut during the week of June 27, 1942, peaking at #21. "The Way You Look Tonight" thereby became Lee's eighth vocal to make the Billboard charts. (For details about her sixth and seventh entries, which were recorded after "The Way You Look Tonight" but released earlier, see notes under next session.)

Nearly twenty years elapsed before The Lettermen proved the song's perennial appeal: their version peaked at #13 in 1961. Later yet (1971), Edward Woodward's version made the British music charts, too.


Arrangements

1. "The Way You Look Tonight"
In the track listing of Columbia Legacy's 1999 CD set #65686, the arrangement of "The Way You Look Tonight" is credited to Mel Powell. Aurally, the number sounds like a head arrangement, presumably routined by Powell. D. Russell Connor lists no arranger in his bio-discography.


Personnel

1. Peggy Lee's Prominent Participation With The Sextet
2. Benny Goodman's Non-Participation
This date marked Lee's second reunion with the prestigious small group ensemble that was known as The Benny Goodman Sextet. Critic Leonard Feather has brought attention to the highly unusual fact that "virtually nothing is heard from Benny [during The Way You Look Tonight]; it's basically a showcase for [Peggy Lee's] vocal, with a brief intro by McGarity and with Mel [Powell] on celeste."


Masters

1. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this sextet session were the instrumentals "The Wang Wang Blues" (master #32593), "The World Is Waiting For A Sunrise" (master #32594) and "St. Louis Blues" (no assigned matrix number).

2. Breakdowns
There are no extant breakdowns from this date.


Date: March 12, 1942; 3:00 p.m. - 6:40 p.m. (Booked 3:00 - 7:00)
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Sol Kane, Bud Shiffman (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Art Ralston (bar), James "Jimmy" Maxwell, John Napton, Bernie Privin (t), Cutty Cutshall, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Ralph Collier (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 32601-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) I Threw A Kiss In The Ocean - 3:00(Irving Berlin)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7644 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues   (1983)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
b. CO 32601-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) I Threw A Kiss In The Ocean(Irving Berlin)
unissued
c. CO 32601-"C"Alternate Take (Columbia) I Threw A Kiss In The Ocean(Irving Berlin)
unissued
d. CO 32601-1Master Take (Columbia) I Threw A Kiss In The Ocean - 3:00(Irving Berlin)
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6652 — {Full Moon / I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78Co 36590 — {Full Moon / I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean}   (1942)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)
e. CO 32602-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) We'll Meet Again - 3:10(Ross Parker Clarke, Hugh Charles) / arr: Mel Powell
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7644 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues   (1983)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
f. CO 32602-1Master Take (Columbia) We'll Meet Again - 3:17(Ross Parker Clarke, Hugh Charles) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6644 — {We'll Meet Again / Before (Rachmaninoff Special) [instrumental]}   (1942)
COLUMBIA EPB 1636 — Benny Goodman Presents Peggy Lee    (1953)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)
g. CO 32603-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Full Moon (Noche De Luna) - 3:05(Gonzalo Curiel, Marcelen Odette, Bob Russell)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7644 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues   (1983)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8823 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME III, 1 & 2   (1994)
h. CO 32603-1Master Take (Columbia) Full Moon (Noche De Luna) - 3:17(Gonzalo Curiel, Marcelen Odette, Bob Russell)
COLUMBIA's Okeh 78Ok 6652 — {Full Moon / I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean}   (1942)
COLUMBIA 78Co 36590 — {Full Moon / I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean}   (1942)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)
i. CO 32604-2Alternate Take (Columbia) There Won't Be A Shortage Of Love - 2:40(John Jacob Loeb, Carmen Lombardo)
Nostalgia Book Club Licensed LPNost 1004 (also: Co Alb P3 13618) — [Various Artists] Rare Big Band Gems 1932-1947   (1976)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7644 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues   (1983)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8824 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME IV, 1 & 2   (1994)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Acrobat Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Addcd 3047 — Where Or When   (2008)
j. CO 32604-1Master Take (Columbia) There Won't Be A Shortage Of Love - 2:40(John Jacob Loeb, Carmen Lombardo)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)
COLUMBIA's Columbia House LPCo alb P5 15536 — [Benny Goodman] The Legendary Benny Goodman   (1981)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony CD(Japan) Sicp 124 — A Portrait Of Peggy Lee, 1941-1942 [24-track edition]    (2002)




Photo

A photograph of Peggy Lee and Benny Goodman during the rehearsals for the band's performance of "I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean."


Songs

1. "We'll Meet Again" In The Music Charts
2. "Full Moon" In The Music Charts
This session generated two hits for Peggy Lee and The Benny Goodman Orchestra. According to Joel Whitburn's music chart listings in his book Pop Memories, 1890-1954, "We'll Meet Again" made its debut during the week of May 23, 1942, and "Full Moon" did so a few weeks later, on the week of June 13, 1942. Lee's summer chart streak continued with yet a third song, which reached its peak at the end of June ("The Way You Look Tonight," recorded on March 10, 1942).

A popular warhorse, "We'll Meet Again" enjoyed a fair number of hit versions. Two of them, one by Kay Kyser and the other by Guy Lombardo, had actually been released a year earlier than Goodman's. Both 1941 versions had peaked at #24. Contemporaneous with the Goodman-Lee recording (1942) was a Victor 78-rpm single by Sammy Kaye with vocal by Allan Foster, which made a small dent in the charts. (From the vague data at hand, I gather that it peaked somewhere below the top 30.) Twelve years later, Vera Lynn (the so-called World War Sweetheart) and members of Her Majesty's Forces took their version on London Records to #29. Goodman and Lee charted higher than all of those versions: #16.

Goodman and Lee's "Full Moon" also had contemporaneous competition in the charts. A Decca recording by The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, with vocal by Bob Eberly, peaked at #19. Goodman and his canary peaked three notches below Dorsey and his crooner (#22).


Masters And Issues

1. "Full Moon"
In the estimation of bio-discographer Donald Russell Connor, the playing throughout this session's takes of Full Moon illustrates "the competence attainable by a stable personnel." He gives "[p]osies to Peggy Lee, too, quite professional by now, and exhibiting a distinctive style."

2. "Full Moon" [Song] And Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman [LP]
3. "Full Moon" [Song] And Miss Peggy Lee [LP]
4. "Full Moon" [Song] And We'll Meet Again [LP]
Discographer Russ Connor notes that the the intro and the first chorus of "Full Moon" are missing from the above-listed releases -- all of them on either the Harmony or the Hallmark label.

5. "There Won't Be A Shortage Of Love" [Song] And Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings [CD]
Goodman discographer David Jessup notes that the 1999 Columbia CD set misidentifies its take of "There Won't Be A Shortage Of Love" as #1. It is instead #2. The set also mislabels its take as previously unissued. Both takes had been previously issued; #1 in various Columbia LPs, #2 in releases from the collectors' label Phontastic.

6. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this session were the instrumentals "Before (Rachmaninoff Special)" (master #32600) and "Peter And The Wolf" (no master number assigned).

7. Breakdowns
Breakdowns are extant from all but one of this session's six performances ("There Won't Be A Shortage Of Love"). One breakdown happened during "I Threw A Kiss In The Ocean," one during "We'll Meet Again," two during "Full Moon," and the others during the instrumental performances.


Arrangements

1. "We'll Meet Again"
2. Mel Powell
3. Salvatore "Tutti" ("Toots") Camarata
Mel Powell arranged at least two numbers from this session: the vocal "We'll Meet Again" and the instrumental "Peter And The Wolf." Tutti Camarata arranged the instrumental "Before (Rachmaninoff Special)." Powell and Camarata are identified as the authors in the actual arrangements, which are currently kept in the New York Public Library, as part of the Benny Goodman Collection of Musical Arrangements. The collection does not include any arrangements for "I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean," "Full Moon," or "There Won't Be A Shortage Of Love."


Date: May 14, 1942; 2:05 p.m. - 6:25 p.m. (Booked 1:30 - 5:30)
Location: Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Sol Kane, Bud Shiffman (as), George Berg, Vido Musso (ts), Art Ralston (bar), James "Jimmy" Maxwell, John Napton, Bernie Privin (t), Charlie Castaldo, Lou McGarity (tb), Tom "Tommy" Morgan (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Alvin Stoller (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 32793-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) You're Easy To Dance With - 3:34(Irving Berlin)
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1014 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 7; 1941-1942   (1985)
b. CO 32793-1Master Take (Columbia) You're Easy To Dance With - 3:18(Irving Berlin)
COLUMBIA©CBS Sony LP(Japan) Sopj 22-23 — Elmer's Tune   (1972)
COLUMBIA's Columbia House LPCo alb P5 15536 — [Benny Goodman] The Legendary Benny Goodman   (1981)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7644 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues   (1983)
c. CO 32794-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) All I Need Is You - 3:20(Benny Davis, Peter DeRose, Mitchell Parish) / arr: Dave Matthews
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7644 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues   (1983)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8824 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME IV, 1 & 2   (1994)
d. CO 32794-1Master Take (Columbia) All I Need Is You - 3:22(Benny Davis, Peter DeRose, Mitchell Parish) / arr: Dave Matthews
COLUMBIA 78Co 36617 — {On The Sunny Side Of The Street / All I Need Is You}   (1942)
COLUMBIA EPB 1636 — Benny Goodman Presents Peggy Lee    (1953)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LP/8T/CS/CDHl 7005/Reissued as (CBS Ct/Ck 7005)&(Sony P/Ba/Bt/A 13584)[CD rel. 1988] — Peggy Lee Sings With Benny Goodman    (1957)




Photo

Another shot of Peggy Lee and Benny Goodman during the rehearsal for "I Threw A Kiss On The Ocean," recorded on March 12, 1942.


Personnel & Cross-references (Biography)

1. Vido Musso
2. Lou McGarity
This was saxophonist Vido Musso's last session with The Benny Goodman Orchestra. Goodman bio-discographer Russ Connor shares a personal, tongue-in-cheek recollection that involves Musso, trombone player Lou McGarity, and Peggy Lee: "The author recalls a one-nighter in the Sunnybrook Ballroom, Pottstown, Pa., probably in May ... He also remembers Lou McGarity introducing him to Peggy Lee during an intermission [at the Sunnybrook] with a tentative date in the offing; and that Vido Musso, who acted as Peggy's unofficial bodyguard, talked her out of it."


Arrangements

1. Dave Matthews
In Russ Connor's expert opinion, Dave Matthews might have been the arranger of "All I Need Is You." This identification should thus be considered tentative, not definitive. (In his 1988 book Benny Goodman: Listen To His Legacy, Connor refers to Matthews as the "possible" arranger. Oddly, he had expressed stronger conviction in his earlier notes for the Phontastic LP The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues. "Sensitive Peggy Lee vocal here, in an arrangement I now find" Connor declares, "to be by Dave Matthews, who played alto for Benny in the middle months of 1938." (Phontastic's 1994 CD The Alternate Version, Volume IV, 1 & 2 uses the same notes as the 1983 LP, with just one or two editorial modifications. The just-quoted remark is repeated verbatim.)


Masters

1. "All I Need Is You"
Originally, Donald Russell Connor and other Goodman experts presumed that all existent takes of "All I Need Is You" had been recorded during this date. Russ Connor eventually changed his mind, however. He re-assigned one of the takes ("B") to June 17, 1942. The re-assignment was motivated by the substantially different instrumental intro on take "B." In this discography, I have followed Connor's lead, thereby accepting his re-assignment.

2. Non-Lee Masters
3. Non-Lee Vocals: Art London (aka Art Lund)
No instrumentals were recorded during this session. In addition to Lee's two numbers, the date also generated two vocals by Art London: "I've Got A Gal In Kalamazoo" (master #32795) and "Take Me" (master #32796).

4. Breakdowns
The only extant breakdown from this date happened right before the first completed take of "All I Need Is You."


Issues

1. "You're Easy To Dance With" [Song] And Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings [CD]
The 1999 Columbia 2CD set erroneously classifies its take of "You're Easy To Dance With" as previously unissued. Columbia had previously issued it on multiple occasions.


Date: June 17, 1942
Location: Probably Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Herman "Hymie" Sche[r]tzer, Bud Shiffman (as), George Berg, Jerry Jerome (ts), Johnny McAfee (bar), Tony Faso (aka Joseph Fasulo), Bernie Privin, Cootie Williams (t), Charlie Castaldo, Lou McGarity (tb), Dave Barbour (g), Sid Weiss (b), Mel Powell (p), Alvin Stoller (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 32794-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) All I Need Is You - 3:15(Benny Davis, Peter DeRose, Mitchell Parish) / arr: Dave Matthews
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7644 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume VIII; St. Louis Blues   (1983)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8824 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME IV, 1 & 2   (1994)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1335 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1942-1944   (2004)




Photo

Publicity shots of Peggy Lee, both of them published in magazines, one of them also used as the cover of various pieces of sheet music. Exact date unknown, but no later than mid-November of 1942.


Personnel

1. Personnel Changes
During this mid-1942 period, the amount of personnel changes in Goodman's orchestra is higher than usual, due primarily (though not exclusively) to war drafting.

2. Dave Barbour
This session introduces guitarist Dave Barbour, the man who would become Peggy Lee's first husband. By this time, Barbour was already a seasoned studio player, with about a decade's worth of work as accompanist to the likes of Louis Armstrong, Charlie Barnet, Glenn Miller, Red Norvo and Mildred Bailey, among others. In comments that she made during the later years of her career, Lee misidentified the next session (July 27, 1942) as Barbour's studio debut with The Benny Goodman Orchestra.


Masters

1. Numerical Sequence
For other takes of "All I Need Is You," see session dated May 14, 1942, including notes.

2. Non-Lee Masters
This all-vocals session was partially dedicated to remakes. In addition to "All I Need Is You," two vocals that Art London had tried on May 14, 1942 were remade as well. However, London himself could not be present for the remake session, because he had just been drafted for military service. Hence the two London vocals were assigned to his replacement, Dick Haymes, who also sang two fresh numbers during this session: "Serenade In Blue" (master #32923) and "Idaho" (master #32924).

3. Breakdowns
The only extant breakdown from this date happened during the recording of one of the Dick Haymes vocals.


Date: July 27, 1942
Location: Probably Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), Morty Palitz (pdr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Clint Neagley, Herman "Hymie" Sche[r]tzer (as), Leonard Sims, Jon Walton (ts), Robert "Bob" Poland (bar), Benny Baker, Tony Faso (aka Joseph Fasulo), James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Lawrence Stearns, aka Alfred Sculco (t), Charlie Castaldo, Lou McGarity (tb), Dave Barbour (g), Cliff Hill (b), Mel Powell (p), Howard "Hud" Davies (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 33048-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Why Don't You Do Right? - 3:19(Joe McCoy) / arr: Mel Powell
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1014 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 7; 1941-1942   (1985)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8824 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME IV, 1 & 2   (1994)
b. CO 33048-"B"Alternate Take (Columbia) Why Don't You Do Right? - 3:15(Joe McCoy) / arr: Mel Powell
Blu-Disc/The Meritt Record Society Collectors' Label LPT 1015 — [Benny Goodman] The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 8; 1936-1955   (1986)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7659-61 — [Benny Goodman] The Permanent Goodman; A Portrait In Music Of The King Of Swing, 1926-1945   (1986)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 7660 — [Benny Goodman] The Permanent Goodman; A Portrait In Music Of The King of Swing; Volume 2, 1939-1945   (1997)
c. CO 33048-1Master Take (Columbia) Why Don't You Do Right? - 3:12(Joe McCoy) / arr: Mel Powell
COLUMBIA 78Co 36652 — {Why Don't You Do Right? / Six Flats Unfurnished [instrumental]}   (1942)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc117 (War Dept. Series) — Jazz In America [Various Artists, All Blues Songs; 1 Peggy Lee Vocal]   (1943)
COLUMBIA 78-rpm albumC 122 (37243-37246) — [Benny Goodman] Benny's Best {Cancelled In The USA, Released As Columbia A-52 In Canada}   (1947)
d. CO 33048-2Alternate Take (Columbia) Why Don't You Do Right? - 3:14(Joe McCoy) / arr: Mel Powell
USA Government's War Department, Army-Navy V-Disc Series V-Disc233 — {Perfidia, by Benny Goodman & Helen Forrest / Why Don't You Do Right?, by Goodman & Peggy Lee}   (1944)
USA Government's War Department, Navy V-Disc Series V-Disc13 — {Why Don't You Do Right / other artists' titles}   (1944)
COLUMBIA's Harmony LPH 30024 — Miss Peggy Lee    (1970)





Photos

A full-body publicity shot taken in either 1943 or the second half of 1942. It was used by Peggy Lee's management agency at the time, MCA (Music Corporation Of America). The other picture is a candid from 1943.


Songs

1. "Why Don't You Do Right?"
If interested in learning more about the song "Why Don't You Do Right?" and its connection to Peggy Lee, consult this research page.

2. The Goodman-Lee Version Of "Why Don't You Do Right?" In The Music Charts
The Billboard debut of "Why Don't You Do Right?" took place during the week of January 2, 1943. In the estimation of Joel Whitburn, author of Pop Memories, 1890-1954, the Goodman-and-Lee recording peaked at #4 and spent a total of 19 weeks in the charts. (For Lee's next and last Columbia hit with Goodman -- her tenth -- see session above, dated October 8, 1941.)

4. The Club Version Of "Why Don't You" In The Charts
In 2010, "Why Don't You Do Right?" returned to the charts under the guise of a club house version simply titled "Why Don't You." For additional details, see Issues notes under session dated November 19, 1947, in this page.


Cross-references

1. "Why Don't You Do Right?"
For other studio recordings of "Why Don't You Do Right?," see sessions dated November 19, 1947 and September 8, 1992. See also sessions dated February 8, 1961; April 24, 1968; March 13 and 20, 1977. For yet additional radio, television, and concert versions, consult the song and sheet music index.


Masters

1. "Why Don't You Do Right?"
Of the four extant takes of "Why Don't You Do Right?," two have been officially issued by Columbia. They are slightly different in approach. The most widely disseminated take (#1) spotlights a Peggy Lee who intentionally phrases some of the words in the style of Lil Green yet still adds her own ironic, skeptical stance to the song's message. In take #2, the ensemble performs at a comparatively faster clip, and the singer purposefully phrases the titular phrase in the style of Billie Holiday.

2. Non-Lee Masters
Also recorded during this session were the instrumentals "Six Flats Unfurnished" (master #33047) and "After You've Gone" (master #33049).

3. Breakdowns
Of the three extant breakdowns from this date, one happened before the second completed take of "Why Don't You Do Right?," the others during the waxing of the instrumentals.


Issues

1. "Why Don't You Do Right?" [Song] And Benny Goodman, The Different Version, Volume IV [CD]
2. Why Don't You Do Right? [Song] And The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume Seven [LP]
The Phontastic series of CDs Benny Goodman The Different Version include detailed track information. Each booklet contains both a discographically oriented essay and an actual discography (of the tracks in the CD set).

There is, however, one erroneous tidbit in the essay and discography of the fourth volume of the Phontastic series. In the essay, we are told that take "B" of Why Don't You Do Right? has been previously released in the LP The Unheard Benny Goodman, Volume 7 (Blu-Disc #1014). The error (according to D. Russell Connor): the take issued in Blu-Disc LP #1014 is not "B" but "A." (Take "A" is the one reissued in this Phontastic CD. As for take "B, Blu-Disc had issued it too, in volume 8 of its series, LP #1015).

There is also an error in the discography of the CD set. It correctly identifies the take found in the set as the same that had been previously issued in Blu Disc #1014 (that is to say, take "A"), but it incorrectly lists it as also issued in Phontastic LP #7661. That LP (called The Permanent Goodman; A Portrait In Music Of The King of Swing; Volume 2, 1939-1945) contains take "B" instead.

Underlying these errors is the fact that the Phontastic CDs generally recycled Connor's annotation from the earlier Phontastic LPs. As a result, the recycled notes of a Phontastic CD sometimes include editorial insertions such as the following one: "Here the CD-editor interrupts Russ, announcing that two alternates, unknown when the LP-series was issued, have been added, one of Why Don't You Right?, which was one of Benny's -- and Peggy -- major hits, and another a second take of After You've Gone, the big band version." This insertion is correct; alternate take "A" of ""Why Don't You Right?" had not been previously issued by Phontastic. (The insertion is thus appreciated, and so is the recycling of Connor's earlier liner notes, since they are invariably good. Errors such as the ones detailed here are very rare.)


Personnel

1. Benny Baker
2. Lawrence Stearns
Columbia's log for this session does not list trumpet player Benny Baker as part of its personnel, but Russ Connor's book Benny Goodman: Listen To His Legacy does. "Jimmy Maxwell," explains Connor, "is adamant that his teacher, trumpeter Benny Baker, who regularly played with the New York Philarmonic, recorded with the band on this session." Hence the bio-discographer's addition of Baker to the session's personnel.

As a corollary to this addition, Connor deems the participation of one of Goodman's regular trumpet players (Lawrence Stearns) "questionable." Since Stearns is listed in Columbia's logs (and since Russell Connor and/or Jimmy Maxwell could be mistaken in their claim that Baker was present) I have not excluded Stearns' name from the personnel, however.

In short, my own addition of Benny Baker to this sessionography should be deemed tentative.


Date: July 30, 1942
Location: Probably Liederkranz Hall, 115 East 58th Street, Manhattan, New York
Label: COLUMBIA

Benny Goodman (ldr), The Benny Goodman Orchestra (acc), Benny Goodman (cl), Clint Neagley, Herman "Hymie" Sche[r]tzer (as), Leonard Sims, Jon Walton (ts), Robert "Bob" Poland (bar), Tony Faso (aka Joseph Fasulo), James "Jimmy" Maxwell, Lawrence Stearns, aka Alfred Sculco (t), Charlie Castaldo, Lou McGarity (tb), Dave Barbour (g), Cliff Hill (b), Mel Powell (p), Howard "Hud" Davies (d), Peggy Lee (v)

a. CO 33069-"A"Alternate Take (Columbia) Let's Say A Prayer - 3:17(Charles Farrow)
unissued
b. CO 33069-1Master Take (Columbia) Let's Say A Prayer - 3:10(Charles Farrow)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label LP(Sweden) Nost 7648 — [Benny Goodman] The Alternate Goodman, Volume IX; After You've Gone   (1983)
Phontastic Nostalgia Collectors' Label CD(Sweden) Phon Ncd 8824 [re-pressed 1999?] — [Benny Goodman] THE DIFFERENT VERSION, VOLUME IV, 1 & 2   (1994)
COLUMBIA's Legacy CDC2k 65686 — PEGGY LEE & BENNY GOODMAN; THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, 1941-1947   (1999)
Classics Collectors' Label CD(France) 1335 — [Benny Goodman] THE CHRONOGICAL BENNY GOODMAN, 1942-1944   (2004)
Acrobat Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Addcd 3047 — Where Or When   (2008)




Photo

Benny Goodman And His Orchestra, photographed while performing at the Prospect Park Shell in Brooklyn's Prospect Park (New York) on July 15, 1942. Though not seen in that photo, Peggy Lee was present, too. In the second photo, they are indoors at an unidentified location. Goodman and Lee are in the company of pianist Jess Stacy and saxophonist Hymie Schertzer. Due to the combination of personnel on sight, the picture must date from no earlier than December of 1942.


Songwriters

1. Charles Farrow
2. Merrill Tonning - Bud Williams
Various sources credit Merrill Tonning and Bud Williams as the songwriters of "Let's Say A Prayer." However, the sheet music identifies Charles Farrow as sole author of both music and lyrics.

Personnel (And Issues)

1. Zoot Sims
2. Leonard Sims
3. Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947 [CD]
A tenor saxophonist by the last name of Sims plays on this and on the July 27 session that precedes this one. His first name is given as Leonard in all but one of the sources known to me. The dissenting source is the 1999 Columbia Legacy CD set Peggy Lee & Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings, 1941-1947, which identifies the saxophonist not just as Leonard Sims but as Leonard "Zoot" Sims. Since Zoot Sims' birth name was John Haley Sims, I assume that Columbia Legacy made a mistake. Elsewhere, I have not seen any indication that Zoot Sims played for Goodman during these 1941-1942 sessions.


Masters

1. Non-Lee Masters
2. Non-Lee Vocals: Philip "Buzz" Aston
Also recorded during this session were the instrumental "Mission To Moscow" (master #33070) and two vocals by the band's then-new male vocalist, Philip "Buzz" Aston: "Dearly Beloved" (master #32067) and "I'm Old Fashioned" (master #32068).

3. Breakdowns
There is one extant breakdown from each of this date's performances, including "Let's Say A Prayer."


Issues

1. "Let's Say A Prayer" [Song] And Peggy Lee And Benny Goodman: The Complete Recordings [CD
Contrary to a claim made in the 1999 Columbia Legacy CD set, its take of "Let's Say A Prayer" had not remained unissued before its appearance on the set. The collectors' label Phontastic had already made it available on both LP and CD.


Arrangements

1. Eddie Sauter
The arranger of "Let's Say A Prayer" and of this session's other vocals remains unknown. Only the arranger of the instrumental "Mission To Moscow" is known (Eddie Sauter, according to Donald Russell Connor).







GENERAL NOTES

Statistics: Total Amount Of Songs That Peggy Lee Recorded While Serving As Benny Goodman's Canary

This discographical page lists 34 masters featuring vocals by Peggy Lee, all of them recorded between August 1941 and July 1942, over a total of 18 sessions. Also listed are 61 alternate takes, including three to which I have given the additional designation secondary master, to be explained at the bottom of this page.

In addition to masters and alternate takes, these 18 sessions also generated many breakdowns. Those are mentioned under the notes for each date -- rather than being listed along with the alternates and masters. I have made only one exception to this course of action: I felt that a breakdown of "That Did It Marie" merited being listed due to its potential interest to Lee fans. (See session dated November 13, 1941.)

Having worked under Goodman's wing from mid-1941 to mid-1943, the total number of masters that Lee recorded with the bandleader could have been substantially higher than 34. Unfortunately, a music industry ban prevented recording activity during the last third of Lee's employment as Goodman's canary. (See explanatory section toward the end of this page.) Without that impediment -- and taking into account the singer's pattern of increased popularity over time, culminating with the smash hit "Why Don't You Do Right", from her penultimate recording date -- perhaps we would have been able to enjoy as many as 50 vocal masters, in total. Fortunately, we do count with some extant 1942-1943 remotes, which let us know the titles of some new numbers that Lee was singing during the last third of her residency with Goodman.



Popularity: Peggy In The Polls

After joining the nationally famous Benny Goodman Orchestra, Peggy Lee's name promptly made an appearance in Downbeat's popularity polls.

In 1941, she debuted at #14 in the twenty-five-slot poll for female singers. Lee had received 114 votes. Among the names below hers were Lee Wiley and Maxine Sullivan (placing at the very end of the poll, in the #24 and #25 positions, and tied, with 40 votes each), Helen Humes (at #19, with 60 votes), and Jo Stafford (at #23, with 50 votes and, like Peggy Lee, also a debuting artist this year). Among those above Lee were Ivie Anderson (#8), Mildred Bailey (#7), and Dinah Shore (#5). The top four consisted of Anita O'Day (making a huge debut on the poll, with 1670 votes), Billie Holiday (1871 votes), Helen Forrest (2236 votes) and, at the very peak with 3226 votes, Helen O'Connell.

On the following year (1942), Forrest and O'Connell switched places at the top of the Band, Female poll. Forrest had received 2226 votes. O'Day, the poll's highest debut in the previous year, climbed one more spot, causing Holiday to drop to #4. The two other debutants from the previous year shot up to positions #5 (Jo Stafford, with 654 votes) and #6 (Peggy Lee, with 609 votes).

In 1943, the two debutants continued their fast climb: Peggy Lee reached #2 with 2710 votes and Jo Stafford earned the #1 position with 2815 votes. The previous two chart toppers fell to #3 (Helen Forrest, with 2276 votes) and #6 (Helen O'Connell). Anita O'Day and Billie Holiday also dropped one place each, respectively landing at #4 and #5.

Lee's name appears as well in Billboard's Collegiate polls, starting with one published on the May 2 1942 edition of the magazine. At #5, her debut in the poll for female vocalists was auspicious, with all other 'debutants' behind her: Anita O'Day (#6), Yvonne King (#8), and Jo Stafford (#9). The magazine also published a gender-blind top 10 that placed Peggy Lee at #8, not too far from more established crooners and canaries such as Ray Eberle (#2), Frank Sinatra (#3), Ginny Simms (#6) and Helen Forrest (#7). Helen O'Connell topped both of these lists.

In 1943, Peggy Lee shot up to #3 in the female collegiate poll, trailing behind just Helen Forrest and Helen O'Connell.





Recording Location: Liederkranz Hall And Other Columbia Studios

When in New York, Liederkranz Hall was Benny Goodman's recording studio of choice. Of the Big Apple dates in which canary Peggy Lee participated (sixteen in total), thirteen are officially known to have taken place at that hall, and the remaining three are also suspected to have occurred there.

The so-called Columbia Daybooks (1941-1942) are the main official sources for the topic at hand (i.e., the location at which the bandleader's dates were held in 1941 and 1942). The Daybooks identify the recording studio booked for each of the label's dates during those two years. Unfortunately, there do not seem to be any daybooks beyond mid-June 1942. (Not to my knowledge, at least. They might no longer exist, if they ever did.) As a result of this gap, we are lacking a official, definite documentation of the studio(s) used for Lee's last three canary sessions with Goodman (June 17, July 27, July 30, 1942). Fortunately, other sources can provide grounds for a tentative designation of Liederkranz Hall as the studio booked for all three dates. In interviews conducted over the decades, Peggy Lee herself referred to Liederkranz Hall as the location for all her Manhattan dates with The Benny Goodman Orchestra, never making mention of any other New York facility. And, according to a researcher who has listened to tape transfers of all three sessions in question, the acoustics strongly suggests that the proceedings were indeed happening at Liederkranz.

In his book Sessions With Sinatra, Charles Granata quotes Columbia producer George Avakian's description and assessment of the establishment:  "Liederkranz was a large studio in a beautiful building, located at 115 East 58 Street, between Park and Lexington Avenues, and was actually run by the Liederkranz Society.  It had very natural sonic properties; it was large and had a lot of wood ...  Columbia's sound became famous largely through Harry James's trumpet recordings at Liederkranz Hall, which had a great echo sound." Granata was also the recipient of this exacting description, courtesy of Columbia's classical music producer Howard Scott:  "Liederkranz was the best recording studio in New York.  It was once a German beer hall, and it was a great studio:  100 feet long by 60 feet wide, with 30-foot ceilings.  The only problem was that we couldn't have the heat on the winter because the old radiators snapped and popped." Peggy Lee's own memories about recording at Liederkranz have already been quoted in this sessionographical page, too. (See note titled At The Recording Session, under December 24, 1941 date.) 

The above-seen photos attest to the hall's imposing physicality. The walls seem endless, the ceilings impossibly high, the floors ultra shining.  These photos also provide some evidence of structural modifications undergone by the studio facilities some time in the 1940s.  First in view is a 1938 shot of conductor Vittori Giannini and the WABC Symphony Orchestra.  Curtains cover a large portion of the walls. (In an JMEF Quaterly article called "The Rise And Decline Of The Standard Transcription Company," Linda L. Painter offers that "[a]ccording to engineer Bob Nicholas, in the early years recording it was believed that the studios should be dead, and felt curtains would be hung around the walls.") The extensive lighting is also worth noting. (Viewers wishing to gain a good perspective of the hall should pay heed to such lights. They are visible in multiple photos, from different angles.)  The second image above captures a 1941 Benny Goodman Sextet date that featured Count Basie on piano -- probably in January of that year. Isolation panels were in place, probably as part of the A&R man's and record engineers' efforts to better capture the small ensemble's playing inside such a large hall.  A November 14, 1944 Frank Sinatra session is caught in the third photo, which I have over-brightened to allow for a clearer sighting of the hall's walls.

In the second row, there are two images which depict,one of the dates for the album Ezio Pinza In Scenes From Boris Godounov -- or so is claimed by an online source.  If that Godunov identification is correct, then these photos probably date from December 22 or 23, 1944.  The shots from the Pinza date are followed by a couple of images from a Paul Robeson session. The second of these Robeson photos also features Robeson's pianist Lawrence Brown, the first an unidentified man.  The penultimate image showcases two other pianists, Rael Davidson and Ethel Bartlett, a classical music act. These Bartlet, Davidson, and Robesons items are all undated; I assume them to fall somewhere within the three-year period of 1945-1947.  They make evident that the hall had been undergoing a remodeling, which had comprised the installation of huge polycylindrical sound diffusors on at least two walls.  

Allegedly dating from 1947, another Sinatra session photo concludes this pictorial tour of Liederkanz.  Along with the Robeson pictures, this last image reveals another distinctive feature of the hall:  huge wall mirrors, some of them hidden or half-hidden by curtains, some of them encroached in very tall arches. It is a feature that can potentially elicit visual confusion.  Take, of instance, the first of the two Robeson photographs. The figures distantly seen on that image are not actually men, but refllections on a wall mirror that is only partially covered by curtains.  

In its capacity as a recording facility, Liederkranz Hall started a depreciation process in early 1948. It was then that, according to Granata, "CBS-TV took over half of the ... facility and created two television studios. From all accounts, this completely altered the characteristic sound of the original studio, destroying the ambience that had made it a favorite with producers and engineers."

I should clarify that Liederkranz Hall was not the only space where Columbia scheduled its New York sessions. The label used and owned other city studios as well, including a penthouse facility on 799 Seventh Avenue, bought in late 1949. There were also two studios on 49 East 52nd Street, and more famously, two others on 207 East 30th Street. A New York studio with a connection to the World Broadcasting Service was occasionally rented, too. Liederkranz is, however, the only NY studio on which the Goodman-Lee Columbia sessions are known to have taken place; Lee's canary days were long over by the time that Columbia frequented most of the other mentioned spaces. In general, the acoustics of such later facilities lacked the lively, "electric" reverberation for which Liederkranz had been once celebrated by recording engineers, artists and session musicians alike.

In addition to the sixteen Benny Goodman sessions on which she participated while in New York City (from late 1941 to mid-1942), Peggy Lee had been part of two earlier Goodman dates in Chicago, too. None of the consulted sources pinpoint their exact location. Goodman bio-discographer D. Russell Connor does refer to "Chicago's Columbia Studios," but he does not provide any further specifics. I have actually come across an advertisement which identifies Columbia's Chicago facilities as located on 630 North McClurg Court, WH 4-6000, but the ad's late date (1963) prevents me from confidently proposing that this location was the same one that Goodman and Lee used in August of 1941. (Incidentally, the same ad lists only 799 Seventh Avenue as Columbia's location for its New York recording sessions at that point in time.)



Main Sources And Acknowledgments: Donald Russell Connor, Benny Goodman's Premier Bio-discographer

For each and every session on this page, my primary source has been the research of Goodman's foremost discographer, Donald Russell Connor. Not only was Russell Connor the expert in all things Goodman but he is also credited with originating and developing the concept of a "bio-discography."

Russell Connor's earliest discographical publications were Benny Goodman: Off The Record; A Bio-Discography Of Benny Goodman (1958) and Benny Goodman: On The Record; A Bio-Discography Of Benny Goodman (1969), the latter co-written with Warren W. Hicks. Those initial texts saw heavy expansion when Russell Connor updated their combined contents, publishing them as Benny Goodman: The Record Of A Legend (1984), and later on, as Benny Goodman: Listen To His Legacy (1988), which ranks as his definitive book. In 1996, the indefatigable discographer stroke back with Benny Goodman: Wrappin' It Up (1996), a text exclusively dedicated to additions and corrections of his 1988 opus.

But the wrapping up was not over in 1996. In the summer of 2010, Connor's disciple and Goodman expert David Jessup published Benny Goodman: A Supplemental Discography, which offers new findings made after 1996, as well as a few minor corrections to Russell's data. (I myself am grateful to Russell's successor for his kind clarification of various matters pertaining to this page's data.) Post-2010, bio-discographical research on Benny Goodman has continued to be kept alive by Jessup, through an ever-growing addenda of freshly discovered information.





Discographical Technicalities

1. (Non)Sequential Take Order
When it came to take numbers, Columbia's standard practice was to assign take numbers only when a given take was slated for commercial release. For example, Columbia assigned the number "1" to the take of "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place" that the company originally chose for release on 78 rpm. Later on, when another take was picked for release on LP, that take received the number "2." But all other takes not picked for release were left with take number, their only numerical identification being the matrix number that all of them shared. (There's more commentary on this matter below, point #3.)

As a byproduct of Columbia's practice, take numbers do not bear a direct correlation to their recording sequence. Another look at "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place," from the November 13, 1941 session, can serve as an example. In Columbia's log sheets, take #1 is listed after take #2 because take #1 was recorded last, though released first. Conversely, take #2 was recorded first, but released second.

On a separate matter, it should also be noted that Benny Goodman and his Columbia producers did not always follow a neat, sequential order during the recording sessions. "On occasion," Russell Connor explains," Benny would first record one or more takes of [a] tune, switch to one or more takes of [another] tune, then eventually return to additional takes of the [initial] tune." (In one of his discographical publications, Connor adds that, as a concession to general readers' need for order and simplicity, he has generally grouped together all takes of the same tune, even in those cases when he knew that the real-time sequence had involved alternation between songs. I am not certain that he followed through with this concession in all his books -- not at least in the most definitive of his texts, Benny Goodman: Listen To His Legacy to which the present page closely adheres. In any case, his wording suggests that such shifting between songs was not a frequent occurrence.)

Of further interest are the occasional discrepancies between Columbia's log sheets and Russell Connor's discographical texts. Generally, such discrepancies resulted from the fact that the bio-discographer listened to the actual sessions (i.e., reference acetates and tapes, presumably recorded from the original lacquers, and kept in Goodman's music library), and in the process he discovered logging errors, as well as numerous takes that Columbia did not keep in its vaults.


2. Master Designation
My primary source, a Benny Goodman discography by Donald Russell Connor, lists all Columbia sessions with their personnel, masters, alternates, and corresponding issues, but does not identify which takes are the masters and which are the alternates. I have operated under the assumption that the designated master is the one that Columbia released first (usually on 78 rpm disc).


3. "Secondary Masters"
Throughout this page, I use the parenthetical term "secondary master" or "2nd. master" to identify alternate takes that Columbia have included in a significant quantity of issues, after a different take had originally been fulfilling the same role. Here is a list of all four secondary masters found above, along with an explanation of my rationale:

a) CO 31743-1
"How Long Has This Been Going On?"
During the 78-rpm era, the only commercially available take of "How Long Has This Been Going On?" was #2, which I have thus identified as the master. But after Columbia issued take #1 early during the vinyl era, the company has seldom gone back to take #2, picking instead take #1 for issue in most of its LPs and CDs. See session dated November 13, 1941.

b) CO 31367-2
"Let's Do It"
"Let's Do It" was originally released by Columbia on Okeh 78-rpm single #6474. All but one of the pressings of single #6474 contain take #4, which I have hence deemed the master. But, in what might have been a company mistake, one pressing of Okeh #6474 (maybe the very first pressing?) included take #2 instead. More recently, take #2 has also appeared in various Sony-Columbia LPs and CDs, where the inclusion has been made by design, not by mistake. (In at least one of those issues, take #2 has been misidentified as the master take.) In a Peggy Lee release that was meant to be definitive (The Singles Collection), the producers also chose take #2 over the master. (Personally, take #1 strikes me as the better choice of the two.) For more details, see Issues notes under session dated September 25, 1941.

c) CO 31426-1
"Shady Lady Bird"
Another case in which Columbia issued 78-rpm pressings that contained different takes of the same performance. For more details, see Issues notes under session dated October 8, 1941.

d) CCO 3981-1
"My Old Flame"
Benny Goodman and Peggy Lee recorded "My Old Flame" twice, in two separate sessions. This is by no means the only one of their tunes to have been attempted in more than one date. It is, however, the only of those tunes to have received a different matrix number in each session. Hence CO 31392-1, recorded in New York on October 2, 1941, is the clear master (i.e., the one that was originally issued on 78 rpm disc, and that Columbia kept reissuing over the years). CCO 3981-1 was recorded in Chicago on August 20, 1941, and its identification as #1 suggests that Columbia deemed it as a master take, too. (The likelier reason for the different matrices of these takes of the same song might have been that they were recorded in different cities. ) Although Columbia has issued CCO 3981-1 only once (in a 1999 CD set), and although the set included it only as a bonus track, I have decided to call it a secondary master due to its original, official designation as a #1 take.

4. Take Numbers Versus Take Letters ["A", "B", "C", Etc.]
Some of the alternate takes listed in this page are not extant in Columbia's vaults. Instead, they have been discovered in reference tapes and acetates, kept by Benny Goodman and by other session participants. Naturally, Columbia's logs rarely list such takes. They are accounted for, though, in the books of Donald Russell Connor, who had access to Goodman's personal tape collection.

For my own discographical purposes, listing such unissued alternate takes has posed a minor difficulty: they lack an identifying number, and thus cannot be visually differentiated from other takes. For instance, all three unissued alternate takes of "I See A Million People" (recorded on August 20, 1941), bear only their matrix identification (CCO 3982), with no additional number to distinguish one from the other. I have solved this problematic lack of identification by adding a letter ("A", "B", "C", etc.) to the takes in question. I have placed each letter between quotation marks to reinforce the fact that this device is not found in official sources, but is instead of my own creation.

[A marginal note on my decision to assign letters to alternate takes. Essentially, by using letters instead of numbers, and by placing those letters in quotation marks, I am hoping to keep unissued alternates easily identifiable from one another, and from issued takes. Although I realize that my letter system can be an added source of confusion for some collectors, I am nonetheless reticent to newly assign numbers to unissued takes, or to re-use numbers created by the makers of some non-official, collectors' albums (e.g. Blu-Disc records). My fear is that, in doing so, I could generate even greater confusion in the future. Think about it: were Sony to release any of the currently unissued alternates in the future, there is a chance that Sony would assign them numbers different from those that Blu-Disc created on its own. As a result, collectors and discographers would end up with two different numbers for the same take. This duplication would of course lead to further misinformation ... Although my use of letters can also bring confusion into the equation, I believe that, in the worst of cases, my letter code could be untangled more easily than the alternative options.





Sessions Reported: 18

Performances Reported: 95

Unique Songs Reported: 32

Unique Issues Reported: 269